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Eurospare
2008 Land Rover LR2 Suspension Strut Assembly Eurospare

P311-0E2264A    W0133-1943604  New

Qty:
$161.66
Eurospare Suspension Strut Assembly
  • Chas: -8H088227
Brand: Eurospare
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Chassis Range
2008 - Land Rover LR2 up to 8H088227
Eurospare
2008 Land Rover LR2 Suspension Strut Assembly Eurospare

P311-144F26C    W0133-1975415  New

Qty:
$161.66
Eurospare Suspension Strut Assembly
  • Chas: -8H088227
Brand: Eurospare
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Chassis Range
2008 - Land Rover LR2 up to 8H088227
Eurospare
2003 Land Rover Range Rover Suspension Strut Assembly Eurospare

P311-2ABE352    W0133-1652363  New

Qty:
$538.52
Eurospare Suspension Strut Assembly
  • Front - Right
Brand: Eurospare
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2003 - Land Rover Range Rover
Eurospare
2005 Land Rover Range Rover Suspension Strut Assembly Eurospare

P311-2ABE352    W0133-1652363  New

Qty:
$538.52
Eurospare Suspension Strut Assembly
Brand: Eurospare
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2005 - Land Rover Range Rover
Eurospare
2003 Land Rover Range Rover Suspension Strut Assembly Eurospare

P311-2BAF148    W0133-1652362  New

Qty:
$604.24
Eurospare Suspension Strut Assembly
  • Front - Left
Brand: Eurospare
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2003 - Land Rover Range Rover
Eurospare
2005 Land Rover Range Rover Suspension Strut Assembly Eurospare

P311-2BAF148    W0133-1652362  New

Qty:
$604.24
Eurospare Suspension Strut Assembly
Brand: Eurospare
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2005 - Land Rover Range Rover
KYB
2004 Chrysler Sebring Suspension Strut Assembly KYB

P311-38AF27F    W0133-1616256  New

Qty:
$98.71
  • Excel-G
  • Front - Left
Brand: KYB
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Body
2004 - Chrysler Sebring Coupe
KYB
1993 Eagle 2000 GTX Suspension Strut Assembly KYB

P311-38AF27F    W0133-1616256  New

Qty:
$98.71
  • Excel-G
Brand: KYB
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1993 - Eagle 2000 GTX
KYB
2008 Toyota Matrix Suspension Strut Assembly KYB

P311-1B24D85    W0133-1609815  New

Qty:
$143.97
  • Excel-G
  • Front - Right
Brand: KYB
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2008 - Toyota Matrix
KYB
2008 Toyota Matrix Suspension Strut Assembly KYB

P311-2E7FB44    W0133-1609735  New

Qty:
$143.97
  • Excel-G
  • Front - Left
Brand: KYB
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2008 - Toyota Matrix
Professional Parts Sweden
2003 Volvo XC70 Suspension Strut Assembly Professional Parts Sweden

P311-21B84FE    W0133-1661630  New

Qty:
$106.25
Professional Parts Sweden Suspension Strut Assembly
  • Premium
  • Front
Brand: Professional Parts Sweden
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2003 - Volvo XC70
Sachs
2001 Volvo V70 Suspension Strut Assembly Sachs

P311-2D9F085    W0133-1661630  New

Qty:
$162.95
Sachs Suspension Strut Assembly
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • TwinTube
  • Front
Brand: Sachs
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel
2001 - Volvo V70 X/C
Professional Parts Sweden
2001 Volvo V70 Suspension Strut Assembly Professional Parts Sweden

P311-21B84FE    W0133-1661630  New

Qty:
$106.25
Professional Parts Sweden Suspension Strut Assembly
  • Premium
Brand: Professional Parts Sweden
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel
2001 - Volvo V70 X/C
Professional Parts Sweden
2007 Volvo XC70 Suspension Strut Assembly Professional Parts Sweden

P311-21B84FE    W0133-1661630  New

Qty:
$106.25
Professional Parts Sweden Suspension Strut Assembly
  • Premium
  • w/o Four-C Active Suspension
Brand: Professional Parts Sweden
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2007 - Volvo XC70
Sachs
2007 Volvo XC70 Suspension Strut Assembly Sachs

P311-2D9F085    W0133-1661630  New

Qty:
$162.95
Sachs Suspension Strut Assembly
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • TwinTube
  • w/o Four-C Active Suspension
  • Front
Brand: Sachs
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2007 - Volvo XC70
KYB
2009 Dodge Caliber Suspension Strut Assembly KYB

P311-2F2211B    W0133-1840862  New

Qty:
$134.25
  • Excel-G
Brand: KYB
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2009 - Dodge Caliber
KYB
1994 Dodge Stealth Suspension Strut Assembly KYB

P311-19838A4    W0133-1609013  New

Qty:
$163.53
  • Excel-G
  • Excludes Adjustable Suspension For vehicles with Electronic Suspensions, Leveling Control and Air Suspensi ons refer to KYB Catalog-Appendix C.
  • In order to use the KYB GR-2 strut on vehicles with ECS, it will be necessary to remove the front strut activators and disconnect the suspension control module located behind the right rear trim panel in order to disable the electronic control. Customers desiring to retain the eletronic control must purchase struts from the Mitsubishi dealer. See information in the KYB catalog for more details.
  • Front
Brand: KYB
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel
1994 - Dodge Stealth R/T Turbo
KYB
1996 Dodge Stealth Suspension Strut Assembly KYB

P311-19838A4    W0133-1609013  New

Qty:
$163.53
  • Excel-G
  • For vehicles with Electronic Suspensions, Leveling Control and Air Suspensi ons refer to KYB Catalog-Appendix C.
  • In order to use the KYB GR-2 strut on vehicles with ECS, it will be necessary to remove the front strut activators and disconnect the suspension control module located behind the right rear trim panel in order to disable the electronic control. Customers desiring to retain the eletronic control must purchase struts from the Mitsubishi dealer. See information in the KYB catalog for more details.
  • Front
Brand: KYB
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel
1996 - Dodge Stealth R/T Turbo
KYB
2009 Suzuki SX4 Suspension Strut Assembly KYB

P311-11ADEB0    W0133-2035704  New

Qty:
$114.60
  • Excel-G
Brand: KYB
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Body
2009 - Suzuki SX4 Hatchback
KYB
2009 Suzuki SX4 Suspension Strut Assembly KYB

P311-23EEB5E    W0133-2035705  New

Qty:
$114.60
  • Excel-G
Brand: KYB
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Body
2009 - Suzuki SX4 Hatchback

Latest Struts Repair and Installation Advice

CarJunky AutoAdvice

Strut replacement

Showing 4 out of 4 Posts
Question From mmmmsass4 on Strut replacement

2007 Dodge Grand Caravan with 150,000 miles. Front passenger side strut repair. I purchased quik strut assemblies for the front end of my van. Drivers side was simple - removed entire strut as a unit and installed pre-assembled new strut. On passenger side, the shock is broken. The piston rod that goes up into the center of the upper strut mount and is secured by a nut has ripped out of the upper strut mount. Not the three little bolts the hold the strut mount in place, the main bolt the holds the strut assembly together. I can slide the shock piston up & down with my hand. The outer spring is still under tension. My question: Do I need to rent a spring compressor to safely remove the strut assembly from the vehicle? Will lifting the vehicle remove the tension from the spring since it is no longer held compressed by the shock nut?

Response From Hammer Time Top Rated Answer

You won't be able to lift the van enough to relieve the spring pressure. You will need a spring compressor. Either that of just cut the spring in half with a cut off wheel. Be careful doing that though as there will still be some tension on it when the cut goes through. Take as much weight off the spring as possible first.

Response From mmmmsass4

Update: Took your advice, jacked the van up high and cut the spring in half. It wasn't under too much pressure and dropped right out. Finished up the job, no problems. Thank You!!

Response From Hammer Time

Glad to hear you got it resolved.

Closing this now as solved.

Broken rear strut, and I mean BROKEN

Showing 2 out of 8 Posts | Show 6 Hidden Posts
Question From Guest on Broken rear strut, and I mean BROKEN

1996 Buick Regal 130,000 miles


First off, is it safe to drive the car without one rear strut attached? The strut literally broke through the top mount leaving it completely detached from the top end. The nut is clearly still attached. Does this look like something that can just be pulled up and attached with a new strut mount? How difficult would this be for someone who is mechanically inclined but has never worked with struts?
Also, the strut itself is completely compressed. Does that mean the strut is ruined and must be replaced?
I'm hoping to not need to invest much cash into a 12 year old car with 130,000 miles.

Response From Tom Greenleaf



Quick look shows it's available with the upper mount! Must happen more than usual! "Is it safe to drive" Yes/No - right into the shop to replace it! Control of vehicle is compremised and it could whack and break something else and be additional trouble. It is a higher end DIY job - air wrenches will help and an alignment is required. I strongly suggest doing both sides with the identical replacement part,

T

Response From BrokenInMN Top Rated Answer

Thanks for the info. In my effort to 'go cheap' I am hoping to only replace the mount and not the strut. After some quick elbow grease, the inner strut shaft will slide up and down with resistance, and will stay in any position, even with the weight of a vice grip attached. I'm guessing one the those 'whacks' you mentioned pounded the shaft down hard enough to make the strut stick completely compressed. Is it necessary for a strut to naturally expand to its full length if there is nothing attached to the top? I noticed the new one I bought will slowly push all the way up after I manually compress it. The old strut seems to perform adequately when comparing the resistance and motion to a new strut except the fact that the old one does not expand on its own.
I may be forced to use a new strut anyway. Just below the top nut that you can see in my picture there is a significant amount of the broken top mount rusted solid to the shaft, like a sleeve that has become one with the strut shaft. It may be impossible to remove without damaging the strut plus the fact that this is very likely a 12 year old, original equipment strut. I have only had the car since it had 93,000 miles so I cannot be sure.

My main questoin here is: Is it ok to use the old strut if I can make it fit with a new mount? I am not looking for high performance or the smoothest ride here. This car drives 1.5 in-town miles to work and back every day with the occasional trip across town.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Strut Mount - Rear Gabriel / Strut Mount - Rear for a 1996 Buick Regal

Related Parts Shock/Strut - Front Shock/Strut - Rear About this product: Part Number: 143067 Weight: 2.53 lbs. Warranty: LLT Note: Complete mount kit
Includes mount, bumper bellow and retainers Pricing: $34.99 Availability: Store: Visit your local store to special order. Online: Ships within 3-5 business days

______________________________

Check that out! They do make a fix for just the mount. It might have to come out to install it as that nut will be stuck and shaft may just be an Allen head to the shaft - not sure.

A good gas strut would self extend under pressure. It doesn't have to to be safe but it should have it's shock effect which you think it does. The bottom two bolts are very HD and might give you a hard time. You kinda need to know what your'e doing as they are a serious part of the rear suspension. It's been a while but those are where you adjust the "camber" setting of the alignment as I recall. If you spray paint or scribe the exact position (indexing where it started) you can at least get it back close for a while to use car. This also means supporting the weight just so and if in doubt get help with this.

As I recall - some of these types to get to the top can be from trunk or maybe even from inside package shelf or back seat - memory gone - back in five minutes!

This sure appears like it was weakened by rust. Also take a good look at the other one! If it looks ok now I'd spray the heck out of it with something to stop rust now or just do both at once.

Note: Sometimes when taking the nut of a shock's shaft like this the thing is rendered useless as it's possible for the shaft to "come unscrewed" inside it if the shaft can't be held in position while undoing the nut - like by air wrench as heat is not really an option with shocks/struts.

The whole unit was about $82 bucks listed at AutoZone if it just can't be done separately. I know that's some bucks but as cars go it's pennies!

Tom

Response From BrokenInMN

Thanks much for the insight. After working the old strut a bit it seems to want to expand on its own (very weak, and not all the way extended). But, alas, the shaft has too much of the old mount rusted solid to it to be cleaned off to fit through a new mount, and it may be nearly impossible to remove that top nut from the shaft without scoring up the shaft. I decided to follow your first suggestion of replacing the strut & mount. This makes the most sense anyway. $35 for the mount or $82 for the mount & strut. It isn't worth the trouble to save 45 bucks and fix it halfway.
The other side looks pretty ugly too. I will just replace both and have a smooth ride and some peace of mind too.

One more thing, you are 110% correct on the lower bolts giving me problems. So far I've broken 1 socket and (don't laugh) 1 12" crescent wrench and the nut still hasn't moved. The first one came out relatively easy but the 2nd is being stubborn. Some new tools might do the trick tomorrow. What I wouln't give to have an air wrench right now. I'll have to put one on my Christmas list.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

These things are really best with air tools. All the leverage in the world can just tip the car over and a good air wrench can make this a one shot/done deal! You pay for those things though!

Good luck. Sounds like you have the attack down right. Remember the alignment. You may see that one of the stut's bolt holes allows for altering the tilt (camber)) of the wheel when loosened and tightened,

T

Response From BrokenInMN

I thought I'd give an update and one more "Thanks!"
All is well now with 2 new strut/mount combos installed.
Casualties: 3 sockets, 1 12" Crescent Wrench, 3 bolts for the strut mount, 1 lower bolt, 3 drill bits, and surprisingly no blood! Only some extremely sore muscles and back.

Rust was not my friend on this project. After 12 years of Minnesota winters I should have expected nothing less. I snapped the heads off of 3 of the 4 (both sides) strut mount bolts and had to grab the other ends, from inside the trunk, to screw them inward to get them out. One of which I actually snapped off from the other end using vice grips leaving only the part of the bolt surrounded by threads left. After breaking 3 drill bits, the bolt, or what was left of it, finally busted out without damaging the threads.
On the camber issue: luckily for me it was easy to line up. The old strut was set all the way to the end of the adjustable bolt hole on both sides.

The end result is a car that feels perfectly aligned with much better handling and much less klunking.

Thank You again for the help.

Tom Hinz

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Thanks for the update on the fix. Rust is a real pill with cars - never mind the roads and bridges rotting away as well known.

Glad to hear you survived it!

T

2000 ford focus front strut

Showing 2 out of 3 Posts | Show 1 Hidden Posts
Question From Guest on 2000 ford focus front strut

ford focus, 2000
front strut removal and replacement instruction, simple breakdown.

Response From Guest Top Rated Answer

ford focus, 2000
front strut removal and replacement instruction, simple breakdown.
do i need to compress coil spring before removing strut assembly from car?


edit

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Pretty sure you remove the whole assy then compress spring to replace the strut and install back in. The car should get both sides and an alignment,

T

when to replace front struts?

Showing 2 out of 4 Posts | Show 2 Hidden Posts
Question From captjackny on when to replace front struts?

Granddaughter has my old 2006 Camry (115k miles) at college and the front end started to make some noise. Not sure exactly what since I’m not there to hear it. Anyway I had her take it to a local repair store (chain) to check it out. The checked the front suspension and then did an alignment and rebalance and well as brakes. After all this the guy tells her that she should have the front struts replaced and they “should have been replaced at 50k miles”. He warned that she could end up with a broken spring if this is not done.

My manual doesn't say anything about replacing struts at 50k miles. Is this correct or just a sales job for new struts. Is there a way to tell if the struts are bad or going bad? Any advice appreciated. Thanks

Response From Hammer Time

they “should have been replaced at 50k miles”. He warned that she could end up with a broken spring if this is not done.

That ridiculous................... That must have been a tire store you took it to. have seen them with 150K and still be good. If they don't show any signs of leakage or binding, I wouldn't worry about it.

If the struts were that bad, why did he go ahead and align it? You can't get a good alignment with bad struts. Ignore the guy.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Agree - Garbage advice from that place. If they were no good why did they do an alignment first then say that as it would likely need another if they were done - arggh. They walk among us,

T

Response From Discretesignals Top Rated Answer

115K they are probably worn out.

The bounce test can tell you if the strut isn't absorbing the spring oscillations.

Struts can lock up and cause a harsh ride

The strut could be leaking fluid.


It is dangerous driving around on worn out struts because if the struts don't absorb spring oscillations, the tire can bounce like a basketball going over rough roads. If your tires aren't contacting the road, you are not in control.

struts on 2003 Toyota Highlander 4 WD Limited

Showing 2 out of 10 Posts | Show 8 Hidden Posts
Question From Guest on struts on 2003 Toyota Highlander 4 WD Limited

I was just told by a tire dealer that a strut on my Highlander was "leaking." I have experienced no symptoms of strut dysfunction.

If true, is this expected "wear and tear?" Should I take it to a dealer for inspection?

Response From Tom Greenleaf Top Rated Answer

Is this just some oil staining on the strut? Struts are a shock dampening item, part of suspension and may need replacement along the life of a vehicle. It should be known that it's safe and that any oil staining is in fact from the strut itself. An alignment or front end shop should be able to determine the need to replace it now or if you can wait. I can't from here. Best to replace these in pairs if needed,

T

Response From Jeff Norfolk

The thing about a shock or strut wearing out is they wear out gradually. Most drivers won't notice much of a performance diffrence until there is noise or serious tire wear. Most stuts are good for 80-100 thousand miles. Before then replacement typically on a as needed basis due to damage or fluid leakage. If you are over 100 thousand miles you will likely feel a diffrence when you do have them replaced. Like Tom said, totally safe to drive even if the stuts are worn or leaking a bit of fluid.

Response From Guest

Last Friday, I had new tires put on my 2003 Toyota Highlander at the dealer. Five days later, I noticed a fluid leak - hydraulic fluid, I believe. I took it back to the dealer and was told I needed new rear struts. I drive my car gently, and it only had 44K miles on it. I am suspicious that it is not a coincidence that a fluid leak and strut problem developed days after the tire installation. I'm also suspicious of the $900+ repair cost. Are my suspicions unfounded?

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Where are you noticing this fluid leak? It matters. Strut may be the leak and really shouldn't drip to ground if so.

Low easy miles or not it could happen. Unscrupulous folks could spray oil to make a scare but I have better faith in folks than that type crap. If that was the case it would clean off and not return and fell fine when driving??

T

Response From Guest

It did feel fine while driving. The fluid leak was near the right back tire. My husband slid underneath the car and said it looked like something had sprayed out, freshly. I hadn't at that point been to the dealer for 5 days, so I'm pretty sure nothing was sprayed on, and that the spray was a result of some sort of leak. Given the age/low mileage of the vehicle, and the speed with which this problem followed on the heels of new tire installation, I was wondering if there was a cause and effect there.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

You really need to know what sprayed out and from where - for safety sake.

Is the liquid water soluable? Things that might be back there include:


A rear heater?? Antifreeze and washes off with plain water)

Brake fluid (washes off with plain water)

Strut oils would likely be an oil product

Gear oil from axle parts

Does this have a rear wiper/washer? Could be that too.

***********

Most parts that could leak a fluid are out of harms way from a moving wheel/tire and just in hoisting somthing might have been touched - you need to know what it is/was no matter what.

It's possible a strut just couldn't take it and showed up right then from just being hoisted. It shouldn't of course but unless you can find something done on purpose (unlikely IMHO) it probably can just be chauked up to bad luck,

T

Response From Guest

I was told by the dealer that the fluid wasn't brake fluid, but a "hydraulic" fluid. Before the trip to the dealer, though, the brake fluid was low.

My last car was a Honda Accord. I had it 13 years, 95K miles, and kept up with routine maintenance. It never needed a major repair job. It it looked great when I sold it because the A/C system needed a complete replacement.

Love driving my Highlander, but I won't be buying another one if it keeps costing me big $.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Hammer just made a great point - could be that the easy use this has had, has never had struts at their extremes and seals got crusty there and just gave out from hoisting it. There realy is no blame for something like that - stuff happens.

New rear struts will vary in costs. Check you own parts outlets for the various grades if they are in fact the trouble. Best in pairs and it does mean it will need an alignment. If you aren't happy with a dealer that as some independant shops.

Dealers aren't automatically the best shops or not - it's still a one by one thing and the people you are dealing with,

T

Response From Hammer Time

Not trying to defend anyone here but the coincidence you refer to could actually have been triggered by lifting the truck off the ground which would have fully extended the struts into a position they don't normally ride in and sometimes that will push the seals through some bad portions of the pistons and tear them which will trigger the leak.
As the other person stated, the struts gradually lose their ability to control suspension movement over time and replacing them will definitely benefit your new tire investment. Most of the aftermarket replacements are actually higher quality that the OEM units anyway.