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Graf
2009 Smart Fortwo Engine Water Pump Graf

P311-4511096    PA1142  New

Qty:
57.33
Graf Engine Water Pump
Brand: Graf
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2009 - Smart Fortwo
Beck Arnley
2015 Smart Fortwo Engine Water Pump 3 Cyl 1.0L Beck Arnley

P311-4A60261    131-2469  New

Qty:
78.60
Beck Arnley Engine Water Pump
  • WATER PUMP
  • ; Metal Impeller; Metal Impeller
  • Beck/Arnley parts meet foreign nameplate OE specifications for form, fit and function. Our product specialists work with a network of global sourcing partners so you can install the right part with confidence.
Brand: Beck Arnley
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
2015 - Smart Fortwo L 3 Cyl 1.0L 61 1000
Beck Arnley
2007 Smart Fortwo Engine Water Pump 3 Cyl 0.8L Beck Arnley

P311-252036B    131-2409  New

Qty:
55.69
Beck Arnley Engine Water Pump
  • WATER PUMP
  • ; Metal Impeller; Metal Impeller
  • Beck/Arnley parts meet foreign nameplate OE specifications for form, fit and function. Our product specialists work with a network of global sourcing partners so you can install the right part with confidence.
Brand: Beck Arnley
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Region Aspiration Fuel Type Block Engine CID CC
2007 - Smart Fortwo Canada Turbocharged DIESEL L 3 Cyl 0.8L - 799
Beck Arnley
2005 Smart Fortwo Engine Water Pump 3 Cyl 0.8L Beck Arnley

P311-252036B    131-2409  New

Qty:
55.69
Beck Arnley Engine Water Pump
  • WATER PUMP
  • ; Metal Impeller
  • Beck/Arnley parts meet foreign nameplate OE specifications for form, fit and function. Our product specialists work with a network of global sourcing partners so you can install the right part with confidence.
Brand: Beck Arnley
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Region Aspiration Fuel Type Block Engine CID CC
2005 - Smart Fortwo Canada Turbocharged DIESEL L 3 Cyl 0.8L - 799
Febi
2013 Smart Fortwo Engine Water Pump Febi

P311-3C42036    W0133-1998504  New

Qty:
92.31
Febi Engine Water Pump
Brand: Febi
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Fuel Type
2013 - Smart Fortwo GAS
Febi
2010 Smart Fortwo Engine Water Pump Febi

P311-3C42036    W0133-1998504  New

Qty:
92.31
Febi Engine Water Pump
Brand: Febi
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2010 - Smart Fortwo
Graf
2013 Smart Fortwo Engine Water Pump Graf

P311-4338877    W0133-1998504  New

Qty:
93.84
Graf Engine Water Pump
Brand: Graf
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Fuel Type
2013 - Smart Fortwo GAS

Latest Car Advice

CarJunky AutoAdvice

03 vitara overheating

Showing 2 out of 6 Posts | Show 4 Hidden Posts
Question From pantherl142 on 03 vitara overheating

Hi, vehicle has 336.xxx km but is running strong, 5spd, changed water pump in sept 2012 with a new one...changed thermostat and antifreeze and cap....got the air out and was running good for 2 weeks straight until the last few days...overheating...first starting her up the inflow and outflow hoses are tight with fluid...when she starts to over heat seems like nothing just air or not much in them...and i got balls so i removed rad cap while overheating and runnin...about 3 cups spray out then nothing....fluid are at ther right levels too

Response From Discretesignals Top Rated Answer

That is a whole lot of miles.

Fan clutch working?
Have you tested the coolant system for combustion gases?

I agree, not a very smart thing to do.

Response From pantherl142

yes fan is working good, and no never checked for combustion gasses, actually never heard of it before, anyway I can do it or is it a garage job?

Response From Discretesignals

They have a block test kit that uses a chemical that turns a different color when it comes in contact with combustion gasses. It isn't always accurate.

If you see a bunch of bubbles while the engine is running, that could be an indicator of a head gasket problem.

You could use a leak down tester in the cylinders to see if you get bubbles in the radiator, but there are variables also.

If you know a shop that has a gas analyzer, they can sniff for hydro carbons in the coolant system. That is fairly accurate.

Response From pantherl142

thank you guys so much for the advice, Guess I'll get a appointment at a garage....1 quick question....do ya think the thermostat may be gone already or faulty? wasnt a expensive one....if so I guess i'll check that before I make an appointment...it was just recently changed though

Response From Hammer Time

.and i got balls so i removed rad cap while overheating and runnin

You don't have balls. You just don't have any brains.

Troubleshot a lot. not sure what my issue is

Showing 2 out of 19 Posts | Show 17 Hidden Posts
Question From amp123dime on Troubleshot a lot. not sure what my issue is

Hi, So my 1994 mercury sable 3.0L engine just stopped driving down the highway. Got it home. Assumed fuel pump was bad. Replaced fuel pump (it was clearly bad) & the Powertrain control module (clearly fried). Still wouldn't start. Bought a new distributor and replaced. Had Autozone check the ignition coil, and test the ignition control module. They tested like they were suppose to within range. Replaced the distributor cap spark plugs and spark plug wires.

Just for reference also replaced fuel filter, thermostat, water pump, power steering pump, battery all within a month prior to this issue occuring as well.

Im determined to fix this just don't know what else would prevent the engine from firing up

Response From Hammer Time



Well, if you keep throwing parts at it the way you have been you may eventually hit it and then you may waste a lot more money too.

Here's the way it is done.


All "crank, no start" conditions are approached in the same way. Every engine requires certain functions to be able to run. Some of these functions rely on specific components to work and some components are part of more than one function so it is important to see the whole picture to be able to conclude anything about what may have failed. Also, these functions can ONLY be tested during the failure. Any other time and they will simply test good because the problem isn't present at the moment.
If you approach this in any other way, you are merely guessing and that only serves to replace unnecessary parts and wastes money.



Every engine requires spark, fuel and compression to run. That's what we have to look for.

These are the basics that need to be tested and will give us the info required to isolate a cause.

1) Test for spark at the plug end of the wire using a spark tester. If none found, check for power supply on the + terminal of the coil with the key on.


2) Test for injector pulse using a small bulb called a noid light. If none found, check for power supply at one side of the injector with the key on.


3) Use a fuel pressure gauge to test for correct fuel pressure, also noticing if the pressure holds when key is shut off.

4) If all of these things check good, then you would need to do a complete compression test.

Once you have determined which of these functions has dropped out,
you will know which system is having the problem.

Response From nickwarner

What was the fuel pressure on your "fried" pump? What was the voltage at its connector? What was the ohm reading of its ground circuit? If the PCM was a suspect, what was the criteria for condemning it? If these parts were both bad at the exact same time it would be the first I've seen.

Response From amp123dime

Also tested that it had fuel pressure. So its for sure getting fuel

Response From amp123dime

Not getting a spark. The rotor turns. I guess the next step is to find someone with a scan tool and check the computer codes. Not sure what else it could be. Unless the autozone tests of the ignition control module and ignition coil were misleading me and one of them is bad.

Response From amp123dime

Also wasnt just throwing parts at it. tested the fuel pump by jumping power to it to determine it was bad. The Powertrain control module you could smell the fried electrical and actually broke it open and saw the burnt relays. Then it was a matter of why it wasn't getting spark when I had done a tune-up earlier in the month. Replaced the distributor because after checking the ignition control module and ignition coil. They really wasn't much else left but the pick up coil. Buying a new distributor was much easier than changing out the pick up coil. Plus the distributor gear was worn anyhow.

Response From Hammer Time

You keep trying to justify changing all these parts that didn't fix anything and you still refuse to follow the exact instructions given so you're going to be looking for this problem for a long time.

We deal with guys like you that think they have all the shortcuts and don't test the way we ask all the time. I don't plan on riding your merry-go-round.

Response From nickwarner

Testing fuel pressure doesn't mean you have fuel, it means you have the potential for it IF the pcm triggers the injectors to deliver it and the injectors are capable of delivering the said fuel into the intake. Along with that you have to have sufficient vacuum to draw it into the cylinder and then fire it only if you have the correct compression and spark at the correct time. Checking the pressure was a good idea, but I see no mention of a test of injector pulse with a noid light. You could be condemning an ignition part because it wasn't triggered by the PCM to create a spark due to lack of signal from a crank sensor. Thats why we test the way we do and in the order we do. When you bill by flat rate you have to be efficient with your time. We are efficient and doing it our way saves you time and money. We are the pros you are trying not to take your car to. We are giving you the knowledge to do this yourself for free. Even Houdini wouldn't show you where the rabbit goes.

Response From Hammer Time

Also tested that it had fuel pressure. So its for sure getting fuel


I don't recall seeing a fuel pressure reading.

Response From amp123dime

I appreciate the responses. By no means am I a professional mechanic. The cost of a professional mechanic to solve for this is more than the cars value. I appreciate the FREE advice :) Fuel pressure aside. Bottom line is I am not getting a spark I have 12volts constant on both terminals of the ignition coil. One of the terminals should pulse. Other than the ignition control module what would prevent the ignition coil from pulsing ?

Response From Hammer Time

OK, you just said in a nutshell what i have believed to be true all along. You're blowing off our instructions, taking your own route and lieing about the results.


I don't have time to be wasted like this. If you can't or won't follow instructions, fix it yourself. There are other people that need help that will.

Response From amp123dime

WOW,, I didn't lie about anything. If you don't want to help that is OK. you don't have to. What specific instruction did I not follow ? Testing the fuel pressure ? I don't see a need for that when my current issue I am hoping to solve is why I am not getting a spark. Can't ignite fuel without a spark

Response From Hammer Time

I gave you a specific list of tests and you blew them off.

You haven't proven you have fuel pressure, you haven't proven you have injector pulse, You haven't even proven you have power supply to anything. There's nothing harder to do that try to help someone that thinks he knows more than he does.

You're on your own.

Response From amp123dime

Well hammer time if you get off the merry go round. Thats OK. I know I have fuel pressure because before I changed the fuel pump I pushed the pin where you attach the pressure gauge and no fuel came out. After changing the fuel pump I pushed that same pin and fuel shot out about 10 feet. Not the best method but didn't have access to a fuel pressure gauge and it worked. Not testing anything else related to fuel pressure because.. I HAVE NO SPARK

Response From Hammer Time Top Rated Answer

Gee, i wish I was as smart as you. Maybe you should work for Autozone. You would fit right in there.

Response From Discretesignals

Just to let you know. If you test for injector pulse and you have it, that tells you:

*The ignition module has power and ground
*The hall effect sensor in the distributor is producing a digital position signal to the ignition module.

If you have no trigger at the coil ground circuit and your PIPs going out, you can pretty much conclude the ignition module transistor circuitry died.

All ya had to do was answer those simple questions that was provided and there wouldn't have been so much heart ache. Good luck.

Response From Discretesignals

If you test for injector pulse as HT stated, that would tell you if the ignition module is sending a PIP signal to the engine controller. That helps to know because it eliminates a lot of things.

Response From amp123dime

Also every part I changed did Fix something that was wrong. The parts I changed weren't expensive and were needed. The other parts I have not changed related to not sparking are the ignition coil and ignition control module. Haven't changed those because I am not sure their is something wrong with those parts

Response From amp123dime

The fuel pump was bad. the screen inside was gone and the teeth on the gears in the fuel pump were shot. Also one of the wires attached to the pump didn't have a solid connection. The power control module was definately fried you could smell the burnt electrical. And there was a burnt hole in the control board of the power control module.

did the spark plug test and its not getting a spark. at all. Had my mechanic friend bring his voltage meter and tested that everything was within range. I was told at the auto parts store that coil should pulse. I am getting 12 volts on both of the posts of the ignition coil. Leading us to believe the ignition control module is bad. Even though it tested fine at the auto parts store.

Not a smart way of checking my fan relays...please HELP!!!

Showing 2 out of 10 Posts | Show 8 Hidden Posts
Question From Ed007 on Not a smart way of checking my fan relays...please HELP!!!


Hello,
I have a Chevy Lumina 1997, 3.1 with 145,000mils.


I have been having trouble with my Lumina heating up for a while now. About a month ago I changed the thermostat and flushed the cooling system. That helped for a while, but eventually it started heating up again. I realized that the cooling fan would not come on till the heating gage was all they way on RED. So I came to the conclusion that for some reason the fan would not cool the engine, until dangerously HOT. Today I tried to check the relays to see if i can find the problem. I checked (Fan Cont #1) by removing the relay and creating a connection by placing 2 (V) shaped metal wires and both fans started working. I repeated the process on (Fan Cont # 2), but unlike the first time there was a spark and when i tried to start the car and it would not start. I realize i must have caused an electrical short some where, but i'm not sure where to start. Please help.!!!!

Response From Loren Champlain Sr

1st, If the fan comes on when "It's dangerously hot", that tells me that the cooling fan motor and the relay is okay.
I'd check the coolant fan switch. Some, are PCM controlled, but have a switch that commands the fan to turn on at a specific value, even if PCM controlled. Many coolant fans don't come on until 234F! Hopefully, you've just blown a fuse or a relay. Most GM relays are interchangable. You could take the A/C relay and plug it into the fuel pump relay socket, ect. But, I'd check the fuses, first. You may have an electrical distrubution box under the hood and additional fuses under the dash. As you've probably learned, it's not a good idea to "jump" across terminals.
Good luck.

Response From Ed007


Thank you very much for responding to my question/SOS!!

I checked the fuses and found a blown one. I replaced it and car starts with no problems. But I still have the problem of cooling fan not starting till gage on RED and HOT warning light comes on..then the gage slowly starts coming back down to middle area. I'm very interested to learn more about “Coolant fan switch and PCM” you wrote about. Now I'm still a novice when it comes to fixing my own car, but I'm trying and very motivated to learn and my wallet appreciates it too. Can you please elaborate on PCM and Coolant fan Switch or maybe you can directed my to a website. I very much appreciate you help and advice and I'll make sure to pay it forward.
Thanks again !!

Response From Loren Champlain Sr

Glad to hear it was just a fuse! The PCM is the computer. The coolant fan switch is usually mounted near the thermostat housing. But, the problem you are describing sounds like a possible sticky thermostat. By the time the coolant fan switch "sees" the problem and turns on the fan, the engine is already HOT. I haven't learned how to post a picture of the coolant fan switch, but Tom G. knows how. Hopefully, he'll see the post and show you what it looks like, but I'd be real suspicious of the thermostat.

Response From Ed007


Hello all,


First let me just say thank you all for your help I really appreciate it. Okay, Way2old I changed the engine oil today and I saw that the oil was darker than usual and what little i saw of the inside of the engine when i moved the cap was brownish and dried up oil on the bottom of the cap. So i really do think that the car is getting hot..what i mean is that the gage is giving me the write temp reading (what do you think?). Unfortunately i need the car for work so i still have to drive it, I'm just extra careful with it. Landdchamploren, I changed to thermostat a few months back and whata tough job that was ...its in a really tight spot. To say the the truth the thermostat has been in my mind lately. I bought it at Auto-Zone (i should have gotten it from Chevy dealer) and I'm thinking that it might open at different temp. than the original one (btw, I remember testing the original one and it opened fine) can that be putting the whole cooling system out of wack? I was thinking of going back to AutoZone and see if its on file what kind it was that i bought and research it. I wana replace the coolant fan switch next and see where that takes me.....Tom G. please forward my regards to Kitty for providing a pic of what it looks like.
This morning before going to work, I repeated the process of manually turning on the engine cooling fans (by crossing the first relay terminal, not the 2nd one that caused the fuse blow out) to keep the engine cool till i got to work (30miles from home). I know what you are thinking, but i'm worried the car might not be able to take this over heating for much longer. So..about half way to work I see the gage is slowly moving to the right where the RED is. When it reached the RED, I pulled in to a gas station, but before I could put the car in park the gage started going back to the left....I started driving again and about 5 miles from work it started pulling toward RED, I keep on driving Warning HOT light comes on for about 3 seconds and goes away and i'm still driving...gage starts pulling back all the way left (cool, it goes back a whole 3 quarters) just when I reach the parking lot and almost the same story on the way back to home.

I just thought I'd mention this and hopefully it will help in diagnosing this irritating issue.
Thanks again for all your help!!!

Response From Tom Greenleaf Top Rated Answer

More suggestions/thoughts/question:

Is the radiator fan working yet and can it show HOT when it's on? If it can read normal when it's on then if you can't figure it out right away then make up a fused jumper wire direct to unplugged fan to force to stay on all the time if you must use the car for now. Run heater (better yet 'defroster') full blast and open windows if too hot for you too can both help AND you should feel the air temp comparative to gauge for a guess on gauge accuracy. When boiling hot the heater will quit - know that! Defrost request MAY force radiator fan to run - not sure for this car.

Is this truly full of coolant and staying that way? If no cap on radiator, when cold just squeeze upper rad hose - no bubble to recovery tank should be seen coming up - if so there's urgent need to find out - head gaskets can do that - sorry for the lousy possiblility but you need to know.

Oil sluge from heat: Maybe. Take a look if you can see thru fill cap as a better indicator. Clean cap and look for recurrance. Synthetic oils tolerate heat tons better than conventionals but not a cover for a problem.

I just think the gauge is telling the truth. Low coolant level could cause it to be late or erratic. Radiator could be inadequate, t-stat might be bad but it's rare with the symptoms so far to me.

Note: Cooling fan(s) really aren't necessary when moving along steadily at speeds over 35-40mph or so if air dams and shrouding is intact. Is radiator clean enough - leaves, bugs etc?

Other: Belt properly tight to turn water pump? Kinda must be or other probs would be happening. Water pumps are usually a cake walk on the 3.1s. Never heard of one yet not pumping but makes me wonder. Has been reported that some can corrode impellers causes low flow at lower rpms at first if so.

Kitty say "Hi" - Can you tell her owner isn't wrapped too tight?

T

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Kitty thinks it looks like this one so if this
is wrong it's her fault!






As way2old mentioned testing actual temp with infrafed thermometer would help a lot to verify the actual temp. Check right at thermostat housing when fully warmed up and the temp should be and stay close to the thermostat's rating ~ 195F +/-

Arggh ! Fan will come on later than the t-stat's temp rating. PCM is likely reading ohms from this sucker to make the call. Don't be jumping three wire switches!

This car may also use A/C's HPCO (high pressure cut out) also with three wires to activate fan(s) also thru PCM,

T

Response From Loren Champlain Sr

And, Tom comes through again! I'm impressed! LOL. I just saw an ad last week that you can buy a digital pyrometer for around $20. We paid A LOT more for the Snap-on one! Would be a good investment for DIYers.
btw, I love cats. Kitty looks like a good one! Lots better looking than her Daddy.

Response From way2old

Another thing to consider is if the gauge is reading right. You need to confirm the gauge is correct before you go much farther. See if you can get your hands on an infrared thermometer and check engine temperature against what the gauge is reading. As noted above, the fans come on at different temps. Most will come on around the 220 to 225 range. Good luck.

Response From way2old

Check all your fuses first.

I am planning on being a mechanic

Showing 2 out of 26 Posts | Show 24 Hidden Posts
Question From KyleT on I am planning on being a mechanic

Hey guys I'm Planning on Going to college in about 2 years once i finish paying my house off.
My Dad is a great mechanic but.. he hated people in his shop so i didn't learn very much and i was just wondering if there are any good places to do some Learning Before i go or what type of books to read.
I fix all my own stuff right now and i've been reading on this site but i figured i can ask the pro's.

Response From Peter Blake

Can you spell STUPID?

Totally edited and sorry for auto replies to this thead,

T

Response From re-tired

The old stigma of the grease monkey, parts changer is slowly dieing . 10 years ago I would have begged you to reconsider. The future or auto repair is rapidly changeing . It's gone from massageing an engine , points, dwell degrees , advance curves, a pandora's box of carburator designs , near bullet proof cast iron blocks and heads . To fuel injection . distributorless ignition. multiple overhead cams , all aluminum engines that warp in a moment. Computers for everything . Coming fast are hybrids , alternative fuels such as hydrogen fuel cells . All electric cars . And in your lifetime who knows, levitation ,anti gravity , fission...Crazy , daydreaming ? In my lifetime we have gone from the DC -3 ( a early plane)to man on the moon and looking at. mars . Bottom line is get as much foundation as you can ,math , science , electrical theory . physics , mechanical engineering . Most JR colleges have some kind of mechanical course .But that is just a primer . When you get to the Ivy league's , look toward places like MIT , that are already leading the nation to tomorrow. Good luck .

Response From Tom Greenleaf

KyleT:

I've been watching your post since it was new and thinking of just what to say and as "re-tired" said it's a new game now and somewhat has had changes about every 10 years all along. My forecast is the trade will change faster so the skills to do this for a living will be quite dynamic - more than even right now.

Do, do the college and if that is to be a precursor to automotive technologies take up as much of the sciences as you can. What is being used for power sources right now may be near done in new vehicles a decade out. Some stuff will probably not change. Wheels are round. A fuel need work in climate extremes no matter what is popular. In that mankind has settled in the extremes the vehicle will need heat and air conditioning which so far is an obstacle for much more than the fossil fuels and hydrogen which so far takes more energy to make than you get out of it. Mind blowing.

Back to the sciences. As Issac Newton drew up in length before a ball point pen was heard of still stands! Energy cannot be created nor destroyed - so far a proven fact! It can be transformed into motion, heat and I'm doing a brain search for what else but not much more. Today's vehicles are really a marvel of capturing what was once wasted in any given fuel. Friction and temp waste yet to be perfect but better than ever.

It will take high technology to advance small amounts at a time so computer control plain will rule.

More: Think hard about this as a trade. For now and my tenure at this mechanics (better said is technicians) did need to own thier own tools to a point. A shop would provide the larger items but techs are required to have their own hand tools. It's shocking how much plain metal tools cost! 10s of thousands to be a well equipped tech and way over 100k to own the shop and rising!

Think: Can you make a good living at this trade? Yes. Also consider that if you are not interested and motivated by it then it probably isn't for you. If you are money motivated only not many things are going to work out for the long run. It's a passion you either have or don't.

Check with local vocational schools for evening courses now and take just one for a feel or more as you can and see fit. Adult ed after normal working hours is strong where I am and hope available where you are.

Diagnostic skills will prevail. The plain parts that may need repair or replacing in most things isn't the hardest part but knowing which one(s) need attention is.

Best of luck with whatever you choose to do,

Tom

Response From KyleT

I really appreciate the comments guys. i am currently working in a tire store so i see allot of vehicles in and out.
I've helped my coworker who is a Great mechanic but he doesn't do to much anymore he likes it more for hobby.
Most of what i know is just from working on stuff on my own which I'm learning allot especially with this crappy pickup i just bought =D.

The money on tools i don't mind to much every mechanic has to buy tools if they don't then they aren't going to be a mechanic.

Let me know if there is any other hints you guys got I'm looking into a college right now not to far from me still saving some money up.

Thanks,
Kyle

Response From Sidom

Kick the old man in the butt & tell him to let you help him There is a ton of knowledge you can get there.....

I'm a 1st generation tech and have worked with guys who's fathers, brother or uncles had shops where they worked as kids, I saw the difference.... That kind of experience you can't get at a trade school.....

If he still gives you grieve about it, tell him to post here.... We have a few articulate old techs here that could gently persuade him (that means I have to stay out of it )

Seriously....you need to get into that shop.....

Response From KyleT

well i wish he would of when i was younger but I'm now 20 years old and i live a couple states away with my wife and kids.
When my son is older I know exactly how I'm going to do it. i just hope that i can get this going with the lack of knowledge i got now.
I Love messing with my own stuff and i have passion for it when i do it and always enjoy it, So i hope i can get this going soon.

Response From Hammer Time

As most of the guys have pointed out here, there are different levels of people that call themselves technicians. If you want to excel in this business, plan on continuous ongoing spending on tools and attending training on new features and vehicles. As RT pointed out, most anybody can change parts, although i've seen many screw that up too, but the guy that can fix the car that has been everywhere else first, that guy will never want for a job, no matter how bad the economy may get. Any reputable shop will get rid of people to make a place for you if your that guy but you have to keep up with the technology and that's not cheap. Get in with a company that's willing to spend on your education and training. You may not get rich at first but you will advance beyond everyone else.

Response From chickenhouse

I might as well add to the previos posts Kyle. My start was auto shop in high school followed by a community college stint gaining an associates degree. Then went to work in a small tune-up shop in Michigan. I'm 3 times your age so I don't mind telling you that $5.00 / hour wasn't so bad then. More importantly, they provided /paid for classes at the GM Tech Center in Dearborn. Tookj advantage of all I could! Plus we had Chrysler's schooling nearby. Took some classes there too! All that, plus work expeirence led me to my first ASE cert. Oh yeah, before all that, my dad got me started by having me help him restore a 29 Model A coupc w/rumble seat. First frame-off! Dearborn's Model A Joe cast the babbit bearings anbd line bored them for us. That, my friend, is a good starting point. I wish you good luck in your venture and future. Take good care of them kids. Auto teck can help you reach your goals.

Response From KyleT

Wow thanks for all the advice everyone

The guy I work for right now is pretty awesome i get 10$ an hour which in my small town area that is good wage average house here is 5-15k cost of living is cheap and within a year my house will be payed off at age 21.

But his best benefit is his end of the year bonus's, my christmas bonus last year was 5,000 and he told me to expect double this year which is all going into saving's for my college discount tools =D

How much should i save up for tools before i go to school since the college discount is so high?

I'm a patient person and im still young so i dont mind waiting a few years before college. so if i have to save 40,000 i will.


I apologize if that was hard to read
so to sum it up how much would you suggest saving for tools before i go to school? i read the discount was around 50-75% off snap-on tools.
How much

Response From Hammer Time

Wow, your in pretty good shape. That's one hell of a bonus. One piece of advice on the tools. Don't run out and buy a starter box that you are going to outgrow in a couple years. Go for top of the line boxes but buy one piece at a time. Just make sure it's a color or style that they will be making for a while. I would start out buying a very large, high quality bottom roll around. Once you have that full, you can buy the top or side attachments instead of having to trade in a box in a couple years because it's now too small.
Remember, they will also finance you for tool purchases, especially if your putting big money down.

Response From KyleT

HT i wish i would of read that post about 2 months ago i bought a 42" blue point top/bottom box used, oh well i'll just have to trade up sometime i guess.

Response From Hammer Time

i bought a 42" blue point top/bottom box used, oh well i'll just have to trade up sometime i guess.

Same mistake everybody makes but since you bought it used, it's no big deal. When your ready, just look for something bigger next time. Most of the trucks will take it in trade.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Interesting - I was thinking there was an "up" in quality vs a bigger unit/set. I'd opt for having two smaller units than one larger. Been ions now since I've moved so portability isn't an issue and have several wall cabinets for specific stuff or seasonal stuff.

Ex: A/C stuff and refrigerants get put away for a few months if heated space is limited,

T

Response From KyleT

wow just looked at some prices of the bigger box's... thats insane biggest bottom box i see from snapon is 12,000 OUCH, i know having good tools is essential to mechanic but is having a "Snap-on" box realy necessary if not what are some other good names?

Response From Hammer Time

I know. Boxes are big bucks. That's why you don't want to keep trading up when you need more space. It doesn't have to be Snap on but I definitely wouldn't go Craftsman. That stuff is fine for the DIYer but not for the professional. Some of their tools are OK but not the boxes. Besides, they don't make anything as big. Other good brands are Mac and Matco, even Cornwell makes a decent one now.. I have a Macsimizer myself. Your still going to spend 7 or 8K unless you can find a used or repo one. I bought mine used from the Mac dealer for $2000. They last forever.Something in the 60 to 70" range is good.

Response From KyleT

Cool thank you, just seen a macsimizer on craigslist a few days ago thought about getting it but since i already got the one i will probably wait till it is full.

Response From Loren Champlain Sr

Kyle; Didn't read all of the posts, so forgive me if I'm repeating...Check with Mac, Snap-on, ect. They are always taking in 'trade' boxes. Can get some real good deals on used boxes. As the others said, buy a quality box. Snap-On and Mac boxes will last a lifetime. Litterally! My Snap-On box is nearly 20 yrs. old. I can use the drawers as a ladder. They are that strong.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Check out Craftsmen at Sears. A lot of the quality of a box is how you treat your stuff anyhow. I don't own any from them right now but they were reasonable for the price. Shoot I think they had some huge one with tunes, a fridge and who knows!

Craigslist for location may help. Ebay AYOR - I hear horror stories sometimes??

Other off exact topic: I suggest making sure and getting stuff that locks up even though any turd could get into one. That because I also suggest you first work for a running shop, with others and the best would be one that does a wide variety of work. All the school in the world isn't like having another who's been at it a while for questions to get out of common jams and decide for yourself if you want to go out on your own.

Some shops won't like it but leave a note on a customer's car that YOU were the tech. If happy tell the owners and if not you want to know about it and why. Two seconds (taught this in school) to clean the windshield, wipe off any grease or dirt, dust dashboard, with engine stuff clean off a couple things as it's human nature to go home and stare and if they don't see anything they wonder. Aim to be good at it. The world needs good techs. With the right understanding and customers who know you by name they'll seek you out like anything someone is happy with results of a service.

Stinks but if you come across a lost cause car and it in for something pricey but won't be the answer take the time and advise them of what you found perhaps and what THEY want to do. Folks hate dumping a quick $1500 into something to find the whole damn car/truck really is so bad it isn't worth it.

Renting space may be the right choice over owning if you go out on your own. Lots to think about when in biz,

Tom

Response From re-tired

Hey Tom you forgot the cradle and need for a center post asymmetrical lift to drop the sub frame ala caddy's honda's and others . you can work around the cradle with 4 jackstands but ya gotta have a lift .

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Nothing wrong with Blue Point Kyle. In fact some obsolete old names can be great stuff but you can't replace one broken tool of a set with the same. It happens.

There will always be new stuff you will need. Once everything was just SAE measures, then -- oh my, what's with all this metric stuff? What a rip off it seemed as I lived thru that doubling everything to cover that. Must be a scam - then throw in the "star" or first named "Torxs" headed stuff. More again! Long ones, short ones, magnetic ones - yikes! That's just plain hand tools.

Jacks, jack stands - oh yes - jacks for transmissions and you've probably seen the jacks for huge wheels that no man nor beast could plain lift.

All bets and it's been happening right along is to specialize in an area but be informed in general.

Then comes the power tools. Once you get used to air and electric powered tools you get hooked. Hang on to your wallet!

Tom

Response From re-tired

Don't dispair you can use it to store your scanners,testers,adapters and leads.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Kyle: I too wanted just Snap-On, known or thought to be always the best, and they are excellent but have some exceptions too. So over time of constantly adding assorted brands come in.

Sears "Craftsman" can have a good bang for the buck. A fault I find with them is lifetime warranty is wonderful but they don't always have the one thing you broke and need. Watch out for sets of wrenches, sockets in metric mostly that leave out 5.5mm, 16mm and 18mm! Shocking to get a nice set and then blow the bargain buying just the 16 and 18 to complete and that size is used quite a bit. It a trick because no SAE (English) sizes will do exactly for those except 5.5 is 7/32nds or some fool old English #.

Know that 5/16th = 8mm, 3/4 is 19mm if brain is working today.

Some other names I like are S-K now hard to find where I am, Mac Tools are good, and several others fine. An issue with the lifetime warranty is will the company even be there!? Snap-On of all of them even at their higher prices will no doubt be in the tool biz.

Keep in mind the tool boxes you'll want too. Yikes can the high end stuff cost bucks! Nice if they can stack as the collection grows you can add a couple drawers on what you probably will end up with - the "roll around" box.

Speak for myself - I have my share of cheap Chinese tools too mostly for duplicates. Over the years I've cut or bent some wrenches for a single purpose and don't want to do that to the good stuff.

Even at your age you'll still need both metric and SAE sizes. An example would be when a nut or bolt is rounded or becomes odd sized from corrosion the smidge smaller may hammer on to grab it.

I have several favorite tools. The one for undercarriage stuck/rusted parts that is a must is the "Blue Wrench." Slang for oxy/acetylene torches and I love the name Victor for that. Here the shop/garage would own those for your use but after having them I wouldn't be without,

T

Response From nickwarner

I would recommend saving up as much cash as you possibly can for tools before enrolling. Snap-On, Matco and Mac tools all have an excellent student program that allows you to buy tools at half price while a student. This will literally save you thousands in the end. There are limits to this obviously, but it makes a big difference.
Having a good set of ears will help you learn a lot. The old timers that have done it all for years know every little trick in the book and if you are working hard they will teach you . The tech schools will teach you a lot about how these things work, but the most learning is going to be the hands-on you get.

Response From re-tired Top Rated Answer

Diagnostics is the doorway to repairs . All sucessfull mechanics seem to have a 6th sense , a gut feeling or a hunch about the diagnosis of the tough nut to crack. The car thats been to several muffler/tire emporiums advertising analize your check eng for free estimate in 15 min is the one that the TECHNICAN fixes and he does not give away that knowledge thus the parts changers say he is overpriced , a ripoff. But who do they call for a tip . Most anybody can change an alternator or a water pump . That makes you mechanically inclined. You then must build on that foundation. And having the gained knowledge passed down from generation to generation is pricless. My grandfather was a enginneer at the beginning of the space program . My father was a ship builder AND most importantly a hot rodder , grease monkey a gear head . I grew up on 34 fords , 27 t buckets . dune buggies and Drag raceing . I soaked this in like a sponge .As a result I consider myself smart , however my son has taken the torch and is pulling ahead in leaps and bounds.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

First generation of it here too. It's too bad as lots gets learned the hard way and some mistakes are expensive. Just the plain stuff of dealing with the feel of how much what fasteners can take, extracting broken bolts, what too do when common ones are stripped and it goes on and on.

Hope you can at least get a leg up on building adequate tools. Stinks but you end up needing several styles for each size as automotives is working in tighter spaces all the time. There are some cool tools that get around corners to a nut or bolt you can barely see let alone touch.

Are you able to get a cheap or free vehicle that has sound fundamentals to fix up and sell? Best to make the mistakes on one that's your own first before you tie up a customer's time.

Certainly pick up what you can with the tire biz. Shoot - even that you need to know how to get out of busted lug nuts and tons more.

Learn jacking points as best you can. It's primal to safety, not just for yourself but not to wreck some important part of a vehicle by hoisting the wrong items!

T

2001 Hyundai Elantra No power...

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Question From JoshMc on 2001 Hyundai Elantra No power...

Ok here's the rundown, 2.0 engine acts sluggish at times, what I have noticed is this if it's HOT out. And once the car gets hot to it's normal operating Temp. The acceleration sucks. When it's cool, the acceleration is great, new fuel pump and filter, I have hollowed out pre and cat installed non fouler on downstream o2 sensor, had the head reworked at head shop, new head gasket, new intake gasket, installed new water pump and timing belt, new plugs and wires, new map sensor, new idle air control valve , throttle positioning sensor, coil packs are 2 years old, car is not equipped with a mass air flow sensor, the car is throwing a code for a bad speed sensor, it is equipped with an input and output speed sensor, it shifts a little hard at times, because of the bad speed sensor but very rarely also transmission has been flushed with dealer recommended fluid. The car has acted sluggish before i did any work and it still dose... Any one have any Ideas...

Response From Hammer Time Top Rated Answer

The car has acted sluggish before i did any work and it still dose.

Gee, what a shock


So, you throw a couple hundred dollars worth of parts at the car and then destroy another few hundred worth of needed converters instead of simply paying for the correct diagnosis and you think you're the smart one?

If you really need to throw that much money away, simply giving it away would be a lot less work.

Response From JoshMc

Damn yous guys are fools... you want to talk $ Sh#t and you don't no what the F" your talking about, for 1 let me explain myself, y i put all these parts on this $500 better, that gets 38 miles to the gallon...for the first reason, Coil packs previous owner did not change plugs and the result was coil pack shorted out on #2 cylinder, so i changed both... throttle position sensor went out two weeks ago, the car kept revving up and down, that fixed the problem...map sensor was not throwing the correct voltage at idle or while it was revved up to 2 grand...idle air control valve, car was dying at low idle, to much air in intake....Head job, Car would run hot with AC on, bubbles coming up through radiator...and since i was taking head off , y wouldn't i replace timing belt and water pump...catalytic converters, both were clogged, No i am not spending $600 on cat's when the car isn't even worth $500...Most of all these problems arose over the last 4 months... Now lets get this straight, i came here for help not to be criticized, So are you going sit there and keep talking $ sh#t or are you going to help me diagnose this problem.

Response From Hammer Time

OH, so sorry...................... I'll get you a refund right away.

Response From GC

Any chance you have access to a scan tool with streaming data? Why did you put a non-fouler on the 02? Check engine light on? Code #s if so. Sounds like a mess.

Response From JoshMc

no i dont have access to a scan tool, the non fouler is to fool the ecu that there is not a low bank!

Response From Discretesignals

Hack job. Nothing like reading about a person that threw a bunch of parts on and hollowed a couple cats out instead of actually doing some diagnosis.