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The Following brands are available based on your search.

  • ACDelco
    ACDelco
  • Apex
    Apex
  • DJ Rock
    DJ Rock
  • Elring
    Elring
  • Ishino Stone
    Ishino Stone
  • Nippon Reinz
    Nippon Reinz
  • Victor Gaskets
    Victor Gaskets
  • Victor Reinz
    Victor Reinz

Best Selling Genuine Saab Head Gaskets

  • We Stock the following top leading brands, including Victor Gaskets, Ishino Stone, Nippon Reinz, ACDelco, Victor Reinz, Elring
  • Constantly Updated Inventory of Saab Replacement Head Gasket Parts

We stock Head Gasket parts for most Saab models, including 93, 95, 900, 9000.


Victor Gaskets
2005 Saab 9-2X Engine Cylinder Head Gasket 4 Cyl 2.0L Victor Gaskets

P311-25F6D78    54467  New

26537 PT , 11044 AA482 , 11044 AA483

Qty:
26.32
Victor Gaskets Engine Cylinder Head Gasket
  • Engine Cylinder Head Gasket
  • ; Multi-Layered Steel
  • Product Attributes:
    • Additional Package Contents: Head Gasket
    • Cylinder Bore Diameter:
      • 3.63
      • 92.15
    • Cylinder Head Gasket Material: Multi-layered Steel
    • Gasket Sealant Included: No
    • Item Grade: Oem Standard
    • Material: Multi-layered Steel
    • Package Quantity: 1
    • Thickness:
      • 0.02
      • 0.55
  • MAHLE® gaskets provide world class sealing products trusted by OEMs & Technicians around the globe.
  • Suggested Purchase Quantity: 2
    • Most jobs typically require 2 of this item.
Brand: Victor Gaskets
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
2005 - Saab 9-2X H 4 Cyl 2.0L - 1994
Victor Gaskets
2009 Saab 9-7x Engine Cylinder Head Gasket 8 Cyl 6.0L Victor Gaskets

P311-1C8C2D3    54445  New

12 58 9227 , 1161R , 12558936 , 9199 PT , 12589227 , 1161L , 26192 PT

Qty:
52.39
Victor Gaskets Engine Cylinder Head Gasket
  • Engine Cylinder Head Gasket
  • ; Multi-Layered Steel
  • Product Attributes:
    • Additional Package Contents: Head Gasket
    • Cylinder Bore Diameter:
      • 104.14
      • 4.10
    • Cylinder Head Gasket Material: Multi-layered Steel
    • Gasket Sealant Included: No
    • Item Grade: Oem Standard
    • Material: Multi-layered Steel
    • Package Quantity: 1
    • Thickness:
      • 0.05
      • 1.35
    • Torque To Yield: Yes
  • MAHLE® gaskets provide world class sealing products trusted by OEMs & Technicians around the globe.
  • Suggested Purchase Quantity: 2
    • Most jobs typically require 2 of this item.
Brand: Victor Gaskets
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
2009 - Saab 9-7x V 8 Cyl 6.0L 364 5967
Victor Gaskets
2009 Saab 9-7x Engine Cylinder Head Gasket 8 Cyl 5.3L Victor Gaskets

P311-3E68FED    54442  New

12558809 , 12589226 , 8-12589-226-0 , 1160R , 12558810 , 9284 PT , 26190 PT , 1160L , 88894342 , 12 58 9226

Qty:
43.65
Victor Gaskets Engine Cylinder Head Gasket
  • Engine Cylinder Head Gasket
  • ; Multi-Layered Steel Consolidated MLS Design
  • Product Attributes:
    • Additional Package Contents: Head Gasket
    • Cylinder Bore Diameter:
      • 100.20
      • 3.95
    • Cylinder Head Gasket Material: Multi-layered Steel
    • Gasket Sealant Included: No
    • Item Grade: Oem Standard
    • Material: Multi-layered Steel
    • Package Quantity: 1
    • Thickness:
      • 0.05
      • 1.22
    • Torque To Yield: Yes
  • MAHLE® gaskets provide world class sealing products trusted by OEMs & Technicians around the globe.
  • Suggested Purchase Quantity: 2
    • Most jobs typically require 2 of this item.
Brand: Victor Gaskets
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
2009 - Saab 9-7x V 8 Cyl 5.3L 325 5328
Victor Gaskets
2001 Saab 9-3 Engine Cylinder Head Gasket 4 Cyl 2.3L Victor Gaskets

P311-43B40F0    54630  New

59 60 083 , 59 55 174 , 26428 PT

Qty:
44.08
Victor Gaskets Engine Cylinder Head Gasket
  • Engine Cylinder Head Gasket
  • ; Multi-Layered Steel
  • Product Attributes:
    • Additional Package Contents: Head Gasket
    • Cylinder Bore Diameter:
      • 3.60
      • 91.36
    • Cylinder Head Gasket Material: Multi-layered Steel
    • Gasket Sealant Included: No
    • Item Grade: Oem Standard
    • Material: Multi-layered Steel
    • Package Quantity: 1
    • Thickness:
      • 0.02
      • 0.53
    • Torque To Yield: Yes
  • MAHLE® gaskets provide world class sealing products trusted by OEMs & Technicians around the globe.
Brand: Victor Gaskets
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
2001 - Saab 9-3 L 4 Cyl 2.3L 140 2290
Ishino Stone
2006 Saab 9-2X Engine Cylinder Head Gasket Ishino Stone

P311-3C26C8A    W0133-1837910  New

Qty:
39.54
Ishino Stone Engine Cylinder Head Gasket
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
Brand: Ishino Stone
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Aspiration
2006 - Saab 9-2X Naturally Aspirated
Ishino Stone
2006 Saab 9-2X Engine Cylinder Head Gasket Ishino Stone

P311-3C26C8A    W0133-1837910  New

Qty:
39.54
Ishino Stone Engine Cylinder Head Gasket
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Multi-Layered Steel
Brand: Ishino Stone
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Aspiration
2006 - Saab 9-2X Naturally Aspirated
Nippon Reinz
2006 Saab 9-2X Engine Cylinder Head Gasket Nippon Reinz

P311-35CF77A    W0133-1910708  New

Qty:
46.32
Nippon Reinz Engine Cylinder Head Gasket
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
Brand: Nippon Reinz
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Aspiration
2006 - Saab 9-2X Turbocharged
ACDelco
2006 Saab 9-3 Engine Cylinder Head Gasket 6 Cyl 2.8L ACDelco

P311-16A6F11    W0133-1919389  New

Qty:
54.59
ACDelco Engine Cylinder Head Gasket
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Genuine GM
  • ; Firewall Side
Brand: ACDelco
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
2006 - Saab 9-3 V 6 Cyl 2.8L 170 2792
Victor Reinz
2008 Saab 9-3 Engine Cylinder Head Gasket 6 Cyl 2.8L Victor Reinz

P311-26EC99D    W0133-1919389  New

Qty:
131.40
Victor Reinz Engine Cylinder Head Gasket
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • ; Firewall Side
Brand: Victor Reinz
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
2008 - Saab 9-3 V 6 Cyl 2.8L 170 2792
ACDelco
2009 Saab 9-3 Engine Cylinder Head Gasket 6 Cyl 2.8L ACDelco

P311-16A6F11    W0133-1919389  New

Qty:
54.59
ACDelco Engine Cylinder Head Gasket
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Genuine GM
  • ; Firewall Side
Brand: ACDelco
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
2009 - Saab 9-3 V 6 Cyl 2.8L 170 2792
ACDelco
2011 Saab 9-5 Engine Cylinder Head Gasket 6 Cyl 2.8L ACDelco

P311-16A6F11    W0133-1919389  New

Qty:
54.59
ACDelco Engine Cylinder Head Gasket
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Genuine GM
Brand: ACDelco
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
2011 - Saab 9-5 V 6 Cyl 2.8L 170 2792
Victor Reinz
2011 Saab 9-5 Engine Cylinder Head Gasket 6 Cyl 2.8L Victor Reinz

P311-26EC99D    W0133-1919389  New

Qty:
131.40
Victor Reinz Engine Cylinder Head Gasket
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Firewall Side
Brand: Victor Reinz
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
2011 - Saab 9-5 V 6 Cyl 2.8L 170 2792
ACDelco
2011 Saab 9-5 Engine Cylinder Head Gasket 6 Cyl 2.8L ACDelco

P311-56C9513    W0133-1930592  New

Qty:
37.68
ACDelco Engine Cylinder Head Gasket
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Genuine GM
Brand: ACDelco
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
2011 - Saab 9-5 V 6 Cyl 2.8L 170 2792
Victor Reinz
2002 Saab 9-5 Engine Cylinder Head Gasket 4 Cyl 2.3L Victor Reinz

P311-286E9CC    W0133-1621890  New

Qty:
69.53
Victor Reinz Engine Cylinder Head Gasket
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
Brand: Victor Reinz
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
2002 - Saab 9-5 L 4 Cyl 2.3L 140 2290
Victor Reinz
1987 Saab 900 Engine Cylinder Head Gasket Victor Reinz

P311-356F854    W0133-1633485  New

Qty:
26.74
Victor Reinz Engine Cylinder Head Gasket
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
Brand: Victor Reinz
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Aspiration
1987 - Saab 900 Turbocharged
Victor Reinz
1994 Saab 900 Engine Cylinder Head Gasket Victor Reinz

P311-17865A1    W0133-1629972  New

Qty:
40.61
Victor Reinz Engine Cylinder Head Gasket
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
Brand: Victor Reinz
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Engine Designation
1994 - Saab 900 B212I
Victor Reinz
1995 Saab 900 Engine Cylinder Head Gasket 4 Cyl 2.0L Victor Reinz

P311-3C920D5    W0133-1628772  New

Qty:
33.89
Victor Reinz Engine Cylinder Head Gasket
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
Brand: Victor Reinz
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
1995 - Saab 900 L 4 Cyl 2.0L - 1985
Victor Reinz
2003 Saab 9-3 Engine Cylinder Head Gasket Victor Reinz

P311-3EA544A    W0133-1795480  New

Qty:
57.16
Victor Reinz Engine Cylinder Head Gasket
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
Brand: Victor Reinz
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Engine Designation
2003 - Saab 9-3 B207R
Elring
2000 Saab 9-5 Engine Cylinder Head Gasket 6 Cyl 3.0L Elring

P311-3B882E9    W0133-1720346  New

Qty:
18.08
Elring Engine Cylinder Head Gasket
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • ; Chas: Y3040001-
Brand: Elring
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC Chassis Range
2000 - Saab 9-5 V 6 Cyl 3.0L 181 2961 Y3040001 and up
Elring
2002 Saab 9-5 Engine Cylinder Head Gasket 6 Cyl 3.0L Elring

P311-3B882E9    W0133-1720346  New

Qty:
18.08
Elring Engine Cylinder Head Gasket
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
Brand: Elring
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
2002 - Saab 9-5 V 6 Cyl 3.0L 181 2961

Latest Car Advice

CarJunky AutoAdvice

loosing anti-freeze

Showing 2 out of 2 Posts
Question From dmartin1953 on loosing anti-freeze

I have a 2003 Saab 93 that is loosing anti-freeze. Dealer says it could be a leaking head gasket. Does not appear to be leaking in driveway or when idling. If head gasket is cracked and fluid is mixing with oil, shouldn't oil level rise on dip stick? Any suggestions on what to do? Would replacing the thermostat and changing oil be a way to tell? Thanks for any help!!!!

Response From Loren Champlain Sr Top Rated Answer

dmartin; Head gaskets seldom leak externally, so you usually won't see any 'puddles'. They will, most of the time, leak into the exhaust ports, so the water will get burned and exit the exhaust as steam. If the exhaust is getting into the cooling system, it will super heat the coolant and you'll have overheating issues. Very simple test for that. Either with a chemical or with an exhaust analyzer. If the head gasket blows into an oil jacket, then you will get coolant into the crankcase which will destroy the engine in a heartbeat.

Saab 900s '96 loses coolant

Showing 2 out of 2 Posts
Question From poogod on Saab 900s '96 loses coolant

Issue started: on the highway after driving a constant 75 mph or so for about 80 miles or so. The check engine light started blinking rapidly. No performance drops or anything like that.

1996
SAAB
900s
engine - 2.3L (i think)
miles - 150k - 160k

My SAAB 900s leaks coolant very quickly. When the car is on, bubbles seem to appear in the coolant tank. The tank will go from full to bone-dry empty in around 2-3 miles of driving. It only seems to lose coolant while the car is on, and the coolant ends up splattered all over the engine bay, although running the engine and watching it I can't find any visible leaks. With a leak this rapid I know that no stop leak type fluid will permanently fix it, so I'm really just popping this here to get a rough idea of what it might be and a general idea what kind of cost I should be expecting

Response From Tom Greenleaf Top Rated Answer

?? You may need to wipe down the soaked engine + areas/items around, refill as best you can and watch from cold for leaks. If it got all over engine it is either leaking on something moving or in path of a fan like at radiator. Pressure testing would help too. If nothing found and it holds pressure it could be head gasket troubles and tricky to diagnose at first sometimes.

How much depends on what's wrong, if damage has occurred and it being a $AAB means at least double for most anything it might need,

T

Oil in the Reservoir

Showing 3 out of 35 Posts | Show 32 Hidden Posts
Question From P0E2005 on Oil in the Reservoir

Ok. Unique situation. My brother lived about 5 hours north of me. And moved back in with me recently. The plan was to drive up. Get his car up and running (It had been sitting for about 6 months due to expired tags) And him follow me down.

(2000 Saturn LS2 by the way)

Alas! Upon just checking his coolant level. I encountered a thick, milky black oil, that smelled like engine oil. My first thought "Oh god! Head Gasket" so I flushed it all out. And re-filled the reservoir. And started it up. It Idled ok. No water out of the Tail pipe. Pulled the dipstick, and the Oil level was ok. Didn't look milky or watery. So then I popped the cap off the coolant reservoir to see if any exhaust bubbles were being released in the water.

And here comes the oil. You could watch it rise. Eventually over flowing and just running down the side.

Any ideas? See, the main issue is the car being in his friend's yard 300 miles away. Hard to trouble shoot it. I am running off memory here, and any advice you guys have will be taken into effect upon my trip BACK up next week. It's just rough. I ONLY have Saturday and Sunday off, and with Most mechanics being closed Sunday's I pretty much just have Saturday to work with. So at least a vague Idea would be so great.

Head Gasket? Head? Block? Radiator? Any help yould be appreciated.

Response From Hammer Time

That's not going to be a head gasket. It's going to be a cracked head. Those DOHC are notorious for that and that's about the only way you get oil in the coolant. Head gaskets don't generally do that.

Response From Discretesignals

Oil cooler is probably leaking. The 3.0L is known for that.

Its located in between the cylinder heads under the intake.

?1306112426

Response From P0E2005

Alright guys. You have all been really helpful so far. As soon as I find out more details I will let you know.

Basically praying for something that doesn't lead to buying a new motor :/

Response From Discretesignals

I remember reading an article in Motor Age where they had a Saturn with your symptoms. Found a link to the article if you want to read about it.

http://www.searchautoparts.com/motorage/maintenance-repair/out-production?page=0,0

Response From Tom Greenleaf

P0E2005 : No matter what you find it's better to know. ATF (usually reddish) could turn dark if mixed with coolant but generally not so fast. Also know that all the 'rubber' products in cooling system won't like oil in them and ATF is an oil.

Just factor that even if expensive to stop the oil invasion. You could just feel some cooling system hoses and note they are way too soft or perhaps lucky and not enough time to have done that.

Hard stuff at a distance like that to know the best attack. Fix there or somehow get it back locally. Lots is not fun or cheap on top of fixing the problem!

T

Response From P0E2005

Well guys, I have a buddy with a Blazer and a tow bar. So I believe next weekend we're going to run up and haul it back down here where we can actually work with it.

IF it is the Oil Cooler, any of you guys have an idea of about how much that will cost?

Response From Hammer Time

IF it is the Oil Cooler, any of you guys have an idea of about how much that will cost?

Alldata says 5.2 hours

Response From P0E2005

Ok guys, I have another question. I am shopping around for this "Oil Cooler" Online, and upon entering the make and model of the car, the only results are a TRANSMISSION oil cooler. And it doesn't look like the Cooler pictured in the above Diagram, or the Article in the link above. Am I not searching for the right thing?

Response From nickwarner

I went on Ebay and typed 2000 Saturn engine oil cooler. Found several of them, all AC Delco and new. About $190 for any of them.

Response From P0E2005

See, I didn't try Ebay. I don't understand why I can only find it there, none of the other reputable Auto parts sites have it, they have a Transmission oil cooler that runs about $70.

Response From nickwarner

that would do your transmission fine and do nothing to help your engine. Square pegs don't fit in round holes. This engine isn't a small block chevy. Parts aren't cheap and plentiful everywhere you look for them.

Response From Discretesignals

Rockauto sells just the engine oil cooler assembly

AC Delco p/n 13101668

Response From P0E2005

Ok, I am finding it with that part number now. Awesome! :D

I just wish that the ONLY mechanic within distance to service the car was as smart as you guys are.

Here's an excerpt from the conversation on the phone with him:

Him: "Well the cooler would be a Transmission oil cooler, and attached to the radiator, so just buy the whole radiator, they should come together."

Me: "Well....From what I am finding there is a separate engine ENGINE oil cooler, under the intake between the heads. I believe that's what's ruptured."

Him: "Well....If it's separate it wouldn't be causing your oil in the water, because usually the radiator is cracked and it leaks that way..."

Lord help me... :/

Response From nickwarner Top Rated Answer

Your engine is a Saab design and not a whole lot of them around, so a local independant shop may have never seen this setup before. I've never seen one like it on any of the other engines I've worked on. Go figure the whole brand was discontinued and small wonder why. If there is a shop that specializes in european cars you may find someone who knows exactly what you're talking about.

Response From Double J

We used to get the Cateras in all the time with blown engine oil coolers




General Motors' Opel subsidiary in Europe designed a compact V6 engine with an odd 54° vee angle. It was an iron block/aluminum head DOHC design with 4 valves per cylinder. All 54° engines were assembled at Ellesmere Port in England.
This engine was used in American models as well. The engine was reworked substantially between the 3.0 L L81 and 3.2 L LA3, but the bore centers and deck height were retained. In its 3.0 L form, this engine was notable for recalls of all units installed in Cadillac Cateras due to timing belt tensioner bearing failures, which could cause catastrophic damage to the engine because of its interference design



L81 3.0
The L81 was used longitudinally in Cadillac Catera and transversely in the Saturn L-Series, Saturn Vue, Saab 9-5 and Saab 9000. Bore and stroke were 86 mm (3.38 in) × 85 mm (3.35 in), for 2962 cc (180.75 cu in) displacement. with 10.8:1 compression, the engine produced between 182 hp (136 kW) and 208 hp (155 kW) with 190 lb·ft (258 N·m) to 199 lb·ft (270 N·m).
Saab's turbocharged version (referred to by Saab as 'B308') for the Saab 9-5 produced 200 hp (149 kW) at 5000 rpm and 229 lb·ft (310 N·m) at 2500-4000 rpm. The engine was unique in that an asymmetrical turbocharging method was employed with the turbocharger using the exhaust gases from one bank of cylinders and produced a charge pressure of 3.6PSI (.25 Bar) using a Garrett GT17 turbo. Saab equipped the engine with a special version of Saab Direct Ignition and utilized the Trionic T7 engine management system.
This engine was used in:

  • 1997–2001 Cadillac Catera
  • 1996–2000 Opel Sintra Vauxhall Sintra
  • 1995–2000 Opel Omega Vauxhall Omega
  • 1995–1997 Saab 9000
  • 1997–2003 Saab 9-5 (turbocharged)
  • 2000–2005 Saturn L-Series
  • 2002–2003 Saturn Vue

  • Response From P0E2005

    Ok guys, I'm stuck between a rock and a hard place here, and I need some advice.

    I got in touch with a local mechanic, who agreed to use his truck to come and tow the car back to his shop, and look at it for us. AMAZING! Right?

    Well, I made the mistake of saying, "We need to see if we can save it or have to junk it", and it turns out, Mr. Friendly Mechanic ALSO....Junks cars.

    Now that he has the car, I dunno if he's being honest, or trying to get me to scrap the car, or if he's just stupid!

    He called me and said : "I don't really know where the oil is coming from, but with that, the poor interior, and cracked windsheild, I would just scrap it."

    Me: "Have you ruled out a cracked Block or head gasket yet?"

    Him: "No, I can't do that unless I tear it down, replace the gasket, and it still may not fix the problem."

    Me: "Well...General consensus is the oil cooler, I believe that's the problem, can you look at that and see if it's the problem?"

    Him: "Where is the oil Cooler?"

    Me: "Under the intake, between the heads."

    Him: "I can tear it down, probably $150 labor. But if I do get the part out I won't know if it's leaking."

    Me: "You...can apply some air pressure...with some soapy water...and see if it's leaking..."

    Him: "Yea I could do that."

    So that's what's going to happen, $150 for him to get to the part. I am afraid he's conning me. Gonna charge us $150, Tell us it's NOT the problem. And then recommend scrapping, and with the labor we owe him....Get a free car basically...

    What do you guys think? He IS my only option, there is no moving the car, You think he's just stupid? Or conning me?

    Response From nickwarner

    I scrap cars too, and I still give the truth to my customers. I wonder if this guy is though. Seems like he has an eye for it or is incompetent. Either way he isn't the only option. Rent a u-haul dolly and get the thing out of there. Pay him for his time. Then get out of there. If he has to have you tell him there is a cooler under there and tell him how to test it you don't want him to do it.

    Response From P0E2005

    See, the car is 300 miles away. We have thought about renting a Uhaul and Dolly, but that plus round trip gas. If the car DID need to be scrapped. We'd end up in the hole.

    And he was the only choice because the car is in the middle of BFE Missouri, and he was the only mechanic within 50 miles, and agreed to tow it for us.

    I tell myself, that he is just a hometown MOzura Mechanic, used to fords and chevy's, and is maybe just a little confused by the foreign motor, and I HOPE that's all it is. As it stands now, He's pulling down to the part. He's supposed to let me know by wednesday. But I have news for him, In case he is slightly crooked, and is after a free scrap car. IF the oil cooler isn't the problem, which I know it is, but if he tells us it isn't.....I will pay him for his labor, and scrap that car with a competitor right outta his driveway.

    Response From nickwarner

    "If the car needed to be scrapped we'd be in the hole."

    Cars aren't an investment unless you have a model T or a numbers matching Hemi Cuda with 50 miles. They are an expense. a 300 mile road trip isn't much, and worrying about gas mileage and a Uhaul is a minimal expense compared to the local Cletus in BFE tearing up an engine he knows nothing about.

    Get that car out now before he tears it up. He doesn't know what he's working on and will make your nightmare a reality with your wallet on the chopping block. Even if he puts it together who knows what may be surfacing down the road from his work. Pull the pin now and go get it or leave it there and see it recycled into new saran wrap and beer cans.

    Response From P0E2005

    Ok guys, He pulled down to the part, and said you could visibly see the crack with the naked eye. That it IS the problem. Thank goodness. All I need to do is order the part and an Intake gasket and the car will be ok.

    Now before I order this part, I am finding the AC Delco part # to be 13101668. You guys think that is correct? The part search on ACDelco says it fits my model. But for SOME reason Amazon is saying it won't, Figure Amazon may be wrong. You think I should just order it anyway?

    Response From P0E2005

    Links not allowed

    That is the actual link to the part I am wanting to buy.

    Response From P0E2005

    Well gee Hammertime, thanks for swinging by and removing that menacing link, and not to provide any input . lol



    And TECHNICALLY, as it was not clickable, it wasn't a link anyway. It was an address....Just sayin lol

    Response From Hammer Time

    Sarcasm isn't going to get you too far. The only links we allow is the photographs or youtube videos.

    Response From nickwarner

    The Delco number is the right one. Amazon and EBay don't fix cars, and I've seen their compatibilty charts a mile off regularly. Delco made the part, they know what the right number is.

    Response From P0E2005

    I'm sorry Hammertime, lol I was only messing with you. In all seriousness. I can't express to you guys how much you have helped me in this matter. For real. You guys do something really good here.

    I went ahead and ordered the part. It's on it's way there, and we'll see how it goes. :D

    Response From Hammer Time

    You think he's just stupid? Or conning me?

    Probably a little of both. I don't know how you came up with this choice but it sounds like it was a bad one.

    Response From Hammer Time

    Get a good Delco part number and try a search with that.

    Response From P0E2005

    And also, that article pretty much nails what we were experiencing.

    Response From P0E2005

    Oh god...Cracked head. That's a terrifying notion...We actually drove up to a nearby Mechanic and he did say that those engines had TONS of problems.

    If it is in the reservoir and mixed with water. How could I tell whether it's Oil or Tranny fluid? Judging by the color. I am worried it's Oil. But the oil level read ok.

    Also. After it filled with oil when we ran it. I killed it and flushed it again. Completely dry. And filled it back up. And DIDN'T start it up again. When I came back and checked the reservoir. The oil was there again. Without the car even running.....

    Response From Hammer Time

    The color is about the only way to tell between engine oil and trans fluid. The engine oil doesn't have to be low, it only takes a little oil to make a complete mess.

    Response From P0E2005

    See, It's kind of hard to explain. But this wasn't a small amount of oil. I had to throw down Kitty Litter. It was flowing out of the reservoir like a little oil volcano. Went everywhere. If there is a crack somewhere...it is substantial.

    Someone said since it is an Automatic it may have Engine oil coolant lines that may have broken near the radiator?

    Response From Hammer Time

    I don't believe your car has an engine oil cooler but if it does, that's entirely possible.
    Oil floats on water so even a small amount mixed with coolant will seem like a lot and it's very hard to get it all out.

    Response From Tom Greenleaf

    Is this car 5 hours away from you? A maybe is if automatic that trans fluid if it uses radiator could be leaking inside to engine coolant - at first would float and be expelled to recovery tank. You would see low trans fluid level with this amount so fast in front of you.

    This car is NOT up to that drive till fixed,

    T

    Response From P0E2005

    We left it there. That's what's making it difficult is that it is so far away and we can't move it till it's addressed.

    Stupid me didn't check the Transmission Fluid. But some of the "Oil" in the reservoir was jet black in color. I figured transmission fluid would be more reddish pink?

    If it is in fact Tranny fluid what would that indicate?

    Engine problem - White Smoke / Warranty question

    Showing 2 out of 4 Posts | Show 2 Hidden Posts
    Question From cubicleman on Engine problem - White Smoke / Warranty question

    2004 Suzuki XL7 - 54000 miles
    When car is left unused for a few days, upon starting the engine it makes a funny noise (for a second at startup)...it sounds like marbles grinding (main bearings?) and a puff of white smoke out the tailpipe. It doesn't seem to repeat when started again soon after. I'm past the normal warranty of 3 yr / 36k miles, but I think I have a 100k powertrain warranty. Assuming it's something internal to the engine is this something that should be covered under warranty? Note: I've changed the Oil/Filter every 5-7k miles (although I don't keep receipts), sometimes myself and sometimes a local indy. I also have been checking the oil but it doesn't appear to be down...maybe just a little. Any help / thoughts on what it might be and whether it should be covered under warranty is much appreciated. Also, any advice on how I should approach this with dealer...as I've had other things that I thought should be under warranty in past (things that for my Saab-->Saab dealer would typically just cover) but the Suzuki dealer always seems to find a way to charge me.

    Response From Double J

    hi.
    really not familiar with suzuki vehicles at all...
    Are you sure its not light blue smoke instead of white?
    Reason for asking,valve seals can cause light blue smoke on start up...see many on gm engines..
    where do you live ,region wise...its not just condensation smoke is it?
    As far as the noise,that could be the antilock brake unit running a self test...not sure tho...needs to be listened to by a certified mechanic...

    As far as warranty...dealer is going to have to inspect/diagnose before any warranty can be determined.
    they are going to have to find the cause of failure first.
    Is this the factory 100 k powertrain warranty or an extended warranty?
    factory probably covers things like seals and gaskets,extended warranties may or may not ,depending on your coverage...sometimes its an add on for seal and gaskets...sometimes they'll only cover seals and gaskets when having to go internal for a covered failed component.

    just some thoughts...

    JIM

    Response From cubicleman

    Jim/Tom, Sorry I haven't replied sooner. It looks like the smoke has a slight blue tone to it. I live in the Northeast (NJ). I think I have a 100k Powertrain warranty. I believe Suzuki utilizes GM Engines, so this might be the Valve Seals that you mentioned. The Car is a 2004 with a little over 50,000 miles.

    I haven't checked the coolant...I'll do so tomorrow, since the engine is hot right now. I thought the car called for 7500 mile Oil Changes and half that distance for Severe Use. My typical drive when I use the car is to / from work, ~30+miles each way although I'll occasionally drive it for short distance (to/from local store). My other car is a Saab, for which has a 15000 mile oil change limit, but due to the turbo I do it every 5000 and use Fully-synthetic oil. I'm not as meticulous with the Suzuki, but I think I keep it maintained OK (i.e. tuneups-15k, oil changes-5k, filter changes-15k, etc).

    Response From Tom Greenleaf Top Rated Answer

    That does sound like worn main bearings. Not sure about the color of smoke quite yet - is coolant down at all?

    5-7k oil changes is pretty close to abuse in my book!

    Just checked a common guide for oil change. It's based on normal and severe use. I let you know when I know someone who is NOT a severe use driver by what it said: Short trips, dusty, extended idling time, hot and cold extremes, trailer towing, - - - any of the above you are a severe schedule which means oil changing every 3 thousand miles. Ya - they other says 7500 miles is ok. Some vehicle can handle it, many do not.

    That's just oil change. If the white smoke is a head gasket - coolant in combustion chamber, changing oil really wouldn't cause or prevent that,

    T

    Tiny Bubbles in my coolant ... cooling system pressurizing

    Showing 2 out of 10 Posts | Show 8 Hidden Posts
    Question From 91 Isuzu 4ex1 on Tiny Bubbles in my coolant ... cooling system pressurizing

    Hi All,

    First post here. Have this nagging issue with our import, a 1991 Isuzu Stylus S with 1.6 SOHC 4-cylinder.

    Originally I thought I was simply replacing a leaking head gasket due to coolant and oil leaks around #4 cylinder.

    Removed the head and sent it to the shop for cleaning, checking and milling (shop replaced valve seals and cam seal from HG kit). Put it all back together and it burned 2 quarts of oil in 300 miles. Pulled it apart and removed and replaced the rings, honed the cylinders and re-installed the pistons.

    After replacing the head a second time it was still burning oil, and now there was a lot of heat coming from the cooling system.

    Removed the valve seals installed by the shop with new ones. Stopped burning oil. Noticed that pressurizing #4 while replacing the seals also pressurized the cooling system enough to force coolant out through the cap and hoses. Cylinders 3, 2 and 1 no problem.

    Cars runs OK, 200 lb compression on all 4 cylinders. Oil level is good, but oil is getting black faster than I would expect. Coolant may be entering the engine when running (probably #4?), but no white smoke, no external leaks and no coolant in the oil. If the coolant is 'evaporating' (humor) or being burned it isn't very much, almost imperceptible. NOTE: Car just passed its e-test with flying colors.

    I tried Irontite All Season sealant and that helped a little, but the engine is still pressurizing the cooling system. Coolant enters the recovery tank only when cold and the cap is released. BUT, coolant will not re-enter the rad from the recovery tank when cold.

    I've built a number of engines (mostly NA 6 and 8 cylinders) and never had this much trouble before sealing an engine or installing head gaskets.

    Question:

    What am I missing? a) head gasket (AGAIN??) b) cylinder head? or c) block?

    Response From re-tired

    Sounds like you have a bad head . Take the intake mainifold off and static fill cvooling system (not running) Pressurize one cyl at a time, spray a soapy solutuion into head via intake ports watch for fizz. The machine shop may have missed a hairline crack.

    Response From 91 Isuzu 4ex1

    Thanks for the reply. Really appreciate it.

    Was leaning toward a cylinder head problem when I arrived at the forum, primarily because the cooling system:

  • Slowly pressurized only on #4 when doing the valve seals
  • Pressurized immediately when the engine started from cold
  • And coolant did not return to the cooling system when cold
  • I've been 'chasing' two separate issues - burning oil and anti freeze residue (a very small amount) in the exhaust that I'd never seen before in 45 years of tinkering with cars. I was beginning to doubt myself as well as the work done by others. Assumed (there's that word!) that the shop checked the head properly. The shop knew that car had over 200,000 KMs on it when I tore it down.

    As I tried to figure out where this re-build had gone bad, I began looking at what I had and tried to eliminate the things that it couldn't be. I knew it would have to be one of three things: the block, the HG or the head. Since I had good compression on all cylinders it appeared that the HG was fine, and once the valve seals were replaced (twice) it stopped burning oil. At that point I figured that I could be faced with a bad block or head. That's when I tried Irontite to see if it would seal the crack, and it sort of worked, exhaust was not laden with any anti freeze moisture (funny, no white smoke though).

    Since my garage is somewhat limited, and some of the repairs I have done (although inexpensive to this point) have been by process of elimination (sensors for emissions as an example), I can only approach this last niggling problem by pulling the head (AGAIN) and replacing it with a known good one. If my garage was ready with air and such so I could do this as recommended I certainly would. I truly believe that doing it as recommended is the right thing to do, but without air it won't happen. And as I explained, we just moved and the compressor is over in a corner; - the garage needs to be wired, well you know the drill and now I'm whining, so I'll stop.

    When I take the head off, should I be able to see evidence of a crack from the water jacket to the interior of the cylinder, and what might it look like?

    The head and the intake have to go on together because of the way the common chamber wraps around the head. There's not a lot of room to get at the bolts that attach the intake to the head from behind; - everything, including the intake runner and common chamber makes getting at the bolts while the head is still on the car a nightmare.

    If it makes sense, I'll obtain a new head and swap it with the original and put it back together and see what happens. I'd take it somewhere and have it done, but my labor is cheap and money is also an issue or the garage would be better equipped to do this. New head is about $200+ shipping and core on eBay.

    Thoughts?

    (edited for clarity, not wishing to be argumentative)

    Response From Hammer Time

    I never saw any mention of overheating or coolant consumption here. That would be the main symptom of a compression leak to the cooling system. It wouldn't have anything to do with oil consumption.

    Response From 91 Isuzu 4ex1 Top Rated Answer

    Good points.

    It was burning oil right after the head was originally replaced, 2 quarts in the first 300 miles. The theory at the machine shop was that now that the top end was sealed, the rings were in need of replacement. Once the rings seated it still puffed oil (and moisture) on start-up (valve seals) at the tailpipe and appeared to be running rich. So I wrestled that one to the ground, finally replacing not only the rings, but later the valve seals, valve seals in a head that my hands had not touched up until that point.

    Before I added the coolant sealer it had a 'hint' of anti freeze or moisture coming out the exhaust, but it was so little that it didn't create any white smoke. What was coming out the back was predominantly blue smoke. The blue smoke was present at start up, and during the break-in period (about 1500 miles) while the rings seated. But it never completely stopped, until I replaced the valve seals.

    The ECM and emissions are so 'caveman' that it is pre-OBDI and no one has a cable or diagnostic software to read the ECM in real time. Saturn SAAB Isuzu where we bought the car in 1991 used to have these tools, but when the brand disappeared the tools went with it. Actually that isn't completely true, the Lotus Elan group of people have cables and diagnostic software but I got the impression they thought the Isuzu Stylus was not even close to their 'breed' even though the engines (and likely the electrical systems) all come from GM Lotus and Isuzu development. But this is another topic, and I digress.

    The coolant issue manifested as excessive heat when the car was running. Ordinarily the cooling fans never come on, particularly when the ambient temperature is below 50 deg F. The fans will come on anytime the AC is activated however. Plus, the cooling system now began pressurizing at start-up. It also had small champagne bubbles. Adding the coolant sealer reduced the excess heat issue, but the cooling system was still pressurizing during run.

    I kept watching the recovery tank to see if the fluid went down, but it didn't appear to measurably, and standing behind the vehicle didn't give any indication of an anti freeze smell, or residue. As a bonus however, now that the valve seals have finally been replaced with new ones, it stopped puffing oil. Almost there, I guess.

    If you were a betting man, would you equally weigh the head and the block as a root cause, or lean toward one over the other and why?

    What else might help isolate it as one over the other (since I can't do the recommended diagnosis for the reasons stated earlier).

    I don't want to jump straight to a solution, but it looks like that is where I am.

    Response From Hammer Time

    That was a very long post of pretty much useless information.

    You don't have any coolant loss........
    You don't have extreme overheating........

    Your testing is flawed and I seriously doubt you have any head or head gasket issue but you sure will have a cooling problem if you continue to try to fix a non-existing problem by filling the system with sealer.

    Response From 91 Isuzu 4ex1

    Thanks for the replies.

    I'll end here.

    Response From Discretesignals

    I believe that if you pressurize a cylinder with compressed air from your air compressor and you see bubbles forming in the coolant that is a sign you have a sealing issue. Wether it is due to a poorly sealing head gasket, cracks in the head, or cracks in the cylinder bore, the head has to come off and the cause determined.

    Response From re-tired

    My point ezacly.

    Response From Hammer Time

    If you have compression leaking into the coolant system that severely, you will superheat the coolant with combustion gases and overheat in real short order which this car is not doing. You will also fill the cylinder with coolant on shutdown, if not all the time and this car is experiencing none of that so I really doubt the test findings here. I've never seen a head gasket open between combustion and water jacket that didn't overheat or consume coolant.