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Gates
2001 Acura MDX Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-57D81A7    New

Qty:
$14.81
Gates Radiator Coolant Hose
  • Upper
Brand: Gates
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Vehicle
2001 - Acura MDX
MacKay
1986 Acura Integra Radiator Coolant Hose MacKay

P311-412E603    New

Qty:
$14.02
MacKay Radiator Coolant Hose
  • Upper
Brand: MacKay
This Product is Eligible for Free Ground Shipping
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Vehicle
1986 - Acura Integra
MacKay
2001 Acura EL Radiator Coolant Hose MacKay

P311-15B1AC4    New

Qty:
$13.08
MacKay Radiator Coolant Hose
  • Upper
Brand: MacKay
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Vehicle
2001 - Acura EL
Gates
2002 Acura RSX Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-101CDD1    New

Qty:
$13.72
Gates Radiator Coolant Hose
Brand: Gates
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Vehicle
2002 - Acura RSX
MacKay
1990 Acura Integra Radiator Coolant Hose MacKay

P311-4E60116    New

Qty:
$16.00
MacKay Radiator Coolant Hose
  • Upper
Brand: MacKay
This Product is Eligible for Free Ground Shipping
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1990 - Acura Integra
MacKay
1991 Acura Legend Radiator Coolant Hose MacKay

P311-474772E    New

Qty:
$13.28
MacKay Radiator Coolant Hose
  • Upper
Brand: MacKay
This Product is Eligible for Free Ground Shipping
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Vehicle
1991 - Acura Legend
MacKay
1997 Acura EL Radiator Coolant Hose MacKay

P311-34AB973    New

Qty:
$13.21
MacKay Radiator Coolant Hose
  • Upper
Brand: MacKay
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Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1997 - Acura EL
Ohno
1997 Acura EL Radiator Coolant Hose Ohno

P311-119885E    New

Qty:
$14.51
Ohno Radiator Coolant Hose
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
Brand: Ohno
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Vehicle
1997 - Acura EL
MacKay
1994 Acura Integra Radiator Coolant Hose MacKay

P311-2C9C0D0    New

Qty:
$17.68
MacKay Radiator Coolant Hose
  • Upper
Brand: MacKay
This Product is Eligible for Free Ground Shipping
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Vehicle
1994 - Acura Integra
Gates
1997 Acura Integra Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-2DE4CD2    New

Qty:
$23.29
Gates Radiator Coolant Hose
  • Upper
Brand: Gates
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Vehicle
1997 - Acura Integra
Gates
1997 Acura CL Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-2342CCC    New

Qty:
$20.88
Gates Radiator Coolant Hose
  • Upper
Brand: Gates
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Vehicle
1997 - Acura CL
MacKay
2001 Acura CL Radiator Coolant Hose MacKay

P311-323000D    New

Qty:
$16.82
MacKay Radiator Coolant Hose
  • Upper
Brand: MacKay
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Vehicle
2001 - Acura CL
Gates
2004 Acura TSX Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-2EF0535    New

Qty:
$19.26
Gates Radiator Coolant Hose
  • Upper
Brand: Gates
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Vehicle
2004 - Acura TSX
Gates
2004 Acura TL Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-3E8B1C9    New

Qty:
$18.13
Gates Radiator Coolant Hose
Brand: Gates
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Vehicle
2004 - Acura TL
Gates
2003 Acura MDX Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-3F9353D    New

Qty:
$19.26
Gates Radiator Coolant Hose
  • Upper
Brand: Gates
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Vehicle
2003 - Acura MDX
Gates
2005 Acura RL Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-3921A00    New

Qty:
$21.27
Gates Radiator Coolant Hose
Brand: Gates
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Vehicle
2005 - Acura RL
Gates
2009 Acura TL Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-24E35B6    New

Qty:
$18.37
Gates Radiator Coolant Hose
Brand: Gates
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Vehicle
2009 - Acura TL
Gates
2001 Acura MDX Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-28FF5CB    New

Qty:
$14.99
Gates Radiator Coolant Hose
  • Lower
Brand: Gates
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Vehicle
2001 - Acura MDX
MacKay
2001 Acura EL Radiator Coolant Hose MacKay

P311-0F8D1FD    New

Qty:
$13.11
MacKay Radiator Coolant Hose
  • For models with A/T.
Brand: MacKay
This Product is Eligible for Free Ground Shipping
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Vehicle
2001 - Acura EL
MacKay
2001 Acura EL Radiator Coolant Hose MacKay

P311-033131B    New

Qty:
$11.90
MacKay Radiator Coolant Hose
  • For models with M/T.
  • Lower
Brand: MacKay
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Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2001 - Acura EL

Latest Acura Repair and Radiator Hose Installation Advice

CarJunky AutoAdvice

89 Acura Integra radiator hose question

Showing 7 out of 7 Posts
Question From dlmcmurr on 89 Acura Integra radiator hose question

Can anyone tell me which radiator hose goes to the thermostat on this model? I've had the head off and replaced all the hoses at that time. The new hoses look like they fit better in the reversed position relative to the old hoses, but the engine got hot on the first run. That was with the top hose to the thermostat. I did bleed the thermostat housing during refilling. I thought upper hoses always went to the thermostat and someone before me had reversed them?

Thanks,
Dave

Response From Tom Greenleaf

. 1: Thermostat replacement-Integra
***************
Make sure spring end of thermostat is towards engine. There's a lot going on right there and may take a cycle or two to settle down and purge all air out. All the hoses must be right where they belong. This looks like other hoses are part of telling this t-stat when to open and if not all correct there will be problems. When at all possible - match up old hoses to new ones and many need to be cut at one or both ends to match. Everything I could find suggests the upper hose does go from thermostat to radiator directly, T

Response From Tom Greenleaf

http://www.autozone.com/...eId=0900c15280049680

True: Most thermostats won't go in backwards but some have an "up" side to assist air purging.

Try that site for the diagram.

Heater really should be run when first testing out a cooling system after it's been drained for any reason. Most will blow strong heat when full enough and if not there's still more to go (purging) ..

In a career I haven't seen many new thermostats be totally wrong and the problem. In troublesome cases I will test them in water watching the action work on a stove.

Air is lousy at transfering heat so t-stats can be slow to react to hot air but will in time - usually late. As said some are designed with notches or tiny check valves to allow air past them (must be installed with that "UP")for better self purging but even that is slow.

Keep at it. Air still in system is most likely the trouble so far,

T

Response From dlmcmurr

Tom,

Your link didn't work, but it pointed me in the right direction. In the radiator section at the same site, figure 1 shows the hose routing with the lower going to the stat and the upper going to the head. I'll reverse my hoses this evening and try to bleed the system better and see where it goes from here. Hope I haven't cut the one too short!

Thanks,
Dave

Response From Tom Greenleaf Top Rated Answer

Ok: That's "AutoZone's" parts site. Some, not all when you look for a part will show how it's replaced, located or more about it. Look below when you get a picture of a thermostat for example the look for "repair guides" below that and if there's any further stuff it's hidden there - just a trick to be able to look at stuff.

If you can take pics that's even better so I/we can see just what you are dealing with.

Bleeding: If a plug up high on or near thermostat is there it's for letting air out. If not sometimes you can just remove the highest hose and fill from there and re-attach. Run engine till heater works and upper hose past thermostat is warm to hot and shut if off for a good while. It should be pushing air out to recovery reservoir and when it contracts as it cools can only draw back liquid. Can take many cycles of that to be stabil.

If heater worked before it will work now and when no heat is noted it's frequently because the actual liquid in the cooling system's engine side is still too low unseen at a glance. Understand that the thermostat when closed is not letting air thru it so it must be warm enough to open but don't let it overheat. As said - some t-stat's come with a slot or mini hole to let the air past it when cold but that's still painfully slow and with even minor junk going thru system won't work as it would plug.

Getting air out is not as quick and simple as it looks sometimes. Keep at it and look for the signs of temp stability as the idicator that it's mostly done and would finish the last tidbits of air over use so re-check your coolant level daily for a few days of use is suggested by me anyway.

Good luck - keep trying,

T

Response From dlmcmurr

Tom,

It always bugs me wondering how some suggestions worked out, so I thought I'd tell you how this project ended up now that it's running again and I've semi-caught up some of the other things that got behind.

This started out as project to replace a damaged exhaust valve. The last car head I had removed was in a Vega over 30 years ago, so the DOHC experience was not where I really wanted to start. It all went relatively well. As I said, I had used (obviously faulty) logic to decide the radiator hoses had originally been reversed. I put them back correctly, but things still weren't normal. Got frustrated and went to bed. On a whim, turned on the key the next morning and waited on the gauges to stabilize. Lo and behold, the temp gauge was showing normal after resting all night! Must have damaged it when I was banging the head around. Went out and bought another sending unit and that solved that problem. Once I put the proper Permatex on the head to radiator hose adapter (looks kinda like a smaller thermostat housing) and resisted the urge to tighten it all the way down, that solved another problem. Other little incidentals like the intake cam being one tooth off, a nicked O-ring on an injector (those are hard to find replacements for), etc. kept the job interesting. I enjoy reading and using web resouces to learn how things work, plus I really couldn't afford to replace my 280k+ mileage car right now. I had hoped that new valve stem seals, camshaft seals, and a valve cover gasket would make a significant difference in my oil consumption since they were all leaking, but that has not proven to be the case. Guess that means instead of $350, I should have spent 4 to 5 times that to rebuild the engine, but I was worried that even my $350 would be wasted as I would overlook (or cause) some other major problem. At least this gets it to where I can sell it in good conscience later if I want to. Plus I can buy a lot of oil for $1000.

I appreciate people like you that enjoy helping those of us that have the reasoning power and desire, but lack the practical experience to solve our problems. I try to do the same in other areas where I have knowledge.

Thanks again,
Dave

Response From dlmcmurr

Thanks, Tom. Fortunately, the thermostat only fits in one way, with the spring into the pipe running across the back of the block to the water pump. One thing I forgot to do was open the heater valve to purge that system, too. I'll run it through one more cycle this evening. Guess there's always a chance the new thermostat is bad, but probably I just didn't get enough air out. Is that drawing available somewhere that I can read the labels?

Dave

1987 Acura Integra 1.6L FI won't start

Showing 2 out of 2 Posts
Question From sowest03 on 1987 Acura Integra 1.6L FI won't start

Hi all, my 87 Integra with 369,000 miles won't start. I was driving on the freeway and the temp gauge shot up, notice smoke so I pulled over to the side. My upper radiator hose split/burst open and all fluids drain. I replaced the hose and fill with new fluids but when I tried to start it up, it cranks but won't start. Help please.

Response From Discretesignals Top Rated Answer

Read this and post your results:


http://autoforums.carjunky.com/Automotive_Repair_C1/General_Discussions_F5/IF_YOUR_STARTER_CRANKS_THE_ENGINE_BUT_IT_WILL_NOT_START_P75655/

1999 Acura TL Compression

Showing 4 out of 7 Posts | Show 3 Hidden Posts
Question From kenscar on 1999 Acura TL Compression

I have a 1999 Acura 3.2 TL with 130,000 miles that I have kept meticulous care of and now want to sell it. I was showing it to a perspective buyer when the radiator hose came off during our test drive.
Yeah, during the test drive!!! Has this not happened, it would have been sold and gone. Anyway, it was the temp gage that gave the warning...no idiot light came on. I cannot be certain exactly how long it was running since the hose became disconnected, perhaps a mile or two, but it was not until we were pulling over that the engine started to knock. I reconnected the hose, got it filled with water, and it ran fine as I drove back to the house. I had the cooling system flushed and refilled with coolant the next day. The cooling system tested good with no leaks. The buyer was still interested but wanted to have their (dealer) mechanic inspect the car. Their mechanic ran a hydrocarbon test on the cooling system. This came back positive and they said it has a blown head gasket. There is no water in the oil, the coolant level remains full, and there is no loss of power. I ran a compression test this morning and got 230, 210, 230, 205, 225, & 230. While this appears consistent I am not sure what spec is for compression.
I still want to sell the vehicle but do not want to screw anybody. I can have the head gaskets replaced and recoup my money in the sale but I do not want to expend any more effort than is really necessary...and I am leary of dealers; they tend to be go overboard with repairs to maintain their integrity.
So the first question i have is: What is spec for compression on a 1999 Acura 3.2 TL?
The big question: Is it necessary to have the head gaskets replaced? Also, what is the risk of not replacing them? How long can it run like this?

Thanks for your help
~Ken

Response From Sidom

Well 1st off Ken I would like to commend you on the way you are going about this..... Most people wouldn't give it a second thought & just move on to the next unsuspecting buyer.... You're a decent person....

I don't have a maxium spec but minimun is 135 lbs with a 28lb max variation. Those readings actually seem a bit high but the cylinders could be carboned up & that would account for high readings...... The reading don't look too bad but that 205 is right on the edge..... I would hate to see you spend unnecessary money but a leakdown test on the suspected cylinders would confirm a bad head gasket. Also a pressure transducer & labscope would confirm that & be easier to run.

Is the car using any coolant? HCs are measured in "parts per million", did they say how many ppms there was?

You said you ran the compression test, if you have an air compressor you could run a leakdown test (sort of) youself. I would bring the low cylinder up on the compresson stroke & run air in there with the rad cap off (you may need someone to hold the crank pulley with a breaker bar to keep the engine from turning over), if you get bubbles or the level rises, then you are probably looking at a bad head gasket....

As far as the risks go, you really can't calculate it...... If the alledged leak stay the same as it is right now, not getting any worse, then there wouldn't be too much of a problem. (not likely if there is a leak) If the leak got big quickly & overheated the engine severly, you could risk ruining the whole motor............

Hope this helps some........

Response From kenscar Top Rated Answer

Thanks for the response.
It does not appear to be using any coolant but then again I really have not driven it much since their mechanic inspected it.
They did not report a ppm on the hydrocarbons. He said it was a "lithmus" test; the tab turns cooler in the presence of hydrocarbons. From what I gather this test can also be done with SMOG test equipment?
Since I do not have an air compressore or the proper fittings, I probably need to have another shop diagnose it.

Thanks again

Response From Sidom

That is one of 2 tests I place no value in..... The other is a block test..... A tube with blue liquid that will turn yellow when air from the cooling system is passed into it with exhaust gases in it....... The only time I've see those tests being accurate was when it was such an obvious blown head gasket you didn't need those test to confirm it. In cases like yours (early on) I've seen those tests pass cars & just the opposite, when there was no gasket problem get a false positive.

Exhaust gas analyzer, pressure transducer or leakdown test are the only sure ways I go by to detect a leaking head gasket in the early stages...........

Response From kenscar

Hmmm.Thanks, Sidom. I will start with the exhaust gas analyzer. Is there a particular ppm reading above which I should be concerned or is anything above 0 ppm bad?

Response From Sidom

HCs are raw/unburned fuel so the reading should be zero..............

Response From Hammer Time

A compression test isn't what you need here. Have an independent shop check it out for you. They can pressure test the cooling system or they can use an exhaust analyzer to sniff for hydrocarbons in the radiator.