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  • Centric Parts offers a full line of C-Tek standard replacement brake and clutch parts for import and domestic vehicles. C-Tek components provide exceptional quality and value. Utilizing world-wide manufacturing sources allows Centric Parts to provide the highest quality replacement parts while maintaining value.
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Brand: Centric
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2002 - Chrysler Neon Rear
Centric
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  • Centric Parts offers a full line of C-Tek standard replacement brake and clutch parts for import and domestic vehicles. C-Tek components provide exceptional quality and value. Utilizing world-wide manufacturing sources allows Centric Parts to provide the highest quality replacement parts while maintaining value.
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Brand: Centric
Position: Rear
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Vehicle Body Position
2004 - Chrysler Sebring Sedan Rear
Centric
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Centric Drum Brake Wheel Cylinder  Rear
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  • Centric Parts offers a full line of C-Tek standard replacement brake and clutch parts for import and domestic vehicles. C-Tek components provide exceptional quality and value. Utilizing world-wide manufacturing sources allows Centric Parts to provide the highest quality replacement parts while maintaining value.
  • Suggested Purchase Quantity: 2
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Brand: Centric
Position: Rear
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Vehicle Position
1990 - Chrysler Town & Country Rear
Centric
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Centric Drum Brake Wheel Cylinder  Rear
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  • 13/16" Bore
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    • California Proposition 65: Warning: Cancer And Reproductive Harm
  • Centric Parts offers a full line of C-Tek standard replacement brake and clutch parts for import and domestic vehicles. C-Tek components provide exceptional quality and value. Utilizing world-wide manufacturing sources allows Centric Parts to provide the highest quality replacement parts while maintaining value.
  • Suggested Purchase Quantity: 2
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Brand: Centric
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1998 - Chrysler Town & Country FWD Rear
Centric
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Centric Drum Brake Wheel Cylinder  Rear
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  • 3/4" Bore
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  • Centric Parts offers a full line of C-Tek standard replacement brake and clutch parts for import and domestic vehicles. C-Tek components provide exceptional quality and value. Utilizing world-wide manufacturing sources allows Centric Parts to provide the highest quality replacement parts while maintaining value.
  • Suggested Purchase Quantity: 2
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Brand: Centric
Position: Rear
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1998 - Chrysler Town & Country FWD Rear
Centric
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Centric Drum Brake Wheel Cylinder  Rear
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  • 14" Wheels 260mm Front Disc
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  • Centric Parts offers a full line of C-Tek standard replacement brake and clutch parts for import and domestic vehicles. C-Tek components provide exceptional quality and value. Utilizing world-wide manufacturing sources allows Centric Parts to provide the highest quality replacement parts while maintaining value.
  • Suggested Purchase Quantity: 2
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Brand: Centric
Position: Rear
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Vehicle Drive Type Position
1995 - Chrysler Town & Country FWD Rear
Centric
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$9.27
Centric Drum Brake Wheel Cylinder  Rear
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  • 15" Wheels 282mm Front Disc
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  • Product Attributes:
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  • Centric Parts offers a full line of C-Tek standard replacement brake and clutch parts for import and domestic vehicles. C-Tek components provide exceptional quality and value. Utilizing world-wide manufacturing sources allows Centric Parts to provide the highest quality replacement parts while maintaining value.
  • Suggested Purchase Quantity: 2
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Brand: Centric
Position: Rear
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Vehicle BrakeABS Drive Type Position
1994 - Chrysler Town & Country Non-ABS FWD Rear
Centric
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Centric Drum Brake Wheel Cylinder  Rear
  • C-Tek Standard Wheel Cylinder
  • C-TEK Standard Wheel Cylinder
  • Product Attributes:
    • California Proposition 65: Warning: Cancer And Reproductive Harm
  • Centric Parts offers a full line of C-Tek standard replacement brake and clutch parts for import and domestic vehicles. C-Tek components provide exceptional quality and value. Utilizing world-wide manufacturing sources allows Centric Parts to provide the highest quality replacement parts while maintaining value.
  • Suggested Purchase Quantity: 2
    • Most jobs typically require 2 of this item.
Brand: Centric
Position: Rear
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Position
2003 - Chrysler Voyager Rear
Centric
Qty:
$10.02
Centric Drum Brake Wheel Cylinder  Rear
  • C-Tek Standard Wheel Cylinder
  • C-TEK Standard Wheel Cylinder
  • Product Attributes:
    • California Proposition 65: Warning: Cancer And Reproductive Harm
  • Centric Parts offers a full line of C-Tek standard replacement brake and clutch parts for import and domestic vehicles. C-Tek components provide exceptional quality and value. Utilizing world-wide manufacturing sources allows Centric Parts to provide the highest quality replacement parts while maintaining value.
  • Suggested Purchase Quantity: 2
    • Most jobs typically require 2 of this item.
Brand: Centric
Position: Rear
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Position
1996 - Chrysler Town & Country Rear
Centric
Qty:
$12.89
Centric Drum Brake Wheel Cylinder  Rear
  • Centric Premium Wheel Cylinder
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  • Product Attributes:
    • California Proposition 65: Warning: Cancer And Reproductive Harm
  • The Centric Parts brake hydraulic program is the most complete and up-to-date in the industry and includes Brake Master and Wheel Cylinders, Brake Hoses, Caliper And Wheel Cylinder Repair Kits And Remanufactured Power Boosters.
  • Suggested Purchase Quantity: 2
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Brand: Centric
Position: Rear
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Position
2007 - Chrysler Town & Country Rear

Latest Chrysler Repair and Wheel Cylinder Installation Advice

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Brake repair or lack of on 2000 GMC Sierra

Showing 2 out of 3 Posts | Show 1 Hidden Posts
Question From dogsnponies on Brake repair or lack of on 2000 GMC Sierra

I had taken my truck in for repair as the the brakes were making noise and slow to stop. When I picked up the truck I was advised that the brakes were not in need of repair but instead were cleaned and adjusted. The receipt read: "Remove dual rear wheels, inspect shoes, drums, wheel cylinders and hardware, replace and torque to specification".
A few weeks later the rear brakes seized and caught on fire on the highway necessitating a tow for the truck and a horse trailer. The brakes had to be drilled off of the truck and the truck required new rear brake shoes, wheel cylinders and adjustment. I was told my the mechanic that the linings were paper thin.
My question is- what did this first shop do wrong or not do at all?

Response From DanD Top Rated Answer

After a couple of weeks worth of driving before the incident; I find it hard to believe they were adjusted incorrectly; with-in the first 10 or 20 miles you would have felt/smelt/seen something.
I have seen the self adjuster(s) do this and don’t ask me why?
It just happened to us on a 3500 GMC G van; we did a complete rear brake job; it got everything except drums (they were machined); about 6 months ago.
Last week the driver came in with smoke rolling out of the right rear drum. Pulled it apart; thinking I was going to see a failed axle seal or the bonding of the friction material had come off. But there was nothing visibly wrong other then you could see that the new adjuster lever had a worn mark on it from trying to ratchet the adjuster wheel? Everything was in place; the parking cable wasn’t over tightened, nothing? We replaced all the heat damaged components, machined the drum and sent him down the road; still not knowing why?
This part I’m only speculating on; this is a new driver (one week) with this company and he’s on a route where he has to back into a lot of loading docks with this van. If he’s a nervous two footed driver (especially backing up); it could explain why the adjuster got such a work out?
Back in the 80’s when full sized rear wheel drive Chryslers were the norm as taxi cabs; we would purposely leave the adjuster levers off. We blamed the constant stop & go and backing up that a cab does for the adjuster to walk themselves up and lock the wheels?

Dan.

Response From Hammer Time

They may have adjusted them to tightly or something in the self adjusters kept making them tighter. It is highly suspicious at the least but hard to prove anything.

Two Ladies Restoring a 1988 Chrysler Fith Avenue Need Help Installing Brakes and Suspension! PLEASE HELP!!!

Showing 7 out of 7 Posts
Question From Dark1s on Two Ladies Restoring a 1988 Chrysler Fith Avenue Need Help Installing Brakes and Suspension! PLEASE HELP!!!

We're doing a complete restore on a 1988 Chrysler 5th Avenue. First of all just to let everyone know, we don't have any previous automotive experience But we're not dumb and we're determined that this car is going to get fixed, even if we have to stand on our heads! After purchasing the repair manual online, we already with no one's help installed the windshield wiper motor, and stripped down the door frames and replaced the window motor. So as far as the brakes and suspension go, we're starting with the parts that need the most attention. First on the list of repairs is completely replacing all the parts that have to do with Steering, Suspension, and Brakes. When replacing the Brakes and Suspension, which parts should we replace first? We called the local auto parts store and got a list of parts we need to to replace the Brakes. Here's the list they gave us.1 Brake Pads (Front), 1 Brake Shoes (Rear), 2 Rotor & Hub Assemblies (Front), 2 Brake Drums (Rear), 2 Wheel Cylinders (Rear), 1 Brake Show Hardware Kit, 1 Hold Down Kit (Rear), 1 Self Adjuster Repair Kit (Left), 1 Self Adjuster Repair Kit (Right), 1 Brake Hose ( Left Front), 1 Brake Hose (Right Front), 1 Brake Hose (Rear), 2 Wheel Bearings (Outer and Front), 2 Wheel Seals, (Front Wheel), 2 Spindle Lock Nut Kits (Front), 2 Dust Caps/Wheel Bearing), 2 Wheel Bearings (Rear Wheel), 2 Wheel Seals (Rear Wheel), 1 Caliper w/ Hardware (Left Front), 1 Caliper w/Hardware (Right Front). Is anything missing from this list? Which part is it best to install first? Now for the suspension, we're really out in the cold, because Mopar doesn't make any of the parts going back more then 10 years and we're talking 1988, so we have find a different solution to getting parts such as new leaf springs and a torsion bar, etc for the suspension. How do we find parts not made by the manufacturer any more??? And we're talking about complete teardown of the suspension just like the brakes. We want to get this baby in mint condition! Like he came right off the lot!

By the way, there's another question that's kinda related to this whole job. We're gonna be under the car a lot, so we want to know, Are Jack Stands Safe? I've heard a lot of hell stories about Jack stands, so we wanted to know can you lift the car completely off the ground on four jackstands and work safely underneath it? We're using four five-ton jack stands. Any suggestions would be great. We'll be so happy when the brakes and suspension are working again. No more squeaking and slipping! Thanks again!

Response From Tom Greenleaf

You have so much going on here that you probably should enroll in an adult ed vocational school.

Why do you think it needs a torsion bar? Just one! Rusted at the floor? Forget that car if so.

Leaf springs - again why?

If you must do this just make sure car is properly supported on solid surface.

Best to ask one question at a time as things arise. I can't give you two year tech school education in one thread,

T

Response From Dark1s

Thank you for your imput Tom but we don't have the money or time to go to vocational school so we have been kinda winging it like they did in the ol day's. I purchased the repair manual because it's a complete rebuild guide as for as the basic parts. The leaf springs on my car are not in the best condition a bit of rust on them and the shackles on one of them looks very bent. We were just simply asking if it's a good idea to do the brakes and suspension at the same time since we are going to be taking the bottom of the car apart? And which one should we start working on first the suspension or the brakes?? We we're just hoping to get some kinda guideness or els we'll just have to jump in head first?

Response From Tom Greenleaf Top Rated Answer

I'd make it stop properly first!

What you need is one heck of a good parts outlet. I would choose NAPA nearest to me for pro help. Springs (leaf) can be fixed and a good parts store would know who does in the area.

Near every dumb part you need is same day for a car that new or is for me. I drive an 1989 as a dailer driver - not this car but order by 10am parts are there by 4pm almost without fail!

Torsion bars are adjustable! If one is broken (I think this uses two) that's a different thing.

Suspension and front end parts. They wouldn't likely all be bad so learn how to look for the worn ones.

Brakes: Follow your guide to the letter! If you need parking brake cables you make any adjustments to them when brakes are done and proper first.

Short of dropping this off for resoration there are several trades involved. Front end and alignment specialty shops. Not worth buying some tools for many repairs. You will likely need an auto body shop and a body shop parts store for some common stuff. Know a good salvage yard. Special body parts won't be available new easily.

Special shops for different things:

Body work/finish work.
Auto Glass as needed.
Transmission work is frequently on it's own.
Front End parts and alignments not done everywhere - another specialty.
Uphostery! Need I say more?
A/C is frequently on its own too.
Welding is on its own short of smaller issues.
The list goes on forever.

Trying to say you need a good central shop and parts store as your "Ring Master" to do this as you simply won't be able to do everything yourself.

There are plenty of things you can do yourself and plenty that would cost you zillions to have the equipment/tools for.

I'd find a local or national club for Mopars and join it.

____________________

Is the car operational now? If rough enough you may want to buy a parts car of the same.

One thing at a time as you can't just wave a wand and it all be done at once nor at the same places.

Tools! Yikes you can go broke buying just tools. When something needs a special tool it frequently is better to just let that go out as the tool can easily exceed the whole cost of a job. Why own a tool for a one time thing?

Appreciate your energy but suggest you break things down into catagories and go for it one area at a time,

T

Response From Dark1s

Thanks. Appreciate you pointing us in the right direction. We are starting just one job at a time. Now we know to stick with the brakes first. The car is operational. So we're not trying to do everything at once. Trying to keep the job step by step. Right now what we're focusing on is the Brakes and Suspension, since that is what we seems to have the most problems. The A/C and all that other stuff can wait for later. We already found a local junkyard and pulled some body interior parts, so we're not completely dumb. We've done our research as much as a newbie can do.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Start with front brakes. I wouldn't even touch the rears till front is all done. If you place floor jack under lower control arm just lift it a couple inches. Pry up on the wheel still on and look for motion at ball joints then jockey it side to side and look for tie rod ends, pitman arm, idler arm for play. Just do that now so you know if you need those.

Take the front wheels off, caliper off of rotor and let's get going. The flex hoses unless this is a museum piece will give you a hard time where they meed the body and metal line. May break metal line and we can cross those bridges when and if they happen,

T

Response From Hammer Time

I can't give you two year tech school education in one thread,

Keyboard won' survive that........LOL

Seizing brakes on 2001 Dodge Dakota 6cl

Showing 2 out of 2 Posts
Question From Bernie on Seizing brakes on 2001 Dodge Dakota 6cl

Recurring brake seizing problem on 2001 3.9 litre dodge dakota. Have spent over $1600.00 on repairs by qualified repair shops on 3 occasions to no avail. Today. the front left (disc) brake seized on. I become aware because pedal becomes rock hard with no free play and wheel pulls to l. or r. whichever is seizing. When I stop and touch the wheels, one of them is too hot to touch. If the truck sits for a few hours and cools down, brakes seem normal again. I'm really reluctant to write the following but it is absolutely true. Sometimes, the right or left REAR brake will seize also and as you know, they are drum brakes not discs like the fronts. Incidentally the mileage is only about 70 K but I have had the rotors replaced on 2 occasions with aftermarket stuff because the problem started with oem parts and Iv'e been told the Chrysler rotors are problematic.The most recent serviceman thought their might be dirt in the hydraulic system so he flushed it and replaced the fluid , again to no avail.I just can't trust this vehicle for reliable transportation any more. Are their any sugestions out their???????????????????

Response From Tom Greenleaf Top Rated Answer

Some thoughts on this: The hot one to the touch is the one that's seizing up. Vehicle will pull either way when hot as sometimes the hot or dragging one has more friction then less when too hot.

Problem can be either the caliper or the flex hose to it or a mix of both. Best to replace in pairs. You didn't say was the $1600 bucks in repairs was for and if not those items already done not sure what to say except it's bad luck all at once.

Check all brakes. Rear drums can freeze wheel cylinder's pistons but more commonly a parking brake cable refuses to release all the way. It might be the front brakes so hot that fluid is boiling and rear brakes are still working hard - dunno from here.

Rear brakes if one is dragging tend NOT to make the vehicle pull so much but will show one warm or hot vs the other if so. If equal perhaps both are doing more work than they should if fronts are boiling fluid.

It's brakes - gotta check them all out and repair/replace parts as needed,

T

Town & Country Brake Troubles

Showing 2 out of 31 Posts | Show 29 Hidden Posts
Question From Vetro_Radox on Town & Country Brake Troubles

Hello there! The car I'm having issues with is a 1994 Chrysler Town & Country AWD 3.8L with more mileage than you'd believe. I'll start with the most important problem first. I have next to no braking when the car is running and only slightly more with the car off. I cannot build any real pressure in lines with the car on or off. I must apologize here for I have only had the chance to bleed one side so far, I wil try the other side tomorrow. Fluid reaches the drivers side front brake normally during bleeding but I still cannot build any pressure in the lines. The drivers side rear brake is a whole different problem, absolutely no fluid goes to the rear during bleeding. The brake reservoir is full and no fluid is leaking anywhere. None of the lines appear to be crimped or damaged in any way either. It is also worth noting that the front calipers, shoes, and rotors have all been replaced recently although I do not believe that has caused the aforementioned problem. The problem was not exactly sudden but it took less than three days to develop to the point it is at now.

The second problem is likely connected to the first in some way and has been going on for much longer. The van gradually developed a front driver's side brake grab that would not be present while the car was off and not until the car had been driven for a few miles. It was minor at first and may have been going on for a short while before I noticed. I eventually felt the drag that the brake was having tried to adjust my driving style to prevent the brake from grabbing as hard. Eventually it progressed to the point that the brake would actually smoke after the car had been driven for a while. I didn't yet have the money to replace parts (I had assumed I had a warped rotor or sticking piston or something along those lines) so I was forced to drive the van for a few more days, I'll admit, I was foolish and made a mistake doing so. One day the brake grabbed particularly hard and tore the rotor clean in half. I now didn't have a choice so I had no choice but to pony up the cash and replace the rotor, caliper, and shoes. I did both of the front brakes just as a precaution. The problem is, the front driver's side brake still sticks while driving. Not as hard as it was before, but I don't doubt that the same thing will happen again if I don't do something. Fortunately I was able to stop driving this car regularly soon after I replaced the brake parts and was forced not to drive it at all shortly thereafter due to the first problem occurring.

Thank you all for reading this, if I have omitted any information you require please let me know. I will be checking in on this thread frequently as I am at a bit of a loss right now. I'm much more used to my simple old El Camino.

Response From Sidom

Is the rubber gasket the seals the master cylinder reservoir cap swollen & distorted and doesn't seem to fit the cap anymore?

Response From Sidom

I was referring to the "original" seals. If anything besides DOT3 brake fluid was used in that system. Then the whole system is contaminate and every rubber part would need to be replaced.

A good indicator is the rubber cap on the master gets swollen & distorted because of the contamination. Every other rubber piece will do the same as the cap and it causes all kinds of brk problems.....

A big mistake people make is to use power steering fluid or ATF......

Edit...I missed that last sentence......Yes it is a good thing if it is in its original form & undistorted

Response From Vetro_Radox

Definitely no fluid contamination. While I'm not the most experienced with newer cars I have rebuilt just about every inch of my El Camino so I have a decent amount of mechanical knowledge. Sorry I haven't yet gotten back to you guys with the results of the brake bleeding. Hopefully I will get a chance in the next couple days. The temperature being over 106 is a little annoying but it won't stop me from doing the brakes.

Response From nickwarner

I'm going to go back to your first post and comment. You said you only bled the left side. You can't bleed that way and get a good result. You must go from the furthest from the master to closest. The right rear, left rear, right front, left front in that order.

Response From Vetro_Radox

Indeed, I was mostly checking to see if I was getting fluid to the brakes. I included that information in my original post just to mention that no fluid was getting to the left rear at all. I ran out of time then to do an actual brake bleeding so I will have to do a real one soon.

Response From nickwarner

Follow the brake lines right near the gas tank and there is a residual pressure valve for the rear brakes. See if you have fluid coming in and going out of it.

Response From Vetro_Radox Top Rated Answer

Hello again, sorry for the large delay in response, life got in the way a bit. I have now replaced the master cylinder because I discovered the old one was leaking at the back. I then bled all the brakes and now braking is not bad at all. I still need to replace the front flex hoses but that shouldn't be any trouble. There is still one problem. During bleeding no fluid would come out of the left rear bleeder. I then decided to pull the line off to see if fluid was even getting to the wheel cylinder. As soon as I turned the line fluid came out of the bleeder. So I closed the line up and tried to bleed that brake again, no fluid. I cannot undo that brake line without damaging it due to rust so I will probably have to replace the line anyway. Could I possibly have a clogged wheel cylinder or something?

Response From nickwarner

You could have a bad bleeder screw. Take it completely out and see if fluid will come through the hole. If so you can get individual brake bleeders at the parts stores. Its really a small passage in them for fluid and if they get a bit of rust in them won't flow through at all.

Response From Vetro_Radox

I actually did try it with the bleeder screw out. No fluid then either. I should've mentioned that in my last post.

Response From Discretesignals

You trying to bleed the rear brakes with the wheels off the ground?

Response From Vetro_Radox

Up on jack stands actually. The rear right didn't have any trouble with bleeding however.

Response From Discretesignals

That has that height sensing proportioning valve I believe. It's the thing the rear brake lines run to that has a spring attached to it that is connected to the suspension. We had one a while back where the valve got stuck and was blocking off brake pressure. It can also be plugged up with contamination too.

If the rear suspension is hanging down, the proportioning valve will block off.

Response From Vetro_Radox

Hmm.. I have actually looked for that, my chilton implies that because this is an AWD model in wasn't equipped with one. I've followed the line to the front and didn't find one, unless it is for some reason between the fuel tank and the floor of the van.

Response From Discretesignals

It wouldn't be hard to find, so maybe yours isn't equipped. It should have a Bendix ABS system in it that could be causing problem with fluid getting to that wheels. Sometimes they use the ABS system to proportion brake fluid to the rear. I don't know if that system is that high tech though. You might have to unscrew the brake pipe for that wheel at the ABS module and then see if the line is clear. If the line is clear, bleeding the ABS module out might be the next step. There is a huge procedure for bleeding out the hydraulic modulator and it requires a scan tool with the capability to do that.

Response From Vetro_Radox

You are correct about it having a Bendix ABS system. I'll see what I can do, however I don't know a whole lot about ABS systems so I'll have to be cautious. If I end up having to bleed the hydraulic modulator I might just have to live with 3 wheel braking, I definitely can't afford a scan tool, particularly not for a car with 3/4 of a million miles on it.

Response From Hammer Time

I am really amazed at the thought process of some DIYers.

If I end up having to bleed the hydraulic modulator I might just have to live with 3 wheel braking, I definitely can't afford a scan tool, particularly not for a car with 3/4 of a million miles on it.


Why have you ruled out simply just paying a shop to bleed your brakes for you?

Response From Vetro_Radox

Bleeding the brakes has gone fine, but I know very little about ABS systems if I'm honest so when Discretesignals said that the bleeding the hydraulic modulator was a huge procedure and that it would require a scan tool I decided that I was probably out of luck for now. I'm in college right now and have pretty much no money so that's why I can't get a shop involved. Having looked up hydraulic modulator bleeding it doesn't actually seem that difficult if I can find someone with a scan tool.

Response From Vetro_Radox

Whoops didn't mean to make this extra post, I thought my last one didn't go through.

Response From Vetro_Radox

Nope, cap seals are brand new. Interestingly enough I discovered (before the posting of this thread) that there was an extra cap seal that had somehow ended up stuck inside the master cylinder reservoir. I'm not sure where this gasket came from, I've changed the cap seals several times before and never lost track of a gasket. Odd as this is, the removal of this extra gasket seal has made no difference in the way the braking system acts. It is also important to note that the gasket seal I removed from the reservoir is undamaged.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

So far I haven't seen any flex hoses being replaced. The rubber flex hose to calipers can fail inside them unseen such that fluid pressure can't return. Some, even without using brakes just build up pressure from expanded brake fluid and that brake will drag. If so or if somehow still original - do both fronts or all of them at this age and as you indicated, high miles.

Those flex hoses on Mopars go to a brake line with a long flare nut that easily corrodes to the metal line inside so be ready to make up new line if they will not cooperate.

You said you've only bled out one side? Not much point in brake feel till all are known free of air in the system. Fresh brake fluid would be good for it all around and may take a pressure bleeder to accomplish it - when all else is right,

T

Response From Vetro_Radox

Hi there guys, thanks for the advice so far. I'll give the brakes a real bleeding today and I'll look into replacing those front flex hoses. It has been a while since I've done those. The rear brakes are drums however and do not have flex hoses. I'm still wondering what would stop fluid completely from going to the driver's side rear.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Rear isn't making a front wheel drag in anything I can think of? There just may be two flex hoses or at least one for rear. I just can't recall if this is independently rear suspended or a plain axle but with AWD it wouldn't be like one without back there,

T

Response From Vetro_Radox

It's a plain rear axle with AWD.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

One axle mean just one flex hose usually and it isn't subject to the trauma of a front one and wouldn't be the cause of the troubles so far anyway but glance at the thing if you are under there just for rust or cracks,

T

Response From Vetro_Radox

Alright, will do. I'm going to replace the front flex hoses anyway, problem or not because I know they haven't been changed for at least the last 250k miles. I have a car show to get to, so I won't be back here for at least 4 hours, hopefully I will have had time to get to the brake bleeding by then.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

OMG - That many miles and the age and still original! Remember they have to ride up and down AND twist with steering plus first shot at road conditions!

Again - if the brake line into hose end is trouble try if it looks decent not to twist it up and if it goes we can discuss making up line properly.

Good luck,

T

Response From Vetro_Radox

Actually the front flex lines have been replaced 3 times prior to this. When I said this van has a lot of miles, I mean a LOT of miles.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Newer or not if NG it's NG - hoses again, check those bolts that allows fluid flow. It's that or defective parts and not ready to believe that so far,

T

Response From dr.donut

the one bleeder maybe so coroded that the fluid won't go through, you can replace it or take it out and clean it, to bleed brakes you start with the one farthest from the master cyl, and work toward the closest, I crack the bleeder with a short hose on it that runs upward so that air that comes out can not go back in, then slightly push the brake peddle no more than an inch, nice and easy, the bleeder is open the whole time saving the ,"open it, close it"" dialog when using an assistant, you should feel it get a little stiffer, and if you have drum brakes in the rear and they are worn,(drums and shoes) that small amount of play will take up alot of peddle, and even if the brakes are bled the peddle will still hit the floor untill you tighten up that situation, and before I compress the front caliper piston I pull back the rubber boot and give it shot of WD40, this helps the caliper relax, when you see a front wheel cover that is dark thats brake dust from a clinging caliper, I am not "lord god of auto repair" but I hope that helps, it's never done me wrong

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Quote from original post ">>It is also worth noting that the front calipers, shoes, and rotors have all been replaced recently although I do not believe that has caused the aforementioned problem."
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Bleeders shouldn't be the issue if calipers recently were replaced but was just thinking the bolt that holds hose on could be the culprit too. Those can usually just be cleared out if blocked solid. If nothing on that wheel that is in a cards as a maybe,

T