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Choose a Year for your International 's Steering Gear

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The Following brands are available based on your search.

  • BBB Industries
    BBB Industries
  • Cardone
    Cardone

Best Selling Genuine International Steering Gears

  • We Stock the following top leading brands, including Cardone, BBB Industries
  • Constantly Updated Inventory of International Replacement Steering Gear Parts

We stock Steering Gear parts for most International models, including M1100, M800 Post Office, MS, MS1210, Scout II, Travelall, 100, 150, 200, 1000D, 1010, 1100D, 1110, 1200D, 1210.


Cardone
1973 International 1010 Steering Gear Cardone - Reman. Power Steering Gear

P311-27DF928    27-7501  Remanufactured

3893469

Qty:
$95.40 132.50
Cardone Steering Gear
  • Remanufactured Power Steering Gear
  • with Standard Rotation In-Line filter available For warranty purposes it is recommended to always install a filter and to use suggested OE Fluid and flush the system
  • Reman. Power Steering Gear
  • Product Attributes:
    • Features and Benefits:
      • 100% Hydraulic Testing Measures For Proper Flow, Leakage And Performance To Ensure Perfect Fit And Function.
      • 100% New O-rings And Lip Seals Ensure Leak-free, Long-lasting Performance.
      • All Critical Components Are Tested To Ensure Product Reliability.
      • Our Remanufacturing Process Is Earth-friendly, As It Reduces The Energy And Raw Material Needed To Make A New Part By 80%.
      • Rust Inhibitive "cool Dip" Finish Is A Penetrating Dye That Completely Covers All Exposed Surfaces For A Consistent, Protective Finish That Will Not Crack, Flake Or Peel.
      • Shafts Are Surfaced To Precise Specifications To Eliminate Premature Seal Wear And Extend Gear Life.
  • The steering gear box is the heart of the vehicle’s steering system. It guides the wheels’ movement in conjunction with the direction that the steering wheel is rotated, helping achieve ideal steering response for more efficient driving. CARDONE® Remanufactured Steering Gear Boxes are re-engineered, built and tested to match O.E. performance. Each unit features 100% new O-rings and lip seals to ensure leak-free, long-lasting performance. Shafts are surfaced to precise specifications to eliminate premature seal wear and extend gear life. All units are 100% hydraulically tested to ensure perfect fit and function.
Brand: Cardone
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1973 - International 1010
Cardone
1974 International Scout II Steering Gear Cardone - Reman. Power Steering Gear

P311-3242871    27-6537  Remanufactured

7818886 , 6272004 , 6260560 , 6258460 , 7818145 , 7818137 , 6260559 , 7819389 , 7818138 , 3996779 , 3996781 , 7813599 , 3996780 , 7826336 , 358938 , 7809529 , 7818141

Qty:
$55.80 125.93
Cardone Steering Gear
  • Remanufactured Power Steering Gear
  • Casting # 5691676 In-Line filter available For warranty purposes it is recommended to always install a filter and to use suggested OE Fluid and flush the system
  • Reman. Power Steering Gear
  • Product Attributes:
    • Features and Benefits:
      • 100% Hydraulic Testing Measures For Proper Flow, Leakage And Performance To Ensure Perfect Fit And Function.
      • 100% New O-rings And Lip Seals Ensure Leak-free, Long-lasting Performance.
      • All Critical Components Are Tested To Ensure Product Reliability.
      • Our Remanufacturing Process Is Earth-friendly, As It Reduces The Energy And Raw Material Needed To Make A New Part By 80%.
      • Rust Inhibitive "cool Dip" Finish Is A Penetrating Dye That Completely Covers All Exposed Surfaces For A Consistent, Protective Finish That Will Not Crack, Flake Or Peel.
      • Shafts Are Surfaced To Precise Specifications To Eliminate Premature Seal Wear And Extend Gear Life.
  • The steering gear box is the heart of the vehicle’s steering system. It guides the wheels’ movement in conjunction with the direction that the steering wheel is rotated, helping achieve ideal steering response for more efficient driving. CARDONE® Remanufactured Steering Gear Boxes are re-engineered, built and tested to match O.E. performance. Each unit features 100% new O-rings and lip seals to ensure leak-free, long-lasting performance. Shafts are surfaced to precise specifications to eliminate premature seal wear and extend gear life. All units are 100% hydraulically tested to ensure perfect fit and function.
Brand: Cardone
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1974 - International Scout II
BBB Industries
1974 International Scout II Steering Gear BBB Industries - New Steering Gear

P311-5964FEC    N503-0110  New

Qty:
447.16
BBB Industries Steering Gear
  • ; Power Steering
  • New Steering Gear
Brand: BBB Industries
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1974 - International Scout II
BBB Industries
1972 International M800 Post Office Steering Gear BBB Industries - New Steering Gear

P311-57AEB7A    N502-0109  New

Qty:
458.12
BBB Industries Steering Gear
  • ; Power Steering with Standard Rotation
  • New Steering Gear
Brand: BBB Industries
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1972 - International M800 Post Office

Latest Car Advice

CarJunky AutoAdvice

inner tie rod or Rack question

Showing 2 out of 14 Posts | Show 12 Hidden Posts
Question From smoraq on inner tie rod or Rack question

2004 Merc Grand Marquis 92,000 miles:
Tire wear inner, drivers side. Inner tie rod appeared sloppy compared to passenger side. Replaced Driver side inner and outer tie rods. Still has play drivers side inner tie rod where it connects to steering unit. Any help is appreciated.
Thank you

Response From Tom Greenleaf

? Have you determined tire wear is because of tie rod ends - those don't generally wear tires unless so bad they wobble and about to fall off/out. Replacing a good one (some will disagree with this) doesn't make it better. Good is good, replacements can be junk.


OK - because of the bellows can be at least a little tricky so see just where free play is for inners. Is anything else not right about rack suspension, and the bar right down from the steering wheel?


Same feel both old and new one? Something doesn't add up. Suggests it wasn't bad to begin with?


T

Response From smoraq

Thanks for your reply. I have not determined that tie rod end caused tire wear. Bar from steering wheel appears tight. I agree that maybe there was no problem in the first place, just that there was play on drivers side and no play on passenger side. Maybe it wasn't broke and I fixed it anyway? Thanks for your help.

Response From Hammer Time Top Rated Answer

If you installed that stuff correctly, there cannot be any play there so you may be actually moving the steering gear internally or maybe your play could be a wheel bearing or something else.

Response From smoraq

Play is definitely from inner tie rod towards steering assembly. So if inner tie rod is new and installed tightly, could rack and pinion be faulty? Thanks again.

Response From Hammer Time

It's definitely NOT a loose tie rod end. Of course the rack can be worn out which should have been checked before installing tie rod ends.

Response From Discretesignals

You'd think if there was internal play in the rack, you would see it on the passenger side too when your checking for play in its tie rod? How are the rack bushings? Can you move the rack pushing on it with your hands? You'd think inner tread wear on one tire would be a camber issue.

Response From smoraq

I think replacing the Rack is not something I can do. Is there a way to test it, or should I just bite the bullet and take it to a shop? Thanks again
Add'l info: no fluid leaks and rack is not loose against chassis.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

You'll need this aligned when all set anyway - places I know ALL do and want front end work as well.
One extra thing for the alignment is if tires are really all worn differently it really won't help with the best alignment - not tire wearing just not as perfect as could be,


T

Response From Discretesignals

Has this vehicle been in an accident and had front end damage?

Response From smoraq

Yes, about a year ago it was hit pretty hard on front passenger side.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Accident damage can't be contained into exactly what damage happened to everything and this issue probably does stem from that and now past the "unseen" damage grace period for anywhere I know of.


No telling what was harmed in the rack in this case that wasn't noticed at that time or all tested good. You said tire(s) aren't wearing evenly which if that is since the fix for accident damage it wasn't done too well was it?


If you were paying strict attention to tire wear and the clues they leave lots more than just a car the pulls left or right you should have brought that up long ago now.
With this new snag in the mix now I suspect the rack is the problem or tires all mix matched before or after the accident so you are starting from square one again.


A good alignment shop will check a ton of things including tire pressure and suspension parts all tight and can be put in range or norms after an accident. This includes proper even tires too.


Now for all I know or we know this car is so bent maybe it needed frame straightening or being totaled out? Can't know, alignment machine should show plenty you aren't going to see by eye,


T

Response From smoraq

Thanks to all of you for your help. Will go to shop for repair.

Response From smoraq

Yes, about a year ago front end was hit pretty hard on passenger side. Damage was repaired

03 Chevy Silverado Popping

Showing 2 out of 4 Posts | Show 2 Hidden Posts
Question From brittonp on 03 Chevy Silverado Popping

Hey folks,
I've got an '03 Chevy Silverado 1500 4WD Extended Cab. I keep up on all the maintenance and try to do all the repairs myself but this one has me stumped. When turning at low speeds I can feel a little pop in the steering. I can't hear it outside and it isn't shaking the vehicle. The truck acts fine at highway speeds and doesn't give any other trouble. Any advice?

Response From DanD

The intermediate steering shaft has been a problem with these years of GM trucks. Going by your description of the noise and feel of the problem; this shaft is the likely cause?
Here’s the TSB on this.

Dan.

#00-02-35-003N: Clunking Noise Under Hood and Can Be Felt in Steering Wheel and/or Steering Column (Replace Upper Intermediate Steering Shaft (I-Shaft) Assembly) - (Mar 26, 2008)

Subject: Clunking Noise Under Hood and Can Be Felt in Steering Wheel and/or Steering Column (Replace Upper Intermediate Steering Shaft Assembly)

Condition: Some customers may comment on a clunk-type noise coming from under the hood that also can be felt in the steering wheel. These conditions may be more noticeable when turning at low speeds on rough road surfaces.

Important:
• I-shaft P/N 19153614 has been designed to replace previous designed dampened and non-dampened I-shafts. The physical difference in the yoke size will accommodate all vehicles listed in this bulletin.
• Due to the design of the new I-shaft, it is not possible to lubricate/grease the I-shaft.

Response From brittonp

That sounds like it's exactly it, and I was able to find the parts at GM parts direct for cheap! I've never taken apart anything in the steering column though, is this something that could be difficult, i.e. parts hidden by firewall, press fits?

Response From DanD Top Rated Answer

They’re not all that bad to replace; you may have to loosen the steering gear and lower it, to gain room for the shaft to be removed.
If this truck has an air bag; make sure you disconnect the battery and wait for 10 or 15 minutes before you start the job. Anytime you’re working on or with the steering column; you should always deactivate the ABS system. Disconnecting the vehicles battery; will allow the ABS system’s internal back-up battery to discharge; making it safe to work on, without lighting off the air bag.

Dan

Power Steering and Brakes

Showing 2 out of 3 Posts | Show 1 Hidden Posts
Question From Guest on Power Steering and Brakes

So last night i was delivering this trailer in my Chevrolet Express 15 passenger van. When i get to the place and go to park the trailer my power steering stops working. and it takes a whole lot more effort to make the brakes work... almost like the vacuum line in the brakes broke...
the fluids are all fine... but im stumped. why would both go at the same time?

Response From steve01832

If you have the 4.3 liter engine the brake assist comes off of the power steering. If you look behind the master cylinder you won't see the traditional round brake booster. It is one of GM's "better" designs. You should first check the power steering belt tension. If it's ok, then the pump may have failed.

Steve

Response From DanD Top Rated Answer

Oh Yea. I can just about picture what has happened to the system.
Like Steve said the power brakes on these vans use what is called hydra boost that the power brake assist comes from the power steering pump.
Why; because there’s a chance that under heavy load the engine will not make enough vacuum to run the vacuum power brake system if it were used.
These vans also have variable rate steering: EVO (electronic variable orifice) is its official name. Meaning that at lower speeds the steering can be turned with one finger for ease of parking lot manoeuvres: once above a certain speed the power steering assist is lowered making the steering wheel harder to move; giving better road feel.
With all this going on the poor power steering pump is working its arse off because it’s a positive displacement pump; in other words the pump, pumps as hard as it can all the time.
With EVO they restrict the fluid flow to the steering gear which makes the pump’s internal pressures soar and the effort to turn the pump go through the roof.
The end result is the pump’s driveshaft breaks because of all this effort to turn it.
The first one I came across you couldn’t see a physical problem with the pump, the pulley or belt; everything looked normal and in place.
What happen’s is the pump’s driveshaft breaks inside; behind the seal and the thing doesn’t produce any pressure.
Take the belt off and you’ll likely be able to pull the pulley and a portion of the pump’s driveshaft right out the end of the pump.
Dan.

Just rereading this; damn I’m long winded LOL but I didn’t know how else to explain what has likely happened.