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Best Selling Genuine Nissan Wheel Bearings

  • We Stock the following top leading brands, including Timken, NSK
  • Constantly Updated Inventory of Nissan Replacement Wheel Bearing Parts

We stock Wheel Bearing parts for most Nissan models, including 300ZX, 350Z, Altima, D21, Frontier, Maxima, Pathfinder, Pickup, Quest, Sentra, Titan, Versa, Versa Note, Xterra.

Timken
1984 Nissan Stanza Wheel Bearing - Front Timken

P311-26557EF    LM300849  New

Qty:
$15.14
Timken Wheel Bearing  Front
  • Tapered Roller Bearing Cone
  • Suggested Purchase Quantity: 2
    • Most jobs typically require 2 of this item.
Brand: Timken
Position: Front
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Body Drive Type Position
1984 - Nissan Stanza Sedan FWD Front
Timken
1997 Nissan 200SX Wheel Bearing - Front Inner Timken

P311-5B60792    514002B  New

Qty:
$42.18
Timken Wheel Bearing  Front Inner
  • Preset, Pre-Greased And Pre-Sealed Double Row Ball Bearing Assembly
  • Suggested Purchase Quantity: 2
    • Most jobs typically require 2 of this item.
Brand: Timken
Position: Front Inner
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Drive Type Position
1997 - Nissan 200SX FWD Front Inner
Timken
1982 Nissan 720 Wheel Bearing - Front Inner Timken

P311-1067814    LM104949  New

Qty:
$12.67
Timken Wheel Bearing  Front Inner
  • Tapered Roller Bearing Cone
  • Suggested Purchase Quantity: 2
    • Most jobs typically require 2 of this item.
Brand: Timken
Position: Front Inner
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Drive Type Position
1982 - Nissan 720 4WD Front Inner
Timken
2002 Nissan Altima Wheel Bearing - Front Timken

P311-41F9F63    510060  New

Qty:
$38.77
Timken Wheel Bearing  Front
  • Preset, Pre-Greased And Pre-Sealed Double Row Ball Bearing Assembly
  • ; Optional
  • Suggested Purchase Quantity: 2
    • Most jobs typically require 2 of this item.
Brand: Timken
Position: Front
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Drive Type Position
2002 - Nissan Altima FWD Front
Timken
2001 Nissan Altima Wheel Bearing - Front Inner Timken

P311-5A99736    510009  New

Qty:
$42.18
Timken Wheel Bearing  Front Inner
  • Preset, Pre-Greased And Pre-Sealed Double Row Ball Bearing Assembly
  • Suggested Purchase Quantity: 2
    • Most jobs typically require 2 of this item.
Brand: Timken
Position: Front Inner
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle BrakeABS Drive Type Position
2001 - Nissan Altima 4-Wheel ABS FWD Front Inner
Timken
1996 Nissan Maxima Wheel Bearing - Front Timken

P311-5A99736    510009  New

Qty:
$42.18
Timken Wheel Bearing  Front
  • Preset, Pre-Greased And Pre-Sealed Double Row Ball Bearing Assembly
  • Suggested Purchase Quantity: 2
    • Most jobs typically require 2 of this item.
Brand: Timken
Position: Front
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Drive Type Position
1996 - Nissan Maxima FWD Front
Timken
1992 Nissan Axxess Wheel Bearing - Rear Inner Timken

P311-5A99736    510009  New

Qty:
$42.18
Timken Wheel Bearing  Rear Inner
  • Preset, Pre-Greased And Pre-Sealed Double Row Ball Bearing Assembly
  • Suggested Purchase Quantity: 2
    • Most jobs typically require 2 of this item.
Brand: Timken
Position: Rear Inner
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Drive Type Position
1992 - Nissan Axxess 4WD Rear Inner
Timken
2006 Nissan X-Trail Wheel Bearing - Front Timken

P311-41F9F63    510060  New

Qty:
$38.77
Timken Wheel Bearing  Front
  • Preset, Pre-Greased And Pre-Sealed Double Row Ball Bearing Assembly
  • Suggested Purchase Quantity: 2
    • Most jobs typically require 2 of this item.
Brand: Timken
Position: Front
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Drive Type Position
2006 - Nissan X-Trail AWD Front
Timken
2003 Nissan Frontier Wheel Bearing - Front Outer 6 Cyl 3.3L Timken

P311-26557EF    LM300849  New

Qty:
$15.14
Timken Wheel Bearing  Front Outer
  • Tapered Roller Bearing Cone
  • Suggested Purchase Quantity: 2
    • Most jobs typically require 2 of this item.
Brand: Timken
Position: Front Outer
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Drive Type Position Block Engine CID CC
2003 - Nissan Frontier RWD Front Outer V 6 Cyl 3.3L - 3275
NSK
2000 Nissan Maxima Wheel Bearing NSK

P311-4797564    W0133-1608025  New

Qty:
$66.32
NSK Wheel Bearing
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • ; Production: 04/1999-
  • Front
Brand: NSK
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Prod. Date Range
2000 - Nissan Maxima Fr:04-00-99
NSK
1991 Nissan Axxess Wheel Bearing NSK

P311-06E8B53    W0133-1621682  New

Qty:
$63.86
NSK Wheel Bearing
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
Brand: NSK
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel
1991 - Nissan Axxess Base
NSK
1993 Nissan Altima Wheel Bearing NSK

P311-06E8B53    W0133-1621682  New

Qty:
$63.86
NSK Wheel Bearing
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • ; Production: 06/1992-
Brand: NSK
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Prod. Date Range
1993 - Nissan Altima Fr:06-00-92
NSK
1999 Nissan Altima Wheel Bearing NSK

P311-06E8B53    W0133-1621682  New

Qty:
$63.86
NSK Wheel Bearing
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • ; Production: -08/1999
Brand: NSK
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Prod. Date Range
1999 - Nissan Altima To:08-00-99
NSK
1990 Nissan Axxess Wheel Bearing NSK

P311-06E8B53    W0133-1621682  New

Qty:
$63.86
NSK Wheel Bearing
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • ; Production: 01/1989-
Brand: NSK
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Drive Type Prod. Date Range
1990 - Nissan Axxess AWD Fr:01-00-89
NSK
1999 Nissan Maxima Wheel Bearing NSK

P311-06E8B53    W0133-1621682  New

Qty:
$63.86
NSK Wheel Bearing
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • ; Production: -03/1999
Brand: NSK
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Prod. Date Range
1999 - Nissan Maxima To:03-00-99
NSK
2004 Nissan Sentra Wheel Bearing NSK

P311-4CD9C02    W0133-1624210  New

Qty:
$51.11
NSK Wheel Bearing
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Front
Brand: NSK
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2004 - Nissan Sentra
NSK
2006 Nissan Sentra Wheel Bearing NSK

P311-4CD9C02    W0133-1624210  New

Qty:
$51.11
NSK Wheel Bearing
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • ; Production: -08/31/2006
  • Front
Brand: NSK
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Prod. Date Range
2006 - Nissan Sentra To:08-31-06
Timken
2004 Nissan Titan Wheel Bearing Timken - with Retainer

P311-1EA7982    W0133-1767592  New

Qty:
$58.62
Timken Wheel Bearing
  • ; Production: 10/2003-
  • with Retainer
  • Rear
Brand: Timken
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Prod. Date Range
2004 - Nissan Titan Fr:10-00-03
Timken
2006 Nissan Titan Wheel Bearing Timken - with Retainer

P311-1EA7982    W0133-1767592  New

Qty:
$58.62
Timken Wheel Bearing
  • with Retainer
Brand: Timken
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2006 - Nissan Titan
Timken
2007 Nissan Titan Wheel Bearing Timken - with Retainer

P311-1EA7982    W0133-1767592  New

Qty:
$58.62
Timken Wheel Bearing
  • ; Production: -03/31/2007
  • with Retainer
Brand: Timken
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Prod. Date Range
2007 - Nissan Titan To:03-31-07

Latest Nissan Repair and Wheel Bearing Installation Advice

CarJunky AutoAdvice

How To Repack Wheel Bearings ~ '93 Nissan Pickup 2WD

Showing 5 out of 9 Posts | Show 4 Hidden Posts
Question From Guest on How To Repack Wheel Bearings ~ '93 Nissan Pickup 2WD

Hey Guys,

I have a '93 Nissan Pickup, D21, 2WD,, and am looking for any and all help in Repacking The Front Wheel Bearings on my Truck.

I haven't started this job yet,, as I am still studying the Repair Manual,, and making a list of the Materials, Parts and the extra tools that I will need for this. I like to have all my parts, tools, & instructions before I begin a maintenance job that I haven't ever done before.

I have both the Nissan Service Manual,, as well as a Chilton's Repair Manual for my Truck.

My first question is what is the best way to remove the Inner Wheel Bearing and Seal? If the Inner Oil Seal is removed,, will the Inner seal then be aasily removed or do I need to drive it out?

The Books say to use a brass Rod Drift to drive out both the Bearing and Seal. Can the Seal be pryed out or does it have to be driven out,, as the books say?

I have watched a mechanic in the past do this maintenance,, but to tell you the truth,, I have forgotten exactly how he did this. And locally they want 150 dollars to repack the front wheel bearings. So I need to do this myself if I can,, as I need to save as much as I can on my Truck Maintenance Expense.

Any help and suggestions are appreciated.

Have a nice day,
Joe

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Arggh! Just Googled the web away looking for service tools for this not showing just what I wanted. Is this style and inner and outer bearing, dust cap, lock nut with cotter pin, packable bearing type? Couldn't find it exactly but think it's straight forward bearing service but.........

Dust caps can be a pill and they can be removed with nice ice-tong type tool, channel lock pliers, or flat screwdriver twisted to release cap. That would expose a locking/adjusting nut held with cotter pin or nut made to "ding" to hold in place. When outer bearing is free it will come out with a washer in front of it. With caliper out of way the whole hub should come off with inner bearing inside help mostly by the inner seal. Inner grease seal can be removed without damaging it but they should be considered expendable.

Some mechanics will put rotor back on with just the nut finger tight and pull sharply to remove inner bearing and seal will come out too. I DON'T CARE FOR THAT AS IT'S HARD ON THE INNER BEARING!

That grease seal can be pryed out with hub face down with a seal removal tool which is really just pry tool that can just pry on metal of the seal without hurting the rubber seal.

There are a few different ways serviceable wheel bearings do things but it's mostly basic. You can spend a fortune on special tools but it's mostly unneeded.

For routine repacking you don't need to remove bearing races at all! Those do get pounded out with a brass drift but lets not go there for just packing the bearings.

With bearing out you can pack them by hand (have plenty of hand cleaner) merely pushing grease thru bearing till you see it come out opposite side. Inner bearing gets placed back in hub, seal new or good saved one just tapped back into place or with tools if you want (or a washer or socket that exactly fits) and ready to install over spindle for outer bearing, then washer, then nut torqued while spinning rotor/hub to spec (hard to define that without a torque measureing tool but about as hard as you could do with a screwdriver on socket straight on such that hub has no freeplay -- it gets to be a feel--) then nut is locked there with cotter pin or nut may have a skirt to punch down a dimple into a slot on the spindle. Dust cap carefully hammered back with screwdriver or again a socket that fits just right to contact just the crimped last part to friction fit back into the hub. Brake parts back together as needed and press brakes when back to set them again to close contact (disc brake type only) and it's done.

This is primal bearing service 101 if you will. If you had a hand once you'd know it forever for assorted ones on cars, trucks, rear bearing on some FWD vehicles, trailers of all types etc.

This is simple yet IMPORTANT to do right. When a race is removed it adds to the procedure to set it known bottomed in place but routine service doesn't require messing with it.

Cotter pins types should get new cotter pins. Torque should err to less if in doubt.

Just spent 1/2 an hour trying to find some standard concise procedures for this and all lacked.

AutoZone had some good advice and graphics if searching around there.

Since early in my work on anyting I've had a neat Snap-On ice tong multi tool that I've had now for decades and couldn't find on to show a pic of. That, Channell lock pliers, ball peen hammer, assorted washers, diagnal wire cutters (dykes) and a cotter pin puller hook (hand but not mandatory) is about all I've ever needed.

Best one tool is Snap-On tool # GCP 10 (marked USA) and looks like tongs to pick up a block of ice - couldn't find it listed anywhere??

Note: Tapered inner and outer bearings are torqued to adjust lash (freeplay) and barrel type the retaining nut is not adjusting bearing lash but rather holding in its inner race but still frequently help securly locked with cotter pin or other method on a spindle nut.

Any one out there have a good link to existing bearing service suggestions? This all just off the top of my head.

When in doubt - ask, and get proper help instructions as this is important but also routine. Good luck,

T

Response From Guest

Arggh! Just Googled the web away looking for service tools for this not showing just what I wanted. Couldn't find it exactly but think it's straight forward bearing service but.........

Dust caps can be a pill and they can be removed with nice ice-tong type tool, channel lock pliers, or flat screwdriver twisted to release cap. That would expose a locking/adjusting nut held with cotter pin or nut made to "ding" to hold in place. When outer bearing is free it will come out with a washer in front of it. With caliper out of way the whole hub should come off with inner bearing inside help mostly by the inner seal. Inner grease seal can be removed without damaging it but they should be considered expendable.

Some mechanics will put rotor back on with just the nut finger tight and pull sharply to remove inner bearing and seal will come out too. I DON'T CARE FOR THAT AS IT'S HARD ON THE INNER BEARING!

That grease seal can be pryed out with hub face down with a seal removal tool which is really just pry tool that can just pry on metal of the seal without hurting the rubber seal.

There are a few different ways serviceable wheel bearings do things but it's mostly basic. You can spend a fortune on special tools but it's mostly unneeded.

For routine repacking you don't need to remove bearing races at all! Those do get pounded out with a brass drift but lets not go there for just packing the bearings.

With bearing out you can pack them by hand (have plenty of hand cleaner) merely pushing grease thru bearing till you see it come out opposite side. Inner bearing gets placed back in hub, seal new or good saved one just tapped back into place or with tools if you want (or a washer or socket that exactly fits) and ready to install over spindle for outer bearing, then washer, then nut torqued while spinning rotor/hub to spec (hard to define that without a torque measureing tool but about as hard as you could do with a screwdriver on socket straight on such that hub has no freeplay -- it gets to be a feel--) then nut is locked there with cotter pin or nut may have a skirt to punch down a dimple into a slot on the spindle. Dust cap carefully hammered back with screwdriver or again a socket that fits just right to contact just the crimped last part to friction fit back into the hub. Brake parts back together as needed and press brakes when back to set them again to close contact (disc brake type only) and it's done.

This is primal bearing service 101 if you will. If you had a hand once you'd know it forever for assorted ones on cars, trucks, rear bearing on some FWD vehicles, trailers of all types etc.

This is simple yet IMPORTANT to do right. When a race is removed it adds to the procedure to set it known bottomed in place but routine service doesn't require messing with it.

Cotter pins types should get new cotter pins. Torque should err to less if in doubt.

Just spent 1/2 an hour trying to find some standard concise procedures for this and all lacked.

AutoZone had some good advice and graphics if searching around there.

Since early in my work on anyting I've had a neat Snap-On ice tong multi tool that I've had now for decades and couldn't find on to show a pic of. That, Channell lock pliers, ball peen hammer, assorted washers, diagnal wire cutters (dykes) and a cotter pin puller hook (hand but not mandatory) is about all I've ever needed.

Best one tool is Snap-On tool # GCP 10 (marked USA) and looks like tongs to pick up a block of ice - couldn't find it listed anywhere??

Note: Tapered inner and outer bearings are torqued to adjust lash (freeplay) and barrel type the retaining nut is not adjusting bearing lash but rather holding in its inner race but still frequently help securly locked with cotter pin or other method on a spindle nut.

Any one out there have a good link to existing bearing service suggestions? This all just off the top of my head.

When in doubt - ask, and get proper help instructions as this is important but also routine. Good luck,

T

Hey Tom,

And Thank you so much as this is the first time that I will have done this,, but need to learn to do correctly. As I also need to repack my Trailer Bearings as well. So I'm thinking that If I can get the Nissan done,, then hopefully I will have the tools and knowledge to do my Single Axle Trailer as well. No brakes on it,, and should be much easier to do.

I purchase a Bearing Packer that fits on my Grease Gun. It was only 10 $'s at O'Riellie's so I went ahead and got it. They said that If I don't want to use it,, and don't open it,, that I can return it.

I'm not afraid of buying more tools,, as in my opinion,, they are a Great Investment,, especially for future jobs,, and when needed "Right Then",, and saves me time and money to go out and buy more tools in the middle of a repair job or emergency job.

I will be making a list of the tools that you mention,, and visit Autozone, Carquest, Advance, & Orielly's.

I will also go ahead and purchase the Inner Bearing Seals,, as the book says to replace them.

Is this style and inner and outer bearing, dust cap, lock nut with cotter pin, packable bearing type?

Yes Tom,, The Inner Bearing has a Bearing Oil Seal,, but the Outer bearing only has a flat type Lock washer.

So it is mainly the Inner Bearing that I am trying to figure out how to remove without damageing it or the surrounding Metals.

Both manuals say to tork the Wheel Bearing Lock Nut to 25-29 ft lbs,, and then turn back 45 Degrees!!! What exactly is that all about? Then they say to check the Bearing Preload,, with a Spring Gauge attached to the Lug Studs,, and should have a pull that is 2.2 to 6.4 lbs. I don't remember the fellow that has done all of this service before doing this. Maybe he just knows how much is normal wheel turning resistance is supposed to be by Experience. That's what I am thinking anyway.

If I need to purchase one of those spring gauges,, I'll do that as well,, if they don't cost too much,, and if commonly available.

I sure do appreciate all the Help,, and I'm thinking that this is helpful to a lot of othres as well. Especially when I often see Vehicles on the Shoulder of the Road,,with the Wheel off the Spindle at a 45 Degree Angle up in the Wheel Wells.

I hope that a lot of other's get in on this discussion. Is is possible to post picture's in this forum?

Anyway Thanks again so much and keep the help coming,
Joe

Response From Tom Greenleaf

JIM - THAT WAS AWESOME - WHERE DO YOU FIND MY BEARING TOOL?!! Handiest sucker in the whole collection IMO.

Joe: There's a struggle to explain how tight is tight without tools that measure it which make a universal suggestion as to how to tighten up bearings without known #s off of tools I don't even own a bit risky but I'll try and any reader this is AYOR - go buy tools and knock yourself out trying to figure out something that really does come by feel with a little experience.

Joe - now that I know what exact type bearing you are dealing with I can explain better for this type. It would be similar to what's used on all kinds of stuff - trailers, especially of all kinds.

The inner bearing is held there only by that grease seal. The races are pressed or hammered down in place but again for routine repacking you don't touch those.

On the end of the tool now shown has a scoop like part that goes under the rubber lip of common grease seals and if you tap (rubber hammer or real one) on the tongs just so it pops the seal out - frequently undamaged. They are cheap as cars go so replacing them isn't a waste. If you didn't have the tool for that it would pry out or as said in first reply some tech's just put the hub (in this case rotor) back on with inner bearing and seal still stuck in hub and just the spindle nut without the washer put on - then yank the whole hub toward you and bearing and seal will stay on the spindle shaft. I DON'T REALLY SUGGEST DOING THAT FOR BEARINGS TO BE REUSED SO PLEASE TRY HARDER.

When ready to reassemble - put greased up inner bearing in hub then take a washer or sometimes just a hammer can tap the seal new or used one back snugly and evenly in it's place. The hub then goes back over the spinde and outer bearing in, washer over it and tighten nut up by hand.

If races were not involved you can then take a 10 inch channel lock type plier and tighten the nut firmly by hand while spinning the rotor. Now back off nut till you feel the rotor wobble again and retighten till nut starts to feel resistance of being tight - still while spinning rotor. Now choke up on channel locks such that leverage is reduced and tighten till nut won't tighten any more (as said earlier it's now like firm screwdriver tight with lack of a torque reading that's about it) and then feel for freeplay now should be zero and back off just to the next spot that a cotter pin can go in and that's your spot. Rotor should still show no freeplay and rotor when spun by threads of wheel studs should be able to coast - perhaps not a ton with new grease and a new seal. Now the cotter pin can be bent such that typical pins shorter part can be bent up on over end and tapped down flush with the end of the spindle. The longer part of pin can be cut off but long enough so it too is part of preventing teh nut from loosening by itself. Cotter pin must be out of the way of rubbing inside of the dust cap which is next and can be tapped on with a hammer and screwdriver or a socket that neatly fits just so. Wipe up any excess grease.

Note: I did google some pics of someone doing all this and they had their greasy hands all over the friction area of the rotor! That's a big NO NO! If you get grease on it clean it off with brake cleaner or lacquer thinner and clean cloth or paper towels would do as it can trash good brakes!

If this is confusing which I'm perfectly capable of causing then just get someone to really show you this once and you'll have it for life. This style bearing is used on trailers - boat trailers frequently are dunked under water and raise holy hell with bearings so that it's a common routine to repack those - sometimes many times a season or at least be checking them.

Side note: Dust caps for boat trailers or any can be fitted with a type (called bearing buddies) that have a grease fitting in the cap and maintain a spring loaded charge of grease in the entire hub area to prevent dirt and water especially from getting in. Motor vehicle bearing really shouldn't ever be dunked under water but obviously boat trailers it can't be avoided and doing this bearing thing can be an every time you have dunked it go back in a repack and check bearings is there's any doubt.

Vehicles can go a very long time without needed this done and frequently just at brake service time is enough IMO.
_________________
Readers: There are assorted ways the spindle nut is locked in place with various applications. Many are "castle" nuts, some use a light weight castleated cover nut to postition, some use a locking screw, some use a "key" to slide in a slot, and some on left sides of threaded spindles are reverse threaded - mostly European older cars - VW bug for example - the originals.
________________

Final note: When bearings need replacing the race must be removed and there are different procedures for that and the subsequent setting of preload when reassembling. Ask separately for that concern as needed.

Gees - that was a lot of work - there's only so much "top of my head" to take take from! Hope that explains it,

T




Response From Guest

JIM - THAT WAS AWESOME - WHERE DO YOU FIND MY BEARING TOOL?!! Handiest sucker in the whole collection IMO.

Joe: There's a struggle to explain how tight is tight without tools that measure it which make a universal suggestion as to how to tighten up bearings without known #s off of tools I don't even own a bit risky but I'll try and any reader this is AYOR - go buy tools and knock yourself out trying to figure out something that really does come by feel with a little experience.

Joe - now that I know what exact type bearing you are dealing with I can explain better for this type. It would be similar to what's used on all kinds of stuff - trailers, especially of all kinds.

The inner bearing is held there only by that grease seal. The races are pressed or hammered down in place but again for routine repacking you don't touch those.

On the end of the tool now shown has a scoop like part that goes under the rubber lip of common grease seals and if you tap (rubber hammer or real one) on the tongs just so it pops the seal out - frequently undamaged. They are cheap as cars go so replacing them isn't a waste. If you didn't have the tool for that it would pry out or as said in first reply some tech's just put the hub (in this case rotor) back on with inner bearing and seal still stuck in hub and just the spindle nut without the washer put on - then yank the whole hub toward you and bearing and seal will stay on the spindle shaft. I DON'T REALLY SUGGEST DOING THAT FOR BEARINGS TO BE REUSED SO PLEASE TRY HARDER.

When ready to reassemble - put greased up inner bearing in hub then take a washer or sometimes just a hammer can tap the seal new or used one back snugly and evenly in it's place. The hub then goes back over the spinde and outer bearing in, washer over it and tighten nut up by hand.

If races were not involved you can then take a 10 inch channel lock type plier and tighten the nut firmly by hand while spinning the rotor. Now back off nut till you feel the rotor wobble again and retighten till nut starts to feel resistance of being tight - still while spinning rotor. Now choke up on channel locks such that leverage is reduced and tighten till nut won't tighten any more (as said earlier it's now like firm screwdriver tight with lack of a torque reading that's about it) and then feel for freeplay now should be zero and back off just to the next spot that a cotter pin can go in and that's your spot. Rotor should still show no freeplay and rotor when spun by threads of wheel studs should be able to coast - perhaps not a ton with new grease and a new seal. Now the cotter pin can be bent such that typical pins shorter part can be bent up on over end and tapped down flush with the end of the spindle. The longer part of pin can be cut off but long enough so it too is part of preventing teh nut from loosening by itself. Cotter pin must be out of the way of rubbing inside of the dust cap which is next and can be tapped on with a hammer and screwdriver or a socket that neatly fits just so. Wipe up any excess grease.

Note: I did google some pics of someone doing all this and they had their greasy hands all over the friction area of the rotor! That's a big NO NO! If you get grease on it clean it off with brake cleaner or lacquer thinner and clean cloth or paper towels would do as it can trash good brakes!

If this is confusing which I'm perfectly capable of causing then just get someone to really show you this once and you'll have it for life. This style bearing is used on trailers - boat trailers frequently are dunked under water and raise holy hell with bearings so that it's a common routine to repack those - sometimes many times a season or at least be checking them.

Side note: Dust caps for boat trailers or any can be fitted with a type (called bearing buddies) that have a grease fitting in the cap and maintain a spring loaded charge of grease in the entire hub area to prevent dirt and water especially from getting in. Motor vehicle bearing really shouldn't ever be dunked under water but obviously boat trailers it can't be avoided and doing this bearing thing can be an every time you have dunked it go back in a repack and check bearings is there's any doubt.

Vehicles can go a very long time without needed this done and frequently just at brake service time is enough IMO.
_________________
Readers: There are assorted ways the spindle nut is locked in place with various applications. Many are "castle" nuts, some use a light weight castleated cover nut to postition, some use a locking screw, some use a "key" to slide in a slot, and some on left sides of threaded spindles are reverse threaded - mostly European older cars - VW bug for example - the originals.
________________

Final note: When bearings need replacing the race must be removed and there are different procedures for that and the subsequent setting of preload when reassembling. Ask separately for that concern as needed.

Gees - that was a lot of work - there's only so much "top of my head" to take take from! Hope that explains it,

T





Tom, Jim & All,

Thank you so much for helping me understand this,,and I believe that I understand this procedure enough now,, that I can undertake this,, after I purchase 2 or 3 more tools. Especially the Tongs that Jim posted a Picture of and Tom Swears by.

I'm going to print these instructions out,, and have them there with me,, as I do this,, and that should help me also.

I need to also put some brake Cleaner on the List,, just in case I smudge the Rotor by accident. Thank you Tom for pointing that out,, as I'm sure that I would have made the same mistake. I'm pretty easy on my brakes,, and have 160 Thousand miles on the originals. The last Tire Specialist that did the Alignment told me that they were worn 50 Percent,, and that I should get ready for a brake Pad Replacement at about 300 Thousand Miles... He was ~

I saw the Bearing Buddy in the Northern Hydraulic's Catalog,, and I'll be looking to see If I can install those on the Trailer as,, that might save me a whole lot of work, from not having to repack the wheel bearings. Thank you so much for mentiioning this.

Even though this is basic Bearing Maintenance,, It is very important to do correctly,, and can also get complicated if not done correctly,, which explains why it takes so much to explain...

But it is very much appreciated,, and will most certainly help me and many other's a lot that want to do this.

Any other's that wish to offer help,, feel free as this will be talked about a viewed over the Web by many many other's as time goes by.

Have a Great Day,
Joe

Response From Guest Top Rated Answer

Tom, Jim,

It took me a while,, but I finally found what looks like the tool shown in Jim's Post.

http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product2_6970_200312767_200312767

I found it at Northern Tool,, and just put in my order for one. I didn't think that the price was too bad,, at 12 $'s + 6 $'s for shipping and it will probably last me a long long time,, and help me out in doing the repackin of the Nissan,, and my trailer. Total to my House is 18 $'s,, and It costs me 10 dollars just to go into town for tools or anything else...

This one isn't a Snap On Brand,, and probably isn't as good,, but was a little bit cheaper than the Used Sanp On one that I found for 47 $'s, on Ebay.

Thanks again,, and hope this helps others as well,, I know for sure that all the help here has allready helped me,
Joe

Response From Tom Greenleaf


Item# 1586713

Only $11.99
Guaranteed Lowest Price Qty


In Stock
Ship Wt. 1.0 lbs


________________________________________

Nice find! I did go back and finally find it at Snap On (choke) $59.99 but I do have decades on it already.
To badger this thread the one shown is an exellent deal. I may grab a spare for that price. Note the "scoop" end of one handle end doesn't look quite as curved as the Snap On. I have sharpened mine, there and at the tongs. Note those tongs will get in between the crimp of a dust cap and the hub. As you become the local pro with wheel bearings you also notice that some (especially foriegn) things will have very little room to grab and you can tap on the tong and they get right in. It saves the cap.

Again - this sucker is a fav of mine. Got more dang things out with it then many specialty tools. More than you may get into but all kinds of axle seals and things on assorted equipment.

Snap On makes some nice tools. In fairness some other brands are as good and many better!

T

Response From way2old

Whew!!!! That makes me glad I don't do that anymore!!!!!!!!!! I forgot what it was like. Need a beer.

Response From Double J

Heres a pix of the tool Tom



Jim

Nissan Sentra 08 Replacing Right Front Wheel Bearing Advice

Showing 4 out of 4 Posts
Question From jj2451 on Nissan Sentra 08 Replacing Right Front Wheel Bearing Advice

I don't have any experience when it comes to fixing my car, but there is always that first time. I took my car to the shop a few weeks ago and I got told to replace the front wheel bearings. I want to fix this myself because I want feel useful and save a couple of hundred $$$. Any suggestions where to start looking for research or any advise?

Response From Hammer Time

I want to fix this myself because I want feel useful and save a couple of hundred $$$.

My wife could use a heart transplant. Can you tell me where I can learn how to do this online. I don't want to spend the money and this is as good a time as any to learn heart surgery. It shouldn't be that hard, right?

Response From Tom Greenleaf Top Rated Answer

OP - That's a 'spot on' analogy by Hammer Time. I don't want to be the first for a heart job and the learning experiment if needed but all do learn even that WITH another right there. As said with this stuff where you risk brakes or a wheel messing up there's real danger if all wrong so either learn from a pro in person once at least then you can get it.


I really love the web and all the stuff of what you absolutely can do that just isn't so easy for lack of tools or some snag and the best instructions can't cover it all.
Ask yourself this without looking it up. Where do you place a floor jack (not one that comes from the car) on this to hoist it? Bet you have to think about even that - right? No harm meant but folks need a solid baseline before any of this stuff and this isn't that hard as things go!


T

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Quote ">>I don't have any experience when it comes to fixing my car"
Do you really want to start with something like this?
A quick and possibly inaccurate look up the hub bearing type this should be isn't that hard. Of course that's made easier with powerful air tools and knowing how to have brake parts out of the way. Anything is doable by anyone with the right tools and instructions. Just how and where to hoist the car is primal of course.


Would you know a good wheel bearing yourself if in your hands or not? If not I have to suggest learning with an experienced tech for first time things. IDK - all the instructions and videos out there don't really cut it compared to a person to assist right there for first time things.


I'll always question why techs find BOTH bearings in need vs just one as short of both being submerged in water or some equal reason don't find both failing at the same time very often.


This is DIY possible - tools and some attention to detail of course.


Refresh: What symptoms do you have now that they are bad at all? I'm not convinced just because someone said so,


T
PS: Parts could cost as little as $100 ea. Failure to do properly is plain dangerous....

08 Nissan Sentra rear passenger tire locked in place.

Showing 2 out of 3 Posts | Show 1 Hidden Posts
Question From Fwiggins on 08 Nissan Sentra rear passenger tire locked in place.

My Nissan sentra is a 2.0L engine base model. My rear passenger tire won't turn. It is locked in place. I have not removed the tire to see, so this question is to see if someone is familiar, and is this something I should not bother with myself. History of problem is that the wheel bearing(hub) has needed to be replaced on that wheel. I am just curious as to what I potentially have created by not replacing it in a timely manner, ie.. Seized shoes, damaged drum?

Response From Hammer Time Top Rated Answer

If you have been just ignoring a bad wheel bearing, then it has likely just welded itself together. You don't even want to think about attempting this. It's going to be a nightmare for even an experienced tech. He may have to cut it out with a torch and you have probably ruined a lot more than just a wheel bearing now.

Response From nickwarner

Not in a timely manner? You mean you ran it until it finally locked up.

If you think what you were quoted to fix this when you were first told it needed to be fixed was something, you will soon find out what a real repair bill looks like.

I'm glad this isn't in my bay, and as HT stated the first tool I would be going for is the torch, which is about the only thing that is going to get this apart.

2002 Nissan Quest GLE - Shakes beyond 60MPH

Showing 2 out of 6 Posts | Show 4 Hidden Posts
Question From Guest on 2002 Nissan Quest GLE - Shakes beyond 60MPH

2002 Nissan Quest GLE - Shakes beyond 60MPH
Steering wheel as well as seats in rear also shake.
What could be the possible cause?

Response From Guest

Check your fuel injector. My dad's car did the same thing when it reached the 60-70 region. We thought it was something really serious, but it was the fuel injector failing to feed a steady flow of gasoline to the engine. It wasn't a cheap fix but it did solve the problem.

Wish you the best!

Response From dave284 Top Rated Answer

There could be several things to cause this....need to check front wheel bearings/ tie rod ends, an out of balance tire or wheel alignment could also cause this.

Response From Guest

I got it checked from an authorized mechanic workshop just before buying and they took almost 2 hours for checking each and everything but they only told me that there are 4 things -
1) One of the Engine Mount needs to be changed - though it is not must do at this time
2) Rear brake pad needs to be changed as they are at -5%
3) Transmission oil needs to be flushed
4) Time Belt needs to be changed

Can any one of the above cause this problem of Vibration. Pls advice.

Response From dave284

I don't believe that any of those would cause the steering wheel to shake, although a bad motor mount would cause vibration at anytime, I suggest having the front tires checked out and parts of suspension too...again.

Response From Guest

I got it checked from an authorized mechanic workshop just before buying and they took almost 2 hours for checking each and everything but they only told me that there are 4 things -
1) One of the Engine Mount needs to be changed - though it is not must do at this time
2) Rear brake pad needs to be changed as they are at -5%
3) Transmission oil needs to be flushed
4) Time Belt needs to be changed

Can any one of the above cause this problem of Vibration. Pls advice.

is this a bad wheel bearing?

Showing 2 out of 13 Posts | Show 11 Hidden Posts
Question From dmac0923 on is this a bad wheel bearing?

2002 nissan sentra SE-R Spec V 67,000 miles

im starting to think i need wheel bearings. for some time now ive been hearing a rolling noise when coming to a stop. for a while i sucked it up to road/tire noise due to the low profile tires.

recently i can hear a metal to metal scrapping noise coming from my front passenger wheel while driving and turning to the right only. braking or not doesnt make a difference in the sound.

turning to the left is quiet.
brakes are relatively new and look in good shape,
tires have nice even tread wear.
tire pressure is good.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Double check the brake - even take it apart to look for marks of it rubbing with some hardware or something. Metal to metal scraping noise is possible with brake or bearing but more likely brake. With brake retracted you should be able to feel something with the bearing when hoisted off ground. Noise is usually on the side you think it's coming from. Sometimes a bearing goan/growl when turning can be the opposite side from what you would think while driving it so check and compare both sides.

IMO - a bearing failure on one side does NOT mean both are bad or need replacing,

T

Response From dmac0923

to be honest, it sorta sounds like a brake noise. almost like the splash shield was rubbing the rotor. i didnt disassemble the brake, but i visually inspected the pads and the splash shield was fine. the thing that was weird was that braking is quiet and cruising straight ahead or turning left is quiet as well.

now if i jack up the car to wiggle the wheel to check for play. wouldnt new tight ball joints mask any slack in the bearing?

guide me if im wrong her but front end check involves

tie rod ends- with car on ground, lightly wiggle steering wheel and watch TRE for movement

ball joints/bearings- car suspended in air, grab wheel at 12 and 6 and push pull. have partner watch for movement.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Not sure of the layout of this front end. Probably uses a bearing hub instead of "inner-outer" bearings so it's one bearing and no freeplay is allowed. Bad bearings frequently don't show up as freeplay but sure can on their last legs!

Checking front end parts is like you said for the most part. Supporting wheel by lower control arms in most set ups reveals the lower ball joint's condition. You need to look for where forces are as if under a force freeplay won't be noted. TREs are eyeballed for motion. Nothing for freeplay is really allowed if found.

If you dismantle brake you may see the metal to metal shiny spot(s) where something is wrong. A tiny spot can make quite a ruckus. Even if new or good looking check the hardware, pads, anti-rattle stuff and the like for anything out of order,

T

Response From dmac0923 Top Rated Answer

yea i believe the bearing is the entire hub assembly. ill try double checking the suspension and disassembling the brakes my next days off.

Response From dmac0923

just an update,

i pulled the wheel and brakes apart on the suspected wheel today and found that one of the caliper anchor slide pins was completely seized into the caliper mounting bracket thus cocking the caliper assembly.

what i think was happening was that since the caliper was cockeyed the metal brake pad slides were shifted agaings the rotor making the noise.

i was unable to remove the anchor pin from the bracket so once i get the parts and rebuild ill post another update

Response From Tom Greenleaf

dmac - They should have complete calipers with the bracket for this. If you destroy the old bracket you'll pay a "core" charge for that so try to just take the whole mess off as a unit and consider BOTH sides.

When these type slides used in many applications get water/dirt past the seals they really do get as stuck as welded sometimes. Put it on your periodic maint list to just pull calipers and lube them up with real brake grease (usually a silicone) which is remarkably water resistant.

Note for readers: This is a common problem a few months AFTER a vehicle is driven thru deeper water than prudent which IMO is no higher than just below the center of the hub no matter what type vehicle it is. It can happen anyway but note that they call seals around vehicles "DUST" seals as most aren't WATERPROOF as folks think,

T

Response From dmac0923

Tom like you said, they only sold it as the whole caliper assembly.

so that said i replaced the whole caliper assembly on the suspected side. bled the brakes...and went for a spin.........you guessed it.....

THE NOISE IS STILL THERE!!!

i cant really be angry since the caliper assembly needed to be replaced anyways. but i have to admit a few curse words did escape when i heard the noise again.

any ideas?

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Seems like that caliper had to go anyway as you said. It may still have a bearing problem at that wheel or the other side?? You saw the brake wear - bearing may or may not show play or a funny feeling without a load on it till it's wicked bad.

Is it the exact same noise? New pads on old rotor might contact in slightly different spot and make a feel more than noise but possible. If it has an outer rust ring they cause issues with pad only replacements.

Do remember one side can make noise and sound exactly like it's from the other side and fool you. Anything else there that can rub? Dust shield - bad anti-rattle stuff?

T

Response From dmac0923

yea its the exact same noise as before.


the caliper assembly didnt come with pads just the hardware. so they are the same pads/rotor as before. the pads are still like new and there is only a very minor rust ring on the rotor. the brakes were done not too long ago.

i cant replicate the noise with the car jacked up and spinning the wheel by hand. it seems to only do it when its loaded on the ground.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Back to first post "noise turning right - braking or not" so now that brake is not the issue that still leaves bearing(s) and may be that side or not. Just spinning them may not show up the problem and may need the weight of vehicle on it to make that noise.

The wear on the pads while caliper was known frozen does still concern me even if newer but I wouldn't expect the exact same noise with that fixed?? Bearing in question. May show filing dust inside or not??

T

Response From dmac0923

yea i dont even know why i didnt take the drivers side wheel off to take a look. i guess because i was so set on it being the pass side. ill pop the wheel off the other side and see.

the wear on the pad is minimal otherwise i would have done a brake job just enough to put the pieces of the puzzle together. pad still had an even matting surface to the rotor.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Yes - certainly check and also lube up other side so it doesn't happen there with the pin also - later - it's preventable.

The bearing check. Try to just nudge brake pads such that they aren't touching at all and with wheel back on turn/spin them with just the speed you can hang on torqueing them and try to feel any flaw. They should be glassy, silent smooth - no exceptions and without some load may not show. Got one coming in a couple hours right here that won't express itself well sitting still but does driving. Usually when off and in hand you can feel something. Of course when they are really trashed there's no doubt.

The pads may have had a slight bevel and when cocked and working put a sharp leading edge (?) on the pad which could pull a "finger nail on chaukboard" type sound now which I would think would go away. Turning rotors or replacing them takes all that out of course and I know you aren't doing all that for this job.

I don't know what the anti-rattle hardware looks like without seeing it myself but look to see if it's all in proper postion and not touching also. Also make sure the wear sensor if used is in proper position. I've seen them bent and touch when not worn pads!

Good luck,

T