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Best Selling Genuine Chrysler Vacuum Pumps

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Dorman
2012 Chrysler 300 Vacuum Pump 6 Cyl 3.6L Dorman

P311-3A465BF    904-856  New

AP39 , 31317530 , 31201707 , VCP136 , 4581586AB , AIP30 , 31317445

Qty:
164.80
  • Product Attributes:
    • Connector Gender: Female
    • Connector Shape: Rectangle
    • Diaphragm Diameter: 1.4
    • Drive Type: Electric Motor
    • Inlet Port Inside Diameter: 0.255
    • Inside Diameter: 0.255 In.
    • Outlet Port Inside Diameter: 0.09
    • Outlet Port Outside Diameter: 0.23
    • Package Contents: 1 Pump Assembly
    • Port Quantity: 2
    • Terminal Quantity: 2
    • Terminal Type: Blade
    • Vacuum Port Diameter: 0.38 In.
    • Vacuum Pump Connector: Barbed
    • Vacuum Pump Drive System: Electric Motor Drive
    • Vacuum Pump Inlet: 0.38 In.
    • Vacuum Pump Outlet: 0.23 In.
Brand: Dorman
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
2012 - Chrysler 300 V 6 Cyl 3.6L 220 3604
Standard Ignition
2014 Chrysler 200 Vacuum Pump Standard Ignition

P311-20E8E2F    VCP136  New

EC1260 , 4581485AD , 5154322AB

Qty:
219.49
Standard Ignition Vacuum Pump
  • Vacuum Pump
  • Product Attributes:
    • Contents: Pump
    • Hardware Included: No
    • Hose Connector Quantity: 1
    • Hose Size - Inches: 3/8"
    • Notes: Vacuum
  • Direct-fit OE replacement properly restores pressure to ensure efficient running of vehicle accessories. High-quality O-rings and seals prevent leaks and maintain proper vacuum pressure. High-grade rubber mounting bushings withstand vibration and protect against shock, resulting in greater load-bearing capacity and abrasion resistance. Undergoes 100% pressure testing to prevent leaks and ensure OE-matching performance. As a global manufacturer, we maintain complete quality control throughout the manufacturing process.
Brand: Standard Ignition
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2014 - Chrysler 200
Standard Ignition
2015 Chrysler 300 Vacuum Pump Standard Ignition

P311-20E8E2F    VCP136  New

EC1260 , 4581485AD , 5154322AB

Qty:
219.49
Standard Ignition Vacuum Pump
  • Vacuum Pump
  • ; For Vacuum Pump System
  • Product Attributes:
    • Contents: Pump
    • Hardware Included: No
    • Hose Connector Quantity: 1
    • Hose Size - Inches: 3/8"
    • Notes: Vacuum
  • Direct-fit OE replacement properly restores pressure to ensure efficient running of vehicle accessories. High-quality O-rings and seals prevent leaks and maintain proper vacuum pressure. High-grade rubber mounting bushings withstand vibration and protect against shock, resulting in greater load-bearing capacity and abrasion resistance. Undergoes 100% pressure testing to prevent leaks and ensure OE-matching performance. As a global manufacturer, we maintain complete quality control throughout the manufacturing process.
Brand: Standard Ignition
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2015 - Chrysler 300
Standard Ignition
2015 Chrysler 300 Vacuum Pump Standard Ignition

P311-20E8E2F    VCP136  New

EC1260 , 4581485AD , 5154322AB

Qty:
219.49
Standard Ignition Vacuum Pump
  • Vacuum Pump
  • ; For Air Pump
  • Product Attributes:
    • Contents: Pump
    • Hardware Included: No
    • Hose Connector Quantity: 1
    • Hose Size - Inches: 3/8"
    • Notes: Vacuum
  • Direct-fit OE replacement properly restores pressure to ensure efficient running of vehicle accessories. High-quality O-rings and seals prevent leaks and maintain proper vacuum pressure. High-grade rubber mounting bushings withstand vibration and protect against shock, resulting in greater load-bearing capacity and abrasion resistance. Undergoes 100% pressure testing to prevent leaks and ensure OE-matching performance. As a global manufacturer, we maintain complete quality control throughout the manufacturing process.
Brand: Standard Ignition
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2015 - Chrysler 300
Standard Ignition
2016 Chrysler 200 Vacuum Pump 4 Cyl 2.4L Standard Ignition

P311-2F2AE0F    VCP137  New

5047380AD , 5047967AA , 5047700AA , 5047967AC , EC1420 , 5047967AB , 5047380AC

Qty:
Standard Ignition Vacuum Pump
  • Vacuum Pump
  • Product Attributes:
    • Contents: Pump
    • Hardware Included: No
    • Hose Connector Quantity: 1
    • Hose Size - Inches: 3/8"
    • Notes: Vacuum
  • Direct-fit OE replacement properly restores pressure to ensure efficient running of vehicle accessories. High-quality O-rings and seals prevent leaks and maintain proper vacuum pressure. Precision-cut vacuum pump pulley shaft ensures exact OE dimensions for proper fit and easy installation. Undergoes 100% pressure testing to prevent leaks and ensure OE-matching performance. As a global manufacturer, we maintain complete quality control throughout the manufacturing process.
Brand: Standard Ignition
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
2016 - Chrysler 200 L 4 Cyl 2.4L 144 2360

Latest Car Advice

CarJunky AutoAdvice

Air condition 9o Chrysler

Showing 2 out of 6 Posts | Show 4 Hidden Posts
Question From Ronniebebe on Air condition 9o Chrysler

I have a 1990 Chrysler v-6 eng. I believe a 3.0 eng. Everything is power. My question is: the airconditioner is blowing out just cool air,so there must be a leak in the seals. I don't want to put a great expense into this car so ,could l myself recharge the airconditioner and get by for the rest of this summer. Was thinking of going to Pep Boys and getting the kit. Whats your opinion on this. Thanks for any advice. Ron.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Yes you can and they sell these kits everywhere. Just don't add any sealers or condtioners - just pure stuff right now. They are well known as "Death Kits" but they can work if you use your head. Get the hose with a gauge on it and if ANYTHING seems wrong STOP! At 15 years old you may NOT have a leak worth going nuts to fix. If a well thought out and done boost lasts a good time I say go for it. If it doesn't you need something fixed.

Hit back if you need some more help. Stay safe with these products, -- Directions with this stuff lacks badly so ask away,

Response From Ronniebebe

Tom, thanks for your advice. Need one more answer. What kind of coolant is in this air conditioner.Is it the R134a type or something different. Not sure if this is the freon type or the new stuff they use now.
I use to drive big trucks ,been out of it now for about 5 years .Don't know any mechanics anymore. So no one to ask. Ron.

Response From Tom Greenleaf Top Rated Answer

I should have noticed the model year. Car was made new with R-12 and most over the years have been converted to 134a. The fittings are completely differerent as not to mix them up. Sorry for the oversight on that - you certainly need to know what kind of refrigerant you have to continue. Model year 1993 was the switch year and could have either.

If you are still R-12 and just a touch low you may need to get some help from an A/C shop as it's no longer sold to the general public - the little can taps are but NOT the product If so I'd pay for a boost rather than make the investment in a now obsolete product. It's possible that the car has a less common "Freeze 12" which is NOT the same thing but should be marked.

If the fittings look like plumbing threads (they are) it's probably original. The 134a fittings are like air hose fittings that quick connect. Supplies are available everywhere for 134a and if you can't find some R-12 you may want to switch it over. If you want to do this yourself you really should get some help here or somewhere and feel free to email me about this. The kits sold are dangerous and only stick with pure products for now. Consider that it will take some money and a vacuum pump rental to do this vs paying for that. Let me/us know,

AGAIN - it's all important to know what is in your system to proceed - take a look and hit back,

Response From Ronniebebe

Tanks Tom. Thats very good advice,think l'll let the pro's take care of this one. Its the wife's car,l drive a pick up and the air is very cold. Guess if she wants cool air she'll have to use my truck. But l'll take it to the local repair shop. Again Tom thanks a lot and have a good day. Ron.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Just of interest to Ron and others who may read all this..... I take all my own cars to a place for front end alignments as I couldn't possibly justify the $40,000 expense of the equipment! I think they charge about $50 bucks for a responsible alignment. (I haven't had to pay as they want NOT for A/C help) It's "pro bono" both ways!

There's nothing wrong with using a good shop and pay a bit more for stuff that you are unlikely to do a lot of. Almost everyone I know in the car biz is fair and honest. It's very expensive to even do this stuff so give them their due. Just my comment "du jour", Tom

_________________________

Of further interest..... This site is growing steadily and has some of the friendliest folks out there. These posts may be read by millions some day so we need to be careful to be as accurate as possible. Computers are a wonder, but by themselves don't fix a car! C'mon Bill Gates - what's the problem?

1994 Chrysler Concorde engine light and got a code

Showing 2 out of 2 Posts
Question From Guest on 1994 Chrysler Concorde engine light and got a code

Hello all,
we have a 1994 Chrysler Concorde 3.3 and we had the check engine light come on. We took it to auto zone and had them do the check on it. The man that worked their gave us the only code that came up as 32 and said it was most likely a loose or bad wire or hose or the fuel filter. He said the other numbers of 12 and 55 were normal for our car. so the test read 12-32-55. The car runs great and we have had no problems only when we start it some times it takes 1-2 times for it to kick over. We had the starter checked and its fine. It is not making any noises, or sounds, no smoke or odor. Nothing weird at all. Does the filter need to be replaced or does it sound like something more serious.

Response From Loren Champlain Sr Top Rated Answer

Code 12 is loss of battery voltage within the last 50 ignition cycles. Code 32 is a problem with the EGR system.
(Exhaust Gas Recirculation). This is part of the emissions control system. It (the EGR valve) is designed to introduce inert exhaust gases (@ cruise speeds) into the combution chamber to lower combustion temperatures, helping to eliminate Nitrogens of Oxide (the major contributor of smog). At the same time, it reduces engine spark knock, again, by lowering combustion temps. You've probably had a car that would ping under acceleration, but if you put in premium gas, it would stop pinging. Higher octane fuel burns cooler than low octane, there again, lowering combustion temps. With all that said....unless your car is pinging under acceleration, you probably wouldn't know that the EGR was not opening. Now...just because you come up with an EGR code, that doesn't mean that the valve is bad. Could be a plugged passageway, solenoid, valve, ect. At this point, I'd try opening the valve while idling. This can be done with a vacuum pump (if this is a vacuum operated valve) or, if the opening under the valve is large enough, it can be opened with a finger. The engine should at least stumble, or even die when opened at idle. If it doesn't, more than likely, the passageway is plugged. Code 55 is 'end of test'.

Spongy/creeping brake pedal with eingine running

Showing 9 out of 15 Posts | Show 6 Hidden Posts
Question From 4cefed on Spongy/creeping brake pedal with eingine running

Hello all. I've been building and racing all sorts of cars for almost 20 years so I have a fair amount of experience, however this is driving me insane:

2003 Dodge (Neon) SRT-4
2.4L Turbocharged and intercooled 4cyl.
4 wheel ABS disc power brakes, ~130k miles.

The brake pads and discs are all fairly recent, no stuck slider pins or pads worn at an angle. No leaking caliper seals. The car sat for a few months with a rotted front subframe. I replaced it and got it back on the road but the brake pedal can be pushed right to the floor. I almost remember it was a little spongy before but still stopped ok. I bled and bled the system both with a hand vacuum pump and with a partner pumping the brakes. No change. With the engine off, the pedal is rock hard even when "standing" right on it. As soon as you start the engine and get the booster helping the pedal goes right to the floor.

I broke a bleeder in the rear that I was unable to extract and replaced the caliper. After more bleeding and a total flush of all old brake fluid, still no firm pedal. I assumed the master must have finally started to go, I replaced the master after successfully bench bleeding it, bled whole system RL,FR,RR,FL as the book said to, and still no change.

I don't have access to the DRB III tool to activate the ABS system to ensure no air is trapped in the unit, so after much research, some mechanics who work in Chrysler dealers said sometimes they don't have time to use the tool to bleed like the manual says. They claim the ABS unit will "self Bleed" after repeated ABS stops in a dirt parking lot. I have done this numerous times while bleeding in between. I have never seen any bubbles come out and there is no change.

I next figured the old stock rubber hoses were flexing with the added help from the booster. I replaced all rubber hoses with braided stainless performance lines. All crush washers replaced and hoses installed correctly. Bled system, ABS stops, bled system. Still no change.

I have been reading and researching this problem on the SRT forums and regular Neon forums. Numerous people are having this exact problem, some have ABS and a lot of them don't. I've been finding exactly this scenario with other car makes and manufactures as well. I don't want to blame the ABS system, it works well, and I have no reason to suspect air in it. I tried once to bring it to a mechanic for bleeding but they claimed they "didn't have the technology" to remove my stuck bleeder valve and instead wanted me to replace all calipers, pads, and discs. Surprise surprise. I have no problem with bringing it back to someone to have it bled properly with the tool if someone thinks it will help. People with this problem have been through two three and four new master cylinders with no change. So WHAT IS THE PROBLEM THEN? A big thank-you in advance for some professional help here.

Response From Discretesignals Top Rated Answer

ABS light on?

Have you tried using a pressure bleeder? If the ABS unit has ingested air for some reason, you'll need to bleed the unit.

You could have a defective master.

Why would Dodge spend time and money to have an ABS bleed function on their DRB and have a procedure in service information written up if any tech could go out and activate the ABS system by doing panic stops to bleed the system??

Response From 4cefed


ABS light on?

Nope

Have you tried using a pressure bleeder? If the ABS unit has ingested air for some reason, you'll need to bleed the unit.

I am between air compressors right now although I made a rig with the cap from the old master cylinder. I have put three quarts though this thing in various stages never really seeing any bubbles come out. I used the vac pump to flush though.

You could have a defective master.

That's why I changed it once.

Why would Dodge spend time and money to have an ABS bleed function on their DRB and have a procedure in service information written up if any tech could go out and activate the ABS system by doing panic stops to bleed the system??

I doubt it's the "proper and complete" method but it might get 90% of the job done.


Response From Discretesignals

If your replacement master isn't defective, you have all the air out of the system, and there are no leaks, the only thing left is the ABS hydraulic control unit. As HT stated, you could have a valve not sealing or some other internal problem inside the HCU.

Response From 4cefed

If a valve is not sealing in the HCU, is this only the case with the ignition on? if I pulled the fuse for the ABS then started the car for the vacuum boost would that rule anything out?

Seriously, what are the odds I bought a defective master? It was new, not a rebuild. It's a HUGE PITA to get at in this car too.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Can't be sure but I think something in your bleeding either bench bleeding went wrong between bench and install or somewhere. Not sure this vacuum bleeding with a helper pumping pedal was helping or causing a problem?

Defective part even new? I've have them but not in this manner just not machined properly for the pushrod mostly. This isn't all adding up. You may have to start all over,

T

Response From 4cefed

When I flushed the system I used the vacuum pump, but all other flushing attempts were the old fashioned way with a helper pumping.

So seriously, other than something changing in the ABS system when the ignition is on, the only thing this could really be is sill a bad master right?

Response From Hammer Time

The system needs to be bled electronically using a scan tool. There is really no other way to get the air out of the ABS unit.

Response From Discretesignals

Tom had a good one about capping the master to see if it holds hard. That would pretty much eliminate that.

Sometimes when calipers are retracted, during a brake job, by pushing the fluid back up into the master, trash in the caliper gets pushed into the ABS system causing valves to hang.

Just a tip for other that may be reading this: Open the bleeder screws when retracting pistons. I personally attach my vacuum bleeder to the screw and use a piston retractor, so fluid doesn't spill everywhere. I've seen the old RWAL Ford modulators get messed up by pushing fluid back up through them quite often.

Response From 4cefed


Tom had a good one about capping the master to see if it holds hard. That would pretty much eliminate that.

Sometimes when calipers are retracted, during a brake job, by pushing the fluid back up into the master, trash in the caliper gets pushed into the ABS system causing valves to hang.

Just a tip for other that may be reading this: Open the bleeder screws when retracting pistons. I personally attach my vacuum bleeder to the screw and use a piston retractor, so fluid doesn't spill everywhere. I've seen the old RWAL Ford modulators get messed up by pushing fluid back up through them quite often.

Capping the master would be a great test, but if I have to rip all that stuff out of the way, I would just as soon put in another master.

When the pedal sinks to the floor it's not progressive like it's air compressing. It feels like it's just bypassing,

Good tip about opening the bleeders before compressing the cylinder, I'll do that from now on.

Response From 4cefed

I did some more diagnosis, apparently leaving the car sit while you stew about it won't fix anything.

I pulled the ABS fuse and started the car, still had spongy pedal. I put the fuse back and clamped off the vacuum supply to the booster, firm pedal as expected.

Today I got another master and some flare plugs for the ports. I ripped the engine bay apart again and pulled the brake lines from the installed master. I capped those and started the car, so my amazement, firm pedal. So the master in the car (and probably the one before it) was good. I'm going to pull the calipers off the front tomorrow and see if anything doesn't look good. Maybe there is a frozen pin somewhere I didn't see the first time.

Response From Hammer Time

So, i guess you are going to continue to ignore the required electronic bleeding sequence.

Response From 4cefed


The system needs to be bled electronically using a scan tool. There is really no other way to get the air out of the ABS unit.

I wholeheartedly agree. I'm just trying to figure out if it IS actually the ABS. Do any of the ports or valves open with the ignition on?

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Not sure what you did with a vacuum pump? I've started some for a second with a hand held pump and finished with pump, hold, bleed, tighten bleeder and repeat.

If this took a while between proper bench bleeding and getting lines on it in car you could have trapped air.

Bad cylinder. Suks - you could make up plugs and see if it holds or just get another but request another brand as it may if faulty be a whole batch. That was the case when it happened to me - pegged it right to which factory - all got pulled from the parts places.

Could also be barking up the wrong tree and not bleeding it properly or some other reason entirely??

T

Response From Hammer Time

Why would Dodge spend time and money to have an ABS bleed function on their DRB and have a procedure in service information written up if any tech could go out and activate the ABS system by doing panic stops to bleed the system??

I have resolved some bypassing issues like that in the past. It was probably some dirt caught in a valve or something but it has worked for me, mostly GM products though.