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CarJunky AutoAdvice

Searching for 1995 Infiniti G20 Technical Service Repair Manual

Showing 6 out of 7 Posts | Show 1 Hidden Posts
Question From spidsparks on Searching for 1995 Infiniti G20 Technical Service Repair Manual

Year of vehicle : 1995
Make of vehicle : Infiniti (Nissan)
Model of vehicle : G20
Engine size : 2.0
Mileage/Kilometers : 170 K miles

After a frustrating conversation with Nissan Support, I am hoping perhaps a car junky out there might have knowledge where I can find a Technical Service Manual for my 1995 Infiniti G20. Nissan's customer service explained to me that they didn't have any on stock and were not able to educate either on when I could expect to get one. Very frustrating since the G20 has become a pet project of mine and I am trying to find a replacement hose (the one that connects the engine to the brakes drum). Would appreciate any help from fellow car junkies!





Thanks,
Sid

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Not sure what you mean by engine to brake drum. If you mean a rear brake hose I just found them as seen in part below at AutoZone's own site. Check others as needed for your needs. Shop where you wish. Just call or Google the parts store of choice or a dealer if you wish. Helps to be able to name the parts you want.

Come back if you need help from there with installation or parts names if you can describe just what you need and what it does - we'll try,

T
********************
Brake Hose - Rear
Brakeware / Brake Hose - Rear for a 1995 Infiniti G20

Related Parts Brake Hose Plug About this product: Part Number: 77989 Weight: 0.57 lbs. Warranty: 3 MO Note: Fits either side
Pricing: $15.99 Availability: Store: Visit your local store to special order. Online: Ships within 3-5 business days Shipping Restrictions:

  • Overnight and two-day shipping are not available for PO Box, APO/FPO/DPO or US Territory addresses
  • Store: Online:

    Response From spidsparks Top Rated Answer

    Hi Tom, Thanks for you help. I am not sure about the rear hose. Here's a picture of my G20 and the broken hose I am trying to replace:

    Response From Tom Greenleaf

    OK! Now I get it - pics really help!

    That appears to be a vacuum hose to the power brake booster - not an hydraulic part at all. Booster looks like a drum of sorts but not a brake drum like at the wheels.

    Just take a copy of your pic to a dealer as this is unlikely to be an aftermarket part. It is special hose that is both "moulded" and can hold vacuum without collapsing.

    You could fake it temporarily with extra long proper vacuum + fuel tolerant hose making loops to accommodate the curved ends - long story on how to do that and the right thing is getting the right part asap.

    If (judgement call) this is in a spot with just one leak right there you might be able to cut it, plug it for now so engine runs and or get a good brass barbed splice and double clamps each end of splice with 100% stainless hose clamps.

    YOU MUST BE SURE IT ISN'T RUBBING ON ANYTHING NO MATTER WHAT. NO SHARP RUBBING, OR HOT SPOTS.

    Just what happened to this one anyway?

    T

    Ps: This may have two different end I.D.s to make it more of a dealer part.

    PsII: Plugged or leaking this will defeat power assist to the brakes! Engine won't run or run lousy with it leaking. Not advisable to drive the car w/o the power assist - they will work but not well or strong!

    Response From spidsparks

    Thanks for your time Tom. I am not sure what happened but the vacuum hose broke into two somehow, perhaps because of the below zero freezing temperatures. I am going to go to the dealer tomorrow and see what they have to offer. Meanwhile, I found some free repair manuals. See post below!

    Sid

    Response From way2old

    Found this site with some manuals. Click here for Infinity G20 manuals.

    Response From spidsparks

    Thanks for taking the time!

    Here's another site (and it's free / password: pdftown.com) I found for others who are looking for technical service repair manuals:

    Infiniti G20 P11 Series - 1998 - 2002
    http://pdftown.com/PDF-Infiniti-G20-2002-Service-Manual.html

    Infiniti
    http://pdftown.com/Infiniti-PDF-eBook-Category.html

    General Automotive
    http://pdftown.com/Automotive-PDF-eBook-Category.html

    Best,
    Sid

    How To Repack Wheel Bearings ~ '93 Nissan Pickup 2WD

    Showing 4 out of 9 Posts | Show 5 Hidden Posts
    Question From Guest on How To Repack Wheel Bearings ~ '93 Nissan Pickup 2WD

    Hey Guys,

    I have a '93 Nissan Pickup, D21, 2WD,, and am looking for any and all help in Repacking The Front Wheel Bearings on my Truck.

    I haven't started this job yet,, as I am still studying the Repair Manual,, and making a list of the Materials, Parts and the extra tools that I will need for this. I like to have all my parts, tools, & instructions before I begin a maintenance job that I haven't ever done before.

    I have both the Nissan Service Manual,, as well as a Chilton's Repair Manual for my Truck.

    My first question is what is the best way to remove the Inner Wheel Bearing and Seal? If the Inner Oil Seal is removed,, will the Inner seal then be aasily removed or do I need to drive it out?

    The Books say to use a brass Rod Drift to drive out both the Bearing and Seal. Can the Seal be pryed out or does it have to be driven out,, as the books say?

    I have watched a mechanic in the past do this maintenance,, but to tell you the truth,, I have forgotten exactly how he did this. And locally they want 150 dollars to repack the front wheel bearings. So I need to do this myself if I can,, as I need to save as much as I can on my Truck Maintenance Expense.

    Any help and suggestions are appreciated.

    Have a nice day,
    Joe

    Response From Tom Greenleaf

    Arggh! Just Googled the web away looking for service tools for this not showing just what I wanted. Is this style and inner and outer bearing, dust cap, lock nut with cotter pin, packable bearing type? Couldn't find it exactly but think it's straight forward bearing service but.........

    Dust caps can be a pill and they can be removed with nice ice-tong type tool, channel lock pliers, or flat screwdriver twisted to release cap. That would expose a locking/adjusting nut held with cotter pin or nut made to "ding" to hold in place. When outer bearing is free it will come out with a washer in front of it. With caliper out of way the whole hub should come off with inner bearing inside help mostly by the inner seal. Inner grease seal can be removed without damaging it but they should be considered expendable.

    Some mechanics will put rotor back on with just the nut finger tight and pull sharply to remove inner bearing and seal will come out too. I DON'T CARE FOR THAT AS IT'S HARD ON THE INNER BEARING!

    That grease seal can be pryed out with hub face down with a seal removal tool which is really just pry tool that can just pry on metal of the seal without hurting the rubber seal.

    There are a few different ways serviceable wheel bearings do things but it's mostly basic. You can spend a fortune on special tools but it's mostly unneeded.

    For routine repacking you don't need to remove bearing races at all! Those do get pounded out with a brass drift but lets not go there for just packing the bearings.

    With bearing out you can pack them by hand (have plenty of hand cleaner) merely pushing grease thru bearing till you see it come out opposite side. Inner bearing gets placed back in hub, seal new or good saved one just tapped back into place or with tools if you want (or a washer or socket that exactly fits) and ready to install over spindle for outer bearing, then washer, then nut torqued while spinning rotor/hub to spec (hard to define that without a torque measureing tool but about as hard as you could do with a screwdriver on socket straight on such that hub has no freeplay -- it gets to be a feel--) then nut is locked there with cotter pin or nut may have a skirt to punch down a dimple into a slot on the spindle. Dust cap carefully hammered back with screwdriver or again a socket that fits just right to contact just the crimped last part to friction fit back into the hub. Brake parts back together as needed and press brakes when back to set them again to close contact (disc brake type only) and it's done.

    This is primal bearing service 101 if you will. If you had a hand once you'd know it forever for assorted ones on cars, trucks, rear bearing on some FWD vehicles, trailers of all types etc.

    This is simple yet IMPORTANT to do right. When a race is removed it adds to the procedure to set it known bottomed in place but routine service doesn't require messing with it.

    Cotter pins types should get new cotter pins. Torque should err to less if in doubt.

    Just spent 1/2 an hour trying to find some standard concise procedures for this and all lacked.

    AutoZone had some good advice and graphics if searching around there.

    Since early in my work on anyting I've had a neat Snap-On ice tong multi tool that I've had now for decades and couldn't find on to show a pic of. That, Channell lock pliers, ball peen hammer, assorted washers, diagnal wire cutters (dykes) and a cotter pin puller hook (hand but not mandatory) is about all I've ever needed.

    Best one tool is Snap-On tool # GCP 10 (marked USA) and looks like tongs to pick up a block of ice - couldn't find it listed anywhere??

    Note: Tapered inner and outer bearings are torqued to adjust lash (freeplay) and barrel type the retaining nut is not adjusting bearing lash but rather holding in its inner race but still frequently help securly locked with cotter pin or other method on a spindle nut.

    Any one out there have a good link to existing bearing service suggestions? This all just off the top of my head.

    When in doubt - ask, and get proper help instructions as this is important but also routine. Good luck,

    T

    Response From Guest

    Arggh! Just Googled the web away looking for service tools for this not showing just what I wanted. Couldn't find it exactly but think it's straight forward bearing service but.........

    Dust caps can be a pill and they can be removed with nice ice-tong type tool, channel lock pliers, or flat screwdriver twisted to release cap. That would expose a locking/adjusting nut held with cotter pin or nut made to "ding" to hold in place. When outer bearing is free it will come out with a washer in front of it. With caliper out of way the whole hub should come off with inner bearing inside help mostly by the inner seal. Inner grease seal can be removed without damaging it but they should be considered expendable.

    Some mechanics will put rotor back on with just the nut finger tight and pull sharply to remove inner bearing and seal will come out too. I DON'T CARE FOR THAT AS IT'S HARD ON THE INNER BEARING!

    That grease seal can be pryed out with hub face down with a seal removal tool which is really just pry tool that can just pry on metal of the seal without hurting the rubber seal.

    There are a few different ways serviceable wheel bearings do things but it's mostly basic. You can spend a fortune on special tools but it's mostly unneeded.

    For routine repacking you don't need to remove bearing races at all! Those do get pounded out with a brass drift but lets not go there for just packing the bearings.

    With bearing out you can pack them by hand (have plenty of hand cleaner) merely pushing grease thru bearing till you see it come out opposite side. Inner bearing gets placed back in hub, seal new or good saved one just tapped back into place or with tools if you want (or a washer or socket that exactly fits) and ready to install over spindle for outer bearing, then washer, then nut torqued while spinning rotor/hub to spec (hard to define that without a torque measureing tool but about as hard as you could do with a screwdriver on socket straight on such that hub has no freeplay -- it gets to be a feel--) then nut is locked there with cotter pin or nut may have a skirt to punch down a dimple into a slot on the spindle. Dust cap carefully hammered back with screwdriver or again a socket that fits just right to contact just the crimped last part to friction fit back into the hub. Brake parts back together as needed and press brakes when back to set them again to close contact (disc brake type only) and it's done.

    This is primal bearing service 101 if you will. If you had a hand once you'd know it forever for assorted ones on cars, trucks, rear bearing on some FWD vehicles, trailers of all types etc.

    This is simple yet IMPORTANT to do right. When a race is removed it adds to the procedure to set it known bottomed in place but routine service doesn't require messing with it.

    Cotter pins types should get new cotter pins. Torque should err to less if in doubt.

    Just spent 1/2 an hour trying to find some standard concise procedures for this and all lacked.

    AutoZone had some good advice and graphics if searching around there.

    Since early in my work on anyting I've had a neat Snap-On ice tong multi tool that I've had now for decades and couldn't find on to show a pic of. That, Channell lock pliers, ball peen hammer, assorted washers, diagnal wire cutters (dykes) and a cotter pin puller hook (hand but not mandatory) is about all I've ever needed.

    Best one tool is Snap-On tool # GCP 10 (marked USA) and looks like tongs to pick up a block of ice - couldn't find it listed anywhere??

    Note: Tapered inner and outer bearings are torqued to adjust lash (freeplay) and barrel type the retaining nut is not adjusting bearing lash but rather holding in its inner race but still frequently help securly locked with cotter pin or other method on a spindle nut.

    Any one out there have a good link to existing bearing service suggestions? This all just off the top of my head.

    When in doubt - ask, and get proper help instructions as this is important but also routine. Good luck,

    T

    Hey Tom,

    And Thank you so much as this is the first time that I will have done this,, but need to learn to do correctly. As I also need to repack my Trailer Bearings as well. So I'm thinking that If I can get the Nissan done,, then hopefully I will have the tools and knowledge to do my Single Axle Trailer as well. No brakes on it,, and should be much easier to do.

    I purchase a Bearing Packer that fits on my Grease Gun. It was only 10 $'s at O'Riellie's so I went ahead and got it. They said that If I don't want to use it,, and don't open it,, that I can return it.

    I'm not afraid of buying more tools,, as in my opinion,, they are a Great Investment,, especially for future jobs,, and when needed "Right Then",, and saves me time and money to go out and buy more tools in the middle of a repair job or emergency job.

    I will be making a list of the tools that you mention,, and visit Autozone, Carquest, Advance, & Orielly's.

    I will also go ahead and purchase the Inner Bearing Seals,, as the book says to replace them.

    Is this style and inner and outer bearing, dust cap, lock nut with cotter pin, packable bearing type?

    Yes Tom,, The Inner Bearing has a Bearing Oil Seal,, but the Outer bearing only has a flat type Lock washer.

    So it is mainly the Inner Bearing that I am trying to figure out how to remove without damageing it or the surrounding Metals.

    Both manuals say to tork the Wheel Bearing Lock Nut to 25-29 ft lbs,, and then turn back 45 Degrees!!! What exactly is that all about? Then they say to check the Bearing Preload,, with a Spring Gauge attached to the Lug Studs,, and should have a pull that is 2.2 to 6.4 lbs. I don't remember the fellow that has done all of this service before doing this. Maybe he just knows how much is normal wheel turning resistance is supposed to be by Experience. That's what I am thinking anyway.

    If I need to purchase one of those spring gauges,, I'll do that as well,, if they don't cost too much,, and if commonly available.

    I sure do appreciate all the Help,, and I'm thinking that this is helpful to a lot of othres as well. Especially when I often see Vehicles on the Shoulder of the Road,,with the Wheel off the Spindle at a 45 Degree Angle up in the Wheel Wells.

    I hope that a lot of other's get in on this discussion. Is is possible to post picture's in this forum?

    Anyway Thanks again so much and keep the help coming,
    Joe

    Response From Tom Greenleaf

    JIM - THAT WAS AWESOME - WHERE DO YOU FIND MY BEARING TOOL?!! Handiest sucker in the whole collection IMO.

    Joe: There's a struggle to explain how tight is tight without tools that measure it which make a universal suggestion as to how to tighten up bearings without known #s off of tools I don't even own a bit risky but I'll try and any reader this is AYOR - go buy tools and knock yourself out trying to figure out something that really does come by feel with a little experience.

    Joe - now that I know what exact type bearing you are dealing with I can explain better for this type. It would be similar to what's used on all kinds of stuff - trailers, especially of all kinds.

    The inner bearing is held there only by that grease seal. The races are pressed or hammered down in place but again for routine repacking you don't touch those.

    On the end of the tool now shown has a scoop like part that goes under the rubber lip of common grease seals and if you tap (rubber hammer or real one) on the tongs just so it pops the seal out - frequently undamaged. They are cheap as cars go so replacing them isn't a waste. If you didn't have the tool for that it would pry out or as said in first reply some tech's just put the hub (in this case rotor) back on with inner bearing and seal still stuck in hub and just the spindle nut without the washer put on - then yank the whole hub toward you and bearing and seal will stay on the spindle shaft. I DON'T REALLY SUGGEST DOING THAT FOR BEARINGS TO BE REUSED SO PLEASE TRY HARDER.

    When ready to reassemble - put greased up inner bearing in hub then take a washer or sometimes just a hammer can tap the seal new or used one back snugly and evenly in it's place. The hub then goes back over the spinde and outer bearing in, washer over it and tighten nut up by hand.

    If races were not involved you can then take a 10 inch channel lock type plier and tighten the nut firmly by hand while spinning the rotor. Now back off nut till you feel the rotor wobble again and retighten till nut starts to feel resistance of being tight - still while spinning rotor. Now choke up on channel locks such that leverage is reduced and tighten till nut won't tighten any more (as said earlier it's now like firm screwdriver tight with lack of a torque reading that's about it) and then feel for freeplay now should be zero and back off just to the next spot that a cotter pin can go in and that's your spot. Rotor should still show no freeplay and rotor when spun by threads of wheel studs should be able to coast - perhaps not a ton with new grease and a new seal. Now the cotter pin can be bent such that typical pins shorter part can be bent up on over end and tapped down flush with the end of the spindle. The longer part of pin can be cut off but long enough so it too is part of preventing teh nut from loosening by itself. Cotter pin must be out of the way of rubbing inside of the dust cap which is next and can be tapped on with a hammer and screwdriver or a socket that neatly fits just so. Wipe up any excess grease.

    Note: I did google some pics of someone doing all this and they had their greasy hands all over the friction area of the rotor! That's a big NO NO! If you get grease on it clean it off with brake cleaner or lacquer thinner and clean cloth or paper towels would do as it can trash good brakes!

    If this is confusing which I'm perfectly capable of causing then just get someone to really show you this once and you'll have it for life. This style bearing is used on trailers - boat trailers frequently are dunked under water and raise holy hell with bearings so that it's a common routine to repack those - sometimes many times a season or at least be checking them.

    Side note: Dust caps for boat trailers or any can be fitted with a type (called bearing buddies) that have a grease fitting in the cap and maintain a spring loaded charge of grease in the entire hub area to prevent dirt and water especially from getting in. Motor vehicle bearing really shouldn't ever be dunked under water but obviously boat trailers it can't be avoided and doing this bearing thing can be an every time you have dunked it go back in a repack and check bearings is there's any doubt.

    Vehicles can go a very long time without needed this done and frequently just at brake service time is enough IMO.
    _________________
    Readers: There are assorted ways the spindle nut is locked in place with various applications. Many are "castle" nuts, some use a light weight castleated cover nut to postition, some use a locking screw, some use a "key" to slide in a slot, and some on left sides of threaded spindles are reverse threaded - mostly European older cars - VW bug for example - the originals.
    ________________

    Final note: When bearings need replacing the race must be removed and there are different procedures for that and the subsequent setting of preload when reassembling. Ask separately for that concern as needed.

    Gees - that was a lot of work - there's only so much "top of my head" to take take from! Hope that explains it,

    T




    Response From Guest

    JIM - THAT WAS AWESOME - WHERE DO YOU FIND MY BEARING TOOL?!! Handiest sucker in the whole collection IMO.

    Joe: There's a struggle to explain how tight is tight without tools that measure it which make a universal suggestion as to how to tighten up bearings without known #s off of tools I don't even own a bit risky but I'll try and any reader this is AYOR - go buy tools and knock yourself out trying to figure out something that really does come by feel with a little experience.

    Joe - now that I know what exact type bearing you are dealing with I can explain better for this type. It would be similar to what's used on all kinds of stuff - trailers, especially of all kinds.

    The inner bearing is held there only by that grease seal. The races are pressed or hammered down in place but again for routine repacking you don't touch those.

    On the end of the tool now shown has a scoop like part that goes under the rubber lip of common grease seals and if you tap (rubber hammer or real one) on the tongs just so it pops the seal out - frequently undamaged. They are cheap as cars go so replacing them isn't a waste. If you didn't have the tool for that it would pry out or as said in first reply some tech's just put the hub (in this case rotor) back on with inner bearing and seal still stuck in hub and just the spindle nut without the washer put on - then yank the whole hub toward you and bearing and seal will stay on the spindle shaft. I DON'T REALLY SUGGEST DOING THAT FOR BEARINGS TO BE REUSED SO PLEASE TRY HARDER.

    When ready to reassemble - put greased up inner bearing in hub then take a washer or sometimes just a hammer can tap the seal new or used one back snugly and evenly in it's place. The hub then goes back over the spinde and outer bearing in, washer over it and tighten nut up by hand.

    If races were not involved you can then take a 10 inch channel lock type plier and tighten the nut firmly by hand while spinning the rotor. Now back off nut till you feel the rotor wobble again and retighten till nut starts to feel resistance of being tight - still while spinning rotor. Now choke up on channel locks such that leverage is reduced and tighten till nut won't tighten any more (as said earlier it's now like firm screwdriver tight with lack of a torque reading that's about it) and then feel for freeplay now should be zero and back off just to the next spot that a cotter pin can go in and that's your spot. Rotor should still show no freeplay and rotor when spun by threads of wheel studs should be able to coast - perhaps not a ton with new grease and a new seal. Now the cotter pin can be bent such that typical pins shorter part can be bent up on over end and tapped down flush with the end of the spindle. The longer part of pin can be cut off but long enough so it too is part of preventing teh nut from loosening by itself. Cotter pin must be out of the way of rubbing inside of the dust cap which is next and can be tapped on with a hammer and screwdriver or a socket that neatly fits just so. Wipe up any excess grease.

    Note: I did google some pics of someone doing all this and they had their greasy hands all over the friction area of the rotor! That's a big NO NO! If you get grease on it clean it off with brake cleaner or lacquer thinner and clean cloth or paper towels would do as it can trash good brakes!

    If this is confusing which I'm perfectly capable of causing then just get someone to really show you this once and you'll have it for life. This style bearing is used on trailers - boat trailers frequently are dunked under water and raise holy hell with bearings so that it's a common routine to repack those - sometimes many times a season or at least be checking them.

    Side note: Dust caps for boat trailers or any can be fitted with a type (called bearing buddies) that have a grease fitting in the cap and maintain a spring loaded charge of grease in the entire hub area to prevent dirt and water especially from getting in. Motor vehicle bearing really shouldn't ever be dunked under water but obviously boat trailers it can't be avoided and doing this bearing thing can be an every time you have dunked it go back in a repack and check bearings is there's any doubt.

    Vehicles can go a very long time without needed this done and frequently just at brake service time is enough IMO.
    _________________
    Readers: There are assorted ways the spindle nut is locked in place with various applications. Many are "castle" nuts, some use a light weight castleated cover nut to postition, some use a locking screw, some use a "key" to slide in a slot, and some on left sides of threaded spindles are reverse threaded - mostly European older cars - VW bug for example - the originals.
    ________________

    Final note: When bearings need replacing the race must be removed and there are different procedures for that and the subsequent setting of preload when reassembling. Ask separately for that concern as needed.

    Gees - that was a lot of work - there's only so much "top of my head" to take take from! Hope that explains it,

    T





    Tom, Jim & All,

    Thank you so much for helping me understand this,,and I believe that I understand this procedure enough now,, that I can undertake this,, after I purchase 2 or 3 more tools. Especially the Tongs that Jim posted a Picture of and Tom Swears by.

    I'm going to print these instructions out,, and have them there with me,, as I do this,, and that should help me also.

    I need to also put some brake Cleaner on the List,, just in case I smudge the Rotor by accident. Thank you Tom for pointing that out,, as I'm sure that I would have made the same mistake. I'm pretty easy on my brakes,, and have 160 Thousand miles on the originals. The last Tire Specialist that did the Alignment told me that they were worn 50 Percent,, and that I should get ready for a brake Pad Replacement at about 300 Thousand Miles... He was ~

    I saw the Bearing Buddy in the Northern Hydraulic's Catalog,, and I'll be looking to see If I can install those on the Trailer as,, that might save me a whole lot of work, from not having to repack the wheel bearings. Thank you so much for mentiioning this.

    Even though this is basic Bearing Maintenance,, It is very important to do correctly,, and can also get complicated if not done correctly,, which explains why it takes so much to explain...

    But it is very much appreciated,, and will most certainly help me and many other's a lot that want to do this.

    Any other's that wish to offer help,, feel free as this will be talked about a viewed over the Web by many many other's as time goes by.

    Have a Great Day,
    Joe

    Response From Guest

    Tom, Jim,

    It took me a while,, but I finally found what looks like the tool shown in Jim's Post.

    http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product2_6970_200312767_200312767

    I found it at Northern Tool,, and just put in my order for one. I didn't think that the price was too bad,, at 12 $'s + 6 $'s for shipping and it will probably last me a long long time,, and help me out in doing the repackin of the Nissan,, and my trailer. Total to my House is 18 $'s,, and It costs me 10 dollars just to go into town for tools or anything else...

    This one isn't a Snap On Brand,, and probably isn't as good,, but was a little bit cheaper than the Used Sanp On one that I found for 47 $'s, on Ebay.

    Thanks again,, and hope this helps others as well,, I know for sure that all the help here has allready helped me,
    Joe

    Response From Tom Greenleaf


    Item# 1586713

    Only $11.99
    Guaranteed Lowest Price Qty


    In Stock
    Ship Wt. 1.0 lbs


    ________________________________________

    Nice find! I did go back and finally find it at Snap On (choke) $59.99 but I do have decades on it already.
    To badger this thread the one shown is an exellent deal. I may grab a spare for that price. Note the "scoop" end of one handle end doesn't look quite as curved as the Snap On. I have sharpened mine, there and at the tongs. Note those tongs will get in between the crimp of a dust cap and the hub. As you become the local pro with wheel bearings you also notice that some (especially foriegn) things will have very little room to grab and you can tap on the tong and they get right in. It saves the cap.

    Again - this sucker is a fav of mine. Got more dang things out with it then many specialty tools. More than you may get into but all kinds of axle seals and things on assorted equipment.

    Snap On makes some nice tools. In fairness some other brands are as good and many better!

    T

    Response From way2old Top Rated Answer

    Whew!!!! That makes me glad I don't do that anymore!!!!!!!!!! I forgot what it was like. Need a beer.

    Response From Double J

    Heres a pix of the tool Tom



    Jim

    Re: How To Change Disc Brakes

    Showing 2 out of 3 Posts | Show 1 Hidden Posts
    Question From lwwillis on Re: How To Change Disc Brakes

    How do you compress the rear calipers on a Nissan Maxima 2002?

    Response From tut2261 Top Rated Answer

    It requires a speacial tool to turn the piston. Basicly it scews in. If it is turned in to far the parking brake will not work. I suggest reviewing a repair manual for the proper prosedure.

    Response From Guest

    Where can you get the special tool and do you need to disconnect the brake line before compression? What about disconnecting the emergency brake?

    Trying to replace the rear pads on 1994 Nissan 240 SX.

    how hard is it to change water pump on 1990 nissan 240 sx

    Showing 2 out of 3 Posts | Show 1 Hidden Posts
    Question From importracer_ky on how hard is it to change water pump on 1990 nissan 240 sx

    im not sure but i belive its going out im loosing water and on the right side looking at engine stays wet.

    Response From crow

    I had to get my water pump changed last year and it was about $600 with labor and parts. I think it was a 3-4 hour job

    Response From DanD Top Rated Answer

    Not hard at all take it in and a couple hundred dollars later it’s all done. LOL
    Sorry but you have to confirm that it is the pump first and then get yourself a repair manual that covers this job. After you’ve read the procedure then make the choice of whether you want to attempt this.
    Dan.