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Denso
1990 Acura Legend Alternator 6 Cyl 2.7L Denso - Reman Alternator

P311-210AA33    210-0222  Remanufactured

13-8301 , 31100-PH7-024RM , 31100-PH7-024 , 213-8301 , 31100-PP8-004 , 100211-2550 , HOA400 , 10464006 , HOA490 , 1N-8301 , 14764 , 1860378 , 31100-PP8-014RM , 100211-7070 , 90-29-5081 , 13-8286 , N14931 , 14931 , 100211-2551 , AL250X , 3211350 , 31100-PH7-004 , A1120 , VA315 , 13-8304 , CJK46 , 213-8304 , 31100-PP8-014 , 100211-7500 , 334-1760

Qty:
$34.00 $120.95
Denso Alternator
  • Remanufactured DENSO First Time Fit Alternator
  • 70 Amp DENSO is the OE
  • Reman Alternator
  • Product Attributes:
    • Family: Denso Oe
    • Fan Type: Internal
    • Plug Type: 290
    • Regulator Type: Internal
    • Rotation Direction: Clockwise
    • Voltage: 12.0
  • DENSO alternators are not only original equipment on many of the world's top production cars; they are a favorite in motorsports as well, where their light weight, high efficiency, and durability under the most demanding conditions make them the natural choice. Remanufactured DENSO alternators go through a grueling process. Stators and rectifiers are tested to 300 volts, while rotors are submitted to 600 volts, all to ensure reliable performance. Rotor slip rings are buffed to an 8 micron surface finish, with runout limited to 20 microns, minimizing brush wear and abrasion. Bearings are validated to OE standards and loaded with premium OE standard lubricants. New or remanufactured, a DENSO alternator is a quality component. Offered in versions from 40 to 160 amperes and beyond for hundreds of specific vehicle applications, all alternators meet DENSO's rigorous First Time Fit standards. Contemporary cars employ dozens of sophisticated electronic systems from bumper to bumper, placing heavy demands on the charging system. The alternator is no place to cut corners. DENSO First Time Fit alternators meet or exceed all manufacturer standards, mount properly with a minimum of installation issues, and provide years of reliable service. Features. Premium cores and precise OE assembly benchmarks; Design to meet the grueling heat and electrical requirements; First Time Fit provides perfect mounting with no belt/pulley alignment issues; Benefits. Service professionals preferred DENSO's alternators for a trouble free solution; OE quality fit, appearance, and durability; Full compatibility with sensitive electronics systems; Compact and lightweight design
Brand: Denso
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Engine Designation Block Engine CID CC
1990 - Acura Legend C27A1 V 6 Cyl 2.7L - 2675
Denso
1995 Acura Legend Alternator 6 Cyl 3.2L Denso - Reman Alternator

P311-505D334    210-0226  Remanufactured

1N-8305 , N13387 , 90-29-5679 , 334-1888 , CLB18 , 13387 , AL1262X , 14992 , 13-8305 , 10464313 , 100211-6170 , 31100-PY3-013 , A2387 , 1860626 , 31100-PY3-003 , 90-29-5120 , HOA410 , 3341888 , 213-8305 , 31100-PY3-003RM , 15603

Qty:
$34.00 $128.34
Denso Alternator
  • Remanufactured DENSO First Time Fit Alternator
  • DENSO is the OE
  • Reman Alternator
  • Product Attributes:
    • Amperage Rating: 110
    • Family: Denso Oe
    • Fan Type: Internal
    • Plug Type: 290
    • Regulator Type: Internal
    • Rotation Direction: Clockwise
    • Voltage: 12.0
  • DENSO alternators are not only original equipment on many of the world's top production cars; they are a favorite in motorsports as well, where their light weight, high efficiency, and durability under the most demanding conditions make them the natural choice. Remanufactured DENSO alternators go through a grueling process. Stators and rectifiers are tested to 300 volts, while rotors are submitted to 600 volts, all to ensure reliable performance. Rotor slip rings are buffed to an 8 micron surface finish, with runout limited to 20 microns, minimizing brush wear and abrasion. Bearings are validated to OE standards and loaded with premium OE standard lubricants. New or remanufactured, a DENSO alternator is a quality component. Offered in versions from 40 to 160 amperes and beyond for hundreds of specific vehicle applications, all alternators meet DENSO's rigorous First Time Fit standards. Contemporary cars employ dozens of sophisticated electronic systems from bumper to bumper, placing heavy demands on the charging system. The alternator is no place to cut corners. DENSO First Time Fit alternators meet or exceed all manufacturer standards, mount properly with a minimum of installation issues, and provide years of reliable service. Features. Premium cores and precise OE assembly benchmarks; Design to meet the grueling heat and electrical requirements; First Time Fit provides perfect mounting with no belt/pulley alignment issues; Benefits. Service professionals preferred DENSO's alternators for a trouble free solution; OE quality fit, appearance, and durability; Full compatibility with sensitive electronics systems; Compact and lightweight design
Brand: Denso
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Engine Designation Block Engine CID CC
1995 - Acura Legend C32A1 V 6 Cyl 3.2L - 3206
MPA
1990 Acura Legend Alternator 6 Cyl 2.7L MPA - Remanufactured

P311-3C7DACD    14931  Remanufactured

100211-7500 , 10464006 , 14931 , 100211-2551 , 31100-PH7-024 , 86186100049 , 100211-7070 , 321-1350 , 31100-PH7-004 , 31100-PP8-014 , 86186100023 , 86186100067 , CJK46 , 100211-2550 , 334-1760 , 31100-PP8-004 , 19134753

Qty:
$32.00 $76.37
  • ALTERNATOR-RMFD STDRD
  • Remanufactured
  • Product Attributes:
    • Amps: 70 Amps
    • Clock: 6:30
    • Fan: Internal
    • Manufacturer: Nippondenso
    • Pulley: 3 Groove Serpentine
    • Regulator: Internal
    • Rotation: Clockwise
    • Volts: 12 Volts
Brand: MPA
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
1990 - Acura Legend V 6 Cyl 2.7L - 2675
MPA
1995 Acura Legend Alternator 6 Cyl 3.2L MPA - Remanufactured

P311-49D4CF1    15603  Remanufactured

13387 , 100211-6170 , CLB18 , 19134881 , 10464313 , 321-1657 , 334-1888 , 31100-PY3-003 , 31100-PY3-013

Qty:
$81.00 $92.05
  • ALTERNATOR-RMFD STDRD
  • Remanufactured
  • Product Attributes:
    • Amps: 110 Amps
    • Clock: 12:00
    • Fan: Internal
    • Manufacturer: Nippondenso
    • Pulley: 5 Groove Serpentine
    • Regulator: Internal
    • Rotation: Clockwise
    • Volts: 12 Volts
Brand: MPA
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
1995 - Acura Legend V 6 Cyl 3.2L - 3206
Remy
1995 Acura Legend Alternator 6 Cyl 3.2L Remy - Premium; Remanufactured

P311-0D79356    14992  Remanufactured

31100-PY3-003 , 31100-PY3-013 , 100211-6170 , 9760211-617 , CLB18

Qty:
$90.00 $100.49
  • Premium Remanufactured Alternator
  • 110 Amps
  • Premium; Remanufactured
  • Product Attributes:
    • : Remanufactured
    • Amperage Rating: 110
    • Fan Type: Internal
    • Plug Clock Rear View Main Mounting Ear at 6 O Clock: 12
    • Pulley Belt Type: Serpentine
    • Pulley Groove Quantity: 5
    • Pulley Outside Diameter: 63.0
    • Regulator Type: Internal
    • Rotation Direction: Clockwise
    • Voltage: 12.0
Brand: Remy
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Engine Designation Block Engine CID CC
1995 - Acura Legend C32A1 V 6 Cyl 3.2L - 3206

Latest Acura Legend Repair and Alternator Installation Advice

CarJunky AutoAdvice

88 Acura Legend Battery Drain

Showing 8 out of 8 Posts
Question From originalspy on 88 Acura Legend Battery Drain

Something is draining power from the battery when the car is off. If I don't start the car for about 4 days the battery is dead, dead, dead (I can't even pop the trunk). Once I get a jump start and recharge it everything is fine.

Here are some key points:
1. The battery is brand new. This issue eventually killed the previous battery.
2. The alternator is about 1 year old.
3. There are no visible lights on anywhere.

More backstory... I used a Voltage Meter to check the fuses and the alternator. Ran it between the -ve batt post and the -ve batt cable. The VM read about 12.5. Pulled each fuse one by one but the only one that made any difference was a 70A fuse labelled 'Battery' that made the reading drop to about 11. Is that normal?

For the alternator, I disconnected the only two wires coming into it. There was a small one on the side (near the top) that lead to the battery, and a combo plug at the back which lead to a large electronic cluster. Then I checked the battery voltage again and it was still about 12.5. Also, just in case there was something funky with the neg battery cable I also grounded the VM on the engine block instead of the -ve terminal while checking voltage and that didn't change the reading.

I have also checked for case drain, just in case, but there was none.

Hope someone can help.

Response From DanD Top Rated Answer

I think you might be better using an ammeter connected the way you described.
As long as there’s any form of connection or power usage, a voltmeter will show a reading.
Things like the memory’s of the different computers, clock and radio are always using some form of power.
All of these different memory’s shouldn’t add up too anymore then about .025 of an amp, at the very most.
With the ammeter connected, start over again, disconnecting anything/everything you can get too, until you see an amperage drop.
While doing this remember that if a door is open; you might be turning on things; interior/dome light for one example.
On some vehicles, you have to wait a number of minutes after turning the ignition off or closing doors for the different devices to go to sleep.
In other words, the internal timer of a control module may take up to 20 minutes to completely shut down.
So don’t be too quick to condemn something, after pulling a fuse or disconnecting a unit.

Once you find a suspicious circuit(s) that might be causing the problem; you’ll have too read up on their principles of operation.
Confirming how long they should or shouldn’t be drawing current.

It’s too bad that we can’t see electricity or current flow, like coolant or oil leaks; it would make life so much easier. LOL


Dan.

Response From originalspy

Hi Dan,
I set the Multi-Meter to 250 mAmps, then disconnected the -ve battery cable and hooked the Meter between the -ve battery post and the -ve battery cable. When I closed the circuit (-ve Meter terminal to -ve battery post and +ve terminal to ground), it blew the fuse on the Meter. I replaced the fuse but it blew it again. What did I do wrong?
I don't know much about the difference between Volts and Amps, but if there is a reading of 12.5 Volts how can we measure milliAmps?
Frustrated & Confused,
Paul.



I think you might be better using an ammeter connected the way you described.
As long as there’s any form of connection or power usage, a voltmeter will show a reading.
Things like the memory’s of the different computers, clock and radio are always using some form of power.
All of these different memory’s shouldn’t add up too anymore then about .025 of an amp, at the very most.
With the ammeter connected, start over again, disconnecting anything/everything you can get too, until you see an amperage drop.
While doing this remember that if a door is open; you might be turning on things; interior/dome light for one example.
On some vehicles, you have to wait a number of minutes after turning the ignition off or closing doors for the different devices to go to sleep.
In other words, the internal timer of a control module may take up to 20 minutes to completely shut down.
So don’t be too quick to condemn something, after pulling a fuse or disconnecting a unit.

Once you find a suspicious circuit(s) that might be causing the problem; you’ll have too read up on their principles of operation.
Confirming how long they should or shouldn’t be drawing current.

It’s too bad that we can’t see electricity or current flow, like coolant or oil leaks; it would make life so much easier. LOL


Dan.

Response From DanD

What is the maximum amperage rating for this meter? The meter I use here at the shop is a 10 amp max.
What might be going on here is, when you make that connection, a number of modules will initially come on line and then shut down, when it/they don’t see the ignition switch on. This initial draw may be well above your meters rating thus blowing the fuse?
What I do in these cases is before I connect the ammeter; I connect a jumper wire between the battery and the battery cable terminal. Let everybody wake up and then wait for a couple of minutes for everyone to go back to sleep. I then connect the ammeter and remove the jumper wire.
If whatever is drawing on the battery is below the meters rating; the fuse should hold.
Now don’t forget that if you turn something on, like your headlights or the ignition switch, you’ll pop the fuse again.
Something else you can do and this is just to verify that the meter and the meter connections are good; is turn on the dome light or glove box light. The light should light and you’ll see the amperage draw of that light bulb on the meter. Most single filament bulbs will draw anywhere from 1 – 1.5 amps.

Dan.

Response From CosmicCostello

Did this problem ever get solved? I have had the same problem for YEARS. Batteries last about 9-12 months then start dying and needing to be trickle-charged overnight. Then the relapse time frame gets less and less over the next few months until finally no charge will be taken by the battery. When it will take a charge, that lasts about a week if I'm not driving it every day/every other day. No mechanic or dealer has ever been able to find the drain, nor was I when I tested with a voltmeter all the individual circuits. But clearly something is killing batteries on this vehicle. I just don't know what and no one seems able to pin it down.

Response From Hammer Time

This thread is 3 1/2 years old. Please don't post ton old threads. If you have a question, start a new thread of your own. This one is locked now.

Response From originalspy

Hi Dan,
I have one of those Multi-Meters and it does have a section for ~mA which I assume is for milliAmps. It has settings for 0.5, 10, 250, & 1.5V. And I'm guessing, based on your post, that I should set it to 250 mA -- .025 Amp = 25 mA, right?
Thanks for your help.
Paul.

Response From DanD

That'll work.

Dan.