802.589.0911 Live Chat With Us

Finish Selecting Your Vehicle to Shop For Your Radiator

Choose a Year for your Mercury 's Radiator

  • 2011
  • 2010
  • 2009
  • 2008
  • 2007
  • 2006
  • 2005
  • 2004
  • 2003
  • 2002
  • 2001
  • 2000
  • 1999
  • 1998
  • 1997
  • 1996
  • 1995
  • 1994
  • 1993
  • 1992
  • 1991
  • 1990
  • 1989
  • 1988
  • 1987
  • 1986
  • 1985
  • 1984
  • 1983
  • 1982
  • 1981
  • 1980
  • 1979
  • 1978
  • 1977
  • 1976
  • 1975
  • 1974
  • 1973
  • 1972
  • 1971
  • 1970
  • 1969
  • 1968
  • 1967
  • 1965
  • 1963
Show More Years

Shop By Brand

The Following brands are available based on your search.

  • APDI
    APDI
  • CSF Radiator
    CSF Radiator
  • Denso
    Denso
  • Global Parts
    Global Parts
  • Koyo Cooling
    Koyo Cooling
  • Koyorad
    Koyorad
  • LKQ
    LKQ
  • Metrix
    Metrix
  • Nissens
    Nissens
  • One Stop Solutions
    One Stop Solutions
  • Spectra
    Spectra
  • TYC Products
    TYC Products

Best Selling Genuine Mercury Radiators

  • We Stock the following top leading brands, including Metrix, Nissens, Koyo Cooling
  • Constantly Updated Inventory of Mercury Replacement Radiator Parts

We stock Radiator parts for most Mercury models, including Cougar, Grand Marquis, Mountaineer, Sable, Villager.

Metrix
2011 Mercury Milan Radiator 4 Cyl 2.5L Metrix - Plastic Tank

P311-0BD761D    W0133-1907482  New

Qty:
$135.75
Metrix Radiator
  • Aluminum Core
  • Plastic Tank
Brand: Metrix
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel Block Engine CID CC
2011 - Mercury Milan Premier L 4 Cyl 2.5L 152 2488
Metrix
1993 Mercury Sable Radiator Metrix - with Pin Mount

P311-18BF202    W0133-1834481  New

Qty:
$120.88
Metrix Radiator
  • Aluminum Core
  • with Pin Style Mount
  • There are two top mount design radiators. Early Design and Late Design. Please Compare to Original.
  • with Pin Mount
Brand: Metrix
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1993 - Mercury Sable
Metrix
1994 Mercury Topaz Radiator Metrix - Plastic Tank

P311-331B450    W0133-1706346  New

Qty:
$139.53
Metrix Radiator
  • Aluminum Core
  • Plastic Tank
Brand: Metrix
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1994 - Mercury Topaz
Metrix
1997 Mercury Cougar Radiator 8 Cyl 4.6L Metrix - Plastic Tank

P311-1773CD1    W0133-1902635  New

Qty:
$147.77
Metrix Radiator
  • Aluminum Core
  • Plastic Tank
Brand: Metrix
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
1997 - Mercury Cougar V 8 Cyl 4.6L 281 -
Nissens
1999 Mercury Tracer Radiator Nissens - Plastic Tank

P311-2BEE4AB    W0133-1902866  New

Qty:
$183.92
Nissens Radiator
  • Aluminum Core
  • Plastic Tank
Brand: Nissens
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1999 - Mercury Tracer
Metrix
2002 Mercury Cougar Radiator 4 Cyl 2.0L Metrix - Plastic Tank

P311-0C0C6ED    W0133-1929781  New

Qty:
$153.96
Metrix Radiator
  • Aluminum Core
  • Plastic Tank
Brand: Metrix
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
2002 - Mercury Cougar L 4 Cyl 2.0L 121 1989
Metrix
2002 Mercury Cougar Radiator 6 Cyl 2.5L Metrix - Plastic Tank

P311-0C0C6ED    W0133-1929781  New

Qty:
$153.96
Metrix Radiator
  • Aluminum Core
  • w/o A/C
  • Plastic Tank
Brand: Metrix
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
2002 - Mercury Cougar V 6 Cyl 2.5L 155 2450
Metrix
1999 Mercury Mountaineer Radiator 6 Cyl 4.0L Metrix - Plastic Tank

P311-0A97531    W0133-1702701  New

Qty:
$178.98
Metrix Radiator
  • Aluminum Core
  • 1 Row / 1" with Transmission Oil Cooler, w/o Engine Oil Cooler
  • Plastic Tank
Brand: Metrix
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
1999 - Mercury Mountaineer V 6 Cyl 4.0L 245 -
Koyo Cooling
2001 Mercury Mountaineer Radiator 6 Cyl 4.0L Koyo Cooling - Plastic Tank

P311-012E752    W0133-1702701  New

Qty:
$201.90
Koyo Cooling Radiator
  • Aluminum Core
  • 1 Row / 1" with Transmission Oil Cooler, w/o Engine Oil Cooler
  • Plastic Tank
Brand: Koyo Cooling
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
2001 - Mercury Mountaineer V 6 Cyl 4.0L 245 -
Metrix
2001 Mercury Mountaineer Radiator 6 Cyl 4.0L Metrix - Plastic Tank

P311-0A97531    W0133-1702701  New

Qty:
$178.98
Metrix Radiator
  • Aluminum Core
  • Plastic Tank
Brand: Metrix
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
2001 - Mercury Mountaineer V 6 Cyl 4.0L 245 -

Latest Mercury Repair and Radiator Installation Advice

CarJunky AutoAdvice

1992 mercury sable radiator removal

Showing 2 out of 2 Posts
Question From mdjaradat@gmail.com on 1992 mercury sable radiator removal

Hi all, so im trying to replace the radiator on my 92 mercury sable. I managed to disconnect everything except for the lower aluminum transmission line. Its literally unreachable. It seems like the only way to reach it is by removing the power steering pump. I didn't jack the car up because it seems like I can't reach it that way either. Can anyone tell me the proper way to do it, do I really have to mess with the powersteering? thx.

Response From Hammer Time Top Rated Answer

First off, let me suggest that you change your user name. Exposing your e-mail address will bring the wrath of the spammers down on you.




Those lines require a special release tool to remove them








REMOVAL

  1. Drain cooling system by removing radiator pressure cap and opening draincock located at lower rear corner of radiator inlet tank. Three revolutions are required to open draincock to full open position.
  2. Remove rubber overflow tube from coolant recovery bottle and detach it from radiator. On Taurus SHO, disconnect tube from radiator and remove recovery bottle.






  1. Disconnect battery ground cable.
  2. Remove two shroud upper retaining screws and lift shroud out of lower retaining clip.
  3. Disconnect the electric cooling fan motor wires and remove fan and shroud assembly.
  4. Loosen upper and lower hose clamps at radiator and remove hoses from radiator connectors.






  1. Disconnect two automatic transmission oil cooling lines from radiator fittings with Line Disconnect Tool TS2L-9500-AH or equivalent, on vehicles equipped with automatic transaxles.
  2. On 3.OL and SHO engines, remove two radiator upper retaining screws.
  3. On 3.8L engine, remove two hex nuts from RH radiator support bracket. Remove bracket.






  1. On 3.8L engine, remove two screws from LH radiator support bracket. Remove bracket.
  2. Tilt radiator back (rearward) approximately 25mm (1 inch) and lift directly upward clear of radiator support.










  1. If either hose is to be replaced, loosen clamp at engine end and slip hose off connections with a twisting motion.
  2. Remove radiator lower support rubber pads, it pad replacement is necessary.

INSTALLATION
  1. Position radiator lower support rubber pads to lower support, if necessary.
  2. If either hose has been replaced, position hose on engine with index arrow in-line with mark on fitting at engine. On 3.8L engines, install constant tension hose clamp between alignment marks on hose.
  3. Position radiator into engine compartment and to radiator support. Insert the moulded pins at bottom of each tank through slotted holes in lower support rubber pads.
  4. Inspect radiator nylon tank upper mounting bushings for damage. Replace if damaged.
  5. On 3.8L engine, inspect outlet tank metallic pin bracket, LH and RH radiator support brackets. Replace if damaged.
  6. On 3.8L engine, if outlet tank pin bracket must be replaced, remove two retaining bolts. Position bracket on the outlet tank. Install two retaining bolts and tighten to 9-13 Nm (80-115 lb-in).
  7. Ensure plastic pads on bottom of radiator tanks are resting on rubber pads. Install two upper retaining bolts to attach radiator to radiator support. Tighten to 5-7 Nm (45-61 lb-in). On 3.8L, tighten to 17-27 Nm (13-19 lb-ft).
  1. On 3.8L, position RH support bracket onto radiator and over two studs on radiator support.
  1. On 3.8L, position LH support bracket over radiator and radiator support. Align holes in bracket with corresponding holes in radiator support and secure with two screws. Tighten screws to 12-24 Nm (9-17 lb-ft).
  2. Secure RH support bracket to radiator support with two hex nuts. Tighten nuts to 12-24 Nm (9-17 lb-ft).
  3. Install radiator upper and lower hoses to radiator. Position hose on radiator connector so that index arrow on hose is in line with mark on connector. Tighten clamps to 2.3-3.4 Nm (20-30 lb-in) on 3.OL engines. On 3.8L and 3.OL SHO engines, install constant tension hose clamp between alignment marks on hoses.

NOTE:
On vehicles with automatic transaxles, connect oil cooler lines using Pipe Sealant with Teflon� D8AZ- 19554-A (ESG-M4G 194-A) or equivalent oil resistant sealer.

  1. Install fan and shroud assembly by connecting motor wiring and positioning on lower retainer clips. Attach top of shroud to radiator with two screw and washer assemblies, and nut. Tighten to 4 Nm (36 lb-in).
  2. Attach rubber overflow tube to radiator filler neck overflow nipple and coolant recovery bottle. On Taurus SHO, install coolant recovery bottle and connect overflow hose.
  3. Install new 50/50 mixture of water and antifreeze. Operate engine for 15 minutes. Check coolant level and bring it to within 38mm (1 - 1/2 inch) of radiator filler neck. Add one vial of Cooling system Stop Leak Powder E6AZ- 19558-A (ESE-M99B 170-A) or equivalent.
  4. Connect battery ground cable.

where's the rad fan relay switch 1994 Sable

Showing 2 out of 3 Posts | Show 1 Hidden Posts
Question From DennyV on where's the rad fan relay switch 1994 Sable

Can anyone tell me where the raditator fan relay switch is on a 1994 Mercury Sable? Thanks, Denny

Response From Jeff Norfolk Top Rated Answer



Front radiator support



The Cooling Fan Relay is part of the Integrated Control Relay Module, is located at the front of the engine compartment, on the upper radiator support. Here is a picture.

Response From DennyV

THANKS!

ENGINE OIL GETTING IN THE COOLANT SYSTEM

Showing 2 out of 10 Posts | Show 8 Hidden Posts
Question From FREDERICK on ENGINE OIL GETTING IN THE COOLANT SYSTEM

I HAVE A 1999 MERCURY SABLE GS 3.0 WITH 145,000 MILES THAT IS GETTING ENGINE OIL INTO THE COOLANT . WHAT WOULD CAUSE THIS ?

Response From Hammer Time

Are you sure it's engine oil and not transmission fluid?

Does the car have an engine oil cooler?

Response From FREDERICK

NO COOLER, AND THE ANTIFREEZE HAS TURNED TO PEANUTBUTTER!!!!!!!

Response From Discretesignals Top Rated Answer

You should definitely rule out the transmission cooler in the radiator before ripping the heads. I'd pressurize the transmission cooler with air and see if you get bubbles in the radiator.

Response From FREDERICK

WOULD TRANS. FLUID TURN IT BROWN OR RED AS THE TRANS. FLUID IS DEXTRON\MERCON???

Response From Discretesignals

Depends on the color of the transmission fluid. Trans fluid turns dark when it get old and full of friction material.

If the transmission fluid is nice and pink, it will have a strawberry milkshake looking color to it.

This is what coolant inside the transmission looks like:



Either way, you should have the radiator cooler pressurized as stated above before condemning the heads.

Response From FREDERICK

THAT IS WHAT THE ANTIFREEZE RESERVOR LOOKS LIKE, MILKEY PEANUTBUTTER PASTE LOOK???

Response From Discretesignals

All you need now is some jelly and a couple slices of bread.

Response From FREDERICK

THANKS

Response From Hammer Time

Sounds like a cracked head or blown head gasket.

1978 Mercury cooling system problems

Showing 5 out of 9 Posts | Show 4 Hidden Posts
Question From 78merc on 1978 Mercury cooling system problems

Hello,
I just stumbled on your forum and thought I would give it a try! Please pardon the long post, but I wanted to be thorough. I have a 1978 Mercury Grand Marquis with 120K miles. I replaced the heater core myself a couple of weeks ago. Yesterday, before taking it on a long trip, I noticed that I had overfilled the radiator and it was not going into the expansion bottle. When I slammed the hood, about half a cup of antifreeze started leaking from the radiator. I drained some of the antifreeze from the radiator and went on my long trip. The car ran fine.

Today, I got under the hood and decided to blow some of the carbon out of the engine by reving the engine really hard and blowing gumout down the carb throat. My mechanic recommended doing this every once in a while to blow out the carbon. When I was under the hood revving the engine, something blew from the underside middle area of the engine bay on the passenger side and blew radiator fluid all over the engine bay and all over my face! Luckily I was wearing glasses and the antifreeze was not hot. About a gallon of antifreeze started leaking from the bottom of the car. After a face full of antifreeze, I should just take it to my mechanic, but I would still like to attempt to repair this myself. I checked the lower and upper radiator hoses, as well as the hoses connected to my heater core, and they all look OK. I also started the car a few hours later, and it didn't leak until I poured some water into the radiator, then it started to leak. I am no car expert, but I sort of suspect the water pump. My questions are....

1. Could this problem simply be that the hoses connected to the water pump have come undone or ruptured, and I could get under there and reconnect them myself??
2. I can jack up the car if I move the car out of my small garage and take a look under there. Can I safely move the car with antifreeze leaking from the bottom of the car?
3. Could this be a problem other than the water pump?
Any advice would be GREATLY appreciated. Thanks!!

Response From 78merc

Last question I promise. I got the car outside and tracked down the leaking hose. It was a small J shaped hose. I managed to replace it and the car runs fine. I was wondering if it is advisable to do a flush of the cooling system on a car this old. The radiator is only five years old and the heater core is obviously brand new. I thought I might use a bottle of Prestone Super Radiator flush in addition to one of the Prestone flush kits. Thanks!!

Response From Tom Greenleaf

You can ask as many questions as you want. If a thread gets way to long sometimes it's best to make summary and start a new one.

There are several VERY experienced pros here and opinions can vary.

As for flushing system I say go for it but personally don't use anything for a solvent as I just get worried it could hurt something. Plain water AFTER system is empty back and forth thru items till it looks clear. Thermostat out and careful to use gentle pressure from a plain garden hose. If lots of junk is seen it was worth it and if not didn't hurt anything.

New antifreeze not exceeding 50% will help with corrosion from within. Just do know that the used antifreeze will kill plant life and the right thing to do is find out locally where you can dispose of it. My dang city will only deal with it twice a year so I take them to a friends shop as it is a hazmat. Use care if caught in a pan as pets and critters will drink it and it's deadly. Do your best.

Another great thing is to just bleed brakes with fresh brake fluid if this car is unrusted enough that you don't end up busting off bleeders or that could open a whole other project,

T

Response From Discretesignals

Another thing you want to watch out for on the Fords is electrolysis going on in the coolant system. Fords were horrible for this. I have seen a few cores replaced that failed again within a week because there was voltage running around in the coolant system. Make sure that all your body and engine grounds are clean and tight. If you took any grounds off or have any missing, put them back on.

Check for voltage in the coolant system by connecting a volt meter to the negative side of the battery and dipping the tip of the other lead in the coolant inside the radiator with the engine running and all accessories turned on. Also check the voltage while cranking the engine. If you see more than .3 volts AC or DC, check your grounds or you'll be doing that core again...and maybe even a radiator.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

You''ll never cease to amaze me DS! Interesting that I found that Fords had the least problem with that and Mopars were more trouble? Climate? Something in the air? I am VERY conscious of ground straps all over the place and have added them sometimes.

Owned this car as the Ford LTD Landau version - one of my personal top 10 vehicles out of countless vehicles mostly to fix for resale given to me or to cheap to pass up. That LTD wouldn't quit if you threw grenades at it! Died from rust running as new with an unstoppable 400M engine. Orig stuff made it way up over 200K - untouched A/C that still remains the most effective of any car I've ever been in never mind owned.

Except for rust that car was amazing and don't know why as some others of the same were a mess all the time??

"Those were the Days my friend, we thought they'd never end" (the song)


Tom

Response From chickenhouse Top Rated Answer

Wish I had that 400 M, could use it in my 78 T-Bird.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

This is like an old pharts convention

Same basic car I had a '79 Cougar w the 302 that couldn't pass a turtle or spin the wheels on glare ice. Should have come with a bar on the trunk so you could push the dang thing. Oh, you want A/C and to move at the same time? Embarrassing when bicycles pass you - laugh,

Tom

Response From Hammer Time

It doesn't sound like this job is for you judging by the questions you are asking.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Agree with HT. This should be the last of the big Fords and one of the easiest heater cores you'll ever run across. If it's leaking that much it shouldn't be that hard to find where.

Not sure how you think you can overfill this but you could overfill the recovery tank which if all else was right would just blow that out when warmed up,

T

R&R bottom radiator hose

Showing 2 out of 2 Posts
Question From Capthook on R&R bottom radiator hose

Vehicle - 1997 Mercury Sable, 3.0 ltr OHV , 285,000 MILES. Could really use some help on how to get that hose out of there. They really hid that thing. Anybody with any experiance I would really apreciate your help.

Response From re-tired Top Rated Answer

There is no magic bullet for this job .Other than removing a heat shield and or air defector it's just a knuckle buster.