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Best Selling Genuine Chevrolet Timing Covers

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Dorman
1994 Chevrolet C3500HD Engine Timing Cover 8 Cyl 5.7L Dorman

P311-4DADAA7    635-505  New

500350 , 12523972 , 12562818 , 8125239730 , 12523973 , 8125583430 , 103076 , 500350WO , 500LS2 , 8100896710 , 12558343 , 12552427 , 103075 , 93800970

Qty:
$34.63
Dorman Engine Timing Cover
  • w/Timing Indicator
  • Product Attributes:
    • Color/Finish: Black
    • Item Grade: Regular
    • Length (In): 11 In.
Brand: Dorman
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
1994 - Chevrolet C3500HD V 8 Cyl 5.7L 350 -
Dorman
1991 Chevrolet C3500 Engine Timing Cover Dorman

P311-4DADAA7    635-505  New

500350 , 12523972 , 12562818 , 8125239730 , 12523973 , 8125583430 , 103076 , 500350WO , 500LS2 , 8100896710 , 12558343 , 12552427 , 103075 , 93800970

Qty:
$34.63
Dorman Engine Timing Cover
  • w/Timing Indicator V8 350CID 5.7L
  • Product Attributes:
    • Color/Finish: Black
    • Item Grade: Regular
    • Length (In): 11 In.
Brand: Dorman
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1991 - Chevrolet C3500
Dorman
1994 Chevrolet W4500 Tiltmaster Engine Timing Cover 8 Cyl 5.7L Dorman

P311-4DADAA7    635-505  New

500350 , 12523972 , 12562818 , 8125239730 , 12523973 , 8125583430 , 103076 , 500350WO , 500LS2 , 8100896710 , 12558343 , 12552427 , 103075 , 93800970

Qty:
$34.63
Dorman Engine Timing Cover
  • Product Attributes:
    • Color/Finish: Black
    • Item Grade: Regular
    • Length (In): 11 In.
Brand: Dorman
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Fuel Type Block Engine CID CC
1994 - Chevrolet W4500 Tiltmaster GAS V 8 Cyl 5.7L 350 -
Dorman
2017 Chevrolet Caprice Engine Timing Cover 8 Cyl 6.0L Dorman

P311-147257E    635-515  New

500LS2 , 103359 , 12600326

Qty:
$67.59
Dorman Engine Timing Cover
  • Product Attributes:
    • Color/Finish: Silver
    • Item Grade: Regular
    • Length (In): 13 In.
Brand: Dorman
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
2017 - Chevrolet Caprice V 8 Cyl 6.0L 364 5967
Dorman
2005 Chevrolet Trailblazer Engine Timing Cover Dorman

P311-147257E    635-515  New

500LS2 , 103359 , 12600326

Qty:
$67.59
Dorman Engine Timing Cover
  • V8 325CID 5.3L (5328cc)
  • Product Attributes:
    • Color/Finish: Silver
    • Item Grade: Regular
    • Length (In): 13 In.
Brand: Dorman
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2005 - Chevrolet Trailblazer
Dorman
1992 Chevrolet S10 Engine Timing Cover 6 Cyl 4.3L Dorman

P311-248DC4B    635-512  New

103122 , 12513961 , 500262S

Qty:
$34.07
Dorman Engine Timing Cover
  • w/Welded Pointer
  • Product Attributes:
    • Color/Finish: Silver
    • Item Grade: Regular
    • Length (In): 12.25 In.
Brand: Dorman
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
1992 - Chevrolet S10 V 6 Cyl 4.3L 262 -
Dorman
1995 Chevrolet Astro Engine Timing Cover 6 Cyl 4.3L Dorman

P311-13DB58D    635-502  New

89017259 , 103074 , 12554555 , 89017261 , 12591746 , 93445880 , 500262 , 103073 , 10077964 , 12554557

Qty:
$38.13
Dorman Engine Timing Cover
  • Plastic
  • Product Attributes:
    • Color/Finish: Black
    • Item Grade: Regular
    • Length (In): 12.75 In.
Brand: Dorman
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
1995 - Chevrolet Astro V 6 Cyl 4.3L 262 -
Dorman
2007 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 Classic Engine Timing Cover 6 Cyl 4.3L Dorman

P311-13DB58D    635-502  New

89017259 , 103074 , 12554555 , 89017261 , 12591746 , 93445880 , 500262 , 103073 , 10077964 , 12554557

Qty:
$38.13
Dorman Engine Timing Cover
  • Product Attributes:
    • Color/Finish: Black
    • Item Grade: Regular
    • Length (In): 12.75 In.
Brand: Dorman
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
2007 - Chevrolet Silverado 1500 Classic V 6 Cyl 4.3L 262 -
Dorman
1995 Chevrolet S10 Engine Timing Cover 6 Cyl 4.3L Dorman

P311-13DB58D    635-502  New

89017259 , 103074 , 12554555 , 89017261 , 12591746 , 93445880 , 500262 , 103073 , 10077964 , 12554557

Qty:
$38.13
Dorman Engine Timing Cover
  • Plastic wo/Hole for Sensor
  • Product Attributes:
    • Color/Finish: Black
    • Item Grade: Regular
    • Length (In): 12.75 In.
Brand: Dorman
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Engine VIN Block Engine CID CC
1995 - Chevrolet S10 W V 6 Cyl 4.3L 262 -
Genuine
2012 Chevrolet Colorado Engine Timing Cover 4 Cyl 2.9L Genuine

P311-2600F43    W0133-2009900  New

Qty:
$289.36
Genuine Engine Timing Cover
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Oil Pump and Timing Cover Assembly
Brand: Genuine
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
2012 - Chevrolet Colorado L 4 Cyl 2.9L 178 2921

Latest Chevrolet Repair and Timing Cover Installation Advice

CarJunky AutoAdvice

98 K3500 won:t fire

Showing 2 out of 9 Posts | Show 7 Hidden Posts
Question From maglisn on 98 K3500 won:t fire

98 K3500 Chevrolet, 7.4L. installed rebuilt 7.4L, can"t get spark at plugs. Checked all grounds, have power to coil. Scan tool shows trouble code p0336.

Response From Hammer Time

That's a crank sensor code. You likely don't have any injector pulse either. You'll have to troubleshoot the crank sensor circuit to determine what the problem is. Make sure you didn't bend the pins over in the plug when you plugged it in.

Response From maglisn

crank sensor has power to the pink wire, Trying to find out what the values of the other 2 wires. The pins are good.

Response From Discretesignals

Pink is 12 volts with key on
Purple is sensor ground and will have less than 0.1 volts with key on while back probing connector.
Yellow is sensor signal and should have 0-12 volts while back probing the connector and cranking the engine. If your using a volt meter the voltage is going to be averaged out depending on cranking speed. You can also turn the crank by hand to see the true 0 and 12 volt signal on a volt meter. HT is correct that an o scope is the best tool for viewing hall effect sensor signals.

Response From DanD Top Rated Answer

Just a thought here; but was the crank sensor reluctor ring installed when the timing cover went on?



It has happened to me when the machine shop missed it when they did a rebuild on a 4.3lt. Cost them a second timing cover and a whole bunch of labour to diagnose and then install the reluctor ring. LOL
Dan.

Response From maglisn

f
Found the problem, Crank sensor air gap was too wide. Thanks for all the help.

Response From DanD

What the reluctor on the work bench to wide an air gap???

Just joking; glad you found the problem.

Dan.

Response From Sidom


What the reluctor on the work bench to wide an air gap???


Thats always such a crappy feeling......Got it done, cleaning your hands with a rag, getting ready to fire it up, do your final checks, drive it and your done. Only to walk over and see _________ sitting there on your tool box......

Response From Hammer Time

That really doesn't tell you a whole lot. The correct way to do this is with a lab scope. You need to determine the integrity of the other 2 wires back to the PCM and be able to read the signal where they connect to the PCM.

98 Chevrolet S-10 Will Not Start

Showing 2 out of 2 Posts
Question From Nonsmiley on 98 Chevrolet S-10 Will Not Start

Hi guys! I have a 98 Chevrolet S-10, 2.2l, 2wd. Just bought it from a buddy, so I don't have all the info on how it was running before, etc. Battery was completely dead so it is unlikely that any codes are stored. It won't start. It turns over; I checked for spark with timing light and it has it, so I thought maybe the fuel pump was bad. Rented a tester and got almost 50 psi at the fuel rail. The engine does not seem to be trying to start. I tried ether, but got the same result, which makes me think something in the timing. However, I also pulled two spark plugs and could not smell any gas on them.

I am about to do some more tests, but thought I would ask you guys before, so you could maybe make some more suggestions. I am not a part swapper, I want to figure out what is wrong with it.

I am going to start with a noid light to see if the injectors are working, then I thought I would check the crankshaft position sensor with a digital multimeter. Lastly, I will pull the timing cover off and check to see if the chain was broken or slipped. Outside of a compression test, I cannot think of anything else on this truck which would prevent it from starting, and before I get involved in any major potential problems, I would like to rule out less invasive causes.

Thanks in advance for your help!

Response From Hammer Time Top Rated Answer

You need a fuel pump

i need help with my 1981 chevrolet silverado w/ a 7.4 isn't cra

Showing 2 out of 4 Posts | Show 2 Hidden Posts
Question From ssdude on i need help with my 1981 chevrolet silverado w/ a 7.4 isn't cra

i have a 1981 chevy with a 454 and i think it might have a timing problem but can not figure it out. when you crank it over, it will crank a few times and then it will do a slower crank. i can turn it over all day and night but it still will not fire up.

Response From DanD

I’m assuming you’ve checked the basics and know that there’s spark and the carb has fuel?
One way of checking if the timing chain has jumped; is to remove #1 spark plug. Bump the engine over until you feel compression building at #1 Spark plug hole. (stick finger in hole; but not to deep LOL) Now align the timing mark on the lower pulley with the zero mark on the timing marker index. Remove the distributor cap and see if the ignition rotor is pointing to #1 cylinder’s spark plug wire position on the cap as if the cap is installed.
I may look a few degrees off; but if the rotor is pointing any more then that away from #1 and if you did the set up properly, of putting the engine at #1 Top Dead Centre of the compression stroke; then the chain has likely jumped.

Dan.

Response From ssdude

I pulled the #1spark plug out and felt a rhythmic puff of air come out of the cylinder. I looked at the lower pulley and did not find any marks use for alignment. I bought a Chilton’s book and based on that information the marks are not located where the book states they should be located. Do you have suggestions on how I can set the timing without being able to locate the marks? Or set the timing without the marks?

Response From DanD Top Rated Answer

The timing marks should be in this area (blue circle); the lower pulley (Balancer) will have what looks like a saw cut across its width and the index will be on the timing cover. In the picture below the round hole in the index would be TDC or zero timing.



Without the timing marks; bump the engine until you feel the “puff or air”. Then insert a probe (screwdriver) into the spark plug hole as to feel the top of the piston. Now BY HAND rotate the engine slowly until you do not feel anymore upwards movement of the piston. When you begin turning the engine; in its normal direction of rotation and you feel the piston going down; you gone past TDC; start over again. There will be a few degrees worth of crankshaft rotation where the piston will stay still; before it begins to move downwards. Now gestimate the center of crankshaft rotation between piston (up &down) movement and that should be TDC.

Dan.

Oil Leak on 2000 Chevrolet Metro LSi

Showing 2 out of 20 Posts | Show 18 Hidden Posts
Question From timdaniel on Oil Leak on 2000 Chevrolet Metro LSi

For a 2000 Chevrolet Metro LSi, 4 cylinder, 3-speed automatic transmission, 1.3 liters.

So I have put in UV dye into the engine and watched with a UV light to see where oil is leaking from, as it is coming out about 1 drop every 30 seconds while the engine is running. After doing this, I noticed it was coming from this sort of electrical connector that is between the oil filter and the exhaust manifold. I would call it by name but I don't know what it is called, or why there is oil coming from it. It does have a hexigonal shape, so I assume it can be loosened or tightened with a wrench. Could anyone please shed some light on this? I have some pictures here hosted on my google drive:

https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=0Bwtjzvm7qxfIVzdVdkRRWW53T2M&usp=sharing

Response From timdaniel

Just wanted to put an update for all those who might be interested. The repairs were successful.

See, I had done the crankshaft oil seal about a year ago, and I believe I did not put it in all the way so thing behind the harmonic balancer basically grinded and shaved the seal until it was leaking. This time I did follow the book and used a large socket to tap it into the hole and it is not leaking, not one drop. Also the oil pressure switch was indeed leaking quite a bit. This may have been because I noticed it leaking once and tried to loosen it or move it because I did not know what it was, and when I did that, I believe I made it leak. It was very confusing because the oil goes everywhere so it is hard to pinpoint exactly where it was coming from, but if your car is leaking from some unknown location, I recommend that you go and buy some ultra violet dye, and a ultra violet light which you can buy for about $10 cheaper at Target or Walmart by buying it in the pet department, as it works great for also finding pee stains on the floor. Putting that in the engine and using the light showed right away what the problems were. I also noticed a few drops coming from the valve cover seal and so I redid that and it is now not leaking at all and it has been a week.

So anyways thank you guys for helping me out. God bless.

Response From Hammer Time

The dye should be a very last resort for only very hard to locate leaks. A substantial oil leak will spread that stuff all over the place, including your driveway. It will hinder any future attempts to locate oil or even air conditioning leaks. Once it's all over the motor, there is no getting it off.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Agree - I don't find dye helpful at all for automotive use - even A/C not this issue.
OP: Just a warning on oil leak at harmonic balancer: A balancer is two rings of metal w rubber as a shock in between that will slip or up to wobble and fall off not tolerant of oil for long. Any vehicle failures have been rare but oil was the most likely cause IMO,


T

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Couldn't make your pics show but doesn't matter.
What you seem to have described is an oil pressure sender and they do leak thru them without being loose at all. Frequently just a special socket and a new one screws right in where old one came out.
Watch out. That 30 second drop of oil can flood out with no notice so you have your warning to be sure, name the part and replace it like yesterday!


T

Response From timdaniel

Thanks guys. Now does it have to be a special socket or can I use an adjustable wrench?

Response From Hammer Time

You're never going to get that out with an adjustable wrench. In fact if you intend to do any more work on your car, throw that wrench away. All it can do is destroy parts.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

I'm not going to search out the cost of the socket but should be under $10 bucks. They fit the switches without breaking them - who cares to get one out but not the new one going in. It's also one place generally allowed to use Teflon thread tape precisely and only on threads or what old pharts like me call thread sealer by Permatex, brush in cap again just on threads.
Your engine is at stake over this so if not sure how to this it's a while you wait job by any decent tech unless unusually hard to get at. Check for leaks like you would for a drain plug for oil as matter of good practice,


T

Response From timdaniel

Yes, you were right. However, the autoparts stores I went to (Pep Boys and OReilly's) both did not carry the size for the oil pressure sensor switch. But I went home and found out it was exactly a 15/16 socket. So, I also did not have a long one of those but I went to an Autozone and found one for 15/16. It is not leaking whatsoever from there now. However, it is still leaking from the crankshaft oil seal and the oil pump seal it looks like. So that is what I will work on now.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

I can't say they are all the same 15/16, think deep 12pt with a cut out so you don't bust the new switches. I have the right tools or even now would go get THE correct one as those if broken are a powered oil leak meaning you are pumping oil out as in gallons per minute.
Now if you think you have other leaks with one leaking as fast as that it also spilled so wipe area off without hosing down your engine just dry clean areas suspect and watch for them to have oil return actively or again and again keep checking.
It might be all done leaking but take a while to look just dirty and normal or not.
IMO and experience if you really need either crank seal it could be an early warning engine is wearing out via excessive blow-by pushing oil mist out of a front one and under pressure to most rear ones.
Rear main seals will put out as little as a drop every day, two or almost never from new to lube them, fronts don't show it.
Keep an eye out for any engine in your care as nothing is faster to kill an engine than running out of oil PRESSURE if by the level or not pumping doesn't matter it will quickly die so check it's level on a schedule by dipstick no more waiting for any warning lights.
Don't misunderstand oil or any warnings on dash. Red oil lights mean it's too late not time to check it. No dash indicator light is that good to tell you it's time just to simply add oil. Junkyards are full of those cars,


T

Response From timdaniel Top Rated Answer

No, it is not "exactly" a 15/16, but it did the job. I must say that it was pretty scary because it felt very tight going in. This was probably due to the fact that the thread was threaded with some kind of teflon it looked like. I tightened it up until I felt like it was starting to become more difficult, and then stopped.

So about the leaking though. I have had a leak at the rear main seal too. I put in some Bar's Rear Main Seal repair and that seems to have stopped that for now.

As for the crank shaft seal, I did the following to see if it was leaking:

1) Before all this I went to Target and bought a "spot detector" which is a UV light, and cheaper than what they sell it for at the auto parts stores. Then I got some UV dye from o'reilly's and put that in. That made the oil fluorescent. That was how I noticed that the oil pressure sender switch was in fact leaking.

2) Before actually putting in the UV dye, I did spray quite a bit of engine degreaser and clean up the engine as much as I could. I used a can and a half to be exact. I cleaned up all the spots that were really oily.

3) After replacing the oil pressure sender switch, I then noticed that the car was still leaking, but not from the oil pressure sender switch. That was nice and dry. It was coming from somewhere behind the timing cover. So,

4) I removed the drive belts, pullies, etc, and then the timing cover. I then sprayed all in there with engine degreaser and tried to clean it up as best as I could. Then I put the alternator belt, water pump and harmonic balancer back on and ran the engine with it all together. I watched as I noticed that no oil was coming from the cam shaft at all, except for a smiggen around the cam shaft and the valve cover, which was not much at all.

The crank shaft seal however, seemed to be spitting or spraying oil. Not a lot, but over time, it would easily form drops and drip. Not nearly as fast as the oil pressure sender switch, but pretty fast. I then determined that I would change the crank shaft front seal, as well as the fuel pump seal, because they both come in a kit for only $7.00.

P.S. I do always check the oil. I always keep it full. I don't drive that much but, when I do, I check the oil before I go. I am paranoid of anything I work on I guess. But there is always enough oil to be driven, and I always check it after it has sat for a long time, not right after driving like when you pull into the gas station.

Please shed any knowledge you might have, as I would appreciate it. Thank you again.

Response From Hammer Time

I must say that it was pretty scary because it felt very tight going in. This was probably due to the fact that the thread was threaded with some kind of teflon it looked like. I tightened it up until I felt like it was starting to become more difficult, and then stopped.

The thread is tapered pipe thread. that's why it get tighter as it goes in.

Response From timdaniel

On the actual switch though, should the thing be pressed up against the engine? What I mean is should it go until it cannot turn at all?

Response From Hammer Time

No, just enough to be tight enough so it won't leak, just like tightening a pipe into a fitting.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Sport - The damn switches use a special socket not just what might work. You could do that with an assortment of extractors too or possibly Vice-Grips of assorted types. The switch is sensitive so the wrong way or tool it might be torqued on incorrectly and blow out if you messed it up installing the new one, forget the old one as it's going in the trash anyway.


" I put in some Bar's Rear Main Seal repair and that seems to have stopped that for now."


Ya - that shows exactly what you DON'T KNOW! Or perhaps what you do know which is enough to get in more trouble.


Not sure why I'm bothering but you do understand how and engine uses oil as a bearing and lube itself? I know you don't. There are no roller bearings commonly used any engine so all parts are riding on the thinnest film of oil if perfect there's zero or so close to that there's never metal to metal contact or and engine wouldn't last a whole minute or much longer never minds years and many thousands of miles.
The wear on the crankshaft allows it to move too much from wear. That up down wear beats up seals so the can't last long.
An engine is only new once and made so precisely the bit that bore one only last a few times and new ones used. You can't take many parts out of one and put them in another the same day it was made never mind now.
Your engine is worn - they do that greatly over miles, conditions and how well lubed. Since you said you are cheap you probably think saving a buck on types or brands of oil doesn't matter too.
Bad luck happens to but if all was just right there's almost no wearing out a well made engine from new with care mind you.
Finding inordinate leaks us done assorted ways, UV dyes just one.
Already said now that the machine work of an engine in this case shows it's wearing and they do that normally a little bit at a time and the oil pressure switch was in the "Bad Luck" category. Many engines will fail to other leaks to wear over use and time.


I suggested strong observations of oil leaking now that you found a very active one. If you used the wrong tools or did it the wrong way somehow it's back on the watch list,


T

Response From timdaniel

Yes, for about 2 to 3 years now, I have been using the 10w30 Certified oil from Sam's Club. It comes out to be about $2.30 per bottle, which is why I use it. I did read about it though before making the decision to use it, and most people agreed it was acceptable oil.

Well, I guess I get what I paid for. It has about 187,000 miles on it. It was a rebuilt engine though, so in reality it has about half of that. Live and learn I guess.

Response From timdaniel

What do you think of these ceramic additives to engines like (links to makers of mechanic in a bottle makers not allowed) Since you mentioned blow-by, I looked it up. IF that is the case, then I guess it's time for a new car because this one is only worth about $1000 kelley blue book. But either way, if I can fix it for just $100, why not? What do you think?

Response From timdaniel

Yeah, I agree. I would not use it normally. I am just trying to not spend money

Response From Hammer Time

Well, that's the best way to end up spending double what you would have in the first place.

That doesn't even take a regular socket. It is a special socket for oil pressure senders only.

Response From Hammer Time

That's the oil pressure sender for the gauge/light. You need a special socket to remove it but they aren't expensive.