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Best Selling Genuine Volkswagen Heater Cores

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Nissens
1987 Volkswagen Quantum HVAC Heater Core Nissens

P311-1D393E3    W0133-1625769  New

Qty:
$52.46
Nissens HVAC Heater Core
Brand: Nissens
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1987 - Volkswagen Quantum
Nissens
1984 Volkswagen Rabbit HVAC Heater Core 4 Cyl 1.7L Nissens

P311-1D393E3    W0133-1625769  New

Qty:
$52.46
Nissens HVAC Heater Core
  • Excludes Factory A/C
Brand: Nissens
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
1984 - Volkswagen Rabbit L 4 Cyl 1.7L - 1715
Nissens
1999 Volkswagen Jetta HVAC Heater Core Nissens

P311-1AB4404    W0133-1737854  New

Qty:
$84.89
Nissens HVAC Heater Core
  • Quick Connect Coupling Type
Brand: Nissens
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Manuf. Body Code
1999 - Volkswagen Jetta A4
Nissens
1999 Volkswagen Golf HVAC Heater Core Nissens

P311-1AB4404    W0133-1737854  New

Qty:
$84.89
Nissens HVAC Heater Core
  • Chas: 250 001-, German Production
  • Quick Connect Coupling Type
Brand: Nissens
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Manuf. Body Code Chassis Range
1999 - Volkswagen Golf A4 250 001 and up
ACM
1988 Volkswagen Jetta HVAC Heater Core ACM - Original Equipment

P311-037358C    W0133-1620372  New

Qty:
$53.81
ACM HVAC Heater Core
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Original Equipment
Brand: ACM
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1988 - Volkswagen Jetta
ACM
1999 Volkswagen Golf HVAC Heater Core ACM - Original Equipment

P311-037358C    W0133-1620372  New

Qty:
$53.81
ACM HVAC Heater Core
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Mexican Production
  • Original Equipment
Brand: ACM
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Manuf. Body Code
1999 - Volkswagen Golf A3
ACM
1999 Volkswagen Golf HVAC Heater Core ACM - Original Equipment

P311-037358C    W0133-1620372  New

Qty:
$53.81
ACM HVAC Heater Core
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Chas: -250 000, German Production
  • Original Equipment
Brand: ACM
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Manuf. Body Code Chassis Range
1999 - Volkswagen Golf A4 up to 250 000
Nissens
2018 Volkswagen Jetta HVAC Heater Core 4 Cyl 1.4L Nissens

P311-24A2D86    W0133-2025561  New

Qty:
$281.73
Nissens HVAC Heater Core
Brand: Nissens
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
2018 - Volkswagen Jetta L 4 Cyl 1.4L 85 1395
APDI
2002 Volkswagen Cabrio HVAC Heater Core APDI - Heater Core

P311-51B21A7    9010193  New

90903 , 399903 , 176819030 , 94730 , 9903 , 98730

Qty:
$28.35
APDI HVAC Heater Core
  • HVAC HEATER CORE
  • Heater Core
  • Product Attributes:
    • Construction: Expanded Tube
    • Core Depth (in): 1-5/8
    • Core Height (in): 9-1/4
    • Inlet Connection (in): 5/8
    • Outlet Connection (in): 5/8
  • Heater - VW
Brand: APDI
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2002 - Volkswagen Cabrio
APDI
1999 Volkswagen Golf HVAC Heater Core APDI - Heater Core

P311-51B21A7    9010193  New

90903 , 399903 , 176819030 , 94730 , 9903 , 98730

Qty:
$28.35
APDI HVAC Heater Core
  • HVAC HEATER CORE
  • To VIN X250000
  • Heater Core
  • Product Attributes:
    • Construction: Expanded Tube
    • Core Depth (in): 1-5/8
    • Core Height (in): 9-1/4
    • Inlet Connection (in): 5/8
    • Outlet Connection (in): 5/8
  • Heater - VW
Brand: APDI
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1999 - Volkswagen Golf
APDI
1980 Volkswagen Rabbit Pickup HVAC Heater Core APDI - Heater Core

P311-25B853D    9010146  New

171819031B , 175819031 , 94651 , 819031R , 171819031C , 819031B , 98651 , 399901 , 90901 , 9901

Qty:
$58.01
APDI HVAC Heater Core
  • HVAC HEATER CORE
  • Without AC
  • Heater Core
  • Product Attributes:
    • Construction: Expanded Tube
    • Core Depth (in): 1-5/8
    • Core Height (in): 9-1/4
    • Inlet Connection (in): 5/8
    • Outlet Connection (in): 5/8
  • Heater - VW
Brand: APDI
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1980 - Volkswagen Rabbit Pickup
APDI
1980 Volkswagen Rabbit Pickup HVAC Heater Core APDI - Heater Core

P311-1C8EA34    9010163  New

819121 , 399902 , 9902 , 171819032 , 98650 , 171820041A , 90902 , 94650

Qty:
$63.63
APDI HVAC Heater Core
  • HVAC HEATER CORE
  • With AC
  • Heater Core
  • Product Attributes:
    • Construction: Expanded Tube
    • Core Depth (in): 1-5/8
    • Core Height (in): 8-3/8
    • Inlet Connection (in): 5/8
    • Outlet Connection (in): 5/8
  • Heater - Volkswagen
Brand: APDI
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1980 - Volkswagen Rabbit Pickup
APDI
1975 Volkswagen Scirocco HVAC Heater Core APDI - Heater Core

P311-1C8EA34    9010163  New

819121 , 399902 , 9902 , 171819032 , 98650 , 171820041A , 90902 , 94650

Qty:
$63.63
APDI HVAC Heater Core
  • HVAC HEATER CORE
  • Without AC
  • Heater Core
  • Product Attributes:
    • Construction: Expanded Tube
    • Core Depth (in): 1-5/8
    • Core Height (in): 8-3/8
    • Inlet Connection (in): 5/8
    • Outlet Connection (in): 5/8
  • Heater - Volkswagen
Brand: APDI
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1975 - Volkswagen Scirocco
ACM
2013 Volkswagen CC HVAC Heater Core ACM

P311-534A697    W0133-2025562  New

Qty:
$170.33
ACM HVAC Heater Core
Brand: ACM
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2013 - Volkswagen CC
ACM
2011 Volkswagen Eos HVAC Heater Core ACM

P311-534A697    W0133-2025562  New

Qty:
$170.33
ACM HVAC Heater Core
  • with Climate Control
Brand: ACM
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2011 - Volkswagen Eos
ACM
2007 Volkswagen GTI HVAC Heater Core ACM

P311-534A697    W0133-2025562  New

Qty:
$170.33
ACM HVAC Heater Core
  • with Denso System
Brand: ACM
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2007 - Volkswagen GTI
ACM
2018 Volkswagen Tiguan Limited HVAC Heater Core ACM

P311-534A697    W0133-2025562  New

Qty:
$170.33
ACM HVAC Heater Core
  • Vendor:DENSO
Brand: ACM
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2018 - Volkswagen Tiguan Limited
ACM
2011 Volkswagen Golf HVAC Heater Core ACM

P311-534A697    W0133-2025562  New

Qty:
$170.33
ACM HVAC Heater Core
  • Vendor - Denso
Brand: ACM
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Body
2011 - Volkswagen Golf Hatchback
ACM
2015 Volkswagen CC HVAC Heater Core ACM

P311-534A697    W0133-2025562  New

Qty:
$170.33
ACM HVAC Heater Core
  • Production: -01/11/2015
Brand: ACM
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Prod. Date Range
2015 - Volkswagen CC To:01-11-15
ACM
2001 Volkswagen Passat HVAC Heater Core ACM

P311-5142C97    W0133-1622658  New

Qty:
$41.94
ACM HVAC Heater Core
Brand: ACM
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel
2001 - Volkswagen Passat GLS 4 Motion

Latest Volkswagen Repair and Heater Core Installation Advice

CarJunky AutoAdvice

96 Volkswagen Golf overheating

Showing 9 out of 10 Posts | Show 1 Hidden Posts
Question From juniorinky on 96 Volkswagen Golf overheating

bought a used 96 golf. it runs about 230 degrees. I put a new thermostat in an a new water pump. I flushed the heater core and the radiator out. I hope The fans up say they run all the time just to see if this would help. I bought a new temperature sender unit and it still reach 230 degrees. it will sit and idle perfect and it runs great but it just reads a little high especially with the fans running all the time now. I thought maybe it might be a head gasket. it did get a little warm and it ran up to about 235. I'm going to check the compression on it tonight. if I take the cap off the overflow tank it will bubble up over

Response From Sidom

How are you seeing that it's running at 230? If you are going by the gauge in the dash then it would be best to see what the temp the comp temp sensor is reading...These systems will run in the 220 range so 230 isn't that far out....if the dash gauge is slightly skewed that could account for a high reading...

Before you rigged up the cooling fans, were they coming on & going off by themselves?

Have you been having to add any coolant?

These systems need pressure on them to raise the boiling point so running it with the cap off can cause some problems in itself...

Response From juniorinky

That was one of the things I first thought that maybe the guage was off.I installed a new sending unit and the fans did come on and off by themselves.I just temporarily rigged them to see if the temp would go down with them on constant but it doesnt. with the fans running I would think that the temperature would be quite a bit lower than 230. the car runs great and idles great it just stays at 230.I thought maybe it could be a head gasket.

Response From Sidom

It is possible that something is going on, I would have to find the exact specs on a VW but take a GM. The fans will come on around 225 and run until around the 210 mark and then turn off....If there was a problem with that system that kept the temp up, the fans would run constantly..

The fact yours were turning off sounds like comp was seeing normal conditions..

Head gaskets, even in their early stages usually show some other signs than just a high temp.....Some are using small amounts of coolant on a regular basis, running rough for a few minutes on cold start up, the heater intermittently losing heat & blowing cold...

A bad sending unit could definitely cause a bad reading on your gauge but it's not the only thing, theres wires & the gauge itself..

It's not going to hurt anything to check the other stuff but I would really want to look at a datastream and see what the comp is seeing...

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Oroginal poster: NEVER TAKE A PRESSURE CAP OFF OF COOLING SYSTEM WHEN ITS EVEN A WARM ENGINE - YOU MIGHT NOT KNOW HOW MUCH PRESSURE IS IN THERE OR IS RELIEVING IT WILL CAUSE SUDDEN BOILING IN YOUR FACE AND THEN OFF FOR SKIN GRAFTS! I DON'T CARE IF THE CAR BLOWS UP DON'T DO THAT!

Do you think you really have a problem at all? Already said the dash gauge isn't necessarily that accurate. With electric fan cooled radiators there will be some minor fluctuation in temps - then fan(s) come on and then that's the temp it can do.

Hot wiring it you took a chance at messing things up. They either do or don't come on by themselves and while driving along most will not be needed - some are. If you have A/C and or using defrost many fans just stay on - can't know each design.
If you really want to know actual temps you need an infrared thermometer taken right at thermostat and it should be real close to the thermostat's rating and use only the one temp, proper thermostat the car calls for. Many are going to be 195F but can't speak for all.

Maybe I misread something but you need accurate info before you just go jumping to conclusions. My first point was the point. Pressure will prevent coolant from boiling by near exactly 3 degrees F per lb rating of the pressure cap. Fun facts. That is, a 15lb pressure cap the coolant will not boil until 45 degrees higher than the boiling point at your altitude too which counts. Releasing it when forced in liquid state it will instantly flash boil the danger of which is likely plastered all over the place underhood! Careful first,

T

Response From juniorinky

I am wondering if I do have a problem or maybe paranoid.I just think 230 is too high especially when fans are always on and my thermostat is 195.Coming home last nite it got a lot hotter than 230.I tried to burp the system this morning to expel the air and noticed the lowet rad hose was at best luke warm.All others were real hot.My son is taking the rad out now so I will do a better job flushing it after work.

Response From Sidom Top Rated Answer

If the passage ways in the radiator get restricted then no amout of flushing will clear those.

When you 1st start losing passages, it's more noticable when the engine is under load.....higher speeds...going up hill...running the a/c...Thats when it needs 100% of the cooling area & if only 80% is there, then it will run hotter..

If you have a infra-red thermometer, you can check all the areas of the radiator for cool spots....If there are areas that are "cold", that would indiate that coolant isn't flowing thru them due to a restricted passage way

Of course if the radiator is doing it's job then the outlet hose will be cooler than the inlet hose....If both hose were the same temp....then that would be a problem...

You said in an earlier post that the fans were coming on & going off by themselves & only stayed on after you rigged them to.......
Has something changed since then?

I can't say for sure is you do or don't have a problem.....The 1st step would be to moniter the coolant via the comp....at idle & cruise....

Using a dash gauge to diag cooling problems can lead you down blind alleys......Been there done that

Response From juniorinky

Fixed my overheating problem and wanted to post to let others know if they have a problem like mine.Replaced the head gasket and solved the overheating issue.Wired the fans back to normal and now we are back to normal.Didnt see anything out of the ordinary but it was pretty nasty but all cleaned up and running great.Thanks for everyones help.

Response From Hammer Time

The blown head gasket is not a surprise but something else may have caused that head gasket to blow in the first place. Unless you know what the trigger of the original overheating was you may still have an underlying issue in the cooling system that will need to be addressed to prevent it from happening again.

Response From MarineGrunt

First thing you should do is probably pressure test the cooling system and check for leaks.

2001 6n2 polo tdi , Head Gasket Problem?

Showing 3 out of 16 Posts | Show 13 Hidden Posts
Question From ShazPolo on 2001 6n2 polo tdi , Head Gasket Problem?

Hi there. I have a 2001 Volkswagen Polo Colour Concept 1.4 tdi 3 cylinder. It has done 106,000 miles. Right the issue with this car is that when I take it on a good run for example a 20-30 min long run on the motorway/ring roads, the coolant will near enough empty, so it's losing a lot of water. Now I can't see any leaks, but when I put my foot down the car chucks out black smoke, not sure if this is due to it being remapped or because of the headgasket. Also when I put the heaters on, there is a horrible smell that comes in to the car, as if someone burnt something in the oven. The oil looks fine. The coolant bottle is a bit dark at the bottom of it and no matter how hot the engine is when you open the coolant cap it doesn't chuck out water so it wouldn't burst open like most cars. The car doesn't get overheated, but loses water a lot. Please can you help me as I don't know where this water is going. How can I physically check the headgasket or check for a crack in the head of the engine? Thanks

Response From Discretesignals Top Rated Answer

You need to have the coolant system pressure tested. Some leaks won't show up until there is pressure in the system. If you have a coolant smell inside the vehicle the heater core is probably leaking.

Response From ShazPolo

I took the car to another garage today, the mechanic screwed the coolant cap off checked the water and the water looked clean, he said if it was head gasket this water wouldn't be clean, he also looked at the oil and the oil looked very clean too. he concluded by saying it could be the water pump but I'll check it for you properly tomorrow. Also I've realised today the car getting a bit steamed up from the inside and that smell still exists. The mechanic said the smell could be Air filter/pollen filter. But the steam? Heater matrix?

Response From Hammer Time

That guy is the janitor masquerading as a mechanic. Take it somewhere else.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Hey - you need better help than you got. Steaming inside is almost always the "core" for the heater which is a mini radiator if the term isn't used by you.

The smell/odor about confirms it. Losing that much "water" better said coolant would almost always make a mess inside the car generally on passenger's side and not familiar with this car so couldn't say which side as it sounds right hand drive so far. So yes there's a pretty good chance it needs more than just the core. Real techs shouldn't have too much trouble diagnosing this but may not know exactly if head gasket is involved the total extent of that job till apart,

T

Response From ShazPolo

Hi fellas thanks for the reply. Yes that mechanic didn't seem too sure. I went to a couple of mechanics today, both said it doesn't seem to be head gasket, because theres no white smoke coming out of the exhaust, no milky oil, no oil in the expansion tank and the water isn't being lost around town, just on long runs on the motorways/highways . They both said it could boil down to the following things, The cap on the expansion tank, water pump, thermostat, heater core. Right another question, the radiator fan isn't kicking in, I replaced the fan switch, and the number 30 fuse on top of the battery, then it started to work, but now it isn't working again, I pulled off the switch adapter connected to the fan switch, connected a wire to both connection points on the adapter and the fan started to work only whilst I had the wire connected, maybe I need to buy another new fan switch? And when the fan isn't kicking in, could this be the reason that the Overheating light comes on when there is water loss? Sorry for doing your heads in guys, I just don't know a great deal about cars. Thanks. And Yes it is a right hand drive. P.S one of the mechanics today said the windows are getting steamed because of a slight leak in the heater matrix (core) but that doesn't explain the great amount of water loss

Response From Hammer Time

The fan motor is probably shot and drawing too much current.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Loss of coolant/water will cause overheating for any reason it leaks. Fan must work and your warning light/gauge could be confused if running low on coolant. I say "coolant" as engines are NOT made to run on real plain water even for vehicles that would be used in places that could never freeze there was a product sold called "coolant" just to protect engine metals but haven't even heard of it sold and wouldn't be practical for even US tropical areas or territories.

A heater core leak could leak externally to something hot like exhaust and burn off without much evidence and still make an odor. Some could leak at a hose connections and not be the "core" itself but drip into that housing (air box) with both loss of coolant and the odor and not be the core itself. Rare for exactly that.

Any reason an engine overheats things are stressed. Head gaskets and a list of things go wrong up to ruining an engine. Fan just might be drawing too much power as Hammer Time said if it blew new parts that made it work for a while. Just lack of fan could cause overheating and blow coolant to ground but you should see evidence or have warning light or gauge inside.

Leaks unseen only at longer use or higher speeds can be water-pumps or several vehicles still need fan even when air speed should be enough.

Don't worry about which words we call assorted parts. The harder part for a vehicle not sold to where most techs here are is we wouldn't know of so many very common problems with a certain make or model - the basic ideas of how things work are still there. The tests and observations for head gasket are fair so far but can take more intense diagnosing to be absolutely certain,

T

Response From Discretesignals

Or the steam from the leaking heater core is shorting out the fan resistor.

Response From ShazPolo

Hi, took the car on the motorway today, it lost all its water within 30-40 mins, then the temperature light came on, although the temperature never went above 90. I put the heaters on warm and kept my window open until the next service station, I manually connected the fan to the battery, and topped up the water again. This time all the coolant was lost within 20 minutes . I really don't know where the coolant is going so quick. I pulled over and didn't see any leaks anywhere. When I drive around the city, I can drive for ages and ages, and the car won't lose coolant, even driving it fast, it doesn't lose coolant. But as soon as I hit the motorway/highway and go at high speeds for long periods of time, it loses water and the temperature light comes on. Could it be water pump? Head Gasket? A crack in the head?

Response From Hammer Time

I put the heaters on warm and kept my window open until the next service station,

That's the fastest way I know to be buying a new engine. I see it every day.

You need to have the car towed to a repair shop and have them pressure test the system to find the leak and pray you haven't already ruined the motor.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Shaz - losing water that fast if it wasn't a head gasket it will be and probably lots more at HT said maybe the whole engine is toast and still need to fix why it was leaking in the first place,


T

Response From Discretesignals


Also I've realised today the car getting a bit steamed up from the inside and that smell still exists. The mechanic said the smell could be Air filter/pollen filter. But the steam? Heater matrix?

Those are symptoms of a leaking heater core. How comes someone can't figure that out? It probably only pisses out when the engine is running.

Response From ShazPolo

Right fellas. An update. I stuck a cloth to the Coolant Bottle (expansion tank), went on a long journey, got to my destination and checked the cloth, the cloth was soaked, i squeezed the cloth and a lot of water dripped out. So I am going to change the coolant bottle.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Saz - Let's start over with this. The "recovery" bottle/tank/THINGY should have "coolant" in it and markings for "cold" and "hot" (meaning warmed up) levels so would soak a cloth if this was properly filled in anything that uses that system which is EVERYTHING I can think of since the 1960s about.

Plain water is not good even if it is using lots at least a mild mix - add food coloring if need be - like just a drop or two but most are colored either green or orange/pink, some blue out there.

Back: It the tank leaks which isn't unheard of then liquid would come out any may be part way up where it leaks then when cooled off or after cycling level normally would go empty and voila you would have a wet cloth - which if a test should be UNABLE to clog the return hole to usually a hose back to radiator.

If, If, If that is what is happening AND coolant is coming out at a certain level more so with full operating temp whilst (did that for you) driving it could make a smell inside car and a chance leave little evidence.

It would leak just sitting there cold if overfilled for a test as well near certainly. THEY DO CRACK especially at fasteners that hold them or just bad luck and have to go for new. Patching them if so from outside either wont last or wont work at all. If that tank is also pressurized as in the cap is the acting radiator cap no patch will last for poop.

This is possible for the situation but unusual you wouldn't see it or evidence. If so it still could and will run engine short of coolant, overheat sooner or later and all the possible damage from overheating possible,

T

Response From Discretesignals



Also I've realised today the car getting a bit steamed up from the inside and that smell still exists. The mechanic said the smell could be Air filter/pollen filter. But the steam? Heater matrix?

This is a symptom of a bad heater core. I don't understand why it can't be determined if it is leaking or not.


If that is a surge tank that is cracked, why haven't you seen coolant on the ground? When is someone going to pressure check this coolant system and determine where the coolant is going??????

You keep driving it like that and your going to need an engine. If there is a leak, the system can't pressurize and lower the boiling point of the coolant.