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Bendix
1994 Lincoln Continental Disc Brake Pad - Front Bendix - Bendix CQ

P311-1C3EC42    D601  New

Qty:
$42.41
Bendix Disc Brake Pad  Front
  • Disc Pad OE Ceramic
  • Bendix CQ
Brand: Bendix
Position: Front
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Position
1994 - Lincoln Continental Front
Bendix
1981 Lincoln Town Car Disc Brake Pad - Front Bendix - Bendix TitaniuMetallic II

P311-271321A    MKD150  New

Qty:
$42.41
Bendix Disc Brake Pad  Front
  • Disc Pad
  • Bendix TitaniuMetallic II
Brand: Bendix
Position: Front
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Position
1981 - Lincoln Town Car Front
Bendix
1991 Lincoln Town Car Disc Brake Pad - Rear Bendix - Bendix CQ

P311-1182AA9    D544  New

Qty:
$42.41
Bendix Disc Brake Pad  Rear
  • Abutment Kit Included Disc Pad
  • Bendix CQ
Brand: Bendix
Position: Rear
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Position
1991 - Lincoln Town Car Rear
Bendix
2002 Lincoln Continental Disc Brake Pad - Rear Bendix - Bendix CQ

P311-013CB27    D610  New

Qty:
$42.41
Bendix Disc Brake Pad  Rear
  • Disc Pad
  • Bendix CQ
Brand: Bendix
Position: Rear
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Position
2002 - Lincoln Continental Rear
Performance Friction
Qty:
$51.11
Performance Friction Disc Brake Pad  Front
  • 934 CARBON METALLIC HIGH PERFORMANCE EXTENDED LIFE
  • Product Attributes:
    • FMSI Number: D934
    • Pad Material: Carbon Metallic
  • .10 PFC CarbonMetallic© High Performance Extended Life formulation offers upgraded durability, increased longevity, and quieter operation for fleet, towing, and medium duty applications as well as performance sportscar specific applications. Carbon Metallic© delivers better performance than the OE. Stops Quieter, Stops Quicker, and Lasts Longer than any other pad. PFC CarbonMetallic© unique friction material meets all environmental standards and contains no cancer-causing ceramic fibers, no copper, no antimony, no asbestos, no lead, no cadmium, no chromium, and no potassium titanate. Multi-Layer(tm) technology allows for lower noise, lower dust, and longer pad and rotor life while eliminating a soft or mushy pedal. PFC CarbonMetallic© brake pad formula is the best on the market, providing you with the quietest and best performing everyday disc pads.
Brand: Performance Friction
Position: Front
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel Region Position
2005 - Lincoln Navigator Base United States Front
Performance Friction
Qty:
$76.83
Performance Friction Disc Brake Pad  Rear
  • 935 CARBON METALLIC HIGH PERFORMANCE EXTENDED LIFE
  • Product Attributes:
    • FMSI Number: D935
    • Pad Material: Carbon Metallic
  • .10 PFC CarbonMetallic© High Performance Extended Life formulation offers upgraded durability, increased longevity, and quieter operation for fleet, towing, and medium duty applications as well as performance sportscar specific applications. Carbon Metallic© delivers better performance than the OE. Stops Quieter, Stops Quicker, and Lasts Longer than any other pad. PFC CarbonMetallic© unique friction material meets all environmental standards and contains no cancer-causing ceramic fibers, no copper, no antimony, no asbestos, no lead, no cadmium, no chromium, and no potassium titanate. Multi-Layer(tm) technology allows for lower noise, lower dust, and longer pad and rotor life while eliminating a soft or mushy pedal. PFC CarbonMetallic© brake pad formula is the best on the market, providing you with the quietest and best performing everyday disc pads.
Brand: Performance Friction
Position: Rear
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel Region Position
2005 - Lincoln Navigator Base United States Rear

Latest Lincoln Repair and Brake Pads Installation Advice

CarJunky AutoAdvice

Brake Problem

Showing 2 out of 8 Posts | Show 6 Hidden Posts
Question From dwheeler on Brake Problem

Hello,

I have a 1997 Lincoln Continental, 4.6 with 121,000 miles. I recently replaced the break pads all the way around. Everything went great, bled the lines, no problem. Now when I am driving the breaks are squeaking and when I apply the breaks the squeaking diminishes. The front rotors shine indicating to me the pads are applying when I brake, the backs rotors have surface rust indiciating the pads are not applying when I brake. I think the pads on the front are not releasing 100% and the pads on the back are not applying 100%. What are possible causes?


Dave

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Comments: You can get "gun rust" you can see on one wet overnight so that's inconclusive. In replacing brakes the rotors should be replaced or resurfaced for proper break in and calipers totally inspected as best as you can or replace those too. Sliding parts need be lubed with proper brake lube.

The squeak is a sign of cheap pads even with a hack job they can be quiet. If a half a$$ed job and you should take it all apart again inspect and replace items as needed,

T

Response From dwheeler

Tom,

Thanks for the reply. Unfortunately I have been unemployed for the past 18 months because the company I worked for decided to move to China and my funds are now limited, reason for the half a$$ed job... just working with what I have available. I guess the problem didn't make sense to me because my breaks never squeaked before, and now it is so loud when driving.

Dave

Response From Sidom

As Tom & HT pointed out on the brks, its how it's done & quality of the parts....

From your post, I'm guessing you got the least expensive pads, PLUS with the not turning the rotors and if you weren't totally clean going back together there is almost no way it wouldn't make noise. If you get any dirt or grease on the rotor or pad surface, even with high quality pads, they'll squeek.

About all you can try right now would be to take it back apart, sand the pads real well, bevel the edges, clean and sand the rotors and make sure the pads & slides are free moving. If the rear calipers aren't working that is a big problem as well, now the frts are doing all the work & that will overheat them. Jack up the rear wheels, apply the brks and see if it locks up the wheel, if it doesn't, then that would need to be addressed as well..

If you're using cheap pads, you may never get them quiet.... I've asked parts managers that question. Why is there cheap grades of pads available for cars it was never a factory option for? The answer was simple.

"There's a demand for them".

DIYers want a cheap options and while they may (barely) meet DOT safety standards for that vehicle they don't even come close quality wise. Most shops won't install them. I know mine won't. But some DIYers don't want to spend $50, $60 or more for a set of pads when they can get them for $20.. You have to realize this is a difference between $20 pads & $70 pads for the same car and it's not "some guys just like to spend a lot money on their parts"........

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Sorry for the financial crunch - join the masses. Not doing it right actually costs more or worse an accident!

Noise can be from cheap pads or sometimes rust gets in there. Rotors should be taken off and rust behind them in rusty areas of the world as flakes can fall down and make them feel warped and worse a false sense that the lug nuts are really tight enough!

There's no easy way to short cut on brakes without some intense understanding and I won't suggest it on an open forum.

As HT said, the new pads may already be trying to mate with untouched rotors so may be junk already - no savings there.

IMO, they need to come apart again for inspection and parts as needed and the machine work. Price out rotors if need be as they make cheaper ones that are safe.

Can't be there but get help from a friend who is a mechanic who just might make some decisions on what is a must and what can wait.

Hard to do that from a web forum as we aren't there,

T

Response From Hammer Time

You can't buy the cheapest pads either.

Response From Hammer Time

Look, I keep deleting your duplicate questions and you keep posting them again. You only need one question.

Response From Hammer Time Top Rated Answer

Tom is right. When you just slap brake pads on and do nothing with the rotors, that';s what you get. If you opened the hydraulic system, you may have put some air in that wasn't there before.
If you have rust pitted rear rotors, they need to be replaced. The fronts need to be measured to determine whether they get replaced or resurfaced. If you put too many miles on those new pads, they will have to be replaced with the rotors again.

How to turn rotors on a '99 Town Car?

Showing 2 out of 11 Posts | Show 9 Hidden Posts
Question From Ragnorok on How to turn rotors on a '99 Town Car?

- 'Lo all. I have a 1999 Lincoln Town Car that I'm putting front brakes on. This isn't so hard, in and of itself, but I'd also like to turn the rotors because I have some uneven braking that's typical of mild rotor warpage.
- The problem is, the hub cover has this rubber seal on it, and that seal says "permanent sealed bearing - do not remove". I'm curious how one is supposed to turn the rotors on this vehicle if they can't be taken off? If they can be taken off, I'd like some insight into how that's done without damaging anything.
- I did pull back about 10mm of the rubber seal, unfortunately prior to reading the warning. (wry grin) Some gentle prodding didn't even budge the hub cover, which normally doesn't take a lot of effort to remove. Once I saw the warning, however, I stopped cold and came to the web to see what I could see. (grin)
- Thanks for your time...

Rags

Response From Tom Greenleaf

With caliper and the bracket removed the rotor just falls off! It may be stuck from rust and DON'T bother turning it as they don't cost that much for a good new one. None come with tons of extra metal anymore and they just warp from heat when thinner. Clean and lube where the rotor contacts hub/bearing as if it's crusty it will behave like a warped rotor. A rubber hammer should do to loosen it up and then gasket scrapers for any rust. Good luck,

Response From Ragnorok

- Odd. Typically the rotor is held on by a really big nut secured by a cotter pin, which is under the hub cover, the that says it's a permanent sealed bearing in this instance. Naturally the bearings are in there, too! (grin)
- If there is no such nut on this Town Car, what keeps it together? The caliper can't be holding it on there. Mere friction doesn't seem like it should suffice to hold a front wheel on (naturally the studs are in the rotor and hold the wheel) during normal driving conditions.
- I'm not telling you you're wrong, Tom, and I greatly appreciate your response. I've been working on cars for about twenty-five years, and I've never heard of a front rotor (coasting wheel on this rear-wheel drive car) that's not held on a by a nut/cotter pin.
- So before I just start whacking on it with a rubber hammer, I'd feel better with some explaination of this arrangement. Be as technical as you like ... I've a fair bit of automotive experience, and I'm a software engineer to boot, so I don't believe in "too much information". (wink) Links and/or diagrams would be a real bonus. Or maybe I should just see if Chilton has a manual for this car? (snicker)
- Thanks for your time!...

Rags

Response From Tom Greenleaf

I don't have much time right now but know that the front wheel bearing is a barrel and sealed unit and the rotor comes off like a brake drum would. Bearing is NOT serviceabe or adjustable. Easy to replace with air tools if needed. They use thread lock on the orig caliper bracket which must be removed to get rotor off.

Again - don't waste your time turning a rotor on this. New ones are too cheap to bother. That's your call.

Hit me at base address if needed, I need to get off this computer right now, Good luck,

Response From DanD

Good one Tom and you say you're out of the trade, maybe in body but you still know your stuff.
Dan.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Dan - thanks for the kind words!! I do what I can. Love your flag on your posts! Be well and love reading your posts, Tom

Response From johnwagnerjr Top Rated Answer

Tom - I've got a '91 Town Car and I want to replace the front brake pads and rotors. You mentioned that the '99 Town Car rotors just falls off when the caliper and braket are removed. Is this the same on my '91?

Thanks, John

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Not sure but 1991 should be the old style. Just two 11/16th bolts and regular wheel bearings. That was a change year for Lincoln so I'm not sure. A quick look will tell.

FYI - I've had great luck with disc pads called "Porcelain" for being real quiet. Just a tad more money for less problems. With a 1991 take a good look at the flex hoses and calipers and consider bleeding them out with good new brake fluid, good luck,

Response From johnwagnerjr

Thanks for the insight and the advice on pads. I've never done brakes before so this should be fun.

--John

Response From Tom Greenleaf

You are scaring me!! If you've never done brakes before go one at a time. Parts are asymetrically opposite so you have a reference. Make sure that the caliper hose is in proper position and DON'T let it hang by it while working.

Take most brake fluid out of master cylinder with a new clean turkey baster an mark it for cars only!! - or throw it out!! Hit me at home base if you have troubles or questions - I'm at this silly computer way too much so I'll catch it. Never re use brake fluid. There's a spot for private messages here if you want to leave a phone # or get mine. Take your time, it'll work just fine, Tom

Response From Ragnorok

- Gosh I am SUCH a retard!! Of course that's how it is!! The rotor is held on by pressure on the studs, when the wheel is on there, and it's the HUB that's held on by the bolt!! (smacks forhead)
- Since I can turn them for $15 for the pair, I don't think I can replace them for that price. I'm sure they'll just warp again (they did the first time), but at least I'll have smooth braking for while. (wink) I'll see about replacing them next pad set ... I'm not one to turn rotors a second time regardless.
- Thanks a million for your patience, Tom. I sure feel like a n00b...

Rags

Troublesome Brake Question.

Showing 2 out of 4 Posts | Show 2 Hidden Posts
Question From Guest on Troublesome Brake Question.

Ok so, my instructor at Lincoln Tech (DADC),
popped this question and assured 20pts to the final grade of the 1st person to get it right.

The question was: What kind of gas do brakes give off during/after the braking period?

Ive scoured my text books, countless internet pages etc. Only to find that this gas is very suprisingly referred to as just that, "gas".

Does anybody know WHAT this "gas" is? Or, where i might find more info defining this "gas"?

Response From Tom Greenleaf

HOT AIR! (And particulates of materials used) Now you could look up the composition of air. Oxygen%, C2O%,Nitrogen% etc.

This question is incomplete. The only thing common to almost all brakes is the use of a steel product. The friction material that was commonly used was asbestos does give off a smell of sulfur like gas. Trouble with that is asbestos is near banned for use in friction material now. It is where I live in the "People's Republic of Massachusetts" and products are clearly marked "asbestos free."

Now if you research "steel" you will find it starts as Iron Ore and through foundaries becomes iron which then can be altered in grades and different types. A few: Cast Iron, Steel, Hardened Steel, Stainless Steel, High Carbon Steel, and lots more.

I don't know your instructor or the intensity of the class but I suspect this is a trick question. I have heard and been told that the temp at point of contact can reach 3,000 degrees F. in brakes. That may be part of the trick as metals at that temp would give off a gas of various types depending on the metal used.

Friction material: I've seen, asbestos, porcelain, semi-metalic, metalic, more? What percent of what metal is used? It's not listed on packaging anyway. If not now we'll see more plastics. Crude brakes in various applications use rubber! Now that could go off on another tangent. The only real braking action for a vehicle is the friction between its tire and the road. Both of those vary too. I'm digging too deep for the trick here I'm sure.

You've captured my attention with this and I want to know what answer you come up with and what the instructor comes up with. I gotta know that answer!

My cat was of no help!

T

Response From Guest Top Rated Answer

You know, I myself am starting to think that this IS a trick question. Since the banning of Asbestos products here in the US in the late 1970's, all we are left with is composite/organic, semi-metallic, fully metallic, ceramic, and even carbon fiber for higer grade brake pad applications. (Not to say that you can't cross the canada/mexico boarder and still buy asbestos containing products...in fact i hear that Asbestos is one of canadas top 10 products)

But as for Non-Asbestos products here in the US, I've been reading up on a process in which they "cook" persay, the brake pads during manufacurting. The goal in which is to reduce "gas", if not almost entirly make gasses non present (hmm, slotted, dimpled, drilled rotors becoming useless, beside maybey better wet weater braking i.e. prevent hydoplane at the rotors??). Off course theres other goals in mind such as higher COF, slower wear etc etc.

So, if they are starting, or have been making pads with little to no "gas" during braking, something else has to replace the gas due to "conservation of matter". So the best thing that I can come up with, is a rather fine dust. Not a gas, but a dust. But then I also wonder how sumthing can get THAT hot and not produce some kind of vapor i.e "gas".

To tell you the truth I am VERY confused about this, and i dont think ill be getting that 20pts tacked onto my final grade haha. HOWEVER, my class ends next week. So, I'll be sure to pry the answer (if there is one) out of him.

(you know now that i think about it, its prolly a trick question devised to make us read our damn text books. And if so, it sure as hell worked!!!)

Response From Tom Greenleaf

I still want that answer. If you think this is really pointing to a "gas" then I would pick sulfer. Think! High carbon steel has the carbon (coal) and high sulfer coal is a problem with air pollution and also makes acid rain downwind of the monster plants that use it. Now controlled though.

Still kind of think this is a trick because there is no material that absolutely all brakes use.

If you win - kitty likes Fancy Feast!

T