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1967 rolls royce silver shadow

Showing 3 out of 3 Posts
Question From Guest on 1967 rolls royce silver shadow

I am having a problem with bleeding the brakes, my car is a 1967 rolls royce silver shadow. we replaced all the lines and master cylinder, but we still can't get the fluid to the rear wheels. Any suggestions.

Response From Double J

I am not familiar with Rolls Royce at all..but in braking systems,there is a metering valve pin that usually has to be held when bleeding brakes in order to get pressure to the rear wheels.
Usually this pin is either near/under the master cylinder or in some kind of valve device in line...
Trace where the rear lines come from and see if it has such a device.
The pin either has to be pushed in and held or pulled and held by an assistant.

Also ,did you bench bleed the master cylinder first?
Very important that you do.

Just a thought

Jim

Response From Tom Greenleaf Top Rated Answer

Cool! To add with VERY limited RR work that Model Year 1967 was year ONE that all cars sold to US must have dual braking systems - most went front separate from rear.

Just a "betcha" for RR is that they just bough OTC GM combination brake valve (aka perportioning) or perhaps a Ford design where you did need to push a red rubber button to properly bleed brakes. You could do it without if the master cylinder was well bench bled as Jim said.

Still guessing but know that early FORDs with disc/drum brakes metered a tad too much pressure to front wheels first which went unrecalled I think as it only made a problem when stone cold with fast idle of a choke set up and front wheels would lock while backs were pushing a car that couldn't steer (ice and snow conditions only) with locked up fronts which was exicting but life was good then and who cared?

T

Need help identifying a car part

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Question From tinykin on Need help identifying a car part

At least I think it is a car part. Any idea what the part in the photo is. It was in a box of parts that I believe came from a 1926 Rolls Royce but no guarantees. I think it it is some sort of pulley belt (each link has a tapered or v type cross section) but would like help.http://autoforums.carjunky.com/photos/pic/159u4YAV/774.jpgThanks all.

Response From tinykin

The 1926 and the Rolls are family legend and nothing more. This came from my uncle's estate and he was a child of the Depression so anything which may have been of value, could be repurposed or was just neat to a teenager was kept. Our family, at that time, wouldn't have owned a Rolls. We were the on the "just getting by" side of the tracks.

Response From Hammer Time

It's quite obvious that it's a chain that drives something. I doubt you will ever know exactly what it drives though.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

What can I say if you don't need it or have this car at all anymore it's an item of interest to some and scrap metal to another. Only cool thing to some junky for old crap would be that it has a box - hopefully the exact one the new one came in as the pic kinda looks like the old one to me.


I dare say if you wish to part with it you probably would get an assortment of reactions at certain antique shops/dealers or perhaps if you know one a collectible car parts place and get ideas that it's total junk to just a two bit thing of interest.


Side topic to all this is I do or did (too much crap now already) collect neat crap with known ages and history and have tons of shat all around my place. That and it's just my opinion I'd toss out.


Other neat things you can make a lamp or something out of. If you have a ton of assorted such stuff find a person or place to come see all of it if you want to sell it all but YES you should know what things are first and that was my best try,


T

Response From Tom Greenleaf Top Rated Answer

Two things make this hard, 1926 as a guess and Rolls Royce (is that a guess too?) make it a guess from me. Looks a lot like a timing chain but cars that old used chains for more than you think too. Rolls no doubt gave up on chair driving wheels even that early and it's too small anyway.


If I get bored I'll look for an exploded view in the search engine "images" sections and see if I can narrow it down. For now that's a timing chain to me. Hey - people were much more apt to hang on to old parts in general for things but probably NOT an original Rolls owner of those days but still might have come along with it over all those many years,


T

Need Help Identifying Vehicle

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Question From caiushart on Need Help Identifying Vehicle

For starters I need help identifying this mark on the car. I have searched everywhere and I cannot find it. Anything you can tell me would be appreciated. The vehicle itself is believed to be heavily customised. It is believed to be from the 1920s and is supposedly European in origin.

The mark:


The whole vehicle:

Response From paulrhyan

This thread is getting kind of old but I just thought I would add my $.02.

Regarding the emblem. I'm not sure exactly where it is positioned on the car (Not on the hood or grill from what I can see). So I have to wonder; is it a manufacturer's emblem or could it be a family crest of the original owner.

If the original owner was a man of wealth and/or title and a member of a prominent family of the time, then I am assuming that it isn't much of a stretch that his automobile (probably one of few at the time) would be adorned with the family crest (or part of their coat of arms).

Just a thought. Good Luck.

BTW: Is it just me or is that car really longer than my dad's Winnebago?

Response From Discretesignals

Its a 1923 Hispano-Suiza H6A 6-Wheel Victoria Town Car.

http://www.forneymuseum.org/FE_HispanoSuiza.html

Maybe if you visit or call the museum, they can give you information on that emblem.

Response From Tom Greenleaf Top Rated Answer

Yikes - tough one. Steering wheel is on the right so would highly likely be a British car maker. You'd be surprised how many there were long out of biz.
Google out car makers of Great Briton. TMK without doing so myself Rolls Royce, goes way, way back but doesn't smack of that brand. Try assorted names of coach makers of British Leylands.
Then try Google Images for emblems of brands you find to zoom in your search.


Hey - question: Looks like it's on display at some show or collection. Did you take the pics and what was said being right there?


For now best I can say is the US car makers of luxo "Landau"* type cars would NOT have specially made one for right hand driving so it would be a Euro something.
* Landau is when driver sits out in the weather like that with coach for the owners a left over from a stage coach idea......

Response From caiushart

I actually work at the museum this vehicle is being displayed at. It was first owned by a private collector who had no real records of how he got it or from whom so the information we have on it isn't accurate. The Landau type cars could have the double back wheels? Have you seen a vehicle similar to this one at all?

Response From Tom Greenleaf

? Just was looking myself. No exact match for the emblem yet. The rear wheels don't make much sense to me? Why? That's part of the "Custom" of it IMO/GUESS.
See if this site shows was showing this which may not show here.........



That was removed general link under the image that may not show.
This is what I just Googled...........
https://www.google.com/...+British+car+emblems
Keep trying different search words. The crown in your pic suggests a country with Royalty and not all capable of making cars did the King and Queen thing so you are testing my History of Europe and who did what when!
FYI - Car and coach making was strongest with probably Germany - the first auto made by them subject to opinion. The Brits and Italians should have been strong as well.
It's a luxo car so should be a limit to which country would even bother if they did too.
We'll find out what the emblem is at least. If you are there look for marks on the engine. Could be a straight 8 cylinder but not sure at all. No telling if engine is for the car either I guess. Most would be called a "Tunnel Drive" which means to me trans and driveshaft are bolted up solid so nothing moving to see making the rear differential torque the whole drivetrain like a "T" if you will. High bet all rear wheels don NOT drive this thing just the front most ones.
Still looking around,


Tom

The link just went to Pinterest registration page.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Sorry for two posts - I might have the word "Laundau" wrong? It was always my thought that coaches that the driver not inside was a Laundau but now think that's inaccurate, Tom

Response From caiushart

When I go back to work I will ask about the engine and do a proper write up of everything I find when I examine the vehicle further. That will be this saturday.

The back wheels are really frustrating though. I have found other cars with six wheels but the double wheel set is typically in the front of the car not the back.

I noticed the emblem had a double headed eagle. Which is symbolic of the Russian or Byzantine royalty. Obviously this car isn't from Byzantine, but would it be possible it was Russian?

Response From Double J

Found this site
For what its worth

Click

Response From Tom Greenleaf

? Russian? They did make cars but it's the right hand drive that throws me off - why? Part of altering it - maybe.
Trivia for you: Driving on the left, steering from the right was later. Think. The way to drive or ride and pass people on a road even prior to cars is "Clockwise" in doing such. Think of entering a rotary for example.
This all off the top of my head not searched out. Boats and navigation is just the opposite you drive from the right where motor vehicles for land drive on the left just opposite of which country does which way.
Back to Russian? Not sure if all was well defined which way you did what? It's possible the vehicle with 4 rear wheels could be such that you could have a 1/2 track drive for rear - wild traction as I don't think roads were as good in huge Russia everywhere as they would be in say London and some other very old Euro cities and areas making roads of stones long before motorized vehicles.
Dang, the only thing I can think of world standard is railroad tracks - exactly 5 feet 8+1/2 inches not some metric measure - worldwide.
This could end up a goose chase as you said the car was totally custom as it is. Could be parts from assorted vehicles for powertrain and coachwork from others? May not find a sure answer for this one? Tom

Response From caiushart

I hesitate to mention because I haven't been able to verify it yet but... according to the collector it was a Hispano Suiza. It doesn't look like any Hispano Suiza I have come across.

Response From Double J

Only ones that I have seen that come close to this are the German staff cars made by Mercedes/ Daimler- Benz
The W31 G4

Click

Click

Response From Hammer Time

I like this part

Armament:
OPTIONAL:
1 OR 2 x 7.92 MG34 OR MG 42 machine gunson pintle mounts at amidships (behind front bench) and aft (behind rear-most bench). Additionally, any personal weapons could be used in defense.

Response From Double J

LOL

Saw that....
Wonder how much that option cost?...LOL

Found this site..shows one that was restored...click on the small images and you get a close up of the axles, engine etc...
click

Response From Tom Greenleaf

I think you found it Double J. The double rear wheels would be difficult as a whimsical custom job so is part of the car or made from that chassis. Germany had the steel work, engineering to make about anything. Double wheels not needed except tires stunk still so would matter complete with dual side mount spares.
What fails is the emblem of a crown and right hand steering wheel so custom is the operative name for that car no doubt one of a kind w high bet the German drivetrain, Tom
PS: Think it's that old but steel may bear mold marks of the Eisen-Gotz steel makers of Germany?

Response From Tom Greenleaf

I'm almost done for a while here. Did look at those cars and can see why one would think it was part one of them. This site and pics don't work all the time with me but here's one that's close with some metal work......

^^^^ Was there?
The car is so custom it's going to be difficult as it's proving to be,


Tom

97 Jaguar transmission fluid level

Showing 2 out of 4 Posts | Show 2 Hidden Posts
Question From comnavguy on 97 Jaguar transmission fluid level

This is a 97 Jag XK8a with 58,134 on the odometer. The transmission is slipping occasionally when starting from a dead stop.

The owner took it to a Jag shop and was told that the tranny is sealed and fluid can not be added.

If that's true, isn't there a diagnostic hook-up (maybe on the OBDII) to learn the fluid level to see if that could be the problem?

Is slipping in 1st gear a problem with Jag XK8s car when they get over 50K ?

Just as a side issue, did Ford own Jaguar in 97 ?

Response From Tom Greenleaf Top Rated Answer

I'm not going to be of much help with this but don't want the thread to go unnoticed. There's some method for trans fluid that may be all different than the typical dipstick which may involve removing all and filling to spec and no routine just "adding" might be true. Jags and others are their own bird sometimes.

If this slipping is a low fluid problem there should be evidence of a leak somewhere. If a real slipping it's trouble no matter what.

Owner's manual may suggest if it can be checked via a computer scan and bet it can but may take either a Jag dealer or trans specialty shop for the help.

Ford and Jaguar: It was close to that year but not sure when exactly they were really part of each other. Many car makers use or consult other car makers and have for ions. Ex: Rolls Royce no less at least once used GM for A/C help - like way back. Borg Warner has been involved with several car makers for transmission designs or outright made components.

Best I can do for you with this question,

T

Response From comnavguy

That's a start anyway.

The reason I asked about Ford is that about 97, they stopped putting dipsticks in their transmissions - until owners complained. And fluid had to be drained and re-filled to spec through access hole in the floor.

I don't think this Jag problem is one of fluid, because there is no lag going from P to R or D and no apparent slipping in Reverse or going through the gears.

Thanks again for the reply.

Response From Hammer Time







V8 Sedan & XK8 DATE
9/97
307-02
MODEL 1997 MY-ON XK8 Range
1998 MY-ON V8 Sedan NA
VIN 001001-ON
812256-ON Checking Fluid Level -
ZF 5HP 24 E -
Revised Procedure
Issue:
This bulletin provides a more detailed procedure for checking the transmission fluid level.
Action:
To check the transmission fluid level accurately, proceed as follows: 1. Position the vehicle on a level surface and let the vehicle stand for at least 2 minutes. 2. At the PDU base station make the following menu selections: DIAGNOSTICS, TOOLBOX, POWERTRAIN, DATALOGGER. Connect the PDU to the vehicle and ensure that the transmission is not in limp-home mode and that no DTCs are stored. 3. On the PDU, make the following menu selections: DATALOGGER, TRANSMISSION, TOT (transmission oil temperature). Check that the transmission temperature is below 30°C if ambient temperatures allow. Allow to cool if necessary. NOTE: 30-40°C is the optimum temperature range for checking and filling transmission fluid. The range of 30-50°C is acceptable: Checking with a fluid temperature of 30°C represents the maximum fluid fill. Checking with a fluid temperature of 50°C represent the minimum fluid fill. Once the engine is running, the transmission fluid heats up rapidly. 4. Have the ATF filling: container prepared so you can add fluid immediately after opening the plug. Start the engine with the transmission in the Park position. 5. Verify that the idle speed in between 600-750 RPM. 6. Move the selector lever from the Park position to the Drive range and pause for 3 seconds. 7. Move the selector lever from the Drive range to the Reverse position and pause for 3 seconds. 8. Move the selector lever from the Reverse position to the Park positions. 9. Ensure that the fluid temperature has not risen excessively and immediately raise the vehicle and remove the fluid level/filler plug. 10. Fill with Esso ATF LT 71141 until the fluid begins to overflow from the fluid level/filler plug. 11. Wait at least one minute until the flow of fluid has reduced to a trickle. 12. Reinstall the plug and check the PDU to verify that the fluid temperature has not exceeded 50°C.

power issues help!

Showing 2 out of 19 Posts | Show 17 Hidden Posts
Question From dumbcar on power issues help!

I have a 2001 chrysler/dodge intrepid 2.7 about 160 000 km
I drove my car to work stopped it for 5 mins then tried to start it again and it wouldnt. It was making a clicking sound behind the dash. I waited for the clicking sound to stop and tried again and it started. This would happen for 2 days when ever i did a stop engine to ignite within a short time. (The ticking only happened the first time) then one time it wouldnt start at all. I got a jump start. Was able to drive home which is a 10 min drive and when reversing into my drive way everything died. Everytime i jump start, it lasts 15 mins and dies. Lights flickering inside and outside. I changed the alternator. Had to get another jumpstart. Car lasts 30 mins then dies. This time the battery light was on. I go and get a new battery. Open the door and my cab lights are bright again try to start. It clicks once like it should then all my lights die and instruments dies and it wont start. When i open the door my km guage and the light for the seat belt are on and flickering really fast. When i try to use my autolocks they clicck sound really fast without working. When i try to start now nothing happens but my oil light comes on. Dont know whats wrong

Response From Discretesignals

Sounds like the electrical system has a low voltage problem. Do you have a digital volt/ohm meter?

Are the battery connections clean and tight? What is the voltage on the battery terminals when the lights are flickering?

Response From dumbcar

I do not have a volt meter unfortunately but the terimal are new and the connectors have been scraped down to fresh metal. And on tight and secure

Response From Discretesignals

If your going to diagnose electrical problems, you will need a volt meter.

Response From dumbcar

And what do i test? I already had the new battery checked its running just over 12 volts

Response From Discretesignals

You need to find out what the voltage is on the electrical system with loads applied. The battery light doesn't come on to tell you to change the battery. It comes on when there is a charging system fault.

You need to verify the voltage at the battery terminals when the lights are acting up. A reading of only 12 volts open circuit on the battery posts is a dead battery. Need some direction. Without some voltage measurements at different points in the electrical system, your guess is good as ours.

Response From dumbcar

Thanks for trying

Response From Discretesignals

Not sure what you mean by that. If you were looking for an easy answer, I wish I could give it to you. It doesn't work that way though when it comes to diagnosing electrical problems. Sure we could guess and tell you to replace parts, but that can get expensive and time consuming.

Response From dumbcar

I agree. Was trying to be proactive and do my own repairs. But i think this is above me now and im going to tow it to the shop and let them figure it out. I do appreciate the responses you have posted. Thanks

Response From Discretesignals

Understandable that your trying to save a buck. I do that myself when it comes to working on my home. I don't know squat about wood working, but if it something I might be able to figure out, i'll try it.

Let us know how things turn out, so we can resolve your thread. Thanks : )

Response From dumbcar

Final update. Turns out my positive connection was corroded. Little trimming and splicing and im driving again. Hope this helps future questions from intrepid owners

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Appreciate the update and you found the problem spot. It's not unique to any particular make or model it's connections that nobody tends to along the way whether a ride on lawn mower or car - same bull can happen.
If you hack up cables they'll be back to haunt you. I'm finding whole new ones quickly unavailable now so higher end cable end splices more common quickly.
Some vehicles just place batteries of awkward locations, assorted makes could be under back seats, behind an inner fender shield or even in trunks and get neglected that much more,


T

Response From dumbcar

Ya mines in front of the passanger wheel well under the air filter

Response From Tom Greenleaf Top Rated Answer

I thought so! Another bright idea to bankrupt a company. Now FIAT has their name first at the dealers kinda the blind leading the blind.
They place batteries where they either have to or want to because the weigh something. Many sports or Euro cars put them low under back seats and some in trunks like now an old Rolls Royce I worked on.


As said, it's just not something listed to check and tend to on routine lists of things to do periodically. If you just put a quick spray* of light oil like a WD-40 on the connections even at oil change times this almost doesn't happen. I do my own more often than that and never get surprised.


It's less messy if you put some in a cup and Q-Tip it on things that will be a hassle someday right up to latches of glove boxes and so on,


T


T

Response From dumbcar

Good tip. Im just glad it wasnt something else stupid expensive

Response From Hammer Time

Sounds like it's time to close this one.
If you need it reopened, just ask a Mod.

Response From Discretesignals

I remember reading somewhere that Chrysler did that so they could have a lower hood line. That is what gave those cars the suppository look. Glad to read you got it figured out. Thanks for keeping us updated.

Response From dumbcar

I will for sure. Thanks

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Quote from post #3 "Edit | Delete | Quote | Reply
I do not have a volt meter unfortunately but the terimal are new and the connectors have been scraped down to fresh metal. And on tight and secure "
Get a DVOM or just a voltmeter. You must have replaced those for a problem seen or one that happened already. Most are so dang cheap (cable ends) clean and tight isn't good enough. Most again are really meant for a last ditch temporary fix to get vehicle going till you can splice in the better ones properly.
If you just used those "U" bolt ends only that you strip back some wire those always are junk so need to both get those right which you'll see with a DVOM and fix the reason they went bad in the first place and any collateral damage near battery from acid that made them go bad in the first place,


T