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Borla
Qty:
$948.75
Borla Exhaust System Kit
  • MINI COOPER S 04-05 1.6L 4CY
  • ; Single 2.25in. Into Dual 2in. Out; Includes Conn. Pipes/Mufflers/Hdw/3.14in. Round x 5 in. Long Dual Rolled Angle-Cut Long Tip; Center Rear Exit;50 State Legal / California Emissions Compliant T-304 Stainless Steel
  • S-Type Cat-Back(TM) Exhaust System
  • Product Attributes:
    • Exhaust Type: Dual
    • Exit Position: Center
    • Exit Style: Straight
    • Inlet Inside Diameter: N/a
    • Material: T-304 Stainless Steel
    • Muffler Type: Turbo
    • Outlet Outside Diameter: N/a
    • System Type: Cat Back
    • Tail Pipe Diameter:
      • 2.000 In.
      • 2.250 In.
    • Tail Pipe Material: Stainless Steel
    • Tip Diameter: 3.140 In.
    • Tubing Diameter: 2.250 In.
    • WARNING CA Proposition 65: Yes
    • WARNING CA Proposition 65 Message: Warning: This Product In The Physical Form It Is Sold Does Not Present A Hazard. However; Operations Including; But Not Limited To Welding; Brazing; Or Thermal Cutting Can Expose You To Chemicals Including Chromium; Nickel; Cobalt; Arsenic; Cadmium And Le
  • The BORLA(R) sound of power. Its been described as asonic shot of adrenaline. An intoxicating concert ofsteel, gears and combustion that echoes from thespeedways, deserts and highways of the world.The sound of more victory laps than any otherbrand, the BORLA(R) exhaust note has become the quintessentioal soundtrack of high-performance motoring. And like all good automotive designs there is function behing the form. As any driving enthusiast knows, the sound of an exhaust provides more than just ear candy. Its a communications conduit between car and driver. A link between human and machine. The exhaust sound provides accoustic feedback of engine rpm to aid the driver in critical decisions such as gear selection or throttle input in rev-match shifting. At BORLA(R), we understand this concept better than any exhaust manufacturer. Combining patented technology with computer modeling, extensive prototyping and advanced sound analysis tools. BORLA(R) engineers spend countless hours tuning exhaust systems to best reflect the personality and performance of vehicle applications. The result is an enhanced driving experience. With unrivaled clarity, the BORLA(R) exhaust note can help a driver stay within the powerband through a difficult section, using the exciting sensory feedback of sound. With unrivaled clarity the Borla exhaust note can help a driver stay within the powerband through a difficult section, using the exciting sensry feedback of sound.
Brand: Borla
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel Body Block Engine CID CC
2006 - Mini Cooper S Hatchback L 4 Cyl 1.6L - 1600
Borla
Qty:
$971.18
Borla Exhaust System Kit
  • MINI COOPER S 04-05 1.6L S/C
  • ; Single 2.25 in. Into Dual 2 in. Out; Includes Conn. Pipes/Mufflers/Hardware/3.14 in. Round x 5 in. Long Dual Rolled Angle-Cut Tip; Center Rear Exit;50 State Legal / California Emissions Compliant T-304 Stainless Steel
  • S-Type Cat-Back(TM) Exhaust System
  • Product Attributes:
    • Exhaust Type: Dual
    • Exit Position: Center
    • Exit Style: Straight
    • Inlet Inside Diameter: N/a
    • Material: T-304 Stainless Steel
    • Muffler Type: Turbo
    • Outlet Outside Diameter: N/a
    • System Type: Cat Back
    • Tail Pipe Diameter:
      • 2.000 In.
      • 2.250 In.
    • Tail Pipe Material: Stainless Steel
    • Tip Diameter: 3.140 In.
    • Tubing Diameter: 2.250 In.
    • WARNING CA Proposition 65: Yes
    • WARNING CA Proposition 65 Message: Warning: This Product In The Physical Form It Is Sold Does Not Present A Hazard. However; Operations Including; But Not Limited To Welding; Brazing; Or Thermal Cutting Can Expose You To Chemicals Including Chromium; Nickel; Cobalt; Arsenic; Cadmium And Le
  • The BORLA(R) sound of power. Its been described as asonic shot of adrenaline. An intoxicating concert ofsteel, gears and combustion that echoes from thespeedways, deserts and highways of the world.The sound of more victory laps than any otherbrand, the BORLA(R) exhaust note has become the quintessentioal soundtrack of high-performance motoring. And like all good automotive designs there is function behing the form. As any driving enthusiast knows, the sound of an exhaust provides more than just ear candy. Its a communications conduit between car and driver. A link between human and machine. The exhaust sound provides accoustic feedback of engine rpm to aid the driver in critical decisions such as gear selection or throttle input in rev-match shifting. At BORLA(R), we understand this concept better than any exhaust manufacturer. Combining patented technology with computer modeling, extensive prototyping and advanced sound analysis tools. BORLA(R) engineers spend countless hours tuning exhaust systems to best reflect the personality and performance of vehicle applications. The result is an enhanced driving experience. With unrivaled clarity, the BORLA(R) exhaust note can help a driver stay within the powerband through a difficult section, using the exciting sensory feedback of sound. With unrivaled clarity the Borla exhaust note can help a driver stay within the powerband through a difficult section, using the exciting sensry feedback of sound.
Brand: Borla
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel Block Engine CID CC
2004 - Mini Cooper S L 4 Cyl 1.6L - 1600
Borla
Qty:
$841.25
Borla Exhaust System Kit
  • MINI COOPER S-TYPE
  • ; 2.25 in.; Includes Connecting Pipe/Muffler/Hardware/4 in. Dual Round Rolled Angel Cut Tips; Dual Center Rear Exit;50 State Legal / California Emissions Compliant
  • S-Type Cat-Back(TM) Exhaust System
  • Product Attributes:
    • Exhaust Type: Single
    • Exit Position: Dual Center
    • Exit Style: Straight
    • Inlet Inside Diameter: 2.250 In.
    • Material: T-304 Stainless Steel
    • Muffler Type: Turbo
    • Outlet Outside Diameter: 4.000 In.
    • System Type: Cat Back
    • Tail Pipe Diameter: 2.250 In.
    • Tail Pipe Material: Stainless Steel
    • Tip Diameter: 4.000 In.
    • Tubing Diameter: 2.250 In.
    • WARNING CA Proposition 65: Yes
    • WARNING CA Proposition 65 Message: Warning: This Product In The Physical Form It Is Sold Does Not Present A Hazard. However; Operations Including; But Not Limited To Welding; Brazing; Or Thermal Cutting Can Expose You To Chemicals Including Chromium; Nickel; Cobalt; Arsenic; Cadmium And Le
  • The BORLA(R) sound of power. Its been described as asonic shot of adrenaline. An intoxicating concert ofsteel, gears and combustion that echoes from thespeedways, deserts and highways of the world.The sound of more victory laps than any otherbrand, the BORLA(R) exhaust note has become the quintessentioal soundtrack of high-performance motoring. And like all good automotive designs there is function behing the form. As any driving enthusiast knows, the sound of an exhaust provides more than just ear candy. Its a communications conduit between car and driver. A link between human and machine. The exhaust sound provides accoustic feedback of engine rpm to aid the driver in critical decisions such as gear selection or throttle input in rev-match shifting. At BORLA(R), we understand this concept better than any exhaust manufacturer. Combining patented technology with computer modeling, extensive prototyping and advanced sound analysis tools. BORLA(R) engineers spend countless hours tuning exhaust systems to best reflect the personality and performance of vehicle applications. The result is an enhanced driving experience. With unrivaled clarity, the BORLA(R) exhaust note can help a driver stay within the powerband through a difficult section, using the exciting sensory feedback of sound. With unrivaled clarity the Borla exhaust note can help a driver stay within the powerband through a difficult section, using the exciting sensry feedback of sound.
Brand: Borla
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel Body Block Engine CID CC
2014 - Mini Cooper S Hatchback L 4 Cyl 1.6L - 1598
Borla
Qty:
$971.18
Borla Exhaust System Kit
  • MINI COOPER S 04-05 1.6L S/C
  • ; Single 2.25 in. Into Dual 2 in. Out; Includes Conn. Pipes/Mufflers/Hardware/3.14 in. Round x 5 in. Long Dual Rolled Angle-Cut Tip; Center Rear Exit;50 State Legal / California Emissions Compliant
  • S-Type Cat-Back(TM) Exhaust System
  • Product Attributes:
    • Exhaust Type: Dual
    • Exit Position: Center
    • Exit Style: Straight
    • Inlet Inside Diameter: N/a
    • Material: T-304 Stainless Steel
    • Muffler Type: Turbo
    • Outlet Outside Diameter: N/a
    • System Type: Cat Back
    • Tail Pipe Diameter:
      • 2.000 In.
      • 2.250 In.
    • Tail Pipe Material: Stainless Steel
    • Tip Diameter: 3.140 In.
    • Tubing Diameter: 2.250 In.
    • WARNING CA Proposition 65: Yes
    • WARNING CA Proposition 65 Message: Warning: This Product In The Physical Form It Is Sold Does Not Present A Hazard. However; Operations Including; But Not Limited To Welding; Brazing; Or Thermal Cutting Can Expose You To Chemicals Including Chromium; Nickel; Cobalt; Arsenic; Cadmium And Le
  • The BORLA(R) sound of power. Its been described as asonic shot of adrenaline. An intoxicating concert ofsteel, gears and combustion that echoes from thespeedways, deserts and highways of the world.The sound of more victory laps than any otherbrand, the BORLA(R) exhaust note has become the quintessentioal soundtrack of high-performance motoring. And like all good automotive designs there is function behing the form. As any driving enthusiast knows, the sound of an exhaust provides more than just ear candy. Its a communications conduit between car and driver. A link between human and machine. The exhaust sound provides accoustic feedback of engine rpm to aid the driver in critical decisions such as gear selection or throttle input in rev-match shifting. At BORLA(R), we understand this concept better than any exhaust manufacturer. Combining patented technology with computer modeling, extensive prototyping and advanced sound analysis tools. BORLA(R) engineers spend countless hours tuning exhaust systems to best reflect the personality and performance of vehicle applications. The result is an enhanced driving experience. With unrivaled clarity, the BORLA(R) exhaust note can help a driver stay within the powerband through a difficult section, using the exciting sensory feedback of sound. With unrivaled clarity the Borla exhaust note can help a driver stay within the powerband through a difficult section, using the exciting sensry feedback of sound.
Brand: Borla
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel Body Block Engine CID CC
2008 - Mini Cooper S Convertible L 4 Cyl 1.6L - 1600
Borla
Qty:
$539.33
Borla Exhaust System Kit
  • MINI COOPER S F56 14-19 COOPER S CONV F57 16-18 2.0L TURBO AT/MT FWD 2 DR 2.5in.
  • ; 2.5 in.; Includes Connecting Pipes/Mufflers/Hardware/4 in. Dual Round Rolled Angle-Cut Long Tip; Dual Center Rear Exit;50 State Legal / California Emissions Compliant
  • S-Type Axle-Back Exhaust System
  • Product Attributes:
    • Exhaust Type: Dual
    • Exit Position: Dual Center
    • Exit Style: Straight
    • Inlet Inside Diameter: 2.500 In.
    • Material: T-304 Stainless Steel
    • Muffler Type: Turbo
    • Outlet Outside Diameter: 2.500 In.
    • System Type: Axle Back
    • Tail Pipe Diameter: 2.500 In.
    • Tail Pipe Material: Stainless Steel
    • Tip Diameter: 4.000 In.
    • Tubing Diameter: 2.500 In.
    • WARNING CA Proposition 65: Yes
    • WARNING CA Proposition 65 Message: Warning: This Product In The Physical Form It Is Sold Does Not Present A Hazard. However; Operations Including; But Not Limited To Welding; Brazing; Or Thermal Cutting Can Expose You To Chemicals Including Chromium; Nickel; Cobalt; Arsenic; Cadmium And Le
  • Borla Performance has once again proven why we have a led the aftermarket performance exhaust industry for over 30 years. Borla Performance Industries; the original pioneers of high quality; austinetic stainless steel free flow exhaust utilizes patented award and race winning technology to deliver quality; sound; performance gains; and enhanced fuel economy. All with an easy bolt on installation. All Borla street products carry an unsurpassed written million-mile warranty.
Brand: Borla
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel Body Block Engine CID CC
2018 - Mini Cooper S Convertible L 4 Cyl 2.0L 122 1998
Borla
Qty:
$539.33
Borla Exhaust System Kit
  • MINI COOPER S F56 14-19 COOPER S CONV F57 16-18 2.0L TURBO AT/MT FWD 2 DR 2.5in.
  • ; 2.5 in.; Includes Connecting Pipes/Mufflers/Hardware/4 in. Dual Round Rolled Angle-Cut Long Tip; Dual Center Rear Exit;50 State Legal / California Emissions Compliant T-304 Stainless Steel
  • S-Type Axle-Back Exhaust System
  • Product Attributes:
    • Exhaust Type: Dual
    • Exit Position: Dual Center
    • Exit Style: Straight
    • Inlet Inside Diameter: 2.500 In.
    • Material: T-304 Stainless Steel
    • Muffler Type: Turbo
    • Outlet Outside Diameter: 2.500 In.
    • System Type: Axle Back
    • Tail Pipe Diameter: 2.500 In.
    • Tail Pipe Material: Stainless Steel
    • Tip Diameter: 4.000 In.
    • Tubing Diameter: 2.500 In.
    • WARNING CA Proposition 65: Yes
    • WARNING CA Proposition 65 Message: Warning: This Product In The Physical Form It Is Sold Does Not Present A Hazard. However; Operations Including; But Not Limited To Welding; Brazing; Or Thermal Cutting Can Expose You To Chemicals Including Chromium; Nickel; Cobalt; Arsenic; Cadmium And Le
  • Borla Performance has once again proven why we have a led the aftermarket performance exhaust industry for over 30 years. Borla Performance Industries; the original pioneers of high quality; austinetic stainless steel free flow exhaust utilizes patented award and race winning technology to deliver quality; sound; performance gains; and enhanced fuel economy. All with an easy bolt on installation. All Borla street products carry an unsurpassed written million-mile warranty.
Brand: Borla
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel Body Block Engine CID CC
2015 - Mini Cooper S Convertible L 4 Cyl 2.0L 122 1998
MagnaFlow Performance Exhaust
Qty:
MagnaFlow Performance Exhaust Exhaust System Kit
  • Touring Series Stainless Cat-Back System
  • ; 2.25 in.; Includes Resonator/4x4x14 in. Muffler/4 in. Round Tip; Single Straight Pass. Side Rear Exit; Stainless
  • Touring Series Performance Cat-Back Exhaust System
  • Product Attributes:
    • Attachment Type: Bolt-on
    • Exhaust Pipe Material: Stainless
    • Exhaust Type: Single
    • Exit Position: Single Straight Passenger Side Rear
    • Exit Quantity: Single
    • Exit Style: Single Straight Passenger Side Rear
    • Finish: Stainless
    • Inlet Connection Type: Bolt-on
    • Inlet Inside Diameter: 2.250 In.
    • Main Piping Diameter: 2.250 In.
    • Material: Stainless
    • Muffler Body Diameter: 4.000 In. X 4.000 In.
    • Muffler Body Finish: Polished
    • Muffler Body Height: 4.000 In.
    • Muffler Body Length: 14.000 In.
    • Muffler Body Material: Stainless Steel
    • Muffler Body Shape: Round
    • Muffler Body Width: 4.000 In.
    • Muffler Count: 2
    • Muffler Finish: Polished
    • Muffler Type: Straight-through
    • Outlet Outside Diameter: 4.000 In.
    • Pipe Material: Stainless Steel
    • Recommended Use: Performance
    • Series: Touring
    • Sound Level: Moderate
    • Subtitles: Cat-back
    • System Type: Cat Back
    • Tail Pipe Diameter: 2.250 In.
    • Tip Diameter: 4.000 In.
    • Tip Finish: Polished
    • Tip Length: 4.250 In.
    • Tip Material: Stainless Steel
    • Tip Quantity: 1
    • Tip Shape: Round
    • Tip Type: Welded;single Wall;straight Cut;cut Edge
    • Title: Touring Series
    • Tubing Diameter: 2.250 In.
    • Type: Cat-back
    • WARNING CA Proposition 65: No
  • Made in the USA and engineered to last, for those seeking increased performance and better economy, MagnaFlow Touring Series Performance Exhaust systems deliver the smooth deep sound you want and the wide-open performance power you need. Our exhaust systems feature straight-through flow designs for the ultimate in unrestricted horsepower and torque for big power while maintaining exhaust efficiency. These systems are an engineered balance of interior and exterior noise levels and are tested against SAE j1169 standards.
Brand: MagnaFlow Performance Exhaust
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel Engine Designation Aspiration
2006 - Mini Cooper Base W10B16A Naturally Aspirated

Latest Mini Repair and Exhaust Installation Advice

CarJunky AutoAdvice

Mini Cooper maintanence

Showing 5 out of 5 Posts
Question From zmasterflex on Mini Cooper maintanence

For all those out there brave enough to do their own maintance on the mini cooper here is what you might run into. On 2006 cooper, most jacks won't fit under car (too close to ground) use coopers flimsy jack to raise car a few inches then slide your jack in. Oil filter is a cartridge filter need 36mm socket wrench (access from top, located on rear of engine - the left side when you are facing engine compartment right underneath left exhaust header ___boiling hot). 13mm on the oil drain plug. Regarding brakes, you need a 7mm hex head to remove caliper bolts (5/8 socket to remove caliper mounting bracket). Rotors are bolted on with a very large star-bolt, some type of hardened metal, I broke 2 drill bits trying to drill them out. To top that off there is a sensor in one of the driver side brake pads- yes a sensor- you need to carefully pry it out of the pads backing and snap it into the new pad (using the clip that's on the old pad). Oil change took me an hour, brakes and rotors 2.5 hours. Ridiculous.

Response From re-tired Top Rated Answer

Why were you drilling out the star bolts (torx)? Sounds like a typical brake system . As for hot oil during oil change , wait for it to ciool off. Glad to see you trying to become a diy'er . Just use a little more brain , little less muscle.

Response From zmasterflex

I drilled out the torx bolt because I needed to swap the rotors. I've changed 30-50 sets of brakes with rotors over the past few years sometimes the rotors are held on by these very large screws that are close to impossible to get off so I usually just drill them out, first time cracking a drill bit. As for the hot oil, it's not the oil I was burned on, the cooper's exhaust gets red hot within a minute or two of being turned on never seen that before.

Response From Hammer Time

You could avoid that whole mess by just using an impact driver to take them off in the first place.


Response From Tom Greenleaf

Right Hammer. I've never failed with the impact driver but came close a couple times,

T

troubleshooting Chrysler mini van 2003

Showing 2 out of 34 Posts | Show 32 Hidden Posts
Question From Carr on troubleshooting Chrysler mini van 2003

2003 Chrysler mini van. 3.3 ltr 133600 mi
while driving, engine light came on battery light came on, temperature gauge went off, shifting became sluggish, idle speed went up. It still ran. I turned it off and restarted it. at first engine light only was onand the temperature gauge was working.within 30 seconds temperature gauge went off and the battery light came back on

Response From Carr

Can a PCM be replaced by anyone or is it too technical for the average guy?

Response From Discretesignals

Physically replacing it isn't really hard. Programming it is something that most DIY can't do. You would have to find someone local to program it.

Response From Carr

Ok, i took to mechanic. He replaced two sensors and then the alternator. 750 dollars later still not fixed. So I got a PCM from computer exchange place. Programmed to my vehicle. Followed instructions and installed it. Ran a little rough at first then smoothed out. Drove fine all day. Went to work next day and it happened again. Exactly like before when problem first happened. Any thoughts?

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Arggh. Right away when picked up at the mechanic's and did the same thing why didn't you bring it up right then and there before leaving?


Clearly problem not fixed and has run poorly enough for new things to be the issue. IDK what to suggest except get codes again now as if running poorly there are and if not a problem not communicating with the vehicle,


T

Response From Carr

Lol. When picked up at mechanics, I had spent 750 and he still had no clue. He guessed computer which most would have tried at the beginning but quoted me another 750 to fix that. No thank you. I did computer myself

Response From Carr

So I got the codes again. Four this time. 0106, 0118, 1478, and a new one: 1496. I am guessing that the wiring harness has a short, or that five volt reference thing is off. I don't know how to check it or fix it.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Poor communication so do think wires and vacuum issues to bad grounds? IDK from here. It worked for a while so on comes the guessing that something in that area just being bumped has the problem.


From some older threads not witnessed was that battery placement was or could be a spot under it with assorted items that could be harmed by location or possible acids from battery? A place to look.


Dang - lotta cooks in this kitchen and no chef seems to be an issue as well,


T

Response From Discretesignals

If you have a P1478 code popping up, it appears you'll need to replace the PCM. You should definitely make sure the PCM has good powers and grounds and that your 5 volt reference isn't being pulled down before replacing the PCM though. Just to be on the safe side.

I guess no one verified 5 volt ref when the problem was happening??

Yes, you should really focus on the 5 volt reference circuit. You might need a DSO to monitor the 5 volt reference to see if it drops out when the problem occurs. Might be able to catch it with a volt meter if the 5 volt ref is down long enough for you to start unplugging sensors one at a time to see if it comes back up. Your going to need a wiring schematic and connector pin out. The fun part is going to be finding the problem with the circuit because many sensors uses that 5 volt reference.

While your monitoring the 5 volt ref, wiggle wiring harness around to see if you can duplicate the problem. Hopefully your replacement PCM doesn't have the same issue as the old one.

Even though this video is of a Caddy with a shorted 5 volt ref, the procedure is the same. :

Response From Carr

So I sent in both computers to have them checked. Turns out neither one was bad. It's not the computer. So much for that idea. Lol. Now I'm guessing it's a short. So where would the short be, and how to find it? That's the question. I am still thinking that the battery light coming on and the temp gauge becoming inoperable is a clue. Wish I personally knew a mechanic worth his salt

Response From Carr

So I just drove it to get gas. Ran fine. Temp gauge worked fine too. Shifted normal. Idle speed correct. Turned it off. Got gas. Turned back on and temp gauge quit, idle increased, shift became sluggish again. Lol. It definitely has something weird going on with that gauge. Gauge working van working, gauge not working van has problems.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Did NOT reread whole now old and long thread but when you have an intermittent much of anything and if when checked all is fine you are in trouble.


Problem must show itself while happening if not something in memory of something which may be lost when checked. Now if you have the most info, tools, equipment and know how and everything works fine when checked what would you do?


I did see that a whole cluster was a common issue was a clue and other than parts tossing at some point you need to or find someone to actually chase wiring one end to the other all over.


Just general on electric snags is that grounds that make whole metal of body grounded lose or break straps here or there and can be the problem for intermittent electrical or any connection of a harness for that matter. This isn't fun work and can use a lot of luck sometimes to know you've actually found and fixed something of the sort,


T

Response From Carr Top Rated Answer

So I have fixed my problem. No it was nothing that any code showed. It was a short in the wiring harness. The codes made the mechanic I took it to change things that were fine. That is what I was afraid of in the first place. Today's mechanics are typically code driven. Find the code then change out a part. I solved the problem through research. I found others with the same problem who told me where they found their short. Anyway, there is part of the harness that is close to exhaust pipe. It's located behind the power steering reservoir. Turns out that it is common for the wires to melt there. Sure enough. Fixed the insulation which fixed the problem. Hopefully this can help others fix their problems.

Response From Hammer Time

Today's mechanics are typically code driven. Find the code then change out a part.

No, that's not the way it works. The computer has a self monitoring system and the codes alert the mechanic when the computer sees a malfunction. The codes do not tell anyone to change any parts. They describe a specific situation that the tech has to then troubleshoot to find the cause. A car can have a problem that doesn't set a code either so your vehicle may have had multiple issues so today's mechanic do not change parts unnecessarily. They troubleshoot known issues.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Thanks for posting the source of the problem and the fix. Locked for archives for others to view OR you may request it re-opened by any moderator, T

Response From Carr

Ok. I understand what you all are saying. I guess my main complaint was that I listed a list of problems that all occurred suddenly. It didn't seem like anyone even looked at the symptoms listed. Oh well, water under the bridge. I got the readout from O'Reilly auto. Codes are P0118 and P1478 and P0106. Also, the PCM was changed 30,000 miles ago. Just for your info. Thanks.

Response From Hammer Time

The P0118 addresses your temp gauge problem and is likely causing some serious fuel mixture problems also. There is an issue with the temp sensor. Look at the wiring and plugs before changing the sensor.

The P1478 is a problem with the battery temp sensor which is why your battery light is on.

The P0106 is an issue with the MAP sensor. Again, look at the wiring and connectors and the vacuum supply.


See how much help those codes were. They are all likely unrelated too although a damaged wiring harness could effect all 3.

Response From Discretesignals

If you have a P1478 code popping up, it appears you'll need to replace the PCM. You should definitely make sure the PCM has good powers and grounds and that your 5 volt reference isn't being pulled down before replacing the PCM though. Just to be on the safe side.

The PCM incorporates a Battery Temperature Sensor (BTS) on its circuit board.

The PCM uses the temperature of the battery area to control the charge system voltage. This temperature, along with data from monitored line voltage, is used by the PCM to vary the battery charging rate. The system voltage is higher at cold temperatures and is gradually reduced as temperature around the battery increases.

The ambient temperature sensor is used to control the battery voltage based upon ambient temperature (approximation of battery temperature). The PCM maintains the optimal output of the generator by monitoring battery voltage and controlling it to a range of 13.5 - 14.7 volts based on battery temperature.

The battery temperature sensor is also used for OBD II diagnostics. Certain faults and OBD II monitors are either enabled or disabled depending upon the battery temperature sensor input (example: disable purge and EGR, enable LDP). Most OBD II monitors are disabled below 20 °F.

Response From Carr

Not ticked off. I know to get it read. Was hopeful somebody might have a clue before a read out. But hey, who am I to get in the way of everyone's sarcastic wit. Once I have the reading done, well let's see, I know, I can just ask the mechanic who did the read out. Hmmm. Wonder why this site is even up and running? Gee what would we do without computers to tell us what's wrong? Lol. It's funny, cause my brother could at least offer a diagnosis based on vehicles he's had before. That would be sharing experience, but oh well, thanks for the tips. .. get a read out. ..

Response From GC

Your thread title refers to troubleshooting. Taking WAGs is not troubleshooting. Cant even offer a suggestion without some data. Once you get codes read, that MIGHT offer a starting point for diagnosis. Anyone who offers you a guess does not value your time or money. You can have similar symptoms caused by a large number of different issues (refer to DSs guess), thats why testing is required to narrow it down. Parts stores are real good at guessing, good techs are not.

Response From kev2

CARR if you are still following here -
Thiis is the misconception we as technicians face daily - the misunderstanding that a DTC is the corrective action - the 'code' will tell us what to change. That ]is not the case, NO code says change a part- the people at part stores that do the FREE service say buy this part.

If the vehicle overheats, sets a code* for temp sensor high - flawed part store laymen logic-code says temp sensor SO the sensor needs replaced.
It is just the messenger- example- the technician knows to look for the leaking hose


* p011x, P111x etc

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Sorry. It's just that 99.9% of vehicles can't tell you more than a trouble code has been set. Takes reading what it sees and interpreting that info to continue on for the fix.


It monitors so much to do with how the engine runs, emissions, transmission and shifting and another 100 things not at the tip of my tongue. Owner's manuals that NOBODY EVER READS would tell you just what to do if that light is lit.


Codes at some parts outlets can be read for free - chains like Autozone and many others but write #s down not just what it might suggest the exact fix is.


If the vehicle isn't running perfectly it's possible to cause damage to wait. I'm not thrilled with putting too high of techno stuff in a moving machine exposed to the elements that controls the whole show much either as they get older that can be the problem but when it all works right it gives the most accurate adjustments for the temps and loads on a vehicle, the least pollution and best fuel economy too.


This could be as silly as a missing or loose gas cap or who knows till codes are read and the fix determined with that info,


T

Response From Discretesignals

I'd like to invite someone to our shop that believes a scan tool or code reader tells you what exactly is wrong and which part needs replacing. If I popped the datastream up for the BCM or MIC on that thing and told the visitor to tell me what is going on, they would shit their pants.

Response From Hammer Time

Just give them a factory flow chart for a code, any code.

Response From Discretesignals

Listen friend, cars don't talk to people and say, "Ouch my muffler has a boo boo." Scanners and scan tools are not magical devices that tell you what to replace. Being a modern day technician is a cross between a detective, network technician, and electronics engineer. Cars are no where near as easy to diagnose as back in the old days with points and a carbs.

We don't guess because when you guess 80% of the time you'll be wrong. We can't afford to be wrong when we are responsible for repairing other people's vehicles for a living. Heck, the wrong diagnosis could get someone killed in extreme cases.

If your here to troll the forum, your not going to be here very long. If your here looking for good advice and pointers on which direction to go to solve your problem, this is a great place.

Response From Hammer Time

This is one of those guys that thinks that magic little box that you plug into the car tells you exactly how to fix everything. Don't need a mechanic if you got one of the magic boxes.

Response From Hammer Time

Probably a bad dash cluster. they have a lot of problems.

Response From kev2

scan for codes EVEN if the CEL now is off

Response From Carr

First of all. Check engine light is on and stayed on, second, anyone can say scan codes. I was looking for an experienced mechanic who might have an idea what would cause the symptoms. Wow

Response From kev2

Checking for codes is the first step in troubleshooting.
GUESSING is NOT the way professionals approach an issue- that would be the crystal ball, psychic type.
I will add the collective experience is likely 25years PLUS per site contributor.

So you are unsure why/how the Dash cluster could cause rough shifting and high idle?

In laymans terms the PCM (computer) is seeing an issue and acting accordingly.
So how do we determine WHAT the PCM is seeing/reacting to ?
THAT would be getting the DTC's -
Need ideas on doing that?

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Quote"First of all. Check engine light is on and stayed on, second, anyone can say scan codes. I was looking for an experienced mechanic who might have an idea what would cause the symptoms. Wow "


Gee - you sound ticked off that the vehicle is warning you to CHECK CODES and upset about it. 100s of areas possible and reading them narrows it down so that is the professional response to you inquiry or just give up and send you down the road,


T

Response From Discretesignals

Hell, I take a guess. Faulty BCM, faulty MIC, wiring problem, terminal tension issue, faulty ignition switch, loose fuse, faulty power distribution box, poor grounds, EMI, excessive alternator AC ripple, communication bus problem .... Take your pick and let us know what you figure out.

Response From Carr

Dash cluster? How could that cause rough shifting and high idle?

Response From Discretesignals

I agree with KEV

Downstream O2 sensors work?

Showing 2 out of 33 Posts | Show 31 Hidden Posts
Question From jfls45 on Downstream O2 sensors work?

2002 Dodge Dakota, 3.9L V6, 109K Miles

Downstream O2 Sensor questions
I ran a OBD Scan program from my netbook today and observed the following:
Can someone who knows how O2 sensors work explain which downstream sensor is working correctly, see the attached photo.
This photo shows the O2 sensors after the vehicle has been warmed up to normal operating temp. The downstream are the two on the bottom.


Response From Hammer Time

Are we sure this truck even has 4 sensors. Everything I'm seeing says it only has one downstream sensor unless it's California. The poster is in PA.

Response From jfls45

I'm curious to why you say everything says there isn't 4 sensors, did you look at the photo in original post. you can clearly see 4 sensors.


it's a 02 Dakota 3.9L V6, has the two mini-cats, an upstream and downstream on each mini-cat, these two pipes come together and go into the main cat. then to the muffler... the photo I provided clearly shows 4 sensors if you look at the title window above each sensor. now we got that cleared up, yes i ran the vehicle for long time, its is my daily driver, i run it back and forth to work everyday, 16 miles to work one way, so it is getting heated up. but not thrown one code.

I appreciate all of your help and will hook laptop back up soon and log about 20 minutes worth of driving to post up here to look at.

thanks

Response From Hammer Time

No, what i see is a window that shows 4 graphs that are labeled as 4 different sensors which doesn't mean much of anything. Unless this is a California emissions certified vehicle, it only has one downstream sensor.

Response From jfls45

I tried to copy and paste data stream from excel file but it jumbled all together. is there a way to attach an excel file to this?

Response From Hammer Time

It doesn't apply the line returns when you do that but you can go back in and edit them in. I was trying to do that for you when you deleted the content.

Response From jfls45

this data is idling with the pvc hose unplugged, creating a vacuum leak.

32:03.1 Malfunction Indicator Lamp (MIL) Status 0
32:03.2 Number of Emission-Related DTCs 0
32:03.3 Misfire Monitoring Support 1
32:03.4 Fuel System Monitoring Support 1
32:03.5 Comprehensive Component Monitoring Support 1
32:03.6 Misfire Monitoring Completed 1
32:03.7 Fuel System Monitoring Completed 1
32:03.8 Comprehensive Component Monitoring Completed 1
32:03.9 Catalyst Monitoring Support 1
32:04.0 Heated Catalyst Monitoring Support 0
32:04.1 Evaporative System Monitoring Support 1
32:04.2 Secondary Air System Monitoring Support 0
32:04.3 A/C System Refrigerant Monitoring Support 0
32:04.4 Oxygen Sensor Monitoring Support 1
32:04.5 Oxygen Sensor Heater Monitoring Support 1
32:04.6 EGR System Monitoring Support 0
32:04.7 Catalyst Monitoring Completed 1
32:04.8 Heated Catalyst Monitoring Completed 1
32:04.9 Evaporative System Monitoring Completed 1
32:05.1 Secondary Air System Monitoring Completed 1
32:05.1 A/C System Refrigerant Monitoring Completed 1
32:05.2 Oxygen Sensor Monitoring Completed 1
32:05.3 Oxygen Sensor Heater Monitoring Completed 1
32:05.4 EGR System Monitoring Completed 1
32:05.5 Calculated Engine Load 5.882352941 %
32:05.6 Engine Coolant Temperature 199.4 F
32:06.1 Intake Manifold Absolute Pressure 4.496169878 psi
32:06.3 Engine RPM 991.5 rpm
32:06.3 Vehicle Speed Sensor 0 mph
32:06.4 Ignition Timing Advance for #1 Cylinder 10.5
32:06.5 Intake Air Temperature 158 F
32:06.6 Throttle Position 11.37254902 %
32:06.7 Oxygen Sensor Present (Bank 1 Sensor 1) 1
32:06.8 Oxygen Sensor Present (Bank 1 Sensor 2) 1
32:06.9 Oxygen Sensor Present (Bank 2 Sensor 1) 1
32:07.0 Oxygen Sensor Present (Bank 2 Sensor 2) 1
32:07.1 Oxygen Sensor Voltage (Bank 1 Sensor 1) 0.28 V
32:07.2 O2 Sensor Short Term Fuel Trim (Bank 1 Sensor 1) 2.34375 %
32:07.3 Oxygen Sensor Voltage (Bank 1 Sensor 2) 0.76 V
32:07.4 O2 Sensor Short Term Fuel Trim (Bank 1 Sensor 2) 0 %
32:07.5 Oxygen Sensor Voltage (Bank 2 Sensor 1) 0.84 V
32:07.6 O2 Sensor Short Term Fuel Trim (Bank 2 Sensor 1) -2.34375 %
32:07.7 Oxygen Sensor Voltage (Bank 2 Sensor 2) 0.82 V
32:07.8 O2 Sensor Short Term Fuel Trim (Bank 2 Sensor 2) 0 %
32:07.9 Malfunction Indicator Lamp (MIL) Status 0
32:08.0 Number of Emission-Related DTCs 0
32:08.1 Misfire Monitoring Support 1
32:08.2 Fuel System Monitoring Support 1
32:08.3 Comprehensive Component Monitoring Support 1
32:08.4 Misfire Monitoring Completed 1
32:08.5 Fuel System Monitoring Completed 1
32:08.6 Comprehensive Component Monitoring Completed 1
32:08.7 Catalyst Monitoring Support 1
32:08.9 Heated Catalyst Monitoring Support 0
32:09.0 Evaporative System Monitoring Support 1
32:09.1 Secondary Air System Monitoring Support 0
32:09.2 A/C System Refrigerant Monitoring Support 0
32:09.3 Oxygen Sensor Monitoring Support 1
32:09.4 Oxygen Sensor Heater Monitoring Support 1
32:09.5 EGR System Monitoring Support 0
32:09.6 Catalyst Monitoring Completed 1
32:09.7 Heated Catalyst Monitoring Completed 1
32:09.8 Evaporative System Monitoring Completed 1
32:09.9 Secondary Air System Monitoring Completed 1
32:10.0 A/C System Refrigerant Monitoring Completed 1
32:10.2 Oxygen Sensor Monitoring Completed 1
32:10.2 Oxygen Sensor Heater Monitoring Completed 1
32:10.3 EGR System Monitoring Completed 1
32:10.4 Calculated Engine Load 5.882352941 %
32:10.5 Engine Coolant Temperature 199.4 F
32:11.0 Intake Manifold Absolute Pressure 4.35113214 psi
32:11.1 Engine RPM 984.75 rpm
32:11.2 Vehicle Speed Sensor 0 mph
32:11.3 Ignition Timing Advance for #1 Cylinder 8
32:11.4 Intake Air Temperature 159.8 F
32:11.6 Throttle Position 11.37254902 %
32:11.6 Oxygen Sensor Present (Bank 1 Sensor 1) 1
32:11.7 Oxygen Sensor Present (Bank 1 Sensor 2) 1
32:11.9 Oxygen Sensor Present (Bank 2 Sensor 1) 1
32:11.9 Oxygen Sensor Present (Bank 2 Sensor 2) 1
32:12.0 Oxygen Sensor Voltage (Bank 1 Sensor 1) 0.6 V
32:12.1 O2 Sensor Short Term Fuel Trim (Bank 1 Sensor 1) -0.78125 %
32:12.2 Oxygen Sensor Voltage (Bank 1 Sensor 2) 0.76 V
32:12.3 O2 Sensor Short Term Fuel Trim (Bank 1 Sensor 2) 0 %
32:12.4 Oxygen Sensor Voltage (Bank 2 Sensor 1) 0.08 V
32:12.6 O2 Sensor Short Term Fuel Trim (Bank 2 Sensor 1) 4.6875 %
32:12.6 Oxygen Sensor Voltage (Bank 2 Sensor 2) 0.12 V
32:12.7 O2 Sensor Short Term Fuel Trim (Bank 2 Sensor 2) 0 %
32:12.8 Malfunction Indicator Lamp (MIL) Status 0
32:12.9 Number of Emission-Related DTCs 0
32:13.0 Misfire Monitoring Support 1
32:13.2 Fuel System Monitoring Support 1
32:13.3 Comprehensive Component Monitoring Support 1
32:13.4 Misfire Monitoring Completed 1
32:13.5 Fuel System Monitoring Completed 1
32:13.6 Comprehensive Component Monitoring Completed 1
32:13.7 Catalyst Monitoring Support 1
32:13.8 Heated Catalyst Monitoring Support 0
32:13.9 Evaporative System Monitoring Support 1
32:14.0 Secondary Air System Monitoring Support 0
32:14.1 A/C System Refrigerant Monitoring Support 0
32:14.2 Oxygen Sensor Monitoring Support 1
32:14.3 Oxygen Sensor Heater Monitoring Support 1
32:14.4 EGR System Monitoring Support 0
32:14.5 Catalyst Monitoring Completed 1
32:14.6 Heated Catalyst Monitoring Completed 1
32:14.7 Evaporative System Monitoring Completed 1
32:14.8 Secondary Air System Monitoring Completed 1
32:14.9 A/C System Refrigerant Monitoring Completed 1
32:15.1 Oxygen Sensor Monitoring Completed 1
32:15.2 Oxygen Sensor Heater Monitoring Completed 1
32:15.3 EGR System Monitoring Completed 1
32:15.3 Calculated Engine Load 5.882352941 %
32:15.4 Engine Coolant Temperature 199.4 F
32:16.0 Intake Manifold Absolute Pressure 4.35113214 psi
32:16.1 Engine RPM 986.75 rpm
32:16.2 Vehicle Speed Sensor 0 mph
32:16.3 Ignition Timing Advance for #1 Cylinder 8.5
32:16.4 Intake Air Temperature 159.8 F
32:16.5 Throttle Position 11.37254902 %
32:16.5 Oxygen Sensor Present (Bank 1 Sensor 1) 1
32:16.7 Oxygen Sensor Present (Bank 1 Sensor 2) 1
32:16.8 Oxygen Sensor Present (Bank 2 Sensor 1) 1
32:16.8 Oxygen Sensor Present (Bank 2 Sensor 2) 1
32:17.0 Oxygen Sensor Voltage (Bank 1 Sensor 1) 0.06 V
32:17.1 O2 Sensor Short Term Fuel Trim (Bank 1 Sensor 1) 4.6875 %
32:17.2 Oxygen Sensor Voltage (Bank 1 Sensor 2) 0.76 V
32:17.3 O2 Sensor Short Term Fuel Trim (Bank 1 Sensor 2) 0 %
32:17.3 Oxygen Sensor Voltage (Bank 2 Sensor 1) 0.8 V
32:17.4 O2 Sensor Short Term Fuel Trim (Bank 2 Sensor 1) -3.125 %
32:17.5 Oxygen Sensor Voltage (Bank 2 Sensor 2) 0.74 V
32:17.6 O2 Sensor Short Term Fuel Trim (Bank 2 Sensor 2) 0 %
32:17.7 Malfunction Indicator Lamp (MIL) Status 0
32:17.8 Number of Emission-Related DTCs 0
32:18.0 Misfire Monitoring Support 1
32:18.0 Fuel System Monitoring Support 1
32:18.2 Comprehensive Component Monitoring Support 1
32:18.3 Misfire Monitoring Completed 1
32:18.4 Fuel System Monitoring Completed 1
32:18.5 Comprehensive Component Monitoring Completed 1
32:18.6 Catalyst Monitoring Support 1
32:18.7 Heated Catalyst Monitoring Support 0
32:18.8 Evaporative System Monitoring Support 1
32:18.9 Secondary Air System Monitoring Support 0
32:19.0 A/C System Refrigerant Monitoring Support 0
32:19.1 Oxygen Sensor Monitoring Support 1
32:19.2 Oxygen Sensor Heater Monitoring Support 1
32:19.4 EGR System Monitoring Support 0
32:19.5 Catalyst Monitoring Completed 1
32:19.6 Heated Catalyst Monitoring Completed 1
32:19.7 Evaporative System Monitoring Completed 1
32:19.8 Secondary Air System Monitoring Completed 1
32:19.9 A/C System Refrigerant Monitoring Completed 1
32:20.0 Oxygen Sensor Monitoring Completed 1
32:20.1 Oxygen Sensor Heater Monitoring Completed 1
32:20.2 EGR System Monitoring Completed 1
32:20.3 Calculated Engine Load 5.882352941 %
32:20.4 Engine Coolant Temperature 199.4 F
32:20.9 Intake Manifold Absolute Pressure 4.35113214 psi
32:21.0 Engine RPM 978.5 rpm
32:21.1 Vehicle Speed Sensor 0 mph
32:21.2 Ignition Timing Advance for #1 Cylinder 7
32:21.3 Intake Air Temperature 159.8 F
32:21.4 Throttle Position 11.37254902 %
32:21.5 Oxygen Sensor Present (Bank 1 Sensor 1) 1
32:21.6 Oxygen Sensor Present (Bank 1 Sensor 2) 1
32:21.8 Oxygen Sensor Present (Bank 2 Sensor 1) 1
32:21.9 Oxygen Sensor Present (Bank 2 Sensor 2) 1
32:22.0 Oxygen Sensor Voltage (Bank 1 Sensor 1) 0.8 V
32:22.1 O2 Sensor Short Term Fuel Trim (Bank 1 Sensor 1) -3.125 %
32:22.2 Oxygen Sensor Voltage (Bank 1 Sensor 2) 0.76 V
32:22.3 O2 Sensor Short Term Fuel Trim (Bank 1 Sensor 2) 0 %
32:22.4 Oxygen Sensor Voltage (Bank 2 Sensor 1) 0.84 V
32:22.5 O2 Sensor Short Term Fuel Trim (Bank 2 Sensor 1) -2.34375 %
32:22.6 Oxygen Sensor Voltage (Bank 2 Sensor 2) 0.78 V
32:22.7 O2 Sensor Short Term Fuel Trim (Bank 2 Sensor 2) 0 %

Response From Hammer Time

Yeah, there is. Don't try to post so much junk.

Response From jfls45

so not only did we argue about how many O2 sensors I really had I pretty much got no useful feedback from anyone on this forum...

and there is a way to change from the Calif emissions to non-calif emissions...

Response From Sidom


I pretty much got no useful feedback from anyone on this forum...
I don't think that is a fair statement at all...... Taking my posts out the picture cuz I'll grant there isn't alot of useful info there, I've gone back thru this thread and see a lot of useful info from the other mods... These guys donate their time and knowledge for free and to come in here and say that is bs. You started this thread completely wrong....Rather than stating the problem you had in the 1st post, up front, you start asking about a system that is going to have nothing to do with the driveability problem you are having.... You come in later and spring that little nugget of info on us. So yea that turned what could've been straight forward problem and answer thread into this twisted mess..... Once again, I'm not talking about myself but you have no clue who you are insulting............

Response From Hammer Time

I'll put you in for a refund if your not happy with the free service.

Response From jfls45

Ill send a bill for my time with posting pics and data.

Response From Hammer Time

The value of that data is a wash. You've got the magic software program so you shouldn't need us anyway............LOL

Response From Discretesignals

I am sitting here looking at generic OBD2 data and nothing really stands out as an indication that something is wrong. Looks like two snap shots were taken at idle with the engine warming up.

You stated the problem your having occurs at when the engine is under load. Your not going to get too much from the OBD2 side if there is a misfire going on. Can't really tell from the vacuum leak you created if the O2 sensor responds or not because we are only seeing one frame of data.


Oops thread got locked...just noticed.

Response From jfls45

18:42.5 Malfunction Indicator Lamp (MIL) Status 0
18:42.6 Number of Emission-Related DTCs 0
18:42.7 Misfire Monitoring Support 1
18:42.8 Fuel System Monitoring Support 1
18:42.9 Comprehensive Component Monitoring Support 1
18:43.0 Misfire Monitoring Completed 1
18:43.1 Fuel System Monitoring Completed 1
18:43.2 Comprehensive Component Monitoring Completed 1
18:43.3 Catalyst Monitoring Support 1
18:43.4 Heated Catalyst Monitoring Support 0
18:43.5 Evaporative System Monitoring Support 1
18:43.6 Secondary Air System Monitoring Support 0
18:43.7 A/C System Refrigerant Monitoring Support 0
18:43.8 Oxygen Sensor Monitoring Support 1
18:43.9 Oxygen Sensor Heater Monitoring Support 1
18:44.0 EGR System Monitoring Support 0
18:44.1 Catalyst Monitoring Completed 1
18:44.2 Heated Catalyst Monitoring Completed 1
18:44.3 Evaporative System Monitoring Completed 1
18:44.4 Secondary Air System Monitoring Completed 1
18:44.5 A/C System Refrigerant Monitoring Completed 1
18:44.6 Oxygen Sensor Monitoring Completed 1
18:44.8 Oxygen Sensor Heater Monitoring Completed 1
18:44.9 EGR System Monitoring Completed 1
18:45.0 Calculated Engine Load 44.70588235 %
18:45.1 Engine Coolant Temperature 197.6 F
18:45.6 Intake Manifold Absolute Pressure 13.63354737 psi
18:45.7 Engine RPM 2562.25 rpm
18:45.8 Vehicle Speed Sensor 32.31130198 mph
18:45.9 Ignition Timing Advance for #1 Cylinder 15.5
18:46.0 Intake Air Temperature 109.4 F
18:46.1 Throttle Position 49.80392157 %
18:46.2 Oxygen Sensor Present (Bank 1 Sensor 1) 1
18:46.3 Oxygen Sensor Present (Bank 1 Sensor 2) 1
18:46.4 Oxygen Sensor Present (Bank 2 Sensor 1) 1
18:46.5 Oxygen Sensor Present (Bank 2 Sensor 2) 1
18:46.6 Oxygen Sensor Voltage (Bank 1 Sensor 1) 0.78 V
18:46.7 O2 Sensor Short Term Fuel Trim (Bank 1 Sensor 1) -2.34375 %
18:46.8 Oxygen Sensor Voltage (Bank 1 Sensor 2) 0.5 V
18:46.9 O2 Sensor Short Term Fuel Trim (Bank 1 Sensor 2) 0 %
18:47.0 Oxygen Sensor Voltage (Bank 2 Sensor 1) 0.72 V
18:47.1 O2 Sensor Short Term Fuel Trim (Bank 2 Sensor 1) -3.125 %
18:47.2 Oxygen Sensor Voltage (Bank 2 Sensor 2) 0.34 V
18:47.3 O2 Sensor Short Term Fuel Trim (Bank 2 Sensor 2) 0 %

Response From jfls45

19:31.7 Malfunction Indicator Lamp (MIL) Status 0
19:32.0 Misfire Monitoring Support 1
19:32.2 Fuel System Monitoring Support 1
19:32.3 Comprehensive Component Monitoring Support 1
19:32.5 Misfire Monitoring Completed 1
19:32.6 Fuel System Monitoring Completed 1
19:32.8 Comprehensive Component Monitoring Completed 1
19:32.9 Catalyst Monitoring Support 1
19:33.1 Oxygen Sensor Monitoring Support 1
19:33.2 Oxygen Sensor Heater Monitoring Support 1
19:33.3 Oxygen Sensor Monitoring Completed 1
19:33.5 Oxygen Sensor Heater Monitoring Completed 1
19:33.6 Calculated Engine Load 4.313725 %
19:33.7 Engine Coolant Temperature 161.6 F
19:34.3 Intake Manifold Absolute Pressure 5.221359 psi
19:34.4 Engine RPM 689 rpm
19:34.5 Vehicle Speed Sensor 0 mph
19:34.6 Ignition Timing Advance for #1 Cylinder 14
19:34.7 Intake Air Temperature 131 F
19:34.9 Throttle Position 11.37255 %
19:35.0 Oxygen Sensor Present (Bank 1 Sensor 1) 1
19:35.1 Oxygen Sensor Present (Bank 1 Sensor 2) 1
19:35.2 Oxygen Sensor Present (Bank 2 Sensor 1) 1
19:35.3 Oxygen Sensor Present (Bank 2 Sensor 2) 1
19:35.4 Oxygen Sensor Voltage (Bank 1 Sensor 1) 0.76 V
19:35.5 O2 Sensor Short Term Fuel Trim (Bank 1 Sensor 1) -3.125 %
19:35.6 Oxygen Sensor Voltage (Bank 1 Sensor 2) 0.16 V
19:35.7 Oxygen Sensor Voltage (Bank 2 Sensor 1) 0.8 V
19:35.8 O2 Sensor Short Term Fuel Trim (Bank 2 Sensor 1) -3.90625 %
19:35.9 Oxygen Sensor Voltage (Bank 2 Sensor 2) 0.82 V

Response From Sidom

Well 16 miles should do it but if your gonna run it to get a datastream, I would make sure at least half of it is at freeway speeds.
Before you take off, check and make sure all the moniters have run or passed.....If the O2 moniter is incomplete, the cat moniter won't run....

We appreciate the pictures to see what you got but......damn dude you didn't have to pull out the tranny for us....

I actually have an 02 Dakota but it's got the small V/8 so we can't get a good baseline from that........

Response From jfls45

Four (4) Sensors.

This is Bank 1 Sensor 2:


This is Bank 2 Sensor 1 and 2:



And yes there is a transmission in it now... these pictures were taken when the tranny was being rebuilt.

Response From Hammer Time


You have California emissions.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

I don't frequent new car dealers but MA and CA have had same specs for many years and says so on window stickers. Can't say for sure but I suspect many auto makers just comply to highest standard for many destinations.

MA + CA have done this for ages,

T

Response From Hammer Time

There are only 2 emissions standards. They are "Federal Compliant" and "California and Federal compliant". There are no cars specifically built for Massachusetts or any other state besides California.

I'm not sure what the whole goal of this thread is. The downstream sensors are Cat monitors only and serve no other purpose. They have no input or control over computer decisions for mixture or anything else. If you are not getting a Cat efficiency code, then none of this really matters at all in terms of engine performance.

You can have a blocked or restricted cat than can effect performance but the readings on B2S2 don't reflect that.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

It's not a different requirement just that it must meet CA standards to be sold here new anyway. I don't think it applies to used vehicles like CA where alterations are or were once required.

Nothing near me but I'll try to find a window sticker on a new car and take a pic.............

Just looked at a '97 of my own. Says underhood meets EPA standards for California and I know that was sold new to upstate, NY??!!

Dunno - that's how things are marked here not a MA sticker but must meet CA standards?

I'll see if I can Google out that confusion............

Tom

Response From jfls45 Top Rated Answer

ok, so I live in PA, the Carfax report says it was originally sold as a corporate vehicle right here in PA. Do you know why it has Calif emissions? and could I redo the exhaust without the mini-cats and have just two sensors? What would I have to do besides the wiring harness, change the computer too or could it be done with dealer programming tool?


What are your suggestions?

Response From Hammer Time

No, you can't change it. It is what it is. It was built with a package to be California compliant and that's the way it will always be.

Response From Sidom

DS is right....There just isn't enough info here to even guess at it...

Under all the right conditions it would look like one cat is bad.....But if you haven't run it long enough to fire off both cats then it could just be a case of one of them being to cold...

You should also check to see if all the moniters have run and passed. If you have any incomplete ones then other ones won't run until they run & pass...

If you have an incomplete O2 moniter then you may have a cat code looming to set as soon as the O2 moniter runs & passes....

Response From Discretesignals

Are you getting a P0430 code because Bank 2 catalyst isn't cleaning the exhaust. What rpm was the engine at?

Bank 1 appears that it is doing something and the cat on that side is working. Bank 2 sensor is working because it is fluctuating. You can tell if Bank 1 is responsive by stabbing the gas pedal a few times to richen up the exhaust and see if the O2 responds.

Response From jfls45

So are you leaning toward the downstream sensor bank 2 sensor 2 (bottom right graph) indicating the mini-catalyc converter is bad? Would this cause stutter or poor performance when running in overdrive and a load on the motor?

Response From Discretesignals

Bank 2 catalyst isn't cleaning because the rear sensor pattern is mimicking the front O2 sensor. The Bank 1 side appears to be working.


Were you driving the vehicle at the time the stuttering was occurring when this snap shot was taken?

You want to resolve your drive-ability problem first before condemning the cat. A cat this isn't cleaning won't necessarily cause a drive-ability problem unless it is plugging up the exhaust.

Does your program have the option of viewing misfire data?

Response From jfls45

it checks to see if the misfire check circuit ran which it does, but i get no codes indicating a misfire.

Response From Discretesignals

There might not be enough misfires occurring to cause the light to come on. The misfire monitor is active, but you might not be able to view current misfire pids with your program.

If the engine feels like it is skipping under load. That is usually caused by ignition secondary issues such as spark plug wires breaking down. How are the plugs, wires, cap, and rotor?

Misfires due to an ignition problem will reek havok with the catalyst because the unburnt fuel from the misfiring will cause the catalyst to overheat if there are enough of them.

Response From jfls45

plugs wires cap and rotor and coil all brand new motor has 109K on it. did compression check all about 180PSI

Response From Discretesignals

What are your long and short term fuel trims for both banks at the time of the stutter and loss of power? Can you snap shot a data list and post it up on here when the problem is occurring?

Response From jfls45

I am getting no codes at all.

B14 Sunny knocking sound

Showing 3 out of 4 Posts | Show 1 Hidden Posts
Question From Chemsto on B14 Sunny knocking sound

1999
Nissan
Sunny B14
1.5
120000KMS

I drove though what appeared to be a puddle,ended up being a small lake.Now i hear a knocking sound coming from the engine,car sounds like a tractor! Plus there were rocks in the mini-lake and they had contact with the underside of the car. The oil seems to be ok,correct level,no water but the sound from the exhaust has changed.Please help!
Caroline

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Engine still runs which is good so far. Now it needs to be totally hoisted to inspect for damage my guess is more from "rocks" than the water so far. Exhaust pipe(s) could be bent, broken or more. Will need to be seen in person to really know,

T

Response From Chemsto Top Rated Answer

Another problem,before the water incident,there was a strange and very loud vibrating noise from the exhaust pipe,i think. This would happen any time am idling in traffic and occasionally the idling would change on its own,revving between 500rpm and 1000 rpm. Please help,this was my first car and I have had it for close to 8 years and in my part of the universe mechanics are not known for their honesty especially when dealing with female drivers. Thanks!

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Sorry if you have had difficulties from mechanics in your area. Gender should have nothing to do with any of this. Plenty and increasingly females are taking up auto repair as a trade at least around me!

The idling changing BEFORE this should have been taken care of. Likely issue is vacuum leaks, air intake controls. The vibrations noted could be mounts for the engine/transmission or exhaust parts touching body metal parts which they shouldn't.

I have to guess as they don't sell this car where I am but usual layout would be such that exhaust parts run down and under car and must flex some there normally but still not touch anything. Where it flexes is a trouble spot over time without any adverse situation and may have broken there.

This shouldn't be all that hard to determine with some basic checks and seeing it. If you have sustained damage from whatever in the puddle it will not be known as any exact fix from any known ordinary wear and tear so must be seen.

The exhaust parts would have also been hot and sudden shock of water alone could have caused damage.

If you really feel you have trouble with your area shops then ask around for where people go who are happy with assorted service for their vehicles.

Keep trying. This could be what I'm thinking as exhaust issues and items getting hot that shouldn't and might even be dangerous to continue using this car until it's found and fixed. If bad enough and you are insured for damage it may be a claim with insurance. Can't know from here,

T

dodge check engine light code PO161

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Question From Uwm51b on dodge check engine light code PO161

2001 dodge durango w/ 4.7 4wd.
check engine light came on. the computer stated error
code was po161 (throttle senson). chilton book and
online both say that code is for a different sensor?

could the computer be right, the readout clearly stated
throttle sensor??

Response From Hammer Time Top Rated Answer

The computer doesn't tell you what the code means. It only supplies a code number. It was the code read that you were using that identified it incorrectly.

That code is for a bad heater in the O/2 sensor on the downstream side of bank 2

The one you need to change is in the right side exhaust pipe after the mini converter and before the main converter.