Finish Selecting Your Vehicle to Shop For Your Repair Manual

Choose a Year for your Ford F-150 's Repair Manual

  • 2014
  • 2013
  • 2012
  • 2011
  • 2010
  • 2009
  • 2008
  • 2007
  • 2006
  • 2005
  • 2004
  • 2003
  • 2002
  • 2001
  • 2000
  • 1999
  • 1998
  • 1997
  • 1996
  • 1995
  • 1994
  • 1993
  • 1992
  • 1991
  • 1990
  • 1989
  • 1988
  • 1987
  • 1986
  • 1985
  • 1984
  • 1983
  • 1982
  • 1981
  • 1980
  • 1979
  • 1978
  • 1977
  • 1976
  • 1975
Show More Years

Shop By Brand

The Following brands are available based on your search.

  • Chilton
    Chilton
  • Haynes
    Haynes

Shop for Top Selling Genuine Ford F150 Repair Manuals

  • We Stock the following top leading brands, including Chilton, Haynes
  • Constantly Updated Inventory of Ford F150 Replacement Repair Manual Parts
Chilton
1997 Ford F-150 Repair Manual Chilton

P311-1166DE1    26666  New

Qty:
$22.21
  • Does not include diesel engine, F-250HD, Super Duty, F-350 or information specific to Lightning models.
Brand: Chilton
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Region Submodel
1997 - Ford F-150 United States XLT
Haynes
1997 Ford F-150 Repair Manual Haynes

P311-3F8799A    36059  New

Qty:
  • Does not include diesel engine, F-250 HD, Super Duty, F-350 or information specific to Lightning or other supercharged models.
Brand: Haynes
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Region Submodel
1997 - Ford F-150 United States XLT
Haynes
2012 Ford F-150 Repair Manual Haynes

P311-4482C7D    36061  New

Qty:
$20.66
  • Does not include F-250, Super Duty or diesel models. Does not include information specific to F-150 Heritage, Lightning or Raptor models.
Brand: Haynes
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Region Submodel
2012 - Ford F-150 United States FX4
Haynes
1976 Ford F-150 Repair Manual Haynes

P311-404112B    36054  New

Qty:
Brand: Haynes
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Region Submodel
1976 - Ford F-150 United States Base
Haynes
1997 Ford F-150 Repair Manual Haynes

P311-384D319    99076  New

Qty:
  • Spanish Language. Does not include diesel engine models, F-250 HD, Super Duty, F-350 or information specific to Lightning or supercharged models.
Brand: Haynes
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Region Submodel
1997 - Ford F-150 United States XL
Haynes
1983 Ford F-150 Repair Manual Haynes

P311-2C7CA48    99075  New

Qty:
$20.18
  • Spanish Language. Does not include information specific to diesel engine or Super Duty models.
Brand: Haynes
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Region Submodel
1983 - Ford F-150 United States XLT
Chilton
2012 Ford F-150 Repair Manual Chilton

P311-3C223C3    26668  New

Qty:
$22.21
  • Does not include F-250, super duty or diesel models. Does not include information specific to F-150 Heritage, Lightning or Raptor models.
Brand: Chilton
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Region Submodel
2012 - Ford F-150 United States XL
Chilton
2013 Ford F-150 Repair Manual Chilton

P311-3C223C3    26668  New

Qty:
$22.21
  • Does not include F-250, Super Duty or diesel models. Does not include information specific to F-150 Heritage, Lightning or Raptor models.
Brand: Chilton
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Region Submodel
2013 - Ford F-150 United States STX
Chilton
2004 Ford F-150 Repair Manual Chilton

P311-3C223C3    26668  New

Qty:
$22.21
  • Does not include F-150 Heritage, Lightning, F-250, Super Duty or diesel models.
Brand: Chilton
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Region Submodel
2004 - Ford F-150 United States STX
Chilton
1976 Ford F-150 Repair Manual Chilton

P311-19FEBEE    26662  New

Qty:
$22.21
Brand: Chilton
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Region Submodel
1976 - Ford F-150 United States Custom
Chilton
1987 Ford F-150 Repair Manual Chilton

P311-0CBD428    26664  New

Qty:
$22.21
Brand: Chilton
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Region Submodel
1987 - Ford F-150 United States XL
Haynes
1983 Ford F-150 Repair Manual Haynes

P311-42634E4    36058  New

Qty:
$20.66
  • Does not include diesel engine or Super Duty vehicle information.
Brand: Haynes
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Region Submodel
1983 - Ford F-150 United States XLT

Latest Ford F150 Repair and Repair Manual Installation Advice

CarJunky AutoAdvice

repair manual

Showing 2 out of 2 Posts
Question From el pasoan on repair manual

does anyone know a good website where i can get a free copy of a repair manual or wiring diagrams for a 1984 ford f150?

Response From way2old Top Rated Answer

Try this site. It might have something to help you. I have searched a couple of places and can't find any other info other than whatg I posted before.
http://www.autozone.com/az/cds/en_us/0900823d/80/0c/e9/82/0900823d800ce982/repairInfoPages.htm

2000 Ford F150 4WD 5.4 not reading oil pressure when its first starting up

Showing 7 out of 7 Posts
Question From LBC'N YA on 2000 Ford F150 4WD 5.4 not reading oil pressure when its first starting up

More often than not, my trucks oil pressure guage stays in the(LOW) "pegged" position with the red warning light on. It fluctuates up and down a couple of times, But It primarily stays in the (LOW) position actually reading no pressure until she warms up. I tried to look for the sensor location in my Haynes Repair manual and found absolutely nothing at all pertaining to the oil pressure sensor. What do you think?

Response From LBC'N YA

Wow Don't everyone type their answers to me at once LOL
Unless I should have known it might have been the Flux Capaciter or the Wessenater aternate direction diode

Response From DanD

Sorry buddy
It’s not that we didn’t want to answer your question; it just somehow got missed, I guess? Plus you know what help is like these day’s; especially when the regulars are here on their free time and volunteering that time for nothing other then the occasional thank you.
So later then never; the oil pressure switch is on the left front of the engine.

Dan.

Response From LBC'N YA

Thanx for getting back to me Dan . Might u have a picture or an exploded view of approx. where i'll need to be navigating?

Response From DanD

The diagram wasn’t worth the time too look it up.
Just look down along the left front of the engine block; maybe close to the oil filter or its housing. Maybe go and buy the replacement switch; at least you’ll know what you’re looking for, then?
Short of that; it’ll cost you a plain ticket; so I can come down too wherever the truck is and point it out for you. LOL

Dan.

Response From RonW Top Rated Answer

I have the same truck in a 2WD and the same problem. I replaced the presssure sensor a year ago and still have the problem. I have a couple of more symptoms / observations. My engine temp guage warning light comes on at the same time (engine cold). When I rev the engine up to 2500 RPM the lights go out and the oil pressure returns. There is plenty of oil in the pan and no valve/lifter ticking at any time. Once the engine warms up and the temp. needle comes off of the peg, the engine oil pressure and temperature gauge works fine.
I'm thinking poor ground through the temp. sensor or fouled up computer.
Any suggestions?

Response From chickenhouse

I wish you'd start a new thread with your issue. If you replaced the sensor a year ago and still have not locked the engine up, I would think there is a different prob. Have you put a manual oil pressure gauge in to check actual oil pressure? That would eliminate any worry of low oil pressure you have had for over a year.

'75 F-150 Brake Problem

Showing 2 out of 9 Posts | Show 7 Hidden Posts
Question From mtneer on '75 F-150 Brake Problem

I have begun the restoration of a 1975 Ford F-150 - V8. I do not have much experience working with cars, so I am learning as I go. I have the truck running (after dropping the gas tank and draining the gas, changing the starter, and changing the oil). It starts just fine, but it will not move, the front brakes are stuck. When put in gear, the rear tires spin on the gravel.

When I start the engine, the brake pedal goes to the floor and when I shut it off, it returns to its normal place. I disconnected the vacuum hose from the booster and the pedal did not move. What would cause this behavior? It has brake fluid. The brakes may be seized and I need to 'pop' them off, but would that cause the problem with the brake pedal going down?

Any input would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks!

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Hmmm? The history of how long it may have sat would help. The common denominator would be the master cylinder if both front brakes are that firmly staying applied but with age they both could be frozen but less likely and doesn't explain the foot to floor happening.

Master cyl has to allow the pressure of the last hit to allow fluid back to it which is releasing fluid pressure. At the age if no alterations or hackery it's possible the master is bad or somewhere in its history a pushrod misadjusted but that doesn't jive with foot to floor thing.

As a test for now try releasing some fluid from the line at master that goes to the larger section of reservoir which is for front brakes.

Don't touch pedal and see if then they are free. If that trick works we can go from there but without some more checking at this point I think the master cylinder is at fault. Early without some testing,

T

Response From mtneer

Thanks for the reply. It has set for about 2 years since it was driven last.

I'll try what you said and see if that frees the brakes.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

OK: Start with that as a test. Next question would be did this just happen or did you get it this way? Brake fluid will absorb moisture and rust calipers and wheel cylinders pistons and mess up the master cyl too. These parts shouldn't be expensive and after a two year sit, especially if outdoors I'd be inclined to toss all of them for a resto anyway.

Thinking further since you said a restoration. Is this rusty at all? Take a good look at brake and gas lines. Takes a tad of practice but you can make up your own nice new ones if you want to go for it with this. Leave that for later as it's not the up front issue. Supposed to get a nasty snow overnite thru tomorrow so I may have limited time for a while. Others here can jump in of course,

T

Response From mtneer

Thanks for the replies. The truck is my father-in-law's, he bought it from a friend for a crazy price with thoughts of maybe taking the engine from it and putting it in his '74 Bronco he is restoring. He realized it wasn't going to work out like he had planned, so he left the truck alone. He drove it some before it began to sit, so I know the brakes and everything were working fine then, but after about 2 years, I'm sure things have began to deteriorate.

Instead of trying to fix this problem to get it moving, I may just go ahead like you have suggested and just start on replacing all of the braking components. That is definitely not something I want to get cheap or cut corners on. I'll try some of the suggestions to see if I can get them free and at least get the truck moving from where it is right now.

I really do appreciate everybody's time and help. I am looking into some classes and building up some contacts and really looking forward to the whole process.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Now that you've said you don't want to cheap out on it - great! This may seem intimidating at first but we are here and other sites to help as you wish. Rust is the biggest enemy to deal with and if way too much think about not doing this. You'd be surprised that many of the brake parts are not that expensive but watch out for the super cheap "made in China" rotors and drums if they are not salvageable now. The parts like calipers, master cyl., and wheel cylinder in rear drums on this aren't as expensive as you would think.

Brakes do better being used now and then than sitting unless mothballed in dry storage in an anal retentive manner like collectors do they don't age well just sitting. If you need to replace brake line(s) and the such it isn't expensive but you just need a simple tubing bender and time to do it exactly as it was originally. This is a relatively straight forward vehicle to do and parts shouldn't be a problem at all! Ask - I'll tell you now if you want pro help with parts I can give you a phone # of pro brake parts folks who will know "good" - "better" and "best" for brake parts.

rebuilt calipers are ok (my opinion) but not rebuilt master cylinders or wheel cylinders. There are three rubber flex hoses that at the age should go for new.

This site has it's share of old pharts that were techs before this truck was new! I suggest finding a Ford Truck club for cosmetic parts you may want NOS (new old stock) or excellent reproductions.

If you are going for it best to have a dry place to work and keep it. Even if near rust free sun does damage to cosmetic stuff and all can be fixed or found. Arm rests, padded dash, emblems and such can be done.

You can even get new engine compartment decals and stuff like that!

Go as far as you wish - some stuff is pricey and some not.

Here to help as I can,

T

Response From mtneer

Update on the brakes. My father in law worked on it some the past couple days while I was at work. He said the calipers were stuck. He replaced the calipers and the master cylinder. We bled the lines today and put in new fluid and found a hole in the rear line, which we temporarily fixed by cutting and 'splicing' with a small section from the auto parts store and some couplers. Once we know the condition of the engine, transmission, etc. I'll replace all of the brake lines.

The brakes need to be adjusted some, they're a little tight now, but they work.

We discovered some other things after getting it driving (carburetor, steering shaft coupling) that need to be replaced/looked at, but that's going to be the case starting up a truck that's been sitting for 2 years.

Thanks for all the input and information. I'm sure I'll be asking some more questions along the way. I may post some pictures after I get some of the 'before' stage.

Response From nickwarner

When you go to dive in all the way on this, do as Tom said and buy a tubing bender and a double flaring tool. Get the lines in bulk spools of 20-25 feet long to make it a one piece line. It not only is cheaper than unions and premade sections it looks way better. For reproduction parts try LMC truck for their catalog. And just like Tom said, get the right stuff, not the ChiWanDia specials. You saying you weren't going the cheap route on the brakes makes me happy. So many people I deal with want to put a car together with pretty much no money. So my hat is off to you. Its been said in other posts on this site before, if it don't stop, don't make it go. I've always said brakes are cheaper than coffins. Looking forward to hearing more about this project.

Response From nickwarner Top Rated Answer

You are restoring a truck of the same type I want to do, you just beat me to it. Its a great way to learn, as its a simple truck. For starters, got to your local parts store and make some friends. You need a good repair manual. Call your local technical college and talk to the instructors while you're at it. They will be valuable resources. Also try Summit Racing for their tech support. The main number is 18002303030. Toss the whole brake system. I mean new lines, master cylinder, calipers, wheel cylinders, shoes, hardware, everything. Brakes are the last thing you want to compromise on. But try taking the front bleeder screws out and see if it moves. Please realize you will have almost no brakes if it does. If so, the rubber lines to each wheel may be collapsed or the compensating ports of the master cylinder may be plugged as suggested in the last guy's post. Bear in mind that brake fluid is hygroscopic. It readily absorbs moisture from the atmosphere. Its been in there for 30 years. So how much water is inside that has wreaked havoc on your lines, calipers, master cylinder, etc? You can do this restoration right. Use this site, and buy the more knowledgeable friends of yours as many beers as it takes to get expert help to do this right. Try to do this half assed or cheap and thats the result you will get. You will need an acetylene torch and very good hand tools to do it right. Go to your local pawn shops and look for deals on Snap-On wrenches and sockets. Only get the SAE ones for now. In 1975 the metric system didn't exist as far as we were concerned. Best of luck. Update us with any problems you have. If you were near Eau Claire, WI I'd come over and help you myself just to see it come to fruition