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Gates
1999 Subaru Forester Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-313AE1C    New

Qty:
$16.97
Gates Radiator Coolant Hose
  • Upper
Brand: Gates
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Vehicle
1999 - Subaru Forester
Gates
2000 Subaru Forester Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-313AE1C    New

Qty:
$16.97
Gates Radiator Coolant Hose
  • Production: 04/1999-
  • Upper
Brand: Gates
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Vehicle
2000 - Subaru Forester
MacKay
2004 Subaru Forester Radiator Coolant Hose MacKay

P311-03A3597    New

Qty:
$15.26
MacKay Radiator Coolant Hose
  • Lower
Brand: MacKay
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Vehicle
2004 - Subaru Forester
Gates
1999 Subaru Forester Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-3A2C763    New

Qty:
$18.77
Gates Radiator Coolant Hose
  • Lower
Brand: Gates
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Vehicle
1999 - Subaru Forester
Gates
2003 Subaru Baja Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-22D4A59    New

Qty:
$16.06
Gates Radiator Coolant Hose
  • Production: 02/2002-
  • Upper
Brand: Gates
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Vehicle
2003 - Subaru Baja
Gates
2004 Subaru Baja Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-22D4A59    New

Qty:
$16.06
Gates Radiator Coolant Hose
  • Upper
Brand: Gates
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Vehicle
2004 - Subaru Baja
Gates
2000 Subaru Legacy Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-22D4A59    New

Qty:
$16.06
Gates Radiator Coolant Hose
  • Production: 06/1999-
  • Upper
Brand: Gates
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Vehicle
2000 - Subaru Legacy
Gates
2001 Subaru Outback Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-20D7B3B    New

Qty:
$15.53
Gates Radiator Coolant Hose
  • Production: 09/2000-
  • Left - Upper
Brand: Gates
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Vehicle
2001 - Subaru Outback
Gates
2002 Subaru Outback Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-20D7B3B    New

Qty:
$15.53
Gates Radiator Coolant Hose
  • Left - Upper
Brand: Gates
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Vehicle
2002 - Subaru Outback
Genuine
2001 Subaru Outback Radiator Coolant Hose Genuine

P311-3EF52AE    New

Qty:
$21.05
Genuine Radiator Coolant Hose
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Production: 09/2000-
  • Lower
Brand: Genuine
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Vehicle
2001 - Subaru Outback
Genuine
2002 Subaru Outback Radiator Coolant Hose Genuine

P311-3EF52AE    New

Qty:
$21.05
Genuine Radiator Coolant Hose
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Lower
Brand: Genuine
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Vehicle
2002 - Subaru Outback
Gates
2006 Subaru Outback Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-49F36E6    New

Qty:
$19.80
Gates Radiator Coolant Hose
  • Lower
Brand: Gates
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2006 - Subaru Outback
MacKay
2008 Subaru Impreza Radiator Coolant Hose MacKay

P311-25732A1    New

Qty:
$22.58
MacKay Radiator Coolant Hose
  • (Outlet)
  • Lower
Brand: MacKay
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Vehicle
2008 - Subaru Impreza
MacKay
2012 Subaru Forester Radiator Coolant Hose MacKay

P311-25732A1    New

Qty:
$22.58
MacKay Radiator Coolant Hose
  • Lower
Brand: MacKay
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Vehicle
2012 - Subaru Forester
Gates
2005 Subaru Outback Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-54C7E62    New

Qty:
$16.37
Gates Radiator Coolant Hose
  • Right Upper
Brand: Gates
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Vehicle
2005 - Subaru Outback
Gates
2010 Subaru Outback Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-46C8D8D    New

Qty:
$21.35
Gates Radiator Coolant Hose
  • Upper
Brand: Gates
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2010 - Subaru Outback
Gates
2012 Subaru Legacy Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-3EF00DA    New

Qty:
$21.13
Gates Radiator Coolant Hose
Brand: Gates
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Vehicle
2012 - Subaru Legacy
Gates
2012 Subaru Legacy Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-3EF00DA    New

Qty:
$21.53
Gates Radiator Coolant Hose
  • Lower
Brand: Gates
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Vehicle
2012 - Subaru Legacy
Gates
2010 Subaru Legacy Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-5725997    New

Qty:
$21.13
Gates Radiator Coolant Hose
Brand: Gates
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Vehicle
2010 - Subaru Legacy
Gates
2010 Subaru Legacy Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-5725997    New

Qty:
$21.53
Gates Radiator Coolant Hose
  • Lower
Brand: Gates
This Product is Eligible for Free Ground Shipping
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2010 - Subaru Legacy

Latest Subaru Repair and Radiator Hose Installation Advice

CarJunky AutoAdvice

1998 Subaru Legacy Wagon Radiator/Coolant Leak

Showing 2 out of 15 Posts | Show 13 Hidden Posts
Question From yeahnick on 1998 Subaru Legacy Wagon Radiator/Coolant Leak

1998
Subaru
Legacy
2.2L
160k miles


So, my friend took her car (one above) to Jiffy Lube, gets an oil change, fluids topped off, whatever, then goes to Maui for a week. Lets her friend borrow the car, she gets back her friend says the car is out of coolant, leaks, blah blah. She calls me tells me the whole thing, so I think it's the heater core at first because she mentioned no heater, but low coolant = no heat as well.

Anyways, she drives it over, its leaking pretty bad through the bottom, and I can't see much cause it's dark. So I assume it's her radiator, girl is very very cheap, so I order the least expensive new radiator I can find that has decent reviews (50 bucks shipped, new).

This morning in the rain, I procede to take out the radiator. Fins look good, few bent ones nothing crazy, nothing that tells me it's leaking. I look at the spot where the upper radiator hose attatches and it's sort of warped on one side, it should be circular, but it's flat on one side.

Anyways, should I replace the radiator anyways, or attatch the hose high enough so it's not on the flat warped part, or will it just warp again soon anyways? I will probably pressure check the radiator to make sure it's not leaking, just plug bottom and top and poor water in the fill with a hose or something, ya?

Any help is much appreciated, thanks!

Nick

Will upload pics as soon as I find a host for them! (soon)

Pics:





Response From Discretesignals

Before you took the radiator out you should have pressure tested the coolant system with the engine cold to determine the leak source(s).

If you suspect the radiator has a fault, you should replace it. Doesn't make sense to take your chances on an old aluminum radiator that could destroy a $3000 engine. Flush out the system and replace the radiator cap too. Once you have the new radiator installed and refilled, pressure test the coolant system and check for leaks.

Being a 98, the hoses have probably deteriorated inside. Try to get cheap ass to replace the hoses. Nothing last forever and unless she wants to keep driving the thing or she is not planning on selling it soon, she needs to put some money into it to maintain it.

Response From yeahnick

Hey, thanks so much! Yeah, definitely.

Great, that's what I'll do!

Yeah, had to sell her 05 Prius, and I actually found this car for a decent price for her, it's still a good deal after I put the radiator in. But yeah, gonna have to last at least ~2 years or so of grad school and until financial stability.

Response From nickwarner

Is that duct tape I see on that hose? New hose is cheaper than new engine.

Response From MarineGrunt

I was thinking either duct tape or that foil tape, but he did say she was a cheap ass, so I'd say you're right with the duct tape.

Response From yeahnick

Yeah, it's duct tape. Was there when she got the car, but yeah, :-/.

So... Radiator inlet looks toast?

Response From nickwarner

Yes, and the hose too. I wouldn't be trusting a $50 radiator either. That car isn't going to last through college when the epoxy that holds the plastic tank to the aluminum core cracks, though the MacGuyver job on the hose would burst pretty much anytime anyway. Then when she doesn't bother to look at the temp gauge and the red overtemp idiot light flashes morse code screams of "STOP ME PLEEAAASSSSEEEE" she cracks the block and warps the heads into a pretzel.

New hoses and a new radiator are the only way to prevent such obvious impending failures from happening, and she'll save a lot of money on duct tape. There is no sense trying to be penny wise yet dollar foolish. I can understand not wasting money frivolously, but putting a duct taped hose and a $50 radiator into this and thinking its just as good as new is like playing russian roulette with 5 live rounds. Well, MAYBE you could be the lucky one but I doubt it.

Response From yeahnick

Yeah, if it were my car I would do exactly that. So I'll go ahead and take care of it as if it were mine, thanks guys!

Response From nickwarner

Sometimes you can't just do what she wants, you have to act in her best interests. She may not be happy about the money but if you tell her you found such and such part bad while you were in ther or it was in such bad shape if came apart when you pulled it out she might understand. You have to get her to trust you and your abilities. My girl never questions what I do with the cars. Then again, I'm the one that bought them and I'm the one paying for parts so I guess she has no say anyhow.

One piece of advice for the future is to never look at a car problem without a very bright light, and the LED flashlights are dirt cheap now so get a few. Put one in your house, one in the glovebox, etc. But never order parts based on a general direction of a leak that you saw in the dark. Even in daylight I get out the light to be 100% positive I am right.

Let us know how this works out for you and if any complications come up we can walk you through it.

Response From yeahnick Top Rated Answer

Ok, new radiator is in and working good, actually looks like a pretty decent radiator for 50 bucks, everything fits, etc.

Anyways, car is leaking, peaked underneath to find it, its looking like the water pump. So that's a bummer. I don't have a garage, doing this in the street and don't have enough time to fix this myself (I have to write and defend my Master's Thesis in the next month). Taking the car to the shop I use to have them put in a new one for ~320$ minus the cost of the water pump.

Friend says she just wants the car to last a year and doesn't want to put any money into she doesn't have to. Might try and convince her a car is more of an investment and the better you take care of it the better the re-sale.

Also replaced the top and bottom radiator hoses, and going to have a new thermostat installed, while they're in there I'll have them check the timing belt and tensioner, I might go ahead and buy those and if they don't need to be replaced just return them...

Response From yeahnick

Update:

Had to replace tension-er, and unfortunately found a gutted thermostat in place of where a real thermostat should be. Had my mechanic put a real thermostat in there with the new water pump, he noted the head-gaskets were leaking oil and so were the cam-seals and crank seals. I had him just put it back together drove it around a little bit, and now it's misfiring like crazy. I'm assuming head-gaskets are blown now and going to actually fixed it like I should have when I heard all those seals were going. Anyways, some lessons are hard to learn. Don't flame too much, I'm positive I should have just had everything replaced the first time it was apart,

Response From Discretesignals

It's not uncommon for those to blow head gaskets and also leak oil from the head gaskets. She better be making you dinner and folding your clothes for all your doing for her.

Response From yeahnick

In actuality I was the one who advised her to buy this car in the first place, it was mechanic owned, the guy has a shop. Anyways I thought he was a trustworthy guy, said he did head gaskets and timing belt. Yah, so I really feel responsible, though all I have been doing is trying to help. My pride is hurt, can't believe that guy swindled me.

Response From Discretesignals

A holes like that gives us honest mechs and techs a bad name. I wouldn't even class that person as a mechanic.

Response From nickwarner

Well, lesson learned. Doesn't help that someone gutted that stat before. Good luck on that thesis.

1990 Subi Legacy EJ22 SOHC overheating

Showing 2 out of 2 Posts
Question From subisnacks on 1990 Subi Legacy EJ22 SOHC overheating

Hi, I have a 1990 Subaru Legacy wagon with EJ22 SOHC engine. It has been overheating, mechanic told me it was the water pump. So I had a car project weekend & here's what all I fixed: new water pump, new thermostat, new timing belt & idler pulleys, new valve cover gaskets, new oil filter & oil change, new coolant, new radiator hoses & clamps, new alternator belt. After all that work its still overheating, it starts up & temp starts to go up, but it doesn't stop at operating temp it just continues to go up & up & in about 15 minutes the temp is thru the roof (either at idle or while driving, driving seems to get it there faster). So I'm thinking clogged radiator? Any other ideas?

Response From nickwarner Top Rated Answer

You could have a plugged radiator, could've put the thermostat in backwards, could have blown a head gasket or may be as simple as you haven't gotten the air bed out of the system yet. Double check your work.

temperture gauge shows hot

Showing 2 out of 5 Posts | Show 3 Hidden Posts
Question From ogden55 on temperture gauge shows hot

I have gotten a new stat for my 96 subaru. For a few days it did ok but, then started to heat up again. So, I figure that the stat was bad and got another one. That wasn't the problem. My fear was the head gasket which I hope it isn't. I took out the stat and now it doesn't get hot but, this doesn't not solve the problem neither. Not sure whats next.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Any air in system will screw it up. That can be residual from just drain and fill and not purged out enough or a gasket (head) that is sealing cooling system from combustion gasses can bubble into cooling system and it won't straighten out on it's own.

Pressure tester would help. T-stat should be installed as that can cause overheating but in a back corner unseen and be trouble by itself. When you are pretty sure most all air is out upon refilling - bleeder, use a high hose - whatever it takes then if you allow engine to warm up with pressure cap off you should see flow or feel heat blowing off radiator by the fan. Now if you put the pressure tester on and it rises further it suggests gasses are the issue as it's already warmed up. Don't allow it to overpressure with a tester on it and try like heck not to overheat,

T

Response From ogden55

Thank You for the information I sure hope it isn't the heads. Don't have pressure tester to test like you suggest so is there any way it can be done?

Response From Tom Greenleaf Top Rated Answer

Yes - testers can be rented I think - ask at parts stores. OR - if you trust the pressure cap you have they just feel a radiator hose (larger hoses tell better) for the pressure in the system. If it pressures up fast from cold as in too fast or can repressure up while already warmed up there's a problem. Duh - be careful with removing a cap while under pressure and touching hoses as they can be hot enough for a burn.

The rad or pressure cap whether on radiator or recovery tank allow just so much pressure then lets it off -- then it must hold vacuum also as when system cools and the coolant volume shrinks the idea is to push air to top or the recovery tank and only draw back liquid coolant from the bottom. That cycle eventually self purges air out of the system but some cars things are jammed in to fit the shape of the car so there are places for air to hide and sometimes will just not make it to purge out especially after an overheat that boiled or any time system is drained for service. It's a pill on some and I think this is one of them.

I don't want and neither do you find that the head gasket is the fault right now. It's worth the effort to really diagnose that as that's a big enough job to do and be wrong! It's not condemed yet. Keep trying but still don't let it overheat or it will be the issue.....

T

Response From ogden55

Thank you again..........I'll let you know how it did.

82 subaru gl, heater not throwing heat

Showing 2 out of 5 Posts | Show 3 Hidden Posts
Question From wdano on 82 subaru gl, heater not throwing heat

i just bought a 82 subaru gl, many little things to fix, first off all is the heat problem...no heat...car is 1.8l 2wd wagon, has 262000km, problem...heat selector switch seems to be working (proof -- is slight change in temp when selector turned from hot to cold), changed thermostat, checked fuses and blower, all ok...with little knowledge, i am suspecting water pump or heater core...when car idles heat guage builds, if you then turn on blower a very short shot of warmth with come then die off rather quickly...also, if you idle car then drive it heat will build to almost half of heat guage, then when driving heat guage drops to almost quarter of gauge within minutes...any further info...when engine warm rad hose to rad is warm (hot really), rad then warms, and hose from rad to water pump warm, once all warm both feed and return hoses for heater are warm, yet no warm air from heater...any ideas....

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Sounds like this would benefit from a good general flush of everything - thermostat out and both directions on as much as you can. AYOR to use flushing products as I worry with older vehicles what they might find sleeping that could be fine if not aggrevated.

Temp gauge should be steady all the time so that alone indicates it's not perfect especially if noticed in cooler weather. Flush away and don't overdo the anti-freeze. Watch that and if totally flushed out you know there's some plain water left so add no more than 50% of listed capacity first then just water,

T

Response From wdano

okay...will try flush...am fairly handy around a car, yet not familiar with your technique for flushing with "thermostat out" and in both directions, can you elaborate some for me..thanks

Response From Tom Greenleaf Top Rated Answer

Ok: Thermostat will be cold and shut tight of course when doing this so you get a good/better shot at flushing with plain garden hose thru that and removed radiator hoses as needed. Hold hose and allow direction of water to push backwards thru radiator and engine as possible can dislodge more gunk which should help. Same with heater core. Careful with hoses connected right to a core as they can be good an stuck and break the core in removal. Sacrifice hose if needed NOT the core! Same is true of radiator inlet/oulets - they can break if removal is a fight.

It's just a good time to refresh coolant ( as hazmat BTW so dispose of collected old properly) and a new thermostat while you are there is the common suggestion.

More: I suggest the garden hose way and not full force of water but rather just hold with a rag on hoses and items to allow flow and watch till clear then reverse direction. Silty gunk should flush out. Some crusty blockages won't flush so easy or at all and some may require a radiator or heater core replacement. They used to acid boil them out but most won't take that when older and replacements may be reasonable. Heater core replacements are usually quite a job so try to get that to flow well both ways and save it.

Even in '82 many hoses are custom molded for the car and replace as you see fit or budget allows. New radiator cap is always a good idea too. Actually - you can run up quite a ticket with hoses, t-stat, gasket, clamps and the anti-freeze even doing this yourself!

Re; The flush solvents sold: They scare me a bit so I avoid that stuff if flushing appears to work. If that core really doesn't flow well I might try using flush solvent isolated to just it and not the whole system.

_____________

Do keep in mind that the commonly used EG = Ethylene Glycol is a hazmat AND animals may try to drink it so don't leave it around on open pans. Also already said is that too strong a mix isn't helpful so avoid that - read container and know system capacity + do the math,

T

Response From wdano

thanks tom, will get at that as soon as i can, car is a spare in the event either my wife or i have a break down with one of ours, as i do do most of our auto repairs myself, sometimes its not the best time to be rebuilding drum brakes in a snow filled driveway at 2 am 'cuz she needs to be at work for 8 am...that said, i will repost with results after flush...thanks. dan.

ohh, talked this flush with my father, also a back yard mech-anik...he wants to know if using a descaler like CLR or lime-a-way (household stuff) would be softer than automotive flushes, or would this not be a good idea at any age of car...thanks again