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    Monroe
  • One Stop Solutions
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  • We Stock the following top leading brands, including Bilstein, FCS Struts, KYB, One Stop Solutions
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We stock Shocks parts for most Hyundai models, including Accent, Azera, Elantra, Elantra Coupe, Elantra GT, Entourage, Excel, Genesis Coupe, Pony, Santa Fe, Scoupe, Sonata, Tucson, Veloster, Veracruz, XG300, XG350.

Bilstein
2010 Hyundai Genesis Coupe Shock Absorber - Rear Bilstein

P311-4820DD1    24-196390  New

Qty:
$128.63
Bilstein Shock Absorber  Rear
  • B6 Performance - Shock Absorber
  • B6 Performance
  • Product Attributes:
    • Boot Included: No
    • Finish: Yellow Paint
    • Internal Design: Monotube
    • Lower Mount Type: Eye 14.1mm
    • Series: B6 Performance
    • Title: Bilstein Shock Absorbers
    • Upper Mount Type: Stem
  • Bilstein B6 Performance gas pressure shock absorbers and struts are the ideal choice for most vehicles, including full-size sedans, SUVs and trucks. These shock absorbers and struts provide improved handling and stability, without sacrificing ride comfort. Bilstein B6 Performance shock absorbers offer superior damping ability that makes them ideal for the driver who demands superior performance, while maintaining an exceptional street ride.
  • Suggested Purchase Quantity: 2
    • Most jobs typically require 2 of this item.
Brand: Bilstein
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Position Submodel
2010 - Hyundai Genesis Coupe Rear 2.0T R-Spec
FCS Struts
2001 Hyundai Santa Fe Shock Absorber - Rear Left FCS Struts

P311-0AE82F5    341524  New

Qty:
$19.87
FCS Struts Shock Absorber  Rear Left
  • Suggested Purchase Quantity: 2
    • Most jobs typically require 2 of this item.
Brand: FCS Struts
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Position
2001 - Hyundai Santa Fe Rear Left
FCS Struts
2001 Hyundai Santa Fe Shock Absorber - Rear Right FCS Struts

P311-0AE82F5    341524  New

Qty:
$19.87
FCS Struts Shock Absorber  Rear Right
  • Suggested Purchase Quantity: 2
    • Most jobs typically require 2 of this item.
Brand: FCS Struts
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Position
2001 - Hyundai Santa Fe Rear Right
FCS Struts
2006 Hyundai Sonata Shock Absorber - Rear Left FCS Struts

P311-40E4232    341603  New

Qty:
$30.52
  • Premium Gas Charged
  • Suggested Purchase Quantity: 2
    • Most jobs typically require 2 of this item.
Brand: FCS Struts
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Position
2006 - Hyundai Sonata Rear Left
FCS Struts
2006 Hyundai Sonata Shock Absorber - Rear Right FCS Struts

P311-40E4232    341603  New

Qty:
$30.52
  • Premium Gas Charged
  • Suggested Purchase Quantity: 2
    • Most jobs typically require 2 of this item.
Brand: FCS Struts
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Position
2006 - Hyundai Sonata Rear Right
FCS Struts
2006 Hyundai Accent Shock Absorber - Rear Left FCS Struts

P311-53C9F9F    341635  New

Qty:
$29.10
  • Premium Gas Charged
  • Suggested Purchase Quantity: 2
    • Most jobs typically require 2 of this item.
Brand: FCS Struts
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Position
2006 - Hyundai Accent Rear Left
FCS Struts
2006 Hyundai Accent Shock Absorber - Rear Right FCS Struts

P311-53C9F9F    341635  New

Qty:
$29.10
  • Premium Gas Charged
  • Suggested Purchase Quantity: 2
    • Most jobs typically require 2 of this item.
Brand: FCS Struts
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Position
2006 - Hyundai Accent Rear Right
FCS Struts
2009 Hyundai Sonata Shock Absorber - Rear Left FCS Struts

P311-16F7CF4    341716  New

Qty:
$35.15
  • Suggested Purchase Quantity: 2
    • Most jobs typically require 2 of this item.
Brand: FCS Struts
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Position
2009 - Hyundai Sonata Rear Left
FCS Struts
2009 Hyundai Sonata Shock Absorber - Rear Right FCS Struts

P311-16F7CF4    341716  New

Qty:
$35.15
  • Suggested Purchase Quantity: 2
    • Most jobs typically require 2 of this item.
Brand: FCS Struts
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Position
2009 - Hyundai Sonata Rear Right
KYB
1984 Hyundai Pony Shock Absorber - Rear KYB

P311-2862CD9    KG4006  New

Qty:
$36.54
KYB Shock Absorber  Rear
  • High Pressure Monotube Gas Shock for Cars and Trucks
  • Monotube Performance Upgrade
  • Gas-a-Just
  • Product Attributes:
    • Bump Stop: No
    • Compressed Length (in): 11.14
    • Cover: Yes
    • Extended Length (in): 17.44
    • Lower Mount: E1
    • Rebound Stop: No
    • Stroke (in): 6.3
    • Upper Mount: E1
  • Suggested Purchase Quantity: 2
    • Most jobs typically require 2 of this item.
Brand: KYB
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Position Region
1984 - Hyundai Pony Rear Canada
KYB
2013 Hyundai Sonata Shock Absorber - Rear KYB

P311-3A87810    344655  New

Qty:
$63.53
KYB Shock Absorber  Rear
  • Gas Shock
  • Recommended OE Replacement
  • Excel-G
  • Suggested Purchase Quantity: 2
    • Most jobs typically require 2 of this item.
Brand: KYB
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Position Submodel
2013 - Hyundai Sonata Rear GL
KYB
2013 Hyundai Santa Fe Shock Absorber - Rear KYB

P311-0708879    344664  New

Qty:
$83.46
KYB Shock Absorber  Rear
  • Gas Shock
  • Recommended OE Replacement
  • Excel-G
  • Suggested Purchase Quantity: 2
    • Most jobs typically require 2 of this item.
Brand: KYB
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Drive Type Position
2013 - Hyundai Santa Fe AWD Rear
KYB
2013 Hyundai Santa Fe Shock Absorber - Rear KYB

P311-4690BF0    344663  New

Qty:
$84.30
KYB Shock Absorber  Rear
  • Gas Shock
  • Recommended OE Replacement
  • Excel-G
  • Suggested Purchase Quantity: 2
    • Most jobs typically require 2 of this item.
Brand: KYB
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Drive Type Position
2013 - Hyundai Santa Fe FWD Rear
KYB
2010 Hyundai Santa Fe Shock Absorber - Rear KYB

P311-03AA3BE    349217  New

Qty:
$64.80
KYB Shock Absorber  Rear
  • Replaces 344656 when stock is depleted Recommended OE Replacement
  • Excel-G
  • Suggested Purchase Quantity: 2
    • Most jobs typically require 2 of this item.
Brand: KYB
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Position
2010 - Hyundai Santa Fe Rear
KYB
2015 Hyundai Tucson Shock Absorber - Rear KYB

P311-3B852E7    344658  New

Qty:
$72.29
KYB Shock Absorber  Rear
  • Gas Shock
  • Recommended OE Replacement
  • Excel-G
  • Suggested Purchase Quantity: 2
    • Most jobs typically require 2 of this item.
Brand: KYB
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Drive Type Position Submodel
2015 - Hyundai Tucson AWD Rear GL
KYB
2003 Hyundai Santa Fe Shock Absorber - Rear KYB

P311-43957AC    349207  New

Qty:
$37.83
KYB Shock Absorber  Rear
  • Gas Shock
  • Replaces 344314 when stock is depleted. Additional components / bushings may be required for 349207 Recommended OE Replacement
  • Excel-G
  • Suggested Purchase Quantity: 2
    • Most jobs typically require 2 of this item.
Brand: KYB
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Position
2003 - Hyundai Santa Fe Rear
One Stop Solutions
2001 Hyundai Santa Fe Shock Absorber - Rear One Stop Solutions

P311-42DA7AA    S344314  New

Qty:
$29.80
  • Suggested Purchase Quantity: 2
    • Most jobs typically require 2 of this item.
Brand: One Stop Solutions
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Position
2001 - Hyundai Santa Fe Rear
One Stop Solutions
2006 Hyundai Sonata Shock Absorber - Rear 4 Cyl 2.4L One Stop Solutions

P311-48A0F55    S349060  New

Qty:
$43.61
  • Suggested Purchase Quantity: 2
    • Most jobs typically require 2 of this item.
Brand: One Stop Solutions
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block CC CID Position
2006 - Hyundai Sonata L 2359 - Rear

Latest Hyundai Repair and Shocks Installation Advice

CarJunky AutoAdvice

07 hyundai accent

Showing 2 out of 10 Posts | Show 8 Hidden Posts
Question From scottsrepair on 07 hyundai accent

Have a 07 hyundai accent, the timing belt broke and of course it bent valves, now customer says it is using oil, we have replaced the pcv and would like any help

Response From nickwarner

So you're saying you had the head rebuilt, installed it, and now the car is losing oil?

Response From scottsrepair

Yes, the timing belt broke at 96813 miles, bent all the intake valves we had them and the guides replaced, put everything back together, and now the check engine light flashes and they have had to add sometimes up to 2 quarts of oil at a time, they now have 100637 miles on it

Response From nickwarner

Pull the codes and post them. They don't fix the belt when they should, doubt they took care of it any other way either. Bet this used oil before and they're trying to screw you into giving them a new motor. If no external leaks and head is all good the customer is the only part needing replacement. We've all dealt with them. Good luck.

Response From Discretesignals Top Rated Answer

They have been driving it around for around 4,000 miles with the check engine light flashing? Yikes.

Response From nickwarner

They've been awarded the coveted Massengill award for being a complete and total douchebag. I have an artist carving it from marble as we speak.

Response From Tom Greenleaf


Ah - those are just for decoration

T

Response From nickwarner

Small wonder they are called idiot lights.

Response From Hammer Time

That wouldn't be a surprise on a high mileage car when the new head increased the compression. Probably should have thought better about doing that head and just replaced the motor in the first place.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

I can smell that situation. Belt was ignored long enough to break so what else on the maintenance was ignored. Lower end may have been marginal before.
Any way to find out how much oil it is using now and trust that info?

Is this the type customer that just spent some bucks and now YOU own everything ever wrong with the car type?

Never mind your technical/mechanical skills you need to be a mind reader as well,

T

96 Hyundai CV Joint Replacement

Showing 3 out of 4 Posts | Show 1 Hidden Posts
Question From Nell on 96 Hyundai CV Joint Replacement

G'day Everyone,

First time here. I'm going to have to replace both Right & Left CV Joints on 1996 Hyundai Excel. My Partner has a friend who says he can do it, hmm. Can you please help me with the basics that have to be done & roughly how much it would cost DIY compared to replacing the front axle or am I on the wrong track with replacing axle.

Thanks

Nell

Response From Sidom

Depending on the cost of the reman axles, that would probably be the best way to go. Here the price has come down so much that the price is close either way you do it and changing an axle is less work plus you get 2 new boots & grease.

Changing the boots only is labor intensive and while not real hard there are a few tricks to doing it, so if the prices is good, go with the axles...

Response From Nell

Hi Sidom,

Thanks for the information, one more thing. Does the condition of shock absorbers affect the CV Joints?


PLH

Nell

Response From Sidom Top Rated Answer

That car should have struts on the frt not shocks.

It won't affect it directly but a weak strut will allow the frt end to dip more as well as bounce more, so that is more in & out movement on the inner (plunge) joint & boot so indirectly over time I guess it could....

rattling noise when going over bumps

Showing 3 out of 3 Posts
Question From nforsbe on rattling noise when going over bumps

2012 Hyundai Elantra Touring GLS
mileage: 66,196
Sounds like it's coming from rear passenger side.
Replaced both rear shocks and rear passenger end link. Exhaust isn't loose . Removed everything from trunk. Still having the same rattling noise when going over bumps

Response From Discretesignals

Have you tried disconnecting the rear stabilizer bar links to see if your noise goes away? Could have a bad link.

Response From nforsbe Top Rated Answer

I actually replaced the link I thought was the problem. I will disconnect them both and see what happens.

2002 Hyundai Accent won't start

Showing 2 out of 13 Posts | Show 11 Hidden Posts
Question From fun value on 2002 Hyundai Accent won't start

It is a 2002 Hyundai Accent, 1.5 or 1.6 L engine. Doesn't start, doesn't even turn over. When I jump from Pontiac (with Pontiac engine off) it either clicks and doesn't start or sometimes it turns over really well and starts right up. I cleaned the battery posts and cables. When I take the Hyundai battery to Walmarts and to Autozone they say the battery is good. After starting with the Pontiac I let it idle for about 1.5 hours. At first I noticed the charge indicator on the dashboard showed no charging. Later I noticed it was charging (needle at about 1/3). Aft.about 1.5 hours I turned it off and immediately tried to restart. It didn't start, didn't even turn over, didn't even click, click, click.
So now what? And also, what should I expect the dealer to charge. They do a $85 diagnostic and if I chose to have them repair it, they refund the $85. Any suggestions on other places. Pepboys is 100 miles away.
Thanks.

Response From Discretesignals

Might want to have the battery tested again. Make sure your battery terminals are clean and tight. No corrosion. When you get it running, check the charging system voltage with a volt meter at the battery terminals. When it is charging it should be around 13.5 volts. Also make sure your belts are in good condition and properly tensioned.

Response From fun value

After jumping and starting, the voltage is about 12.77 volts.
I want to try disconnecting the battery while running to see if the alternator keeps it running, but one website said the battery could blow up. Why would it blow if disconnected? Anyway, what do you think. I will wear goggles, even my motorcycle helmet.
What do you think about the alternator? The alternator indicator indicates it is charging.

Response From Discretesignals

The alternator isn't charging. You may need to have the alternator tested. There also could be a problem outside the alternator, such as wiring or connectors problems. On the back of the alternator is a large stud where the battery cable connects to. Check voltage at the stud also. Some alternator circuits have fuses, so be sure those fuses are intact.

The battery won't blow up if you disconnect it while the engine is running, but if the alternator is functioning and you disconnect the battery while the engine is running, you'll stand the chance of frying solid state components such as an engine computer. The reason is because the alternator is sensing battery voltage. When you disconnect the battery, the alternator's regulator senses the extreme drop in voltage, so the regulator full fields the alternator. This generates a very large voltage spike into the electrical system. The spike (surge) is what can take out solid state components. The battery acts as buffer against these spikes, but since the battery is disconnected the buffer is non existent. Some modules have protection, but there is no guaranty damage can't be inflicted.

The best tool that you have to check to see if the charging system is operational is the volt meter. 12.77 volts is near battery voltage and isn't enough. Charging system voltage should be in the vicinity of 13.5-14 volts.

Response From fun value

Hi discretesignals:
Well, before I read your post I cleaned the posts better. I thought I cleaned them pretty well before. But I finally broke down and paid the $10 for a cleaning kit. I guess my kid put so much pepsi on it over and over that it built up quite a thick layer of corrosion. Then I replaced the cable and it started right away. I tested with the voltmeter and it read about 14.7 volts. Hope that's not to high.
But like the others said, and I admit, I am not that smart with this stuff. I am over 63 years old and haven't worked on engines since our John Deere tractor back in the 60's and our Allis Chalmers which used a magneto. We didn't have to worry about all the high-tech back then.
So anyway, now my pontiac engine light is on all the time. Wonder what I did to it.
One time I did accidentally make a big spark when I touched the terminals between the two cars backwards while using the Pontiac to jump the Hyundai. Trying to hurry, working on Sunday, etc...., well now what?
I checked the Pontiac voltage. It's about 12.5 with the engine off and 14.8 running.
BTW, what voltage is considered over-charging?
Also, curious, but what about amperage? I guess it shouldn't be deadly, but would it blow my little VOM?
Well, I am happy I don't have to take my Hyundai in. A year ago I took it in, asked for a simple fix and they talked me into a whole bunch of stuff. It was Christmas, so I gave them $600 for stuff I could have done. But now the Pontiac could cost me even more. I am just a teacher in a school where my salary has been cut $6000.

Response From Hammer Time

You charging voltage is just fine.........................

I wish I could say the same for your truck. You seem to do more damage every time you touch it. Apparently, your idea of cleaning battery terminals was to pour Pepsi over the battery. We aren't in the 60s any more.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Can't use Pepsi. Has to be the real thing....




LMAO,

T

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Operating voltage: ..............................

Voltage regulators control the charging voltage that the alternator produces, commonly keeping it between 13.5 and 14.5 V, to protect the electrical components throughout the vehicle

  • When not replaced, the battery will discharge or over charge (destroying battery), engine will die, CEL will illuminate, charging system light will illuminate, or alternator damage may occur.


  • ***************************************
    14.8? Check or calibrate your VOM. IMO that's an odd voltage to stay at and shouldn't stay at max of range anyway. If verified you can replace just a voltage regulator in most GMs inside alternator. Any doubts on how to do that DON'T!

    T

    Response From fun value

    I recleaned the terminals and posts with stuff from the autoparts store. I think I cleaned it better, because it started without jumping. I put on gloves, motorcycle helmet and removed the positive terminal. It kept running. But I replaced the terminals and tested with the voltmeter. It read out 14.42 volts. So now I wonder if the alternator is over-charging.

    Response From Sidom Top Rated Answer


    I put on gloves, motorcycle helmet and removed the positive terminal. It kept running.


    I guess there are some people out there that really have no business working or cars, before they hurt themselves or the car

    Response From Hammer Time


    Response From Discretesignals

    Ya, the gloves and helmet idea should of tipped me off.

    Response From Discretesignals

    I guess you didn't read what I typed or maybe you didn't understand what I typed.

    Maybe I should use pictures. Disconnecting the battery while the engine is running can cook circuit boards or those small tiny electrical components that are on the circuit boards. Those circuit boards are inside the computers that controls the functions of the engine and the transmission and other electrical items throughout the vehicle.

    In the picture below are tiny little solid state components. They are designed to operate on low voltages. When you induce a higher than normal voltage into one or more of the components they tend to cook. This higher than normal voltage occurs when disconnecting the battery from a working charging system. Those components are repairable up to a point, but very very expensive and time consuming to diagnose and repair. I guess you are willing to take your chances of seeing if a module has overload protection and if it is functioning properly. Not something I would gamble with.



    Knock from front suspension?

    Showing 2 out of 2 Posts
    Question From DJGreg on Knock from front suspension?

    2001 Hyundai Tiburon

    We keep hearing a knock coming from the right front suspension. It happens sometime when we accelerate from a stopped position, changing gears quickly, or coming to a stop. Also, hitting a speed bump or curb often does it as well. I know we should take it to a suspension shop, however we are looking for some thoughts if we could do the repairs ourselves if it's just a shock or something to keep costs down.

    Thank you for your help and input. This is a great site!!!!

    DJ Greg

    Response From Hammer Time Top Rated Answer

    You need to start with a shop inspecting it. We may be able to advise you once you have some idea what the problem is but it needs to be looked at first.