802.589.0911 Live Chat With Us

Finish Selecting Your Vehicle to Shop For Your Steering Shaft

Choose a Year for your Toyota 's Steering Shaft

  • 2019
  • 2018
  • 2017
  • 2016
  • 2015
  • 2014
  • 2013
  • 2012
  • 2011
  • 2010
  • 2009
  • 2008
  • 2007
  • 2006
  • 2005
  • 2004
  • 2003
  • 2002
  • 2001
  • 2000
  • 1999
  • 1998
  • 1997
  • 1996
  • 1995
  • 1994
  • 1993
  • 1992
Show More Years

Shop By Brand

The Following brands are available based on your search.

  • Dorman
    Dorman
  • Genuine
    Genuine
  • MTC
    MTC

Best Selling Genuine Toyota Steering Shafts

  • We Stock the following top leading brands, including Dorman, MTC, Genuine
  • Constantly Updated Inventory of Toyota Replacement Steering Shaft Parts

We stock Steering Shaft parts for most Toyota models, including 4Runner, Avalon, Camry, Corolla, FJ Cruiser, Highlander, Matrix, Prius, RAV4, Sequoia, Sienna, Solara, Tundra, Venza.


Dorman
1997 Toyota Avalon Steering Shaft - Lower Dorman

P311-2A70049    425-455  New

4526033031

Qty:
233.75
Dorman Steering Shaft  Lower
  • ; U-Joint
  • Product Attributes:
    • Diameter: 0.16
    • Spline Quantity: 27
Brand: Dorman
Position: Lower
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Position
1997 - Toyota Avalon Lower
MTC
2005 Toyota Avalon Steering Shaft MTC

P311-4694EBD    W0133-1904445  New

Qty:
223.69
MTC Steering Shaft
  • ; Production: 01/01/2005-
  • with Upper and Lower U Joints
Brand: MTC
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Prod. Date Range
2005 - Toyota Avalon Fr:01-01-05
Dorman
2005 Toyota Avalon Steering Shaft Dorman

P311-48DB4D5    W0133-1904445  New

Qty:
345.61
Dorman Steering Shaft
  • ; Production: 01/01/2005-
  • with Upper and Lower U Joints
Brand: Dorman
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Prod. Date Range
2005 - Toyota Avalon Fr:01-01-05
MTC
2009 Toyota Avalon Steering Shaft MTC

P311-4694EBD    W0133-1904445  New

Qty:
223.69
MTC Steering Shaft
Brand: MTC
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2009 - Toyota Avalon
Dorman
2006 Toyota Solara Steering Shaft Dorman

P311-48DB4D5    W0133-1904445  New

Qty:
345.61
Dorman Steering Shaft
  • with Upper and Lower U Joints
Brand: Dorman
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2006 - Toyota Solara
MTC
2004 Toyota Highlander Steering Shaft MTC

P311-5D193CA    W0133-1904446  New

Qty:
231.19
MTC Steering Shaft
  • with Upper and Lower U Joints
Brand: MTC
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2004 - Toyota Highlander
Dorman
2006 Toyota Highlander Steering Shaft Dorman

P311-41A6E3F    W0133-1904446  New

Qty:
344.08
Dorman Steering Shaft
  • with Upper and Lower U Joints
Brand: Dorman
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel
2006 - Toyota Highlander Sport
MTC
2006 Toyota Highlander Steering Shaft MTC

P311-5D193CA    W0133-1904446  New

Qty:
231.19
MTC Steering Shaft
Brand: MTC
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel Manuf. Body Code
2006 - Toyota Highlander Base MCU23
MTC
2007 Toyota Highlander Steering Shaft MTC

P311-5D193CA    W0133-1904446  New

Qty:
231.19
MTC Steering Shaft
  • ; Production: -04/30/2007
Brand: MTC
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel Manuf. Body Code Prod. Date Range
2007 - Toyota Highlander Base MCU28 To:04-30-07
Dorman
2007 Toyota Highlander Steering Shaft Dorman

P311-41A6E3F    W0133-1904446  New

Qty:
344.08
Dorman Steering Shaft
  • ; Production: -04/30/2007
  • with Upper and Lower U Joints
Brand: Dorman
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel Prod. Date Range
2007 - Toyota Highlander Sport To:04-30-07
Genuine
2006 Toyota RAV4 Steering Shaft Genuine - TSB-0318-08 Rev2

P311-09E9885    W0133-2108577  New

Qty:
260.92
Genuine Steering Shaft
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • ; Production: 11/01/2005-, Japan Made Models
  • TSB-0318-08 Rev2
Brand: Genuine
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Prod. Date Range
2006 - Toyota RAV4 Fr:11-01-05
Genuine
2010 Toyota RAV4 Steering Shaft Genuine - TSB-0318-08 Rev2

P311-09E9885    W0133-2108577  New

Qty:
260.92
Genuine Steering Shaft
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • ; Japan Made Models
  • TSB-0318-08 Rev2
Brand: Genuine
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2010 - Toyota RAV4
Genuine
2008 Toyota RAV4 Steering Shaft Genuine - TSB-0318-08 Rev2

P311-09E9885    W0133-2108577  New

Qty:
260.92
Genuine Steering Shaft
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • ; Production: -07/31/2008, Japan Made Models
  • TSB-0318-08 Rev2
Brand: Genuine
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Prod. Date Range
2008 - Toyota RAV4 To:07-31-08
Genuine
2009 Toyota RAV4 Steering Shaft Genuine - TSB-0318-08 Rev2

P311-09E9885    W0133-2108577  New

Qty:
260.92
Genuine Steering Shaft
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • ; Production: 08/01/2008-, Japan Made Models
  • TSB-0318-08 Rev2
Brand: Genuine
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Drive Type Prod. Date Range
2009 - Toyota RAV4 FWD Fr:08-01-08
Genuine
2012 Toyota RAV4 Steering Shaft Genuine - TSB-0318-08 Rev2

P311-09E9885    W0133-2108577  New

Qty:
260.92
Genuine Steering Shaft
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • ; Production: -11/30/2012, Japan Made Models
  • TSB-0318-08 Rev2
Brand: Genuine
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel Prod. Date Range
2012 - Toyota RAV4 Base To:11-30-12
MTC
1992 Toyota Camry Steering Shaft MTC

P311-28D0F75    W0133-1951692  New

Qty:
156.08
MTC Steering Shaft
  • ; Production: 09/01/1991-, North American made model.
Brand: MTC
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Prod. Date Range
1992 - Toyota Camry Fr:09-01-91
MTC
1994 Toyota Camry Steering Shaft MTC

P311-28D0F75    W0133-1951692  New

Qty:
156.08
MTC Steering Shaft
  • ; North American made model.
Brand: MTC
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1994 - Toyota Camry
MTC
1992 Toyota Camry Steering Shaft MTC

P311-28D0F75    W0133-1951692  New

Qty:
156.08
MTC Steering Shaft
  • ; Production: 06/01/1991-, Japan made model.
Brand: MTC
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Prod. Date Range
1992 - Toyota Camry Fr:06-01-91
MTC
1993 Toyota Camry Steering Shaft MTC

P311-28D0F75    W0133-1951692  New

Qty:
156.08
MTC Steering Shaft
  • ; Japan made model.
Brand: MTC
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1993 - Toyota Camry
MTC
1996 Toyota Camry Steering Shaft MTC

P311-28D0F75    W0133-1951692  New

Qty:
156.08
MTC Steering Shaft
  • ; Production: -07/31/1996, Japan made model.
Brand: MTC
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Prod. Date Range
1996 - Toyota Camry To:07-31-96

Latest Car Advice

CarJunky AutoAdvice

95 Chevy Lumina Base Sedan 3.1/189 cid - Ignition switch

Showing 2 out of 13 Posts | Show 11 Hidden Posts
Question From stingray on 95 Chevy Lumina Base Sedan 3.1/189 cid - Ignition switch

Hi. I am installing a new ignition switch. However, the difficulty is that the actuating rod points to the right. To mount this correctly to the steering shaft the rod needs to point in tandem with the mounts toward the left. The rod is custom bent beneath other things. In turning it towards the left the rod hits the shaft leaving the rod vertical. While the switch can be placed on the rod in any position it will only mount to the steering shaft angled left. The shop manual indicated "pressing the switch into position." That, like I knew, resulted in breaking the switches "jacket". How does the switch get insalled with ease & without force?

Response From Discretesignals

You got the right switch? There are two different ones depending if you have a column or floor shifter.

Response From stingray

You are correct. Yes. The new switch/harness is identical to what I removed. it is a column shift trans. It's really puzzling how it could have been in the position it was in considering the mounting. It's tempting to bend/modify the rod. But again, shouldn't have to.

Response From Discretesignals

Your right. That rod shouldn't need to be moded to make another switch work on it.

Don't know if this helps or not:


Response From stingray

Thank you for the schematic. I'm trying to locate an image of another actuating rod to verify the contours. It did fight removal a bit. But nothing ever felt like it was bending. This is rod thicker than your wire coat hanger! Can't imagine it bending 15 degrees!! That would be some serious twist!!! Would this be the Rubik's Cube of electrical Gremlins?

Response From DanD

That rod may have slipped out of the upper actuator assembly.
If so you may need to disassemble the upper to properly attach it.
These columns are easy to pull out of the car; which makes working on it much better then standing on your head under the dash.
Just make sure you tie off the steering wheel so it cannot rotate any more then when it is installed in the car. If you do over rotate the wheel you'll break the air bag clock spring in the column.

Dan.

Response From stingray

Upper actuator assembly? I pulled the rod out. Relatively easy to do. I sat the switch in place just like the old one was. I'm puzzled at even how the whole set up works. If the one inch elbow end of the rod fits into the jacket/sleeve of the switch & the other end hooks to the cast lever (that cracked), which all moves when the key is turned, then how does the vertical/jacket side of the rod move when it's seated in a nonmoveable plastic tube or jacket? An actuator rod is to actuate something but the end of it seats in a nonmoving plastic housing. If I have to remove the shaft I will. At this point I don't see the justification for it. Now with the rod out it seems too short altogether. The vertical portion of the rod meets the center of the switch. The tube/sleeve to insert it in is another inch away yet.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

OK and general: You said you found a cracked lever of cast metal I'm guessing. That needs to get replaced or depending properly fixed to work as intended.


Not sure if available new so let the hunt begin. Depending it might be able to be welded (aluminum or alloy something) should be done by a pro welder if that's the way out.


Good news is you seem to know right where the snag is in the fix,


T

Response From DanD

Here's an exploded view of the steering column; it might help you see how this thing works.
Below that is the thing I'm thinking/hoping is the "cast lever' you're talking about. The rod (#82) hooks into lever/rack (#39).
I'm also assuming this is a tilt column.

Dan




Response From stingray

Yep #82 in the schematic is the rod that is inhibiting this thing from coming together. Great detailed listing if parts. Still fighting the dilemma to insert the rod into the switches jacket & mount the switch. Just doesn't make sense. The steel rod fits into a plastic jacket that is much longer than the rod & doesn't appear to contact anything once inside. The plastic jacket certainly doesn't move, nor does the switch. So what is an actuating rod actuating? Maybe I'll shoot some pics for more of a real world view of the problem. Seems like the rod needs modifying, yet to think someone got it together???

Response From stingray

I know you all have been in suspense on this. Myself included. Nothing worse than exhausting practical measures & ingesting silly advice from others. Unable to even tow when the column is down & trans cannot be shifted. So it has to get fixed where it rests.
Here is what I procured. The actu8r rod actually inserts into the upper side housing of the ignition switch & not the jacket/sleeve @ the bottom as the shop manual suggests. Now to repair the partially broken cylinder rod within the trans shift cover that the actu8r rod hooks to. Another mystery, why does a 14 gauge rod hook into brittle cast metal? I long for the day to see an engineer repair their design!

Response From Tom Greenleaf

" I long for the day to see an engineer repair their design!"
***************************


I have no doubts that all regulars or techs in general would love to see that on any vehicle there's something somewhere. What really gets me is when some dinky detail that has worked for ages gets changed into something that doesn't hold up over use and time that is a must have thing wherever it is. Nothing new about any of that,


T

Response From Discretesignals Top Rated Answer

I'd pay to see that myself, especially on something such as a plugs and wires on a Camaro F body LT1 or, even better, fixing a half block oil leak on a Cadillac 4.6L. Of course, it seems that Toyota and Honda engineers do consider the mechanic in most of their designs.