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Nippon Reinz
2000 Toyota Corolla Engine Cylinder Head Gasket Nippon Reinz

P311-4059C16    W0133-1692884  New

Qty:
58.65
Nippon Reinz Engine Cylinder Head Gasket
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
Brand: Nippon Reinz
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2000 - Toyota Corolla
Nippon Reinz
2005 Toyota MR2 Spyder Engine Cylinder Head Gasket Nippon Reinz

P311-4059C16    W0133-1692884  New

Qty:
58.65
Nippon Reinz Engine Cylinder Head Gasket
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • ; Production: -01/2005
Brand: Nippon Reinz
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Prod. Date Range
2005 - Toyota MR2 Spyder To:01-00-05
Nippon Reinz
2008 Toyota Corolla Engine Cylinder Head Gasket Nippon Reinz

P311-4059C16    W0133-1692884  New

Qty:
58.65
Nippon Reinz Engine Cylinder Head Gasket
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • ; Production: -12/31/2007, NORTH AMERICAN MADE MODELS
Brand: Nippon Reinz
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Prod. Date Range
2008 - Toyota Corolla To:12-31-07
Nippon Reinz
2003 Toyota Matrix Engine Cylinder Head Gasket Nippon Reinz

P311-4059C16    W0133-1692884  New

Qty:
58.65
Nippon Reinz Engine Cylinder Head Gasket
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • ; Production: 01/2002-
Brand: Nippon Reinz
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Engine Designation Prod. Date Range
2003 - Toyota Matrix 1ZZ-FE Fr:01-00-02
Mahle
2009 Toyota Matrix Engine Cylinder Head Gasket 4 Cyl 1.8L Mahle

P311-0488AE6    W0133-2059445  New

Qty:
75.89
Mahle Engine Cylinder Head Gasket
  • ; Production: 01/01/2008-
Brand: Mahle
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC Prod. Date Range
2009 - Toyota Matrix L 4 Cyl 1.8L 110 1798 Fr:01-01-08
Mahle
2015 Toyota Corolla Engine Cylinder Head Gasket Mahle

P311-0488AE6    W0133-2059445  New

Qty:
75.89
Mahle Engine Cylinder Head Gasket
Brand: Mahle
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2015 - Toyota Corolla
Mahle
2011 Toyota Matrix Engine Cylinder Head Gasket 4 Cyl 1.8L Mahle

P311-0488AE6    W0133-2059445  New

Qty:
75.89
Mahle Engine Cylinder Head Gasket
  • ; Production: -09/30/2011
Brand: Mahle
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC Prod. Date Range
2011 - Toyota Matrix L 4 Cyl 1.8L 110 1798 To:09-30-11
Mahle
2011 Toyota Matrix Engine Cylinder Head Gasket 4 Cyl 1.8L Mahle

P311-0488AE6    W0133-2059445  New

Qty:
75.89
Mahle Engine Cylinder Head Gasket
  • ; Production: 10/01/2011-
Brand: Mahle
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC Prod. Date Range
2011 - Toyota Matrix L 4 Cyl 1.8L 110 1798 Fr:10-01-11
Mahle
2009 Toyota Corolla Engine Cylinder Head Gasket 4 Cyl 1.8L Mahle

P311-0488AE6    W0133-2059445  New

Qty:
75.89
Mahle Engine Cylinder Head Gasket
  • ; Production: 01/01/2008-, NORTH AMERICAN MADE MODELS
Brand: Mahle
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC Prod. Date Range
2009 - Toyota Corolla L 4 Cyl 1.8L 110 1798 Fr:01-01-08
Mahle
2010 Toyota Prius Engine Cylinder Head Gasket Mahle

P311-0488AE6    W0133-2059445  New

Qty:
75.89
Mahle Engine Cylinder Head Gasket
  • ; Production: 04/01/2009-
Brand: Mahle
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Prod. Date Range
2010 - Toyota Prius Fr:04-01-09
Mahle
2012 Toyota Prius V Engine Cylinder Head Gasket Mahle

P311-0488AE6    W0133-2059445  New

Qty:
75.89
Mahle Engine Cylinder Head Gasket
  • ; Production: 09/01/2011-
Brand: Mahle
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Prod. Date Range
2012 - Toyota Prius V Fr:09-01-11
Mahle
2005 Toyota Camry Engine Cylinder Head Gasket 6 Cyl 3.3L Mahle

P311-094F074    W0133-1769573  New

Qty:
73.15
Mahle Engine Cylinder Head Gasket
  • ; NORTH AMERICAN MADE MODELS
Brand: Mahle
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
2005 - Toyota Camry V 6 Cyl 3.3L 202 3300
Mahle
2004 Toyota Camry Engine Cylinder Head Gasket 6 Cyl 3.3L Mahle

P311-094F074    W0133-1769573  New

Qty:
73.15
Mahle Engine Cylinder Head Gasket
  • ; Production: 09/01/2003-, NORTH AMERICAN MADE MODELS
Brand: Mahle
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC Prod. Date Range
2004 - Toyota Camry V 6 Cyl 3.3L - 3300 Fr:09-01-03
Mahle
2006 Toyota Camry Engine Cylinder Head Gasket 6 Cyl 3.3L Mahle

P311-094F074    W0133-1769573  New

Qty:
73.15
Mahle Engine Cylinder Head Gasket
  • ; Production: -01/31/2006, NORTH AMERICAN MADE MODELS
Brand: Mahle
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC Prod. Date Range
2006 - Toyota Camry V 6 Cyl 3.3L 202 3300 To:01-31-06
Mahle
2004 Toyota Solara Engine Cylinder Head Gasket 6 Cyl 3.3L Mahle

P311-094F074    W0133-1769573  New

Qty:
73.15
Mahle Engine Cylinder Head Gasket
  • ; Production: 07/01/2003-
Brand: Mahle
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC Prod. Date Range
2004 - Toyota Solara V 6 Cyl 3.3L - 3300 Fr:07-01-03
Mahle
2005 Toyota Sienna Engine Cylinder Head Gasket Mahle

P311-094F074    W0133-1769573  New

Qty:
73.15
Mahle Engine Cylinder Head Gasket
Brand: Mahle
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2005 - Toyota Sienna
Mahle
2006 Toyota Sienna Engine Cylinder Head Gasket Mahle

P311-094F074    W0133-1769573  New

Qty:
73.15
Mahle Engine Cylinder Head Gasket
  • ; Production: -11/30/2006
Brand: Mahle
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Prod. Date Range
2006 - Toyota Sienna To:11-30-06
Mahle
2007 Toyota Solara Engine Cylinder Head Gasket 6 Cyl 3.3L Mahle

P311-094F074    W0133-1769573  New

Qty:
73.15
Mahle Engine Cylinder Head Gasket
  • ; Production: 11/01/2006-, Part made outside Japan
Brand: Mahle
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC Prod. Date Range
2007 - Toyota Solara V 6 Cyl 3.3L 202 3300 Fr:11-01-06
Mahle
2008 Toyota Solara Engine Cylinder Head Gasket 6 Cyl 3.3L Mahle

P311-094F074    W0133-1769573  New

Qty:
73.15
Mahle Engine Cylinder Head Gasket
  • ; Part made outside Japan
Brand: Mahle
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
2008 - Toyota Solara V 6 Cyl 3.3L 202 3300
Mahle
2004 Toyota Sienna Engine Cylinder Head Gasket Mahle

P311-094F074    W0133-1769573  New

Qty:
73.15
Mahle Engine Cylinder Head Gasket
  • ; Production: 01/01/2003-
Brand: Mahle
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Prod. Date Range
2004 - Toyota Sienna Fr:01-01-03

Latest Car Advice

CarJunky AutoAdvice

1997 Toyota Camry head gasket/smoke

Showing 3 out of 4 Posts | Show 1 Hidden Posts
Question From sarcha on 1997 Toyota Camry head gasket/smoke

I have a 1997 Toyota Camry with 144,000 miles. After driving 50 miles (and stopping to pay a toll and then accelerating to get back on the highway), my exhaust started billowing out bluish white smoke. Although it would still run, I had to tow the car to a mechanics due to the amount of smoke. The mechanic said that the valve seals were busted and it is burning a lot of oil. So, it needs a valve job (about $1000-1500). They also said the oil looked exceptionally clean, but was extremely overfilled. Also, the antifreeze levels look good. Talking to other mechanics (just over the phone), several seem to think it is probably a cracked head gasket and not valve seals. One said that it is even possible (if unlikely) that it is simply the excess oil burning and if I drained enough it would be fine. Over the last month, I have put nearly $600 into the car for brake work, a new flex pipe etc. If it is a blown head gasket or valve seals, I will just sell it for the value of the car minus repair costs. My question is: is it worth spending another $100 to get a second opinion on the chance it is just excess oil, or should I trust it is valve seals or head gasket and just sell.

Response From Loren Champlain Sr Top Rated Answer

sarcha; If the coolant level is okay, the engine not overheating, and the cooling system tested negative for exhaust gasses, I'd have the oil and filter changed with the correct amount of oil installed, and give it another try. It is possible that a valve guide seal, all of a sudden, took a dump, but very rare. Also, have them check the transmission fluid. Transmission fluid burns white. (If it's an automatic?) Are we sure that the oil being "extremely overfilled" is OIL? Under extreme conditions, fuel can contaminate the oil and, again, burn a whitish, bluish, color. A second opinion, and a gas analyzer, should answer the questions.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Just curious sarsha: How do you think or what circumstance might have led to oil being way too full?

If you know oil was added to do that it still isn't good but might - just a maybe ok if level is corrected and possible damage to O2 sensors or coverter may be a problem now.

As Loren pointed out - too much fuel can wash down cylinders and fill oil to super thin - not good for level and doesn't lubricate well. Not good either way.

At a minimum I'd change oil at once completely and check for fuel in oil.

A maybe for why it waited is that oil returns to pan passively (not powered back but drains back from higher spots in engine) and while running there's an amount in limbo if you will in the course of returning and would return faster when warmed up fully. Doesn't take a lot of oil burning to make quite a scene.

Get right on this. There are a few possiblilites as Loren mentioned how to check for. I wouldn't hesitate to pay for another expert opinion and check for all possible damage so you know up front as best you can but don't leave it with gas in oil or too full now,

T

Response From Hammer Time

I agree with both of these guys. Resolving the over filled oil and finding the reason for it are the top priorities here.

Toyota Celica leaking oil from head gasket

Showing 7 out of 34 Posts | Show 27 Hidden Posts
Question From funkeytoad on Toyota Celica leaking oil from head gasket

1995 Toyota Celica, bought this car back in the fall and it's been nothing but trouble. PO said that the engine (1.8) had been rebuilt 7000 miles ago (not the original engine). He had some machine shop do some work to it during rebuild, bored 20 over, crank knife edged. Gave me the paper work to prove it. I have no idea if any of these mod's have anything to do with this oil leak but thought it best to post it.

Did not take long after buying it to discover that I had an oil leak worse than I thought when I looked at it b4. Took it to 2 garages in town and they both said it was leaking from the head gasket. Payed the 2nd garage $750.00 to do the job. He ended up doing this head gasket job 5 times and it leaked again every time. Guy seems well respected in town here and said everything checked out flat, the head and the block. The 4th time he redid the job I demanded the head be machined anyway at my cost just so I was sure it was flat. Leaked again. The last time I had him use a graphite (thicker) gasket with brand new head bolts, it leaks now in 2 places.

My question now is this... Could this possibly be the wrong head gasket? I do not know what year this engine is for sure but I was told it is a 7afe 1.8. Are there different head gaskets for different year 7afe engine's? I'm totally lost now about what to do next. The engine runs great but I'm afraid that the oil is leaking into the cylinders as well as leaking outside. The guy at the garage said he is done with it and says that there is something else wrong with it. What could it be? Thanks for reading my long story, hope like heck someone on here can stear me in the right direction.

Response From Hammer Time

I appears that you have a very bad case of misdiagnosis.

I can't tell you that is is so rare for a head gasket to leak oil externally that i haven't seen one doing that in many, many years. That oil has to be coming from somewhere else, whether it be a cracked block or something else that they are just not seeing but head gaskets just don't do that.

Response From nickwarner

I'm thinking the same thing. I'm not surprised this guy washed his hands of it. He's doing the install correctly. I'm guessing this motor has been run a lot harder than the average commuter car. Nobody does that machine work on a Celica and does 55 in it after all. I'm guessing it got hot at some point and the block itself has a crack right near the deck surface. Only way you would find it is to pull the motor, strip it down and have it magnafluxed. By then you're doing a rebuild.

Response From funkeytoad


I'm thinking the same thing. I'm not surprised this guy washed his hands of it. He's doing the install correctly. I'm guessing this motor has been run a lot harder than the average commuter car. Nobody does that machine work on a Celica and does 55 in it after all. I'm guessing it got hot at some point and the block itself has a crack right near the deck surface. Only way you would find it is to pull the motor, strip it down and have it magnafluxed. By then you're doing a rebuild.

Well from my stand point as the customer, the mechanic shouldn't be allowed to wash his hands of it based on his obvious misdiagnosis of the problem, aside from the fact that he wrote me a 90 day warrentee on his work. Who's to say that he has done the install correctly? I (and you) have no idea if he did it right. I don't know about you but $800.00 is alot of money to me. If he thought after the 1st 2-3 times there was another problem other than the head gasket then he should have found it for the money he was payed. I just think a mechanic should stand by there work and diagnosis but sometimes they do not. After getting it back this last time I noticed that some of my gauges were acting up, I popped the hood and found that a wiring harness was mashed and wires were pulled apart!

Response From speed

Mechanics will stand by there work. Im sure he stands by the head gaskets he replaced but the problem was not as simple as the head gasket obviously. Im sure this tech has done the head gasket correctly but its obvious the headgasket isnt the source of leak and it is not his fault the leak exists in the first place yes ill admit they should have found the actual problem by now especially since ad HT said there is dyes you can use to find leaks but he also is tired of your car im sure having to do a job that takes up a good part of the day 3 times for the price of 1 is very hard on techs that are commission(most are) and to top it off that tech doesnt get paid that full $800 if hehe is lucky he will get half that but in reality he will probably only get 35% of that 800.

Response From funkeytoad


Mechanics will stand by there work. Im sure he stands by the head gaskets he replaced but the problem was not as simple as the head gasket obviously. Im sure this tech has done the head gasket correctly but its obvious the headgasket isnt the source of leak and it is not his fault the leak exists in the first place yes ill admit they should have found the actual problem by now especially since ad HT said there is dyes you can use to find leaks but he also is tired of your car im sure having to do a job that takes up a good part of the day 3 times for the price of 1 is very hard on techs that are commission(most are) and to top it off that tech doesnt get paid that full $800 if hehe is lucky he will get half that but in reality he will probably only get 35% of that 800.

This guy is the owner of this small garage and employs only one other guy so I kind of doubt your 35% estimate. I never said it was his fault the leaked existed! I was never cross with this guy, I never bitched, what I DID do was try and help the guy in anyway I could. I payed for all the parts, the head being machined, after the 3rd time back and on. I even asked questions like, " are we sure the head/block doesn't have cracks?". I was told that everything had checked out good. I'm SURE this guy was sick of seeing me and my car. I was sick of seeing him! Aside from being sick of trying to find someone to follow me over there to drop the car off and take me home, then find a ride to work for 2-3 days, then finding a ride back over there to pick it up again. I don't feel a bit sorry for him. When he 1st got my car it had an oil leak but ran like a top, now after all this it idles rough as hell, some of my gauges don't work (temp gauge for one) because he somehow mashed a wire harness, and the oil leak (he misdiagnosed) remains. Then he tells me, "sorry I did all I can do". This was the worst expeiriance I have ever had with any mechanic.

Response From speed Top Rated Answer

Well im sorry to hear about your misfortunes with this technician. From here its time to find a new shop id try a toyota dealership talk to them explain the situation that you had a bad experience at the previous shop and feel that you wasted your money if the dealership really wants your business they will.strive for your satisfaction that is any reputable dealer in your area. I wish there was more to be done but i guess you can only learn from this experience if you really want this car fixed otherwise id say try to sell it to aomeone who thinks they can handle it.

Response From funkeytoad


Well im sorry to hear about your misfortunes with this technician. From here its time to find a new shop id try a toyota dealership talk to them explain the situation that you had a bad experience at the previous shop and feel that you wasted your money if the dealership really wants your business they will.strive for your satisfaction that is any reputable dealer in your area. I wish there was more to be done but i guess you can only learn from this experience if you really want this car fixed otherwise id say try to sell it to aomeone who thinks they can handle it.

I don't know if I can afford a Toyota dealerships prices but I will get it fixed one way or the other. The one thing I wont do is try and unload it on someone else without being honest about it like the PO did me. I trusted the guy more than I should have I guess. I thought I was getting a really nice car with only 7000 miles on a rebuilt engine, (which with all the paper work and recetes look legit) but he was not all truthful. I do love the car so I will find a way to get it fixed right.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

My two cents is this engine wasn't a good candidate for a rebuild to begin with and modifiying it just added more headaches. Just me perhaps but if an engine needs to be bored over 20 as said up top it's junk. It's not some old iron horse engine that you do those things to,

T

Response From funkeytoad


My two cents is this engine wasn't a good candidate for a rebuild to begin with and modifiying it just added more headaches. Just me perhaps but if an engine needs to be bored over 20 as said up top it's junk. It's not some old iron horse engine that you do those things to,

T
I think what happened was this, the PO bought the car as a toy. He threw out the original engine after buying it and found another 1.8 cheap, threw about $2000 into a rebuild (his receipts show that) to make it a high proformance car. The thing I think he didn't do was replace the radiator or anything to do with the cooling system, (reused all this). The reason I think this is because he went out of his way in showing me the brand new radiator, heater core, all hoses, and temp sensor, ect. Just about everything to do with the cooling system was brand new. This all didn't seem like anything but a bonus to me when buying the car then, but now after going through all this bs it seems very logical to suspect that he probably ran this car very hard and it over heated on him. He probably thought he just blew a head gasket. Thats when he replaced all the cooling system parts and had the expensive 2 piece steel head gasket (that was in there when 1st job was done). It leaked oil like hell after that so he supposed that the head was warped or cracked and decided to unload it on some fool like me. That's what I'm thinking now.

The last week or so after getting it back with the graphite gasket on there, (that I was holding so much hope for) I had noticed that it seemed to be leaking again. I decided to have the oil changed, and after that I noticed when checking the oil level that it was staying on full. I was at first thinking that the graphite gasket had done it's thing and sealed the oil leak. After looking at it 2 days ago I'm starting to think that I may have coolant leaking into the oil now and that's the reason that the level isn't going down. The oil looked okay on the dip stick and there was no white\grey ring around the oil cap but there was under the radiator cap. Not much, just a little bit and the over flow tube was sticky to the touch when I pulled it out. White smoke out of the tail pipe? It's hard to tell when it's this damn cold here in Ohio. I watched it the other night after starting it up to go home from work. It was pumping some steam while warming up but after I got it home I didn't see anything while it idealed in the drive way. I will be keeping my fingers crossed and hope that any contamination was caused during the last 5 head gasket replacments, and keep checking the oil.

Response From MarineGrunt

If you don't think the oil was changed after each head job, or the last head job, I'd change it and especially if you think there's some contamination from the repair. After changing the oil put some dye in it and see if you can find where it's coming from yourself. If not, ask around and find another shop. Check for the leak at night or in a dark garage. The dye will show up better. You'll probably have to jack up the vehicle and get underneath. It might not hurt to throw down a piece of cardboard underneath while the car is sitting at night so you can see if any leaks to the ground. If it does just trace the oil up to where it's leaking from. Maybe its running down, burning off on the exhaust, and not leaking at the head? From the sounds of it oil normally doesn't leak from the head. I realize it's possible, but since the car is drivable and you have it to look at, maybe treat it like it's not leaking from there and check everywhere else. If you are in fact losing oil it has to be going somewhere.

To rule out the antifreeze leaking into the oil, check the compression. Most auto parts stores have a tool loaner program and you can get a compression tester by putting down a deposit. That deposit will be returned once you return the tool. The mechanics here can give you some better advice on what steps you can take to track this down. They really know their stuff so just check exactly what they tell you to check. Antifreeze is kind of sticky so the overflow tube being sticky won't tell you anything. I know you said there was some white crap on your radiator cap but how does your antifreeze look?

Response From funkeytoad


If you don't think the oil was changed after each head job, or the last head job, I'd change it and especially if you think there's some contamination from the repair. After changing the oil put some dye in it and see if you can find where it's coming from yourself. If not, ask around and find another shop. Check for the leak at night or in a dark garage. The dye will show up better. You'll probably have to jack up the vehicle and get underneath. It might not hurt to throw down a piece of cardboard underneath while the car is sitting at night so you can see if any leaks to the ground. If it does just trace the oil up to where it's leaking from. Maybe its running down, burning off on the exhaust, and not leaking at the head? From the sounds of it oil normally doesn't leak from the head. I realize it's possible, but since the car is drivable and you have it to look at, maybe treat it like it's not leaking from there and check everywhere else. If you are in fact losing oil it has to be going somewhere.

To rule out the antifreeze leaking into the oil, check the compression. Most auto parts stores have a tool loaner program and you can get a compression tester by putting down a deposit. That deposit will be returned once you return the tool. The mechanics here can give you some better advice on what steps you can take to track this down. They really know their stuff so just check exactly what they tell you to check. Antifreeze is kind of sticky so the overflow tube being sticky won't tell you anything. I know you said there was some white crap on your radiator cap but how does your antifreeze look?

The anitifreeze looked okay, there was a couple of "flakes" of something I noticed while topping it off the other day but nothing that alarmed me other than the whitish spot under the rad cap. I wiped it clean and will be looking at it again tomorrow. I do not think the oil was ever changed after any of the 5 head gasket jobs done. I could be wrong on this but just my expieriance with this garage, I kind of doubt it. The oil was looking very black and that was the reason I had it changed.

The compression test I have already been thinking on. After this garage did the 1st HG job, the car ran great for about an hour or so b4 it started to stumble and run like total shit. I returned the car to them and after a while they said I had almost no compression in cylinder 1. They called later to say that I had a burned valve in cylinder 1. This was the same cylinder that he had said was leaking oil into after he had it apart so was no big surprise. I payed then to have the valve replaced.

I have no idea how to work a compression tester so I will probably wait til I can afford to pay another garage to do it. The car runs pretty good now, still has a bit of a rough idle once in a while at a stop (which I cant understand) but other than that it runs good. Tell you the truth.... I'm kind of afraid of what a compression test might tell me! I have had no luck with this engine so far and I'm expecting the worst news.

Response From MarineGrunt

To do a compression test you just take a spark plug out and hook the adapter to a spark plug hole. It's pretty simple and something you could probably do.

I wonder if any of the other valves are leaking? If so, that's where your oil could be going.

Response From funkeytoad


To do a compression test you just take a spark plug out and hook the adapter to a spark plug hole. It's pretty simple and something you could probably do.

I wonder if any of the other valves are leaking? If so, that's where your oil could be going.

Got the car into another shop, first thing they did was a compression test and now number 4 cylinder is failing, which explains the rough idle and power loss that I had been complaining about through all these head gasket changes. How the other garage seemed to not notice this bit of info is beyond me, but at least I know now why the car is running like crap.

This shop is expensive but seem top notch in how they do things. After all the history on this engine the owner and I both agree a new head is in order (as long as the block tests out good). He thinks this head is cooked and that the other garage should have known it.

I will update as soon as they call with the bad news.

Response From funkeytoad


I posted about this car a month or so ago about it leaking oil from the head gasket. Long story short... had the car looked at by 2 garages and I went with the lowest estimate because I'm broke. Guy replaced the head gasket 5 times and it leaked again every time. Not only was it leaking out side the engine but was also leaking internally into one of the cylinders. Now I have taken it to a top notch shop (or so they say) and with a compression test it failed on #1 cylinder. Bad valve they said, and with my history from previous shop they decided a brand new head was in order. I had little choice so payed them $ 1.900.00 to do it. Now the car runs great, haven't noticed any leakage around head gasket but I'm now noticing blue smoke from the tail pipe once in a while when driving and have had to add some oil because it was a little low. I'm worried that the gasket has failed again and allowing oil to leak into the cylinders again. (They assured me that the block was flat and had no cracks b4 putting new head on.) I talked to the shop today and they said they would do another compression and leak down test but thought that it was now probably bad piston rings. I don't know, it never smoked b4 and it does not smoke at start up when cold, it seems to do it just when taking off from a stop or when down shifting.

Here is my question, could this be an oil pressure problem? The PO had the engine rebuilt and had the crank knife edged and it bored 20 over. I have read online that knife edging a crank shaft can cause oil pressure to go high but I have no idea if this is true but it does seem to fit my trouble. The car has no oil pressure gauge so I don't know how high it really is. Really stumped on this and growing very broke.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

This engine is cursed. You also have quite a history of failed work on it. It's been so messed with I'm not surprised by much of anything that has happened. Rebuilt is not close to OE new IMO. Bored .20 over is nuts also. That just messed with Mother Nature alone.

Go ahead and get compression test by someone who has a clue. Stinks as you are heavily invested in it but perhaps you should cut your losses and get out of this car for another that isn't so messed up - just my opinion. Your car, your money, do what you want,

T

Response From funkeytoad


This engine is cursed. You also have quite a history of failed work on it. It's been so messed with I'm not surprised by much of anything that has happened. Rebuilt is not close to OE new IMO. Bored .20 over is nuts also. That just messed with Mother Nature alone.

Go ahead and get compression test by someone who has a clue. Stinks as you are heavily invested in it but perhaps you should cut your losses and get out of this car for another that isn't so messed up - just my opinion. Your car, your money, do what you want,

T


That's funny Tom because that's exactly what my best friend told me a long while ago about this car being cursed, lol! He said same as you that I should get rid of it. I probably should at this point but I won't screw someone over on it like what was done to me. I just wish I knew what was causing this so I could get it fixed right! Could the rings have been bad enough to cause a head gasket to leak outside the engine? That does not make since.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Rings are not IMO any cause of a head gasket problem. Trouble is, is it the rings or the cylinder walls or both already! I know people do it but tying to hype up a Toyota engine is wasting time as the original was usually so well balanced for exacting specs it could last many many miles - maybe a very dependable couple hundred thousand miles with routine care and no bad luck like an overheat or strange loss of oil pressure.

Boring out cylinders to me (my opinion) mean the end of that engine for long life. You lose all the balance that took millions in engineering to accomplish.

Rings can last ages. The metal available for over 50 years + is so much better than prehistoric times when a farmer could routinely do them for an oil burner with almost no tools. 1930s, 40s, 50s and got better quickly after that.

If the objective was to get more power it was barking up the wrong tree in a Toyota of this vintage. Almost any car newer than 30 years old.

Seriously - If you want more HP than it was designed with buy a car already designed that way.

Long retired now but the engines of choice to play with were all cast iron and you could play. Alter cylinder heads, polish intakes, camshafts etc and you could get some unreal HP out of some. The fav of them was a small block Chevy or even the big blocks. That killed them early too but you could do an impressive 1/4 mile time at the dragstrip.

Displacement is not the only game.

Trouble today is the car has to still meet all emissions and where I live - MA an altered engine would likely fail inspection for use on public roads and becomes a race use only thing.

Back to top post: What the reason this engine was replaced in the first place and why was the replacement altered or in need? There was a red flag there to begin with. If you need this car for plain transportation I wouldn't have one with a messed with engine.

Things are perspective on what you want and the reality around you. For me in Massachusetts there is no place to drive fast really and for what - to get behind a log jam a cars anyway. Kinda renders cars just four wheels to get around with but like about anywhere folks need them.

Back to this car. A compression test will show if lower end is now the problem. If unfamiliar you add a squirt of oil and if a weak cylinder comes to norms that indicates the pistons for any reason are out of spec. With the miles you mentioned that's way too early if it was ever done even close to well so I reassert this engine is cursed and would take another freaking fortune to make dependable.

Basics on the smoke out exhaust. Without doing anything, most that smoke while driving or accelerating will be a lower end compression problem consuming oil.

You decide. It's your car. You desires for what you want not mine,

Tom

Response From funkeytoad

Thanks for the input Tom. I got duped on this car no question about it. The PO did all this work to the car not me. He went out of his way to show me all the paper work from all the work done and at his word said the engine had only 7000 miles on the rebuild so my thinking was that I was buying something not only fun to drive but also with a rebuilt engine that should last a good while (boy was I wrong). I had never bought anything like this b4 and if it had been a kid selling it I would have thought twice but this guy was my age and seemed as honest as can be. Just goes to show ya I guess.

I will find out tomorrow or on thursday what the tests say. It could be that I had a fried head AND bad rings from the start but I still think I would have noticed this smoking b4 I had the new head put on. Crossing my fingers that maybe this head has a bad valve stem seal causing this because it is still under warranty.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Oil burning from anything to do with valves should be momentary especially after slowing down then starting off again. A lower end (pistons, rings - all of it) if out of spec would more likely put out smoke while plain driving along or with a load.

An engine is so intolerant of being out of spec. It's been messed with. It's DNA (if you will) has been lost in space. All the good intentions and skills may have been applied and I think it plain failed. That engine never should have been redone IMO.

Again - redone is nothing like new. Not even close. Better than what has happened but not as good as the original (new) machine work ever again.

Not here to blame anyone but back to doing the head gasket so many times? If a job fails once, fine. By the second redo of anything you really pay attention to what went wrong and seems nobody did. 5 times is insane.

I guess if I were you I'd go ahead and get it diagnosed just to know and then it's time to "fish or cut bait'' type thing.

This whole thing is a sad story of failure as I see it,

Tom

Response From funkeytoad


Oil burning from anything to do with valves should be momentary especially after slowing down then starting off again. A lower end (pistons, rings - all of it) if out of spec would more likely put out smoke while plain driving along or with a load.

An engine is so intolerant of being out of spec. It's been messed with. It's DNA (if you will) has been lost in space. All the good intentions and skills may have been applied and I think it plain failed. That engine never should have been redone IMO.

Again - redone is nothing like new. Not even close. Better than what has happened but not as good as the original (new) machine work ever again.

Not here to blame anyone but back to doing the head gasket so many times? If a job fails once, fine. By the second redo of anything you really pay attention to what went wrong and seems nobody did. 5 times is insane.

I guess if I were you I'd go ahead and get it diagnosed just to know and then it's time to "fish or cut bait'' type thing.

This whole thing is a sad story of failure as I see it,

Tom

Sad story of failure for sure! The oil burning is exactly what you described as valves. Once I noticed it I started watching out the rear view mirror while driving to see how bad it was. It ONLY seemed to happen while under load from taking off or when down shifting. If I drive the car like a grandma would I see nothing. It's hard to believe my luck could be so bad that a reconditioned head from advanced auto has a bad valve seal but the way it's been going who knows? Lol.

Dropped the car back off at the garage today and while talking to the guy who runs the shop I popped the hood and we took a peek. Guess what? We both spotted oil AGAIN just starting to leak from around the head gasket area where it has b4! The guy didn't know what to say, other than they would drop some dye into the oil again to make sure it was again leaking from there and that they would do their compression and leak down test on it and let me know.

I did everything but beg these guys to go over that block with a fine toothed comb b4 shelling out all that money to put a new head on it and they said they did, but now I'm once again suspecting that there is a crack or something somewhere.

Might know something tomorrow.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

At this point just more comments: From the first post in now a two page thread this has been a nightmare as if I'm telling you something you aren't living. Already said that somewhere along the way this engine should never have been a "core" to work with from the get go. I don't know of this as always being a problem engine but never say never. Car makers have managed to make engine that virtually ALL of a type went bad from new in short order mostly long ago now.

* I'm not convinced anyone has assertively tried to mess you up, perhaps even the seller back last Fall. It certainly doesn't please anyone techs or a shop to fail.

* The block has to be junk along with the multiple tries. Even machine shops aren't perfect. The most invisable flaws could be missed. Perhaps just in tightening this poor thing back up brings out a hairline flaw that magically goes unnoticed. Again I'm a bit surprised after so many attempts that you haven't been advised to dump this engine for another. By the time the same problem shows up so many times I dare say most techs should have said something.

* The oil leak again. Holy crap. Whatever or wherever the flaw is, is still there. Is the replacement head bad - maybe - they make cars new that have problems, even Toyota that historically has been very careful not to produce a flawed design IMO.

+ Been out of this for ages now but not all has changed with gremlins like this. Assorted things would happen multiple times much more basic than this.

A Story of it with a design flaw not this car IMO: Late 70s Dodge Aspen, Plymouth Volare 6 cyl. from new would stall on a left turn if foot off gas. Obvious lack of fuel issues. Had one I fought with till the cows came home. Rebuilt carb (most cars were then) set everything right and it did the same frickin thing. OK - Dump that carb for another completely. SAME thing! OK - defect. On a few (only took a few minutes to swap those out) and I'm going nuts, parts supplier going nuts so changed it to another brand of carb completly and it STILL did it.

The answer with that is some whacked design flaw and all was good otherwise so the answer was to just raise idle and they didn't do that but live with a higher idle than most would like. Later came to find out almost all of them made did the same thing! What was a hair puller is the exact engine had been made in its basics for ages before that without this problem? Near killed me to figure that all out. Those were very popular vehicles so any subsequent complaints of the same issue was just turning an idle screw and all was well. Arggh!

* You've just run in to a not so funny comedy of the missing link with this disaster.

**** I default to say the core of this engine is flawed somehow along with bad luck. For all this work repeatedly I'm deeming this engine no good to continue with from this long history of repeated same problem that it has.

Again - It's up to you but I would bail out of this car.

Sorry for you and actually sorry for the shop too but they should have been thru a nightmare before and advised you to give up on that engine back now a long time ago. My opinion. Good luck,

Tom

Response From funkeytoad

Turns out the oil leak was not the head gasket this time but the o-ring on the distributor. I thought that this could be a possibility when I took it in because this was on the drivers side, not where it had leaked b4 from the head gasket all those times on the passenger side of the engine. Shop owner said that head gasket set should have come with this O-ring but didn't so they didn't change it b4. He said head gasket is sealed tight.

Oil burning issue he said is from #4 cylinder piston rings being either stuck or cracked. It's a disapointment after spending so much to get this thing right but what can ya do? If I had ever thought that the rings might be bad I would have bit the bullet and had them replaced as well when the new head went on but for now I guess I will have to live with it because I'm just about broke throwing money at this car. I hate to but I may end up selling it some time this summer.

I never thought any of the techs were hosing me over on this saga. I knew they were doing their best, the 1st one tried but I left feeling like this was beyond his abilities to a degree but this was a back lot garage. After taking it to a higher end garage they said that there were missing bolts in places and that even the head bolts were a mixed match of different kinds (I hand delivered a box of expensive head bolts to that guy on his last attempt) so I don't know how that happened. In the end that 1st guy was just done with it and wanted me to go away and I did just that a little bit wiser. You get what you pay for.

The guy I bought the car from did hose me. I have no doubt in my mind that dude, after his rebuild ran the piss out of that car and probably had fun doing it untill he went too far one day and over heated it. Then he parked it out front and put a 4 sale sign in the window. Heck I remember him telling me that he was looking for his next project, a toyota supra that he planned to do a build on. I'm sure he is tearing one up right now and when he is done with it he will dump it like b4.

Thanks for posting your wisdom Tom and God bless ya!

Response From Tom Greenleaf

OK - we should close this up soon. An "O" ring should be easy enough. A cracked ring if so means trouble but just stuck might be able to deal with without tearing into it AGAIN. An awful lot of money and effort has gone into making this right for sure.

Suggestion: Next time you buy a used vehicle, pay for a thorough, professional check of the vehicle as a whole. Any seller that doesn't let you do that pass on that vehicle just because of that. Seems to be a 'sellers' market right now. Prices are up for used stuff and hard to find good stuff. The super good stuff usually stays in a family or passed on to friends (scary thing to do if problems come along) and goes fast. Tough right now and has been for this market.

Again, good luck. Life - seems after a spell of bad luck it turns around eventually............ then buy a lottery ticket!

Tom Greenleaf

Response From funkeytoad


I appears that you have a very bad case of misdiagnosis.

I can't tell you that is is so rare for a head gasket to leak oil externally that i haven't seen one doing that in many, many years. That oil has to be coming from somewhere else, whether it be a cracked block or something else that they are just not seeing but head gaskets just don't do that.
link deleted ............. not allowed

This is the you tube link that shows exactly what I'm going through.

Response From Hammer Time

If you really, truly still have ahead gasket leaking, then that means that whomever did the engine in the first place never decked the top of the block and the block surface is not flat.

Response From funkeytoad


If you really, truly still have ahead gasket leaking, then that means that whomever did the engine in the first place never decked the top of the block and the block surface is not flat.

That may be true, I don't know. I also don't know why this site blocked my link to the you tube vid that showed this very thing. The link is called Toyota Corolla oil leak #1. You should take the time to watch it. This is a tech like you who posted the vid to give a heads up about this issue on this engine (same as mine). He is doing a rebuild with a brand new block and head and STILL has an oil leak in the same area I have had until he went with a thicker gasket.

Response From Hammer Time

If you had read the FORUM RULES, you would already know why you link was deleted. The only links that you are allowed to post are your own pictures or videos.

Response From funkeytoad


To do a compression test you just take a spark plug out and hook the adapter to a spark plug hole. It's pretty simple and something you could probably do.

I wonder if any of the other valves are leaking? If so, that's where your oil could be going.

I watched them do the test on my failed #1 cylinder back in Oct so I at least seen it done. It looked simple enough although I'm not sure of what reading would be good on this car.

Update today, checked oil this morning and it remains exactly on the full line again! Been almost 2 weeks since oil change and my oil level has not gone down even a little. I looked closely at the oil while wiping it off dip stick and it looked A okay. I'm not sure yet, but this graphite gasket might have sealed itself. The coolant was still full and there was no more white stuff on the rad cap. I hate to start hoping but this discovery today was the best B-day gift I got today.

I will wash the engine this weekend and keep a close eye on the area where I saw oil seeping (again) after the 1st few days after graphite gasket went on. That will tell me what is going on, either the gasket HAS sealed off the leaking or there is something else (coolant) getting in there that is keeping the level at full.

Response From Hammer Time


what I DID do was try and help the guy in anyway I could. I payed for all the parts, the head being machined, after the 3rd time back and on. I even asked questions like, " are we sure the head/block doesn't have cracks?"

Do you mean that you supplied the parts? And you think you were helping him?


I'm SURE this guy was sick of seeing me and my car. I was sick of seeing him! Aside from being sick of trying to find someone to follow me over there to drop the car off and take me home, then find a ride to work for 2-3 days, then finding a ride back over there to pick it up again. I don't feel a bit sorry for him.


You sound more like the customer from Hell. My sympathy is shifting to him.

Response From funkeytoad



what I DID do was try and help the guy in anyway I could. I payed for all the parts, the head being machined, after the 3rd time back and on. I even asked questions like, " are we sure the head/block doesn't have cracks?"

Do you mean that you supplied the parts? And you think you were helping him?


I'm SURE this guy was sick of seeing me and my car. I was sick of seeing him! Aside from being sick of trying to find someone to follow me over there to drop the car off and take me home, then find a ride to work for 2-3 days, then finding a ride back over there to pick it up again. I don't feel a bit sorry for him.



You sound more like the customer from Hell. My sympathy is shifting to him.

I did not start this topic to find any sympathy, lol. I only started it in hope that someone on here might have had a simular issue with this type of engine, or someone who might know of what could be causing this.

When I talked about helping this mechanic.... The price to do this job included parts, that was in my warranty. He assured me that the issue was the head gasket, if so I felt that the head gaskets he was using were not working. so I did a little research on line and found a video on you tube of a mechanic that had the same exact issue with the same exact engine. He said in the vid that a graphite gasket was the only thing that stopped his oil leak. So I supplied these gaskets and new head bolts (because he was still reusing the old ones) plus anything else he needed. Do I feel like I was doing all I could to help him solve this problem? YES. I knew that getting the head machined would come at my cost but I figured that they must have been missing something so I payed to have it done. I figured this was helping to try and solve it.

I can not begin to imagine how you think in anyway that I was the customer from hell??

Response From funkeytoad


I appears that you have a very bad case of misdiagnosis.

I can't tell you that is is so rare for a head gasket to leak oil externally that i haven't seen one doing that in many, many years. That oil has to be coming from somewhere else, whether it be a cracked block or something else that they are just not seeing but head gaskets just don't do that.

Well, that has been my biggest fear (a cracked block). You are probably right and I thank you for taking the time to post. If this is truly the real problem then I have never been more ripped off on a car in my life. I suppose that if it is a cracked block I would be better ahead to just have a new engine installed? If so, then I would probably end up spending as much money on the engine + install then I payed for the car in the 1st place. Would it be cheaper to just buy a new block?

Response From Hammer Time

You're getting ahead of yourself again. Cracked blocks are not common either so you really need to find out exactly what the real problem is. If nobody is able to find the actual issue, then I suppose another engine may be the answer but i really can't understand why nobody can diagnose thise correctly. They can put U/V dye in the oil if it's necessary but it's not impossible to find the right problem.

Response From funkeytoad

Thank you for the advice. I know that I sound like I'm getting ahead of myself here but I am already out at least $800.00 so far getting this oil leak fixed and I am beyond frustraited. I guess at this point I'm afraid that another garage is going to end up taking me for more money. I did talk to another mechanic this week who thought it far more likely that the head would have hair line cracks than would the block but then this was the mechanic who gave me a quote of $1.200.00 just to replace the head gasket back in Oct. The only good thing right now for me is that the graphite gasket has this leak at more of a slow seep then what it was before so it is not making such a mess. Hopefully it will stay this way until I can save up the money to go through this again.

93 Toyota Camry

Showing 2 out of 6 Posts | Show 4 Hidden Posts
Question From piman02 on 93 Toyota Camry

I have a 4 cylinder Camry that is getting oil in one of the spark plug holes. Question...is it the head gasket or or is it the piston rings and all that good stuff?

Response From Tom Greenleaf

I don't know if Toyota made a hemi head engine for that car. If plugs are on top it's a hemi. If plugs are just on the front it's a wedge engine. Wish I could just look at this but here are some tricks to try.

* Pull that plug wire and get the oil out with paper towels - Leave the plug in. If you can get rid of oily rags or whatever - burn them if you can safely.

* Check torque of valve cover. It's probably 10mm bolts and tighten to a reasonable "screwdriver" tight. Don't go overboard - too tight can break things and cause leaks!! Use a nut driver type tool - it's hands for this. If they seem ok.....

* You may just need a valve cover gasket. A Hemi head gasket set should come with seals for the plugs to keep oil out. They should be in the package for this.

* Another important test is that the engine crankcase has about 1hg of vacuum - that the PCV system makes happen. You can check this a couple ways. A vacuum gauge on the dipstick tube - safest. Or with a slightly warm engine (before cooling fans come on or when they are off - turn off defrost and A/C) hold a lit cigarette over that dipstick tube and see the smoke - it should go down the tube. An incense stick would work too or just give someone a quarter for a cigarette if you don't smoke. (Creative auto diagnostics!!)

** If it won't suck down smoke or has no vacuum, then the PCV valve and that system should be checked. If it's full of sludge and you haven't cared for the car that's NOT good. Other causes are the valve cover gasket, bad oil cap, leaking oil pan gasket or a worn engine with more blow-by the rings than the PCV system can overcome. If this is true is the beginning of the end of that engine if proven so. Depending on how bad if so you might still get a long time out of it.

Hope that gets you fixed up, - T

Response From piman02

Tom,

I wish I could send you some pictures, but the Camry has four tubes that appear to go down to where the head is and the spark plugs go down into the tubes and then you tighten the plugs. These tubes also help to hold the valve cover gasket in place and also help to hold the valve cover down. On the top of these tubes are nuts, you have to use a 31MM socket to tighten or loosen these nuts. I know that it is not my head gasket because there is no coolant in the oil, just the oil in the one tube where the spark plug, and spark plug boot are. I hope this makes sense.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Doesn't really matter what type of cylinder head. The valve cover job is basically the same if you want to do that. Wish I could take one look at this engine and I'd know what you should do. If you want just get the oil out for now and see how long it takes to return.

If it's running well just check some of the things I mentioned in my last post on this. Don't remove the spark plug without getting most of the oil out if you need to. I'm a bit confused what the 31mm stuff is right now.
FYI: The valve cover gasket should be pretty cheap. Cleaning of the surfaces is important if you do this and be gentle on aluminum/alloy parts to no gouge them with any gasket scraper if needed at all.

Is this car in good shape or what condition would you call it. How far do you want to go with this. I don't think any of your problems are big $ at this point. - T

Response From piman02

Yes, the car is in very good shape for a 93, and the car has 179,000 miles on it. The car has been taken care of and so forth. The 31MM socket is for the nuts that you tighten to hold the valve cover down, or loosen to remove the valve cover. These nuts are located at the top of the tubes, and valve cover where the spark plugs go down into. Do you have a regular e-mail so I can send you a picture of what I am talking about?

Response From Tom Greenleaf Top Rated Answer

Sure - TEFeuilleVerte@Comcast.net which is also early in the memberlist here and I've left it there too. I may be able to see what you are talking about by looking at a 99 Camry four but I think they changed some things. 93 was a change year for a lot of things in cars. It makes it tricky. Some were built in 92 and some later in 93.

I cut my work down to a minimum in 93 so I didn't buy more tools books etc. For the most part cars are still using the same basics for decades. If you can send a pic it would help. If you can just send the pic without tricks as I'm NOT a computer geek. I depend on a neighbor for all my IT needs which is well set up but I struggle with some stuff.

In general it's best to stay on the site as many techs will see your questions. Check out the products available too. If you do your own work and need some stuff worth some $$ you do help a site that offers use of the forum for free. Many places/states don't sales tax mail ordered goods so it's worth checking out. I think it's the way of the future. Small cheap parts are impractical to mail order. FYI - I don't make a dime from this!! - T

1996 toyota tacoma running hot

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Question From sleepy on 1996 toyota tacoma running hot

1996 toyota tacoma running hot and my heater blowing cold air, changed out thermostat and block is not getting water to it. I can pour water in my top hose directly into block and it helps for a while

Response From Hammer Time Top Rated Answer

I edited your question into the body rather than the title.


You're not getting all the air bled out of the system. You could also have a blow head gasket pumping it right backk in.

Response From sleepy

I appreciate it, that's what I figured. Just didn't want to admit it!