Finish Selecting Your Vehicle to Shop For Your Thermostat

Choose a Year for your Mini 's Thermostat

  • 2015
  • 2014
  • 2013
  • 2012
  • 2011
  • 2010
  • 2009
  • 2008
  • 2007
  • 2006
  • 2005
  • 2004
  • 2003
  • 2002

Shop By Brand

The Following brands are available based on your search.

  • Beck Arnley
    Beck Arnley
  • Motorad
    Motorad
  • Stant
    Stant

Best Selling Genuine Mini Thermostats

  • We Stock the following top leading brands, including Stant, Beck Arnley, Motorad
  • Constantly Updated Inventory of Mini Replacement Thermostat Parts

We stock Thermostat parts for most Mini models, including Cooper, Cooper Countryman, Cooper Paceman.

Stant
2002 Mini Cooper Engine Coolant Thermostat 4 Cyl 1.6L Stant

P311-4454CA1    14209  New

Qty:
$6.75
Stant Engine Coolant Thermostat
  • Temperature 195 Degrees OE Temperature
  • OE Type Thermostat
Brand: Stant
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block CC CID Fuel Type
2002 - Mini Cooper L 1600 - GAS
Stant
2007 Mini Cooper Engine Coolant Thermostat 4 Cyl 1.6L Stant

P311-4454CA1    14209  New

Qty:
$6.75
Stant Engine Coolant Thermostat
  • Temperature 195 Degrees
  • OE Type Thermostat
Brand: Stant
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block CC CID Manuf. Body Code
2007 - Mini Cooper L 1598 - R52
Stant
2007 Mini Cooper Engine Coolant Thermostat 4 Cyl 1.6L Stant

P311-4454CA1    14209  New

Qty:
$6.75
Stant Engine Coolant Thermostat
  • Temperature 195 Degrees Excludes Housing; OE Temperature
  • OE Type Thermostat
Brand: Stant
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block CC CID Cylinder Head Type Fuel Type
2007 - Mini Cooper L 1600 - SOHC GAS
Beck Arnley
2002 Mini Cooper Engine Coolant Thermostat 4 Cyl 1.6L Beck Arnley

P311-4C314D1    143-0868  New

Qty:
$11.16
Beck Arnley Engine Coolant Thermostat
  • ORIGINAL EQUIPMENT TEMPERATURE; Gasket/Seal Not Included TEMPERATURE 195
Brand: Beck Arnley
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block CC CID Submodel
2002 - Mini Cooper L 1600 - Base
Motorad
2002 Mini Cooper Engine Coolant Thermostat Motorad

P311-307FA28    718-195  New

Qty:
$33.07
Motorad Engine Coolant Thermostat
  • Includes Seal 195F OEM Recommended Temp
  • Standard
Brand: Motorad
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2002 - Mini Cooper
Motorad
2007 Mini Cooper Engine Coolant Thermostat 4 Cyl 1.6L Motorad

P311-100EA8E    678-221  New

Qty:
$104.46
  • Includes housing, seal, and temperature sensor 221F OEM Recommended Temp
  • Standard
Brand: Motorad
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block CC CID
2007 - Mini Cooper L 1598 -
Motorad
2013 Mini Cooper Engine Coolant Thermostat 4 Cyl 1.6L Motorad

P311-100EA8E    678-221  New

Qty:
$104.46
  • Includes housing, seal, and temperature sensor 221F To 2-1-13 OEM Recommended Temp
  • Standard
Brand: Motorad
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block CC CID
2013 - Mini Cooper L 1598 -

Latest Mini Repair and Thermostat Installation Advice

CarJunky AutoAdvice

temperature fluctuating '02 chevorlet venture mini van

Showing 2 out of 2 Posts
Question From claytoon on temperature fluctuating '02 chevorlet venture mini van

2002 chevorlet venture minivan with the 3.4l V6 180 000km. My 02 chevorlet venture mini van had the head gasket changed at 60 000km about three years ago. A couple of days ago the cab heat started fluctuating from time to time but the engine temp guage stayed where it should be. Last night while driving home the cab heat fluctuated again but this time the engine temp needle climbed very quickly to the red just as we pulled in the driveway. Could this be the thermostat , an air lock or a water pump or could this be the head gasket again?

Response From Hammer Time Top Rated Answer

You have air in the system likely due to a leak. have the cooling system pressure tested to find the leak.

93 Chrysler Town & Country Mini Van's heater dosn't put out hot air.

Showing 2 out of 4 Posts | Show 2 Hidden Posts
Question From Dean L S on 93 Chrysler Town & Country Mini Van's heater dosn't put out hot air.

We have a 93 Town & Country Mini Van. A few months ago the heater/air conditioner fan stopped working. At the local high school there is a auto shop who said they could install a new heater fan for the experience of the students. I purchased a new fan and took it in to the school & they installed the fan. Since then the heater hasn't put out hot air only mildly warm air. It makes no difference what position the temperature setting is at the air is only mildly warm, and since it's winter I would like it to be hot air. The high school shop said it's nothing they did. What could the cause this and how can it be fixed.
Thank You
Roger

Response From steve01832 Top Rated Answer

You may have air in the cooling system, low coolant, faulty heater control valve, faulty blend door or cabling, bad thermostat, or a restricted heater core. Can you give us a little more info please?

Steve

Response From Dean L S

Prior to the problem with the heater fan the air conditioner and heater was working fine, the engine temp. and water level was good. Since the new heater fan was installed nothing else has been changed and the engine temp. is running at it's normal range. I did try to turn on the rear heater/ air and cold air came out of the vents not even the warm air that was coming out of the front vents.
Is this of any help?
Roger

Response From steve01832

Roger, the next step is to let the engine get to normal operating temperature. Carefully grab the heater hoses one at a time. If they are both hot the problem is in the ducting of the heater module. If one is hot and one is cold, you have a restricted heater core.
2 of the biggest problems I have seen with these vehicles heat is the heater control valves get stuck in the off position and the blend air duct binds up. Check these out and repost with what you find.

Steve

01 Voyager - no heat

Showing 2 out of 4 Posts | Show 2 Hidden Posts
Question From Richiei on 01 Voyager - no heat

Hello,
I have a 01 Chrysler Voyager - the radiator was changed and now the mini-van is not making any heat. The engine gauge is showing 1/2 between hot and cold, like it usually does, but when the heater is turned on, only cold air is coming out of the vents. If I put the car in neutral and rev the engine to 2k or 2500 hot air will come out. I did bring the van back to the guy who changed the radiator, with the van sitting still in his parking lot it does make hot air. Any suggestions?
Thanks

Response From Sidom Top Rated Answer

I would also make sure the thermostat is in good working order. If that was the problem usually it would set a P0128 code.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Just a maybe: Cooling system may not be really FULL. If this has a radiator cap on radiator check there first - then recovery tank to proper level,

T

Response From Hammer Time

With the engine at full operating temp, locate the 2 heater hoses where they go into the firewall and feel them to see if they are both hot to the touch. If they are..........

The temperature is controlled by the use of an air mix door that is operated by an electric motor/actuator. This door can be jammed or the actuator can be inoperative or have stripped plastic gears internally.

89 Acura Integra radiator hose question

Showing 2 out of 7 Posts | Show 5 Hidden Posts
Question From dlmcmurr on 89 Acura Integra radiator hose question

Can anyone tell me which radiator hose goes to the thermostat on this model? I've had the head off and replaced all the hoses at that time. The new hoses look like they fit better in the reversed position relative to the old hoses, but the engine got hot on the first run. That was with the top hose to the thermostat. I did bleed the thermostat housing during refilling. I thought upper hoses always went to the thermostat and someone before me had reversed them?

Thanks,
Dave

Response From Tom Greenleaf

. 1: Thermostat replacement-Integra
***************
Make sure spring end of thermostat is towards engine. There's a lot going on right there and may take a cycle or two to settle down and purge all air out. All the hoses must be right where they belong. This looks like other hoses are part of telling this t-stat when to open and if not all correct there will be problems. When at all possible - match up old hoses to new ones and many need to be cut at one or both ends to match. Everything I could find suggests the upper hose does go from thermostat to radiator directly, T

Response From Tom Greenleaf

http://www.autozone.com/...eId=0900c15280049680

True: Most thermostats won't go in backwards but some have an "up" side to assist air purging.

Try that site for the diagram.

Heater really should be run when first testing out a cooling system after it's been drained for any reason. Most will blow strong heat when full enough and if not there's still more to go (purging) ..

In a career I haven't seen many new thermostats be totally wrong and the problem. In troublesome cases I will test them in water watching the action work on a stove.

Air is lousy at transfering heat so t-stats can be slow to react to hot air but will in time - usually late. As said some are designed with notches or tiny check valves to allow air past them (must be installed with that "UP")for better self purging but even that is slow.

Keep at it. Air still in system is most likely the trouble so far,

T

Response From dlmcmurr

Tom,

Your link didn't work, but it pointed me in the right direction. In the radiator section at the same site, figure 1 shows the hose routing with the lower going to the stat and the upper going to the head. I'll reverse my hoses this evening and try to bleed the system better and see where it goes from here. Hope I haven't cut the one too short!

Thanks,
Dave

Response From Tom Greenleaf Top Rated Answer

Ok: That's "AutoZone's" parts site. Some, not all when you look for a part will show how it's replaced, located or more about it. Look below when you get a picture of a thermostat for example the look for "repair guides" below that and if there's any further stuff it's hidden there - just a trick to be able to look at stuff.

If you can take pics that's even better so I/we can see just what you are dealing with.

Bleeding: If a plug up high on or near thermostat is there it's for letting air out. If not sometimes you can just remove the highest hose and fill from there and re-attach. Run engine till heater works and upper hose past thermostat is warm to hot and shut if off for a good while. It should be pushing air out to recovery reservoir and when it contracts as it cools can only draw back liquid. Can take many cycles of that to be stabil.

If heater worked before it will work now and when no heat is noted it's frequently because the actual liquid in the cooling system's engine side is still too low unseen at a glance. Understand that the thermostat when closed is not letting air thru it so it must be warm enough to open but don't let it overheat. As said - some t-stat's come with a slot or mini hole to let the air past it when cold but that's still painfully slow and with even minor junk going thru system won't work as it would plug.

Getting air out is not as quick and simple as it looks sometimes. Keep at it and look for the signs of temp stability as the idicator that it's mostly done and would finish the last tidbits of air over use so re-check your coolant level daily for a few days of use is suggested by me anyway.

Good luck - keep trying,

T

Response From dlmcmurr

Tom,

It always bugs me wondering how some suggestions worked out, so I thought I'd tell you how this project ended up now that it's running again and I've semi-caught up some of the other things that got behind.

This started out as project to replace a damaged exhaust valve. The last car head I had removed was in a Vega over 30 years ago, so the DOHC experience was not where I really wanted to start. It all went relatively well. As I said, I had used (obviously faulty) logic to decide the radiator hoses had originally been reversed. I put them back correctly, but things still weren't normal. Got frustrated and went to bed. On a whim, turned on the key the next morning and waited on the gauges to stabilize. Lo and behold, the temp gauge was showing normal after resting all night! Must have damaged it when I was banging the head around. Went out and bought another sending unit and that solved that problem. Once I put the proper Permatex on the head to radiator hose adapter (looks kinda like a smaller thermostat housing) and resisted the urge to tighten it all the way down, that solved another problem. Other little incidentals like the intake cam being one tooth off, a nicked O-ring on an injector (those are hard to find replacements for), etc. kept the job interesting. I enjoy reading and using web resouces to learn how things work, plus I really couldn't afford to replace my 280k+ mileage car right now. I had hoped that new valve stem seals, camshaft seals, and a valve cover gasket would make a significant difference in my oil consumption since they were all leaking, but that has not proven to be the case. Guess that means instead of $350, I should have spent 4 to 5 times that to rebuild the engine, but I was worried that even my $350 would be wasted as I would overlook (or cause) some other major problem. At least this gets it to where I can sell it in good conscience later if I want to. Plus I can buy a lot of oil for $1000.

I appreciate people like you that enjoy helping those of us that have the reasoning power and desire, but lack the practical experience to solve our problems. I try to do the same in other areas where I have knowledge.

Thanks again,
Dave

Response From dlmcmurr

Thanks, Tom. Fortunately, the thermostat only fits in one way, with the spring into the pipe running across the back of the block to the water pump. One thing I forgot to do was open the heater valve to purge that system, too. I'll run it through one more cycle this evening. Guess there's always a chance the new thermostat is bad, but probably I just didn't get enough air out. Is that drawing available somewhere that I can read the labels?

Dave

gas in coolant

Showing 3 out of 3 Posts
Question From Guest on gas in coolant

Hello,
I am having mechanical issues with my 02 mini. I recently took my car to the dealer to have routine service performed and to have an over heating issue looked into. The car over heated one hot afternoon, but quickly cooled back down after shutting it off and hasn't given me any trouble since. Regardless, the mechanic informed me that they had detected gas in the coolant by some diagnostic means and that they think the head, gasket or cylinder may have a crack in it. A repair at the tune of $4700. When the car first over heated - which I shut down immediately as soon as the light came on -- I assumed that the thermostat may have stuck for a moment because of the erratic way the temperature gage reacted. The car is running fine still and at normal operating temperature..

Without having the benefit to diagnosis the car, does this sound like the cause and do i really need to have the head rebuilt. Seems hard to believe when it is running fine.

Best -Regards -Scott

Response From Guest Top Rated Answer

The first thing I would do is get a second opinion from another dealer/repair shop.
You didn't mention whether or not you could smell fuel in the coolant (which you should be able to smell I would think).
Fuel in the coolant happens with cracked block, or a bad intake manifold gasket.
In the case of a cracked block you may also notice oil in the coolant which can appear as thick sludge.

I guess what I'm saying basically is....
get a second opinion from someone else and be sure.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

It's pretty hard for gosoline to get into coolant. They may have detected exhaust gas which could be a gasket or crack in some area. $4700 is insane -- get another opinion, T