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We also have Throttle Position Sensor parts for other Hyundai models, including Accent, Elantra, Elantra GT, Excel, Santa Fe, Scoupe, Sonata, Tiburon, Tucson, XG300, XG350.

TPI
2004 Hyundai Accent Throttle Position Sensor TPI

P311-10064E4    TPS1044  New

Qty:
$9.34
TPI Throttle Position Sensor
Brand: TPI
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2004 - Hyundai Accent
TPI
2010 Hyundai Accent Throttle Position Sensor TPI

P311-395EBE0    TPS1199  New

Qty:
$18.10
TPI Throttle Position Sensor
Brand: TPI
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2010 - Hyundai Accent
TPI
2003 Hyundai Accent Throttle Position Sensor 4 Cyl 1.6L TPI

P311-10064E4    TPS1044  New

Qty:
$9.34
TPI Throttle Position Sensor
  • L4
Brand: TPI
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
2003 - Hyundai Accent L 4 Cyl 1.6L - 1600
TPI
2011 Hyundai Accent Throttle Position Sensor TPI

P311-395EBE0    TPS1199  New

Qty:
$18.10
TPI Throttle Position Sensor
  • To 11/2/2011
Brand: TPI
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2011 - Hyundai Accent
Beck Arnley
2009 Hyundai Accent Throttle Position Sensor 4 Cyl 1.6L Beck Arnley

P311-18082C6    158-1359  New

Qty:
$45.58
Beck Arnley Throttle Position Sensor
  • THROTTLE POSITION SENSOR
  • Beck/Arnley parts meet foreign nameplate OE specifications for form, fit and function. Our product specialists work with a network of global sourcing partners so you can install the right part with confidence.
Brand: Beck Arnley
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
2009 - Hyundai Accent L 4 Cyl 1.6L - 1599
Beck Arnley
2002 Hyundai Accent Throttle Position Sensor 4 Cyl 1.5L Beck Arnley

P311-587E8A3    158-0641  New

Qty:
Beck Arnley Throttle Position Sensor
  • THROTTLE POSITION SENSOR
  • Beck/Arnley parts meet foreign nameplate OE specifications for form, fit and function. Our product specialists work with a network of global sourcing partners so you can install the right part with confidence.
Brand: Beck Arnley
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
2002 - Hyundai Accent L 4 Cyl 1.5L - 1495
Beck Arnley
1995 Hyundai Accent Throttle Position Sensor 4 Cyl 1.5L Beck Arnley

P311-02D710B    158-0486  New

Qty:
$37.74
Beck Arnley Throttle Position Sensor
  • THROTTLE POSITION SENSOR
  • Beck/Arnley parts meet foreign nameplate OE specifications for form, fit and function. Our product specialists work with a network of global sourcing partners so you can install the right part with confidence.
Brand: Beck Arnley
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
1995 - Hyundai Accent L 4 Cyl 1.5L - 1495
Facet
1999 Hyundai Accent Throttle Position Sensor Facet

P311-07396E7    10.5002  New

9946862 , 8 26 924 , 9625299980 , 89452-05010 , 9617220680 , 3450030 , 0K011-18-911 , 9603893880 , 0K30A 18911 , 35170-22010 , 60549359 , 35170-23000 , 0K247-18-911 , 0 280 122 008 , 0 280 122 013 , 90 323 839 , 0 280 122 004 , 1920 Z4 , 0 280 122 003 , 7637025 , 1628 1E , 46 61 062 , 60811198 , 1336385-8 , 0 280 122 001 , 944 606 116 01 , 944 606 116 00 , 1336385 , 88 57 195 , 0K9A5-18911 , 35170 22001 , 0K9A5 18911 , 60808043 , 96 038 938 , 1628 L1 , 35170-22001 , 9947132

Qty:
$35.76
  • Throttle Position Sensor
Brand: Facet
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel
1999 - Hyundai Accent GL
Facet
2005 Hyundai Accent Throttle Position Sensor Facet

P311-26E0F64    10.5086  New

91 81 538 , 22620-1F700 , 35170 22600 , 996 606 116 00 , 90 541 502 , 35170-23500 , 0 280 122 016 , 58 26 473 , 35170 23500 , ERR7322 , 0 280 122 014 , 37890-PDF-E01 , 35170-22600

Qty:
$44.78
  • Throttle Position Sensor
Brand: Facet
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel
2005 - Hyundai Accent GLS
Standard Ignition
1998 Hyundai Accent Throttle Position Sensor Standard Ignition

P311-26B8B14    TH291  New

19236544 , 213-4490 , 71-7905 , 0K247-18911 , 5S5504 , TPS4185 , 037-0001 , 2TPS0109 , 0K30A-18-911 , EC3302

Qty:
$51.59
Standard Ignition Throttle Position Sensor
  • Throttle Position Sensor
  • Genuine Intermotor Quality Alternate Number
  • Product Attributes:
    • Connector Gender: Female
    • Connector Type: Plug In
    • Terminal Gender: Male
    • Terminal Quantity: 3
    • Terminal Type: Blade Terminals
  • Our Throttle Position Sensors maintain specific installed outputs to match OE rather than adjustable consolidated designs. Circuits are printed on flexible polyimide film or ceramic-based substrates for excellent dimensional stability preventing electrical performance drift. Noble palladium/gold/platinum alloys provide low contact resistance for extended service life. Each TPS uses integral rotor bearings and return springs for easy installation. Each sensor undergoes rigorous end-of-line testing with thousands of data points to validate output voltages for optimum performance and trouble-free operation. Featuring the broadest sensor coverage in the market, we meet the service professionals needs with the highest quality product every time he opens the box. As a global manufacturer of emission components, complete quality control is maintained through the manufacturing process from componentry to finished product.
Brand: Standard Ignition
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1998 - Hyundai Accent
Standard Ignition
2002 Hyundai Accent Throttle Position Sensor Standard Ignition

P311-5C6D2B3    TH366  New

037-0003 , 5S5055 , 213-4083 , SS10563 , EC3266 , TPS4157 , 5S5315 , TPS4144 , 19236549 , 19146052 , 0280122014 , 5S5180 , 14048 , 158-0641 , 601-0404 , 71-7828 , 213-4495 , 977-404 , 35170-22600 , 200-1322 , 2-9980 , 141-7027 , 71-7682 , TPS150

Qty:
$53.63
Standard Ignition Throttle Position Sensor
  • Throttle Position Sensor
  • Genuine Intermotor Quality
  • Product Attributes:
    • Connector Gender: Female
    • Connector Type: Plug In
    • Terminal Gender: Male
    • Terminal Quantity: 3
    • Terminal Type: Blade Terminals
  • Our Throttle Position Sensors maintain specific installed outputs to match OE rather than adjustable consolidated designs. Circuits are printed on flexible polyimide film or ceramic-based substrates for excellent dimensional stability preventing electrical performance drift. Noble palladium/gold/platinum alloys provide low contact resistance for extended service life. Each TPS uses integral rotor bearings and return springs for easy installation. Each sensor undergoes rigorous end-of-line testing with thousands of data points to validate output voltages for optimum performance and trouble-free operation. Featuring the broadest sensor coverage in the market, we meet the service professionals needs with the highest quality product every time he opens the box. As a global manufacturer of emission components, complete quality control is maintained through the manufacturing process from componentry to finished product.
Brand: Standard Ignition
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2002 - Hyundai Accent
Standard Ignition
2011 Hyundai Accent Throttle Position Sensor Standard Ignition

P311-4C26318    TH432  New

037-0027 , 2TPS0088 , EC3388 , 5S7717 , 158-1359 , 71-7935 , 3517026900 , TPS4214 , V52-72-0241

Qty:
$67.59
Standard Ignition Throttle Position Sensor
  • Throttle Position Sensor
  • Genuine Intermotor Quality
  • Product Attributes:
    • Connector Gender: Female
    • Connector Type: Plug In
    • Terminal Gender: Male
    • Terminal Quantity: 3
    • Terminal Type: Blade Terminals
  • Our Throttle Position Sensors maintain specific installed outputs to match OE rather than adjustable consolidated designs. Circuits are printed on flexible polyimide film or ceramic-based substrates for excellent dimensional stability preventing electrical performance drift. Noble palladium/gold/platinum alloys provide low contact resistance for extended service life. Each TPS uses integral rotor bearings and return springs for easy installation. Each sensor undergoes rigorous end-of-line testing with thousands of data points to validate output voltages for optimum performance and trouble-free operation. Featuring the broadest sensor coverage in the market, we meet the service professionals needs with the highest quality product every time he opens the box. As a global manufacturer of emission components, complete quality control is maintained through the manufacturing process from componentry to finished product.
Brand: Standard Ignition
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2011 - Hyundai Accent
True Tech
2001 Hyundai Accent Throttle Position Sensor True Tech

P311-225410F    TH366T  New

TPS4144 , 14048 , 5S5055 , 71-7828 , 213-4495 , 19236549 , TPS4157 , 158-0641 , 977-404 , 213-4083 , 5S5180 , 200-1322 , 037-0003 , 5S5315 , 0280122014 , 601-0404 , 19146052 , 141-7027 , SS10563 , 71-7682 , 2-9980 , TPS150

Qty:
$33.01
True Tech Throttle Position Sensor
  • Throttle Position Sensor
  • Product Attributes:
    • Connector Gender: Male
    • Connector Type: Plug In
    • Terminal Gender: Female; Male
    • Terminal Quantity: 3
    • Terminal Type: Blade
  • Made from quality components for dependability.
Brand: True Tech
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2001 - Hyundai Accent
Vemo
2006 Hyundai Accent Throttle Position Sensor Vemo

P311-476D2A7    W0133-1650250  New

Qty:
$27.98
Brand: Vemo
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel
2006 - Hyundai Accent GSi
MTC
2006 Hyundai Accent Throttle Position Sensor MTC

P311-2242354    W0133-1650250  New

Qty:
$51.80
MTC Throttle Position Sensor
Brand: MTC
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel
2006 - Hyundai Accent GSi
Original Equipment
2006 Hyundai Accent Throttle Position Sensor Original Equipment

P311-38B6190    W0133-1782488  New

Qty:
$80.01
Original Equipment Throttle Position Sensor
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
Brand: Original Equipment
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel Region
2006 - Hyundai Accent GLS Canada
Genuine
2006 Hyundai Accent Throttle Position Sensor Genuine

P311-5AE829B    W0133-1782488  New

Qty:
$139.85
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
Brand: Genuine
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel Region
2006 - Hyundai Accent GLS Canada
Dorman
2006 Hyundai Accent Throttle Position Sensor 4 Cyl 1.6L Dorman

P311-0B50BC7    977-404  New

TH366T , EC3266 , TH366 , 3517022600

Qty:
$29.50
  • Product Attributes:
    • California Proposition 65: Warning: Cancer And Reproductive Harm ?Çô Www.p65warnings.ca.gov
    • Color/Finish: Black
    • Electrical Connection Type: 3-way Female
    • Material: Plastic
    • Terminal Count: 3
    • Terminal Type: Blade
Brand: Dorman
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
2006 - Hyundai Accent L 4 Cyl 1.6L - 1600
Walker
2000 Hyundai Accent Throttle Position Sensor 4 Cyl 1.5L Walker - Walker

P311-0639089    200-1322  New

Qty:
$38.72
Walker Throttle Position Sensor
  • Walker Products 200-1322 Throttle Position Sensor
  • Walker
  • Product Attributes:
    • CA_Prop65_Lead: Warning: This Product Can Expose You To Chemicals, Including Lead, Which Is Known To The State Of California To Cause Cancer Or Birth Defects Or Other Reproductive Harm. Www.p65warnings.ca.gov
    • Connector Gender: Female
    • Connector Shape: Oblong
    • Material: Plastic
    • Terminal Gender: Male
    • Terminal Quantity: 4
    • Terminal Type: Blade
  • Walker Products began supplying the fuel system needs of the automotive industry in 1946. Today Walker is one of the largest, privately owned manufacturers of fuel system components and engine sensors, and has served the needs of the worldwide automotive aftermarket. We are committed to supplying products manufactured to meet or exceed OEM standards and specifications. This effort is backed by our own manufacturing, product management and engineering staff to ensure it is maintained and accurate in the production of quality parts, vehicle applications, instruction sheets and technical support. Our products include Carburetor and Fuel Injection Repair Kits, Oxygen Sensors and other Engine Management products such as Throttle Position Sensors, Cam and Crankshaft Sensors, Fuel Injectors, Spark Plug Wires and Gaskets. As an ISO 9001/IATF16949 certified company, we are committed to supplying the highest quality products.
Brand: Walker
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Engine Designation Aspiration Fuel Type Engine VIN Block Engine CID CC
2000 - Hyundai Accent G4EK Naturally Aspirated GAS G L 4 Cyl 1.5L - 1495
Walker
2005 Hyundai Accent Throttle Position Sensor 4 Cyl 1.6L Walker - Walker Products

P311-0639089    200-1322  New

Qty:
$38.72
Walker Throttle Position Sensor
  • Walker Products 200-1322 Throttle Position Sensor
  • Walker Products
  • Product Attributes:
    • CA_Prop65_Lead: Warning: This Product Can Expose You To Chemicals, Including Lead, Which Is Known To The State Of California To Cause Cancer Or Birth Defects Or Other Reproductive Harm. Www.p65warnings.ca.gov
    • Connector Gender: Female
    • Connector Shape: Oblong
    • Material: Plastic
    • Terminal Gender: Male
    • Terminal Quantity: 4
    • Terminal Type: Blade
  • Walker Products began supplying the fuel system needs of the automotive industry in 1946. Today Walker is one of the largest, privately owned manufacturers of fuel system components and engine sensors, and has served the needs of the worldwide automotive aftermarket. We are committed to supplying products manufactured to meet or exceed OEM standards and specifications. This effort is backed by our own manufacturing, product management and engineering staff to ensure it is maintained and accurate in the production of quality parts, vehicle applications, instruction sheets and technical support. Our products include Carburetor and Fuel Injection Repair Kits, Oxygen Sensors and other Engine Management products such as Throttle Position Sensors, Cam and Crankshaft Sensors, Fuel Injectors, Spark Plug Wires and Gaskets. As an ISO 9001/IATF16949 certified company, we are committed to supplying the highest quality products.
Brand: Walker
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Aspiration Fuel Type Engine VIN Block Engine CID CC
2005 - Hyundai Accent Naturally Aspirated GAS C L 4 Cyl 1.6L - 1600

Latest Hyundai Accent Repair and Throttle Position Sensor Installation Advice

CarJunky AutoAdvice

1999 Hyundai Accent Trans Problems!!!!!

Showing 4 out of 4 Posts
Question From Collinsc on 1999 Hyundai Accent Trans Problems!!!!!

I have a 1999 Hyundai Accent and its my first car. The trans is automatic and nobody can figure out whats wrong with it. My check engine light is on at all times. My overdrive button doesnt work and didnt when we bought the car in August 2007. The car has no power when going up hill and i have to shift down manually when stopping just so i can take off again at normal speed....the problems seem to get worse in the summer when its hot.... when driving on the highway at 65-70 my rpms are at 4000-4500. And now it only goes in reverse if i put it in drive first. I had the throttle position sensor replaced when i bought the car and the speed sensor...
does anyone know what this might be?....

Response From dave284

The first thing is to have the check engine trouble codes retreived, autozone does it free....that will most likely point out the problem or let you know the the next steps need to take....the codes will also help us in finding the trouble in other words it takes out some of the guess work

Response From Collinsc

we did that when i went to get it inspected in August and the speed sensor code kept showing up even though i just had it replaced and the guy who put it in double checked it to make sure it was in right....no other codes have shown up.

Response From dave284 Top Rated Answer

O.k. ....that tells me the problems in the trans/trans parts....Here an IDEAL, take it to AAMOCO...tell the service manager that youre a regular customer of autozone and was refered to have the trans checked out and there would be no charge for this......that might shed some light on your problem...it could be good or bad news either way you will know

Too much power too soon

Showing 2 out of 19 Posts | Show 17 Hidden Posts
Question From MDWhite on Too much power too soon

2004 Hyundai Accent 1.6 DOHC. Has way too much power for accelerator position. Make it difficult to drive in traffic. (has 5-sp. man) Check Engine light not on, no computer codes. Just did a little experiment on hwy. -- cruising at steady 60mph, pedal down abt 10%, increase to 20% and held it. Got up to 85mph and was still accelerating slowly when I backed off. Something must be opening the throttle besides my right foot it seems to me. What could be doing this ??

Response From Discretesignals

Probably would be a good idea to have your mechanic take it for a ride to see exactly what your concern is.

Make sure that your floor mat isn't making contact with your accelerator pedal.

This throttle body is cable operated, so inspect the cables for damage or fraying. Make sure the throttle opens and closes without binding. A dirty throttle bore or sticking plate can cause jack rabbit starts. You could clean the throttle and bore with a tooth brush and cleaner to see if that helps out.

Response From MDWhite

Thank you for your response. No, nothing sticking (that would likely cause idle problems) but your comments got me looking at that area and I found the throttle cable adjusting/lock nuts very loose. Got these this adjusted and properly tightened and that helped a lot. Still think the engine is out of spec though -- probably some clown has toyed with the computer at some point (I just bought this used). How would I determine if this is the case ?? I don't know much about these things, but have heard many cars, even an economy car like this have available aftermarket computer mods. I would like to get thisw back to stock.

Response From Discretesignals

Not sure what you mean by clowning with the computer. If for some reason they were able to alter the software in the computer, they would have either have flashed the EEPROM with some sort of modified calibration or would have piggy backed some sort of performance chip. I highly doubt it, but the only way you would be able to tell is by inspecting the PCM harness and looking for a piggy back or connecting up a high end scan tool and looking at the calibration number of the software flashed into the PCM.

Just curious, but have you had your mechanic take it for a spin?

Response From MDWhite

I believe there is a whole industry devoted to doing just those kinds of things with car computers, actually. But still seems like something else is controlling the throttle at times of acceleration. There is no way this is as stock. If that were the case very very few of them would have ever sold. I pretty much have full power at 1/3 accelerator. It ramps up very very quickly above abt 2000 rpm (or less) starting at abt 20% pedal. Makes it very hard to modulate precisely, esp. when dropping the clutch. Have driven over 1.5 million miles in man. trans cars so know what to expect.

Response From Discretesignals

Curious, but if you hold the accelerator pedal at 1/3 what is the position of the throttle blade?

You could loosen the throttle cable nut and then have someone hold the pedal to the floor. Then adjust the cable nut till the throttle blade just touches the wide open throttle position . That would probably set the cable correctly.

Response From MDWhite Top Rated Answer

I opened up the intake there to see if everything was OK and it seems to be. Interestingly there is a passage that bypasses the throttle valve that apparently is there for idle. If it is blocked the engine quickly dies, though it seems much wider (abt 1/2 in diameter) than I think would be needed to support idle. Someone suggested a throttle position sensor might be at fault here, I might try that. I should say that the engine does vary somewhat in its behavior (both when dropping the clutch and in general) in that it does not ramp up in power so wildly as I described and acts more normally with a gradual progression of power, though most of the time it is the former.

Response From Discretesignals

You could have a TPS issue, but a faulty TPS would cause hesitation, stumbling, and possible idle issues. You can sweep the TPS with a volt meter or lab scope to see if it has any dead spots. Not a common failure item.

Response From MDWhite

Have two new things to report. First, I disconnected, cleaned, and reconnected a bunch of engine sensors (though none seemed particularly dirty or corroded) with engine off. Upon starting and running, I noticed a difference right away. It was much more driveable than before, though still not quite right. Just now the crazy power ramp-up happened a bit further down in the throttle, and was now probably a bit less rapid. Also picked up a good 2-3 mpg from this too. (I waited until I had gone through 3 tankfuls of gas to ascertain this. After the first subsequent fillup I thought the gauge must have been stuck.) But like I said still not really right. And then I went to change the sparkplugs recently I found my suspicions about the computer were correct. It has definitely been messed with. It is not firing the coils in stock order (and whoever put the wires on knew the right order to put them) I was lucky I noticed this before I got too far and lost this info. So this is where it stands now. Any further thoughts will be appreciated.

Response From Hammer Time

So, you're saying that the firing order was wrong all along and that caused you to have too much power too soon?
Were the wires connected to the wrong coil or just the wrong pole on a single coil?

Response From MDWhite

No, of course not. It is because someone knew which coils (which are marked with the cylinder No.) went to which cylinders (now NOT the No. on the coil) that it wasn't (isn't) misfiring (in which case the car would have been inoperable). My point is the change in order is evidence of a computer reprogramming, which of course included many other modifications.

Response From Hammer Time

I don't know what you're smoking but you need to put the pipe down.

Response From Discretesignals

I'm confused. The firing order of that engine is going to be 1-3-4-2. That is built into the engine mechanically. Changing the software in the engine controller isn't going to change the mechanical design of the engine.

You can swap 1 and 4 or 2 and 3 plug wires, but you probably won't detect any difference in the running of the engine.

Not only does the spark have to occur in the correct firing order, but the valve timing and pistons' positions also determine the firing order in which combustion events occur:


Response From MDWhite

Maybe I am assuming too much here. I assume a coil is only fired when needed, based on the signal from the camshaft pos. sensor (as processed and routed by the computer and its programming). Maybe they fire twice per cycle ? I don't know. Tell me. If you did what you described with an older car with a distributor it would be practically undriveable (in fact people have seriously damaged engines by misrouting the HT wires).

Response From Discretesignals

On your system, which is called a waste spark, each coil is fired twice in 720 degrees of crank rotation. This means that each cylinder will get a spark while its piston is near top dead center on both the exhaust and compression strokes.

Cylinders that share the same ignition coil are called companion cylinders. That means when one cylinder is coming up on compression stroke its companion is coming up on the exhaust stroke.

The engine computer determines when to fire the coil based on crankshaft position and speed which is provided by the crank shaft position sensor. The computer will also modify the ignition timing based on throttle position, engine load, engine temperature, and etc.

Your right, having spark plug wires switched on distributor systems can cause misfires and melt catalysts, but the engine would perform so badly you'd be a fool to drive on something like that.

Response From MDWhite

Well I finally realized what is going on here. It is so obvious I don't know why I didn't see it sooner. The intake (the throttle valve I inspected before) is way too large for the engine size. Not any modification, just the way it was made. Overengineered idiocy (like firing spark plugs twice as often as needed). So they can claim say 5 HP more at like 5500 rpm or something (which I could drive the vehicle 100K mi and never use once) the low end is tough to control like it is, at least with the manual trans. Doesn't help that the car has some sort of a racing clutch in it either. I realized that in carbureted trim this engine (it is a descendent of the Mitsubishi 1600cc engine that debuted in the 1970 Dodge Colt) would like a 32x34 mm barrel arrangement with maybe half the cross sectional area this intake has. So of course when I have the pedal down about a third if the way the engine has nearly full power, at least at normal driving rpm's. Still I otherwise like the car, it has good performance and now in the warm weather driving it carefully I get abt 40mpg, which is what I got it for.

Response From Discretesignals

Unless the engine has been modified by someone, that throttle body and induction system is going to be designed to fit that engine by the manufacture. Maybe your trying to compare it to an old carbed engine that isn't as responsive.

Response From MDWhite

Yes, thanks for your reply. There is definitely some truth to that, but frankly I don't think it was just that much of a priority. What is it, 90% of cars are automatics now or something like that ? (at least in US). I just couldn't see how the engine was getting that much air, and now I know. Bear in mind this throttle, which is over 50mm in diameter, has TWICE the cross-sectional area of two 25mm chokes that the engine would typically be drawing through in carbed trim. It had been years since I held a carburetor in my hands and I kind of forgot what they were like. But the greatest difference between this engine and the older ones I mentioned is the 4V cylinder head this one has (I would count that as an even bigger difference than the fuel injection vs. carburetion) . They would be remiss if they didn't adapt induction in other ways to take advantage of this, I know. I would like to drive this in automatic trim, that would be really nice I think now (I would not have said that about an older small car). Thats what this is really designed for, I think. Though it wouldn't have been that hard to, say, have the throttle cable wrap on a cam instead of on a simple cylinder to give a variable opening rate in the manual trans cars. And at pedal down they would have the throttle open so they could get that final peak of power. Now I was told when I got the car that it had had a recent clutch replacement and I didn't have any trouble believing that. Very touchy, very grabby. I thought this would fade with use and it really hasn't. I should have mentioned that it is practically impossible to start the car on a hill without spinning the wheels some. I have a choice of either that or stalling the engine, basically. Otherwise I like the car, though I can't understand why on earth anyone would put power steering in such a small car; if I keep it I am going to look into putting in an older model's manual rack and get back that feel of the road I like.

Response From Hammer Time

That's ridiculous. You've been watching too many cartoons.

high idle

Showing 2 out of 2 Posts
Question From signofhorse on high idle

2001 Hyundai Accent GL 1.6L engine. Having problem with high idle. P0507, P0102 codes. Replaced Mass sensor, pvc valve n throttle position sensor. Erased codes n then came back on. Read same codes. Do u have any ideas. Idles about 1700rpm should br about 850.

Response From Discretesignals Top Rated Answer

The P0102 code will set if the PCM sees an open circuit in the MAF signal circuit or if the reading from the MAF sensor is unusually low.

Check the air duct and make sure it isn't ripped. Inspect the MAF air flow sensor wiring, connector, and pins and make sure the wiring isn't broken underneath the insulation and the terminals in the connector are clean and tight. If all that checks out good you'll need a scan tool to look at air flow rate and a good digital volt meter or scope to watch the MAF sensor output voltage to see if it is within specs for the air flow rate.

The high idle could be from a vacuum leak after the throttle body or a malfunctioning ISC valve. You can check the ISC valve by ohm checking the coils inside it to check for any opens in the stepper coils. If the coils are good, you would have to monitor stepper motor control from the PCM to be sure the ISC is being commanded. I found the best way to check for control is by using an oscilloscope. Most DIY don't have one laying around, so you might need to take it to a shop that does drive-ability that has the equipment.

2002 Hyundai Accent with worsening misfire

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Question From Maplicito on 2002 Hyundai Accent with worsening misfire

I tried posting this on another site, but haven't gotten any responses, so I'll try here... I think a cut and paste of what I wrote before should do:

My car is a Canadian 2002 Accent. I believe it's a GLS, and it has the 1.5L engine.

It has a worsening misfire in the low RPM's, although the RPM range this happens in has been broadening. I can now smell unburnt gas when this happens.

This problem first reared its head around a year ago. I replaced the fuel and air filters without it resolving the problem. I changed the spark plugs - the old ones looked to be in reasonable shape, but suddenly it ran great with the new plugs - for a few months.

The misfire started to creep back in. Since then, I've replaced the upstream O2 sensor and cleaned the MAF sensor. I replaced the throttle position sensor. None of these things solved the problem.

The battery terminals were getting pretty corroded - I hadn't thought this would be related to the issue, but I cleaned them. This did not fully solve the problem, but it did drastically improve it. I bought a new battery the same day - the problem while not gone, seemed to be much more manageable.

About 100km later, the problem has significantly worsened again. I tested voltage across the battery - with the car running, the voltage is ~14.2V. When the fan is on full and my fairly high powered stereo is running, voltage still stays ~14.2V. I'm assuming that should mean that the alternator is good?

Previously, I had tried my ignition coil on my sister's Accent, and it seemed to work fine - but I'm not entirely convinced that the coil is guilt free. I have not done any further testing on the coil, and have not tested the spark plug cables - I'm not sure how to properly test the coil or cables, and don't know where to find the appropriate specs for them should I learn how to test them.

Any other suggestions out there? I got the car on the cheap, however, aside from the low (now mid) RPM stutter, the car seems to otherwise be in great shape, and only has 150,000 km on it. Unless it's going to cost an excessive amount, I would like to get this car running right again.

Thanks for any suggestions you guys can offer!

Response From kev2

get the vehicle scanned for any codes. Yes even if light is off.


It is often less expensive to have a vehicle properly diagnosed and repaired than the 'shotgun' randomly throw parts at it method. What tools do you have to diagnose?

Response From Maplicito

I haven't scanned it since replacing the batter last weekend, but previously it would show a p0300 random misfire code, and while I don't remember off the top of my head which ones, it would show the code for a misfire in two of the cylinders. This was just with my dad's OBD2 scanner.

I would like to take it to a shop, but the one shop I trust is currently in the process of moving, and unable to diagnose anything at the moment.

Response From kev2

your dad has a scanner great-
recheck the codes, then look at FT's and o2 sensor voltages- see if its rich and compensating... might want to look at MAP and ECT also.
For a misfire its IGNITION spark at all cylinders, FUEL - injectors, fuel pressure, inj pulse, MECHANICAL- compression or vacuum checks.

Response From Maplicito

Thanks for the response, I'll have a look as soon as I can, and if I need more assistance, I'll post back here. I appreciate your help!

Response From Maplicito

I ran the scanner. It came back with the codes P0300, P0301, and P0303. If memory serves, those are the codes I've always gotten - I don't believe I've ever gotten P0302 or P0304.

I don't know how to interpret the further information I got - it only showed up for the P0300 code:

Fuel System 1
Closed loop

Calculated LOAD
32.9%

Vehicle Speed
29 MPH

Lift Bank 1
-2.3%

Engine RPM
2240 RPM

Engine Coolant Temp
123 F

STFT Bank 1
17.1%


Does that have any useful information in it?

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Maplicito: Quoting you from up top post ">>I changed the spark plugs - the old ones looked to be in reasonable shape, but suddenly it ran great with the new plugs - for a few months."
I'll get back to that but as DS has said the spark tester is a good tool you may not have nor others just yet and IMO time is running out for fixing this or waste you converter.


It seems new plugs made a difference back when but no mention of the wires? With that I'd look again and consider new wires just because if older but you can get good clues without tossing parts. Just move them with a glove at the risk of getting a jolt to you and see if they arc to each other or plain look for rub marks.


Know that high voltage is dumb just seeks the easiest way to ground without regard to if it sparks a spark plug or misses doing that. Most cars are sensitive to correct plugs not off brands or ones with claims to improve over OE specs. This should require NGK plugs if not probably should really think about the right ones. New could have covered weak wires for some time and the source issue the wires or back not actually the original plugs when problem began.
Know also when a plug tries to fire under compression it take more power to it to properly jump the gap so any alternative place to jump out is more likely with loads or temptations like the wires are damp - other things too.


In short I think you could at least visually see a problem with wires up to if when dark see them arcing under load or light misting of them with even just tap water,


T

Response From kev2

your scanner 'snapshot' I would look at why ECT low, why STFT is high...
X2 colleagues mention of spark plug brands - yeah brand does matter.

Response From Maplicito

Thank you for the further replies. The plugs that were previously in the car were some cheap brand that the previous owner put in - the new ones I put in that seemed to temporarily solve the problem were NGK. I'm headed out of town for a bit this weekend (with a different vehicle), but I'll try to get a look at the wires - that really helps, thanks!

As for ECT, I'm assuming the code is likely just the most recent occurrence? If so, that was from a trip that was under 2 km. I don't know anything about STFT, but as I get time, I'll try to research it.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

You can tell if wires are the issue or boots OR the coil(s) involved with minimal test equipment if it's bad enough and think it is.
Ex: If you purposely left a plug wire hanging no ground you are forcing it to find an alternative. That alternative in longer or shorter time then can become the best route to ground for high voltage.
OK - DON'T DO THIS I'LL FIND ANOTHER WAY TOTALLY SAFE. I'll just feel for that fussy feel of high voltage and don't want you to do that - I'm used to it but it's not suggested.


Perhaps try grounding a screwdriver with a jumper wire to it to known ground and use like a wand to find it arc or change when close to a weak area or wire should work. One erratic misfire can jump to another cylinder so you get two code then a list of codes from it not running properly as the poor engine tries to cover up what might be normal issues if all was perfect.
The time the wrong plugs were in there could have started it. Doesn't matter but caught my attention when you said new plugs now proper seemed to solve it for some time but the damage was still lurking is a super strong clue to me.


To avoid just tossing parts test it out. If old wires now (most marked with year made) it really isn't a waste unless insanely costly for a guess if not proven,


T

Response From Maplicito

Thanks Tom. That screwdriver idea sounds easy enough... I have some 10 gauge wire from a project in the basement that I can use.

So far the parts I've thrown at the car have been ones I could justify as being appropriate maintenance and cheap, so I've avoided feeling like I'm just throwing parts at the problem - I appreciate the help in continuing to avoid that.

I will look for a year on the wires - but I suspect they are probably original, so probably something that could use replacing anyway. I'll give that screwdriver trick a try after work, thank you!

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Sorry to sound quite so confident. It's just my nature to 1st think outside the box before going totally nuts testing the snots with questionable results from VERY expensive equipment it just might not require. It's free and easy so why not?


If not convincing results then bring out the big guns,


T

Response From Maplicito

No need to apologize - I don't have the in depth knowledge of cars to do that kind of out-of-the-box thinking, so I really appreciate that someone else is doing it for me!

Response From Maplicito

Thanks everyone who made suggestions in the thread. In particular, I want to thank Tom... he and I had a bit of a back and forth about the car, and based on some things he said and that my uncle suggested to me, I went and bought some ignition wires - the car's running great!

Response From Tom Greenleaf Top Rated Answer

Glad it's fixed and seems to be for now.
So, know these threads are open to the web and should be closed when solved. YOU may ask any moderator to reopen it as needed or wanted.


Happy trouble free motoring, Tom

Response From Discretesignals

Perhaps try grounding a screwdriver with a jumper wire to it to known ground and use like a wand to find it arc or change when close to a weak area or wire should work.

Imagine what happens when the jumper wire pops off. Most screwdrivers laying around the house don't have insulated handles, so you might get a coil kiss even with a jumper on it. High voltage gets unpredictable how it wants to get to ground sometimes.

Response From Discretesignals

That is just one frame of data that doesn't tell you anything. It is like looking at one puzzle piece and trying to guess what the picture looks like when all the pieces are assembled. That is freeze frame of data that can be used to duplicate the condition though.

It does show a positive fuel trim, so it could have some sort of vacuum leak at lower engine loads that may cause misfiring. If I remember they did have issues with the paper intake manifold gasket causing single cylinder misfiring.

Plug wires do eventually wear out and boots can leak. Have you inspected for flash burns on the wires or spark burning through on the boots? Also make sure there is no oil down in the spark plug wells. If it smells gassy while it is missing, that is usually the sign of the fuel not burning due to loss of or poor spark. It can also be caused from a mechanic issue also, but unlikely in your case.

Response From Maplicito

I'm wondering - is there any value to a spark plug tester? I see they don't cost a lot. Is it likely that I would be able to tell if it is sparking properly when the misfire happens (I can get it to misfire while running parked)? Or am I just going to see there is spark, and not really know whether it's getting good spark?

Response From Discretesignals

The adjustable spark plug tester is a good tool in my opinion. You can use it to to stress the coil by adjusting the gap to say around 30 KV. If the coil is weak or spark is finding some other path to ground it will be more apparent with a wider gap set on the tester. You can also use an incandescent 12 volt test light (don't use an LED test light) connected to ground while the tester is installed to find spark leaks. You just run the probe of the 12 volt test light around wires, boots, etc. The spark will find the test light if there is a poor insulation. Be sure to unplug the injector on the cylinder your testing spark on, so you don't have raw fuel going down into the exhaust.

Usually ignition misfires will either happen all the time (dead cylinder) or cause misfiring under heavy engine loads when cylinder pressures are high when more spark output is required.

Response From Maplicito

Thanks for the response... it might be awhile before I can do any of that, but if I need more help, I'll come back here. Or if the shop I want to go to finally gets their move done, I'll go there. Thanks again!