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Gates
2005 Lincoln LS Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-11C54E7    New

Qty:
$15.70
Gates Radiator Coolant Hose
  • w/o Engine Oil Cooler Hose Set Up
  • Lower
Brand: Gates
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Vehicle
2005 - Lincoln LS
Gates
1998 Lincoln Town Car Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-3148E62    New

Qty:
$63.34
Gates Radiator Coolant Hose
  • w/o Oil Cooler
Brand: Gates
Free Ground Shipping on this item
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Vehicle
1998 - Lincoln Town Car
Gates
2000 Lincoln LS Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-3B8FFB9    New

Qty:
$19.62
Gates Radiator Coolant Hose
  • with Single Hose to Upper Radiator
  • Single Hose - ONLY
Brand: Gates
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Vehicle
2000 - Lincoln LS
Motorcraft
2005 Lincoln LS Radiator Coolant Hose Motorcraft

P311-56BB1FD    New

Qty:
$107.58
Motorcraft Radiator Coolant Hose
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • with Engine Oil Cooler Hose Set Up
Brand: Motorcraft
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Vehicle
2005 - Lincoln LS
Motorcraft
2005 Lincoln LS Radiator Coolant Hose Motorcraft

P311-30440E5    New

Qty:
$84.30
Motorcraft Radiator Coolant Hose
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • w/o Engine Oil Cooler Hose Set Up
Brand: Motorcraft
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Vehicle
2005 - Lincoln LS
Gates
2006 Lincoln Mark LT Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-5711735    New

Qty:
$22.27
Gates Radiator Coolant Hose
  • Vendor: MOTORCRAFT Vendor #KM-4739
Brand: Gates
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Vehicle
2006 - Lincoln Mark LT
Gates
2007 Lincoln Mark LT Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-5711735    New

Qty:
$22.27
Gates Radiator Coolant Hose
Brand: Gates
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Vehicle
2007 - Lincoln Mark LT
Gates
2007 Lincoln Mark LT Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-06F57A9    New

Qty:
$22.29
Gates Radiator Coolant Hose
Brand: Gates
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Vehicle
2007 - Lincoln Mark LT
Gates
2006 Lincoln Mark LT Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-06F57A9    New

Qty:
$22.29
Gates Radiator Coolant Hose
  • Vendor: MOTORCRAFT Vendor #KM-4738
Brand: Gates
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Vehicle
2006 - Lincoln Mark LT
Motorcraft
2003 Lincoln Town Car Radiator Coolant Hose Motorcraft

P311-3776403    New

Qty:
$40.80
Motorcraft Radiator Coolant Hose
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
Brand: Motorcraft
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2003 - Lincoln Town Car
Motorcraft
2004 Lincoln Town Car Radiator Coolant Hose Motorcraft

P311-3776403    New

Qty:
$40.80
Motorcraft Radiator Coolant Hose
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • with Short-Tee Attachment to Radiator
Brand: Motorcraft
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Vehicle
2004 - Lincoln Town Car
Gates
2003 Lincoln Town Car Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-5B7C986    New

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$45.93
Gates Radiator Coolant Hose
  • w/o Oil Cooler;with Un-Detachable Rubber Cooling Hose (Long)
Brand: Gates
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Vehicle
2003 - Lincoln Town Car
Motorcraft
2007 Lincoln Navigator Radiator Coolant Hose Motorcraft

P311-57CB3DF    New

Qty:
$65.65
Motorcraft Radiator Coolant Hose
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
Brand: Motorcraft
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Vehicle
2007 - Lincoln Navigator
Dayco
Qty:
$12.22
Dayco Radiator Coolant Hose  Lower - Radiator To Tee
  • Cut to Fit
  • Curved Radiator Hose
  • Product Attributes:
    • Color: Black
    • Contains Heat Shield: N
    • Contains Protective Sleeve: N
    • End 1 Inside Diameter: 1 1/2
    • End 2 Inside Diameter: 1 1/2
    • Hose Type: Single I.d. Hose
    • Material: Epdm
    • SAE Specification: Sae J20r4 Class D-1, Sae J1684 Type Ec
    • Trunk Height: 12
Brand: Dayco
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Vehicle Position
1993 - Lincoln Mark VIII Lower - Radiator To Tee
Dayco
1950 Lincoln Lincoln Radiator Coolant Hose - Upper Dayco

P311-1AC758C    New

Qty:
$12.22
Dayco Radiator Coolant Hose  Upper
  • Curved Radiator Hose
  • Product Attributes:
    • Color: Black
    • Contains Heat Shield: N
    • Contains Protective Sleeve: N
    • End 1 Inside Diameter: 1 1/2
    • End 2 Inside Diameter: 1 1/2
    • Hose Type: Single I.d. Hose
    • Material: Epdm
    • SAE Specification: Sae J20r4 Class D-1, Sae J1684 Type Ec
    • Trunk Height: 12
  • Suggested Purchase Quantity: 2
    • Most jobs typically require 2 of this item.
Brand: Dayco
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Position
1950 - Lincoln Lincoln Upper
Dayco
Qty:
$17.97
Dayco Radiator Coolant Hose  Upper
  • Curved Radiator Hose
  • Product Attributes:
    • Color: Black
    • Contains Heat Shield: N
    • Contains Protective Sleeve: N
    • End 1 Inside Diameter: 1 3/4
    • End 2 Inside Diameter: 1 3/4
    • Hose Type: Single I.d. Hose
    • Material: Epdm
    • SAE Specification: Sae J20r4 Class D-1, Sae J1684 Type Ec
    • Trunk Height: 27-1/2
Brand: Dayco
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block CC CID Position
2006 - Lincoln Mark LT V - 330 Upper
Dayco
Qty:
$17.92
Dayco Radiator Coolant Hose  Lower
  • Curved Radiator Hose
  • Product Attributes:
    • Color: Black
    • Contains Heat Shield: N
    • Contains Protective Sleeve: N
    • End 1 Inside Diameter: 1 17/32
    • End 2 Inside Diameter: 1 17/32
    • Hose Type: Single I.d. Hose
    • Material: Epdm
    • SAE Specification: Sae J20r4 Class D-1, Sae J1684 Type Ec
    • Trunk Height: 21 1/4
Brand: Dayco
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block CC CID Position
2006 - Lincoln Mark LT V - 330 Lower
Dayco
1999 Lincoln Town Car Radiator Coolant Hose - Lower Dayco

P311-302000C    New

Qty:
$57.23
Dayco Radiator Coolant Hose  Lower
  • w/o Oil Cooler
  • Curved Radiator Hose
  • Product Attributes:
    • Color: Black
    • Contains Heat Shield: N
    • Contains Protective Sleeve: N
    • End 1 Inside Diameter: 1 7/16
    • End 1 Outside Diameter: 1 13/16
    • End 2 Inside Diameter: 1 7/16
    • End 2 Outside Diameter: 1 13/16
    • End 3 Inside Diameter: 15/16
    • Hose Type: Branched Hose
    • Material: Epdm
    • SAE Specification: Sae J20r4 Class D-1, Sae J1684 Type Ec
    • Trunk Height: 27
Brand: Dayco
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Position
1999 - Lincoln Town Car Lower
Dayco
1999 Lincoln Town Car Radiator Coolant Hose - Lower Dayco

P311-302000C    New

Qty:
$57.23
Dayco Radiator Coolant Hose  Lower
  • Cut to Fit w/Oil Cooler
  • Curved Radiator Hose
  • Product Attributes:
    • Color: Black
    • Contains Heat Shield: N
    • Contains Protective Sleeve: N
    • End 1 Inside Diameter: 1 7/16
    • End 1 Outside Diameter: 1 13/16
    • End 2 Inside Diameter: 1 7/16
    • End 2 Outside Diameter: 1 13/16
    • End 3 Inside Diameter: 15/16
    • Hose Type: Branched Hose
    • Material: Epdm
    • SAE Specification: Sae J20r4 Class D-1, Sae J1684 Type Ec
    • Trunk Height: 27
Brand: Dayco
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Position
1999 - Lincoln Town Car Lower
Dayco
2006 Lincoln Town Car Radiator Coolant Hose - Upper Dayco

P311-071346C    New

Qty:
$13.24
Dayco Radiator Coolant Hose  Upper
  • Curved Radiator Hose
  • Product Attributes:
    • Color: Black
    • Contains Heat Shield: N
    • Contains Protective Sleeve: N
    • End 1 Inside Diameter: 1 15/32
    • End 2 Inside Diameter: 1 15/32
    • Hose Type: Single I.d. Hose
    • Material: Epdm
    • SAE Specification: Sae J20r4 Class D-1, Sae J1684 Type Ec
    • Trunk Height: 19
Brand: Dayco
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Position
2006 - Lincoln Town Car Upper

Latest Lincoln Repair and Radiator Hose Installation Advice

CarJunky AutoAdvice

1990 Town Car 5.0 v8 cooling problems

Showing 2 out of 13 Posts | Show 11 Hidden Posts
Question From magic_ninja on 1990 Town Car 5.0 v8 cooling problems

Okay so last winter i hooked up a bypassed heater-core on my lincoln (it was bypassed when i bought the car and now i have a heater-core to install). Anyway, since then I have had nothing but trouble from the coolant system of the car and the pipes coming out of the core to under the hood were not blocked off. I let it set for a month and the overheating problems went away, around 2-3 months later the water pump went out. Its been about 2 months since i changed the water pump and it has been overheating while running the AC in town or idling (i have not let it get to a dangerous temp though). Today I noticed coolant leaking and checked, and it was the same leaking as before (my water pump is out again). I need to figure out whats going on with my coolant system in the car and what i should do to get it up to par. This motor has 120,000 miles on it, so its got alot of life left in it. It runs fine as well. What should i do to keep the water pump from going out again and get the cooling system up to par (i noticed it had a lot of rust and corrosion and has had straight water ran in it for a couple years).

HERE IS SOME NEW INFO:
Okay so I idled the car with the AC on (to create the problem scenario) and filled the radiator completely (fill the radiator, wait for it to go down, fill some more, until completely full and also getting the air out of the system). Once completely full i kept the cap on and let it idle, idled for around 30 minutes all together, and it didn't overheat and i didn't notice the leak coming from the bottom two pulleys (water-pump and power steering pulley's i believe, its two pulleys one right in front of the other at the spot for the crank pulley and harmonic balancer). I probably got the names of the pulley's wrong but i can provide photographs if needed. Could heat be manipulating one of the hoses/clamps on the waterpump to be causing this leak? I would think if it was a bad water-pump it would be leaking all the time, and even after 30 minutes of idling and the coolant being completely warm there was no leakage from the water pump.

Response From Loren Champlain Sr

magic; The water pump mounting bolt torque spec is 12-18 ft.lbs. Couldn't find anything on the power steering, though. I would think 25 ft.lbs. should be sufficient.
The heater core replacement is not for a novice. The whole dash has to come off. For an experienced tech, the labor time is 6.2 hrs. You may want to reconsider this? btw, it is mounted under the dash, behind the glove box, inside a plastic box that is easy to break, along with electrical connections, ect., ect.
I've been doing this for nearly 40 years, and I don't hate myself enough to tackle a job like this. If you are determined to do it, I'd suggest buying a GOOD manual that give step by step instructions. Good luck.

Response From Loren Champlain Sr

magic; You need to find out, for sure, where the leak is originating. There is a by-pass hose directly above the water pump that can leak, a faulty pump of course, or the timing cover gasket. A pressure test should confirm if it's the hose or the timing cover gasket. I've run into water pumps that would leak only 1)when hot, 2)when cold, 3)under pressure, 4)no pressure. You should be able to take a look at the seep hole on the underside of the pump to see if there is a 'coolant trail' where it may have leaked. Not sure if this engine/application uses electric cooling fan(s). If it does, make sure that they are coming on once it has reached temp. If it uses a clutch fan, make sure it 'locks up' once the engine reaches temp. You shouldn't be able to 'spin' it when warm. Oh, and never use rebuilt water pumps. Only new.
Once your leak is solved, get that system clean. May take several flushes. May result in more leaks...freeze plugs, ect. I had a '92 Lincoln TC in yesterday. Mint condition, except for the cooling system. Every one of the freeze plugs were leaking, including the ones at the rear of the engine. The engine is going to have to be removed to do all of them.

Response From magic_ninja Top Rated Answer

Okay, here is what I've got.

Drove the car around today with AC on max and got the car heated (took about 20 miles of driving). Once the car was up to operating temps I let it idle and water started leaking from the top bleeder hole of the water pump. Obviously this needs replaced. It was a new pump, and matched the one I pulled off perfectly. It has a lifetime warranty on it as well, so I can get a new one. I did apply silicon, RTV, whatever you choose to call it (thermal grade as well). I also torqued the bolts to specifications, however all I had was a needle wrench, but I am pretty sure it accurately did the job. The system was probably a 35/70 mixture of coolant/water with around 5-10% leftover from the old engine.

Fan Clutch - Performing fine.
Heater Hoses:

I'm sure I hooked them up right, based on the sizes each hose could only reach one side of the heater core.

My questions:
1. Its obvious this cooling system has been neglected and if I don't get it in order I'll end up blowing the motor or the head-gasket at least. I need to get the cooling system clean and up to par. What would be the best process to flush my system during the repair (could I do it before the water-pump as long as I keep the car idle). I would like to get all the gunk out of my system, as I have a new heater-core as well. I would like to have clean coolant flowing through the heater-core.

2.What other things might I want to look into, could the radiator be the primary cause of this? What will I need to do to make sure the cooling system is cleaned?

Repairs performed:
Coolant system flush
Top and Bottom radiator hoses
Water pump

I do have the book for this vehicle as well, so I have the specs I need for everything, as well as the owner's manual.

Thanks for your replies.

Added: what are freeze plugs, where are they located?

Response From magic_ninja

Alright, well flushed the radiator, I used a garden-type pressure hose (has like 8 or so settings, not very much psi) and flushed from the top of the radiator on both sides down and the water ran out fine, at the same rate as it was flowing in and clear as well after a little bit. Then i removed the thermostat and sprayed into the thermostat housing, the water ran from the bottom of the waterpump with fine pressure and clear as well after a bit. Tested the thermostat by dropping it into boiling water and after a minute, it opened up just fine and slowly closed after i removed it. Doing the water-pump tomarrow.

As for the pump I used not sure, it was a 42 dollar water pump and bought from oriely's new. We pretty much only have autozone and oreily's here and I never have been much of a fan of autozone. We will see what happens after the 2nd waterpump repair and if it fails again. The coolant flow seems to be fine, btw i reccomend a racheting wrench if you ever have to remove a thermostat from one of these, the waterpump, alternator bracket and distributor are RIGHT in the way of any rachet access, lol, and its a pain in the ass with a locktighted bolt on :-(. Getting a new radiator cap, thermostat gasket and waterpump tomarrow as my radiator cap has a crack on the rubber seal inside the top of the cap, not sure if this could be the culprit of overheating myself, but it very well could be.

Response From Loren Champlain Sr

magic; In two months, I doubt that it would be the rust that caused the pump failure; And, there's nothing you could have done to cause it. Just happens. There is a seal inside the pump that fails. And, there are varying qualities of replacement pumps. Don't know where you purchased yours, but try and stay with a good quality pump. Even they 'can' go bad, but less likely.

Not sure what a 'needle' wrench is?

As far as flushing goes; If you remove the thermostat, this procedure will be quicker; I'd do it before replacing the pump, if you can do it without overheating. Most parts stores sell flush chemicals. Drain the coolant out of the radiator (if still clean, you can save and reuse it; If not, dispose of it properly) and refill with water. Run the engine until warm, then drain and fill again. You can't do this too many times. Each time, it'll get a bit cleaner. Once you are 'satisfied' with the results, refill again with water, add the flush chemical, and do it again following the instructions on the chemical container. This stuff will be, more than likely, toxic, so when you drain it out, dispose of it properly. I would suggest doing one last clean water flush afterwards to make sure you've got all of the chemical out of the system. A 50/50 mix with water and anti-freeze is ideal. Too much anti-freeze can cause an over heating condition as it doesn't dissapate the heat as well as water. Too little anti-freeze doesn't give you enough freeze protection, rust protection, and boil temp. protection.

Freeze plugs, or soft plugs, really aren't what they say they are. I used to think that they were there in case the water in the engine block froze, they'd allow for the expansion and be 'pushed' out, saving the block. Although I have actually seen this, that isn't what they were designed for. Usually, there are three on each side of the engine block, one or two at the rear of the engine (have to pull the engine or transmission to see them) and usually one at each end of each cylinder head. Replacing the plugs isn't a tough job once you've gained access. THAT (gaining access) can be a nightmare. On your application, it would probably be easier to remove the engine and replace all of them. If it comes to that.

Response From magic_ninja

I just used a normal ole 1/2 wrench and it gets the job done, however much your fingers may hurt at the end.

Response From Sidom


alternator bracket and distributor are RIGHT in the way of any rachet access
If you have a timing light, moving the dist makes it a lot easier.... the module is right in the way.

Response From Loren Champlain Sr

The radiator cap is very important. First, it seals the system. If air can get in there, rust will be the result. Secondly, it keeps the water IN the system. Otherwise, the water will just go past the cap, into the recovery bottle. The bottle will overflow, and won't get 'sucked' back into the radiator once it cools down. Thirdly, a pressurize system raises the boiling point. Straight water without pressure boils at 212F. Under pressure, that boiling point climbs at varying degrees of pressure. I'm sure someone here has a chart.... I should have asked you about the cap at the beginning of this. Sorry.

Response From magic_ninja

Is there any way you guys can post me the torque specs for the power steering pump and water pump, I can't find my manual. Thanks.

Also if you can post a diagram of where the heater-core is in the dash it would help a great deal as i'm doing this too before I fill the cooling system back up.

Response From magic_ninja

Thank you, I got all back together today with the waterpump, minus the fan/clutch fan shroud top/bottom heater hoses and alternator and assembly. As far as the heater core goes my uncle has done several and can provide help if I get stuck, the electronics don't worry me as its kind of one of my hobbies, and it shouldn't be that difficult. Thanks for the advice and I'll keep posting updates to see how the heater-core hoses go

BTW i broke a bolt on the air conditioner compressor pulley. There is still two and the pulley is held on strong/sturdy as I got the bolt in completely before it broke. I know its not the smartest thing, but you think the pulley will still hold fine? If not i'll end up using some african american inginuity to get it done.

Okay, IT IS NOT THE AIR CONDITIONER COMPRESSOR PULLEY. Not sure which pulley it is, but its at the bottom left of the engine looking at it from the front. Anyway I figured out how to get the bolt out, thanks for all the help guys, its about time for a new heater-core thread :-). My uncle is a mechanic and said if i get stuck he will come help me.

Response From Loren Champlain Sr

magic; With your attidute, patience, and determination, I feel pretty confident that you'll get through it. Please, keep us posted.

Response From magic_ninja

It was the air pump, only found that out after I pulled it off. Looked on the net, found out about easy-outs drilled it out (easy out got it 2-3 threads out then broke lol) but enough that it broke the bolt and I could unscrew it out. Got dark once we got to the fan clutch/fan (lol i forgot to put the pulley on the fan/clutch) so hopefullyt omarrow i'm filling back up. Save the heater-core til I figure out why the impala is overheating. Coolant boiling out of resivior after some sustained driving. My guess would be a stuck thermostat. Anyway thanks for the help, I'll try to help answer some questions ont he site as well. I'm not professional but my entire family does their own mechanic work, and a good job at that, so even though I just started I already have a background of knowledge, i just need to aquire the know-how, and only one way to do that.

1982 Ford Granada 3.3L A few million miles?

Showing 2 out of 9 Posts | Show 7 Hidden Posts
Question From irishmantx on 1982 Ford Granada 3.3L A few million miles?

Dear Group,

1982 Ford Granada 3.3L engine. Oily soot found coming out of the tail pipe, and
uses oil more often than used to. (long skid mark / sooty oil stain) from the
exhaust pipe. Original engine since 1982, possibly warning sign engine might
go? It's used heavily and takes me to work back and forth serving as the only
family 'back up' car. (odometer has rolled a few times since original 25,000 miles
back in 1984.)

Is this a sign of bad times for this engine? This particular engine was assembled
in Canada, smooth good solid running engine. If possible, I rather go with a good
long block.

Things done to this car.

Replaced battery, MT-56 Interstate. Replaced Alternator, Water pump (at same time)
radiator hoses, belts, rear brakes (L/R), front disk brake line hose (L/R), coil springs
(x4 w/air conditioner), rear shocks, front struts, thermostat replaced, carb replaced,
front weather strip (L/R) replaced, ignition module, voltage regulator, negative battery
cable electrically taped black since it was originally 'red' possibly mistake of positive cable.
Wheel bearings serviced, rack and pinion steering unit replaced, and head lamps replaced.

Oily sooty exhaust noticeable after idle and running the engine, leaving approx 1 to 2 foot
long 'skid mark' or 'skid stain' on ground / floor of garage. Uses oil more frequently as it
takes a quart every week or after heavy use. Possible warning sign of engine failure?

Shalom,

irishmantx
76531




Response From Tom Greenleaf

? Some confusion with just what this engine is. Is this the 200 CID straight six with one bbl carb? I just looked up a valve cover gasket with mixed info. 3.3 should = 200 CID inch and gasket like this.................

/


With the miles it's hard to say as so many things are possible. Any blue smoke? If any smoke out tailpipe what color? Does this oily soot run out tailpipe leaving a streaked mix of part burned oil and gas - did I understand that properly?

Is is running well now despite the mess it makes? What's taxing my mind is IF it runs on all six cyl. and doesn't smoke than a fair amount of raw fuel or oil is getting in the exhaust. Using some oil at VERY high miles isn't totally amazing nor means there isn't more left to go.

Lots to think about with this. Some engines will put out a trail a water from condensation in the cold exhaust but mostly when colder, humid air and would be dirty but would quit it when warmed up.

Could be sludge if any now not be allowing oil return to pan and valve guides are sucking down oil way too fast but if running well that would smoke and make a scene. You can get a good idea sometimes about sludge just looking in oil fill cap or take valve cover off for a real good look.

IMO if engine has to go the head need be in same condition or reworked. I didn't find reman whole engine available but they should be but not common parts houses. Used at the age would be rare to find a known good whole engine but if diagnosis shows this one is that worn I'd ask a reputable salvage yard for exact fit replacement.

It probably is worth paying for a professional diagnosis, compression and other observations to declare engine's needs.

Sorry for the long response - this has so many possibilities by age and miles it's an open book without some serious diagnostics,

Tom

Response From irishmantx

Dear Tom,

That looks about right!! Some blue smoke does puff out... To be honest, it runs 'OK' BUT....
Since the engine is original, and it takes more oil than normal, leaving a 1 to 2 foot stain of
streaking oil / exhaust soot, I surmise this engine is tired.

I rather get total complete long block with a warranty. I could get her over to a shop for
a full compression and engine diagnostic. At least see where I stand on the shape of this
engine. Or g-d forbid, engine goes, then get her towed. I told my dad (who owns the car)
about this.

One bit of good news, I got the new computer box w/chip back into my 1988 GMC S15
and it 'appears' to run smoothly. Got to test a few more times at certain times the truck
acts up and breaks down. :P So far so good. I hope, fingers crossed.. toes crossed, knocking
on all kinds of wood. lol

Well, I thought it could be something serious about the oily sooty exhaust. I never see this
car act that way. It runs a bit louder, takes more oil than normal, and now I remember I see
piddle leaks toward the front and back of the engine. Like 3 to 6 piddles of oil toward the front,
and 2 to 4 piddles of oil toward the back of the engine. Not sure if it's valve cover or gasket
warped and going bad. When I start the engine, it makes a rattle rattle noise... then goes away.
Belts squeal and hard to keep speed when I get past Warp 7 (70 mph) it shakes, may need front
end alignment, and new tires. :) I keep her between Warp 1 (10 mph) to Warp 6.5 (65 mph).

At any rate, this car is my family heirloom and I help spend money on the C-4 Transmission. I
don't mind saving up for the engine. I already spent money on the rest of the previous posted
items.

It's a 3.3 liter, 200ci engine, Straight 6 engine. Will fuel injection be better than carb?

Shalom,

irishmantx
76531




Response From Tom Greenleaf

OK: This engine has probably had it and what you are experiencing is plain wear from VERY high miles with blowby past pistons and their rings and that will put pressure into crankcase instead of the minute vacuum it should be via the PCV valve. Bet it you just pull the dipstick while idling it blow out when it really should be slightly sucking in air there. Valve guids in head and their seals sucking in oil beyond what it can burn so some actually makes it out the exhaust!

BTW - none of this is good for the cat. converter which is probably dead and kinda surprised it isn't all clogged up.

The shaking is probably tire, wheel, wheel bearing adjustment. Alignment alone really shouldn't be the cause of imbalance or causing shaking if off but would make the cause worse if badly out of spec. With the miles you have to check everything - front end parts even if already done could need them again at a "few million" miles

Carb vs fuel injection. Late carbs were hard to meet emmsions and got more complicated and fussier than much older than this year of vehicle. You really can't switch it to injected as that would be an engineering project and legalities of the car could or would be an issue. Totally impractical and too involved to even think about that.

If you are going to invest in the reman engine start checking for what's available. Ford themselves might still have a reman available. It would be a total stroke of magic to find a good low mile original that matched exactly at the age. Don't expect a reman engine to compete with original new for pounding miles on them. They can only be truly new once,

T

Response From irishmantx

Dear Tom,


Thanks for the info! I had gone out to my 'donor' Granada for
some hard to find parts. My "donor" Granada is a 4.2L which is
a 255ci v8. (It's being used as a donor car since its too costly to
fix immediately.)

Anyways, I did find an air filter intake hose from the wall to the
filter. The old one on my mom's 1982 Granada fell and crumbled
apart. It fit good, and I agree with you about the 3.3L 200 engine.

OK: This engine has probably had it and what you are experiencing is plain wear from VERY high miles with blowby past pistons and their rings and that will put pressure into crankcase instead of the minute vacuum it should be via the PCV valve. Bet it you just pull the dipstick while idling it blow out when it really should be slightly sucking in air there. Valve guids in head and their seals sucking in oil beyond what it can burn so some actually makes it out the exhaust!

I agree with you, mom, dad and I put WAY to many miles on this engine. The
engine was built in Canada and I give credit that maple syrup makes every
thing better. :) (: HA HA! ;) ;) ;) It spits oily soot at least 2ft from tail pipe,
and I must admit, this engine is tired. The car is still good, with Tender Loving
Care, I hope it remains for the next generation. Thanx Tom for your advice.
Merry Christmas, Happy Chanukah, Happy Holidays. Hope you and yours have
a wonderful holiday season, and if you drink too much egg nog, have a backup
driver ready to take you home, or sleep it off in the back seat. ;)

Money is being saved up over time, and save up for a new
engine. I want an engine that has a warranty and there are
rebuilds, but I want a 3.3L 200ci, Straight 6 long block. Is it a
good idea to get new water pump, alternator, carb, fuel pump,
and other parts, or salvage them off of the old engine, and how
much for a catalytic converter?

If all else fails, what engine places do you recommend for a
long block replacement? I don't want the hassle and issues with
rebuild the heads and the block itself. I realize its too much to
put into fuel injection, however, if I am super wealthy, or I meet
a nice sweet, wealthy, rich, financially deep pocketed Jewish
sugar cougar, I might want to hire the guy's at Overhaulin and
do some 'upgrades' and the legal team to make it happen. HA!
Other than that, it's by the book and back to factory standard.

Shalom

irishmantx
76531


Response From Tom Greenleaf

The FORD cast iron straight six engines share quite a bit I recall. My own first was 144 CID in a 63 Falcon, a 200 CID in a 68 Falcon and by chance other Fords were all V8s. Some of these are identical with changes in stroke to change displacement. Many used the 250 CID then trucks went big on the 300 CID called a 4.9L.


What to replace with a reman engine:

If alternator is fine now re-use it. Water pump should be cheaper and probably would put a new not reman pump on. All new cooling system hoses and vacuum lines. Carb? I'd swap first and if needed just get a kit to rebuild it. Should be fairly straight forward if you have good instructions with the kit usually. rebuilt/reman for carbs is mostly a real good cleaning, new needle valve, accelerator pump and gaskets. The idle mix screw my have a hardened cap to prevent messing with the idle mixture. Procedures to remove that with a punch may come with a kit as there is a needle valve behind those - perhaps a "clutch" headed needle valve and you can buy just one socket for those head looks like white spot in this pic......

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Idea is not to tamper with them as too many folks fussed with them and messed them up. For a good cleaning you need to take that out though. With those or any count turn in to a gentle bottom so you can duplicate where it was. If all is lost bottom it (gently is the operative word) and back off about 2+1/2 turns to 3 should be about right. For DIY carb things there are a few special tools. Kit is cheap and should come with specs and a thing to measure float level. If real fussy you find spec of float(s) and weigh them as they can sink from soaking up gas or be heavier and the level of fuel in the bowl is critical for proper fuel mixture. By mid throttle or wide open the idle mix isn't being used at all and too many people think it is the whole adjustment - NOT.

Rebuilt units can be good but I've had tons that needed way too many adjustments that were off. For the vintage you would normally set the idle speed on any and if all is good that's about all. Late carbs were a pill and full of tamper proof crap which can be defeated for cleaning up small holes/ports for fuel flow. I did do a ton of carb work back when.

Catalytic converter: Generally I would suggest an OE one but with this vintage aftermarket should be fine and tons cheaper. Dunno - if welded into the front pipe you may need more tools to cut old one out with care so replacement can just be clamps like a muffler.

Can't say for everywhere but I can't think of a state in US legal to just use straight pipe if a vehicle came with a converter. A good one doesn't harm performance for this and most applications.

Not sure what reman engine will have with it. Ask so you know and if you are doing this at all replace old stuff like plug wires or tune-up things that don't come with it.

Truth is in decades of car stuff I've never used a reman engine - always fully checked out low mile complete used that was a perfect match - no games. All were 100% good with a history. This is just too old to get that lucky.

It was my training and my opinion which may not be everyone's but no reman engine will have the propensity to last as long as a good original. For those making Hot Rods and that - do what you want. For a practical driver leave as much original as possible with most things.

Save up. There's still lots to do with a replacement engine,

Tom

Response From irishmantx

Dear Tom,

OK, I'm still not sure where to go, I guess I'm asking amiss, I wanted some
recommendation on which place to find O.E.M. or 'original' style engines? I
am on a tighter than a lycra leather corset budget, and I wanted a place to
get a replacement engine. I really don't know the history of 'used' engines,
and often some want to sell bull and sell me a wore out engine 'worse' than
mine. :(

But if you don't know of any places to direct me to procure an engine that
is CAST IRON, most original, and or avoid places that sell undesirable engines.
That's OK. I'll ask the mechanic about to perform the 'surgery' to take care of
it. I believe the carb was replaced last year. It runs good, water pump and
alternator was replaced together last year. Kept full of 50/50.

Also what steering columns will fit this Granada? It's a fox foundation style
and I was 'informed' that most Mustang parts for 1982 would fit some parts
on the Granada. The rear end, drive shaft, and the dash top?

Just wanted to make sure I knew where I was going on replacing an engine.
It's a vital investment, and wanted to make sure I sounded like I know I was
asking for, instead of being baffled by bull. :P

Shalom,

irishmantx
76531


Response From Tom Greenleaf Top Rated Answer

Engines: Holy cow - the exacting machine work to make one new is tough. A redo requires more specs to be checked and corrected that if all on paper you couldn't lift the book.

New and engine is cast. then line bored for as close to perfect for long shafts like crank and cam in this. New the engines each have their own DNA. You can't just swap crank bearing caps as once machined that's the fit for that one only. Even the machine tools for new only make so many "bores" before they are out of spec new! Redoing all that with a core engine is an art to itself and some come out well and some don't. They make parts that needed to be re bored to fit a new size but still it's a trade unto itself.

Cylinder walls don't wear evenly. When a cylinder fires the pressure of piston to cylinder wall is on one side so over time it loses it's perfect measurement for the travel of the piston. This is intense to get it all right at once.

************

Parts that interchange: Salvage places have a ton of data for what was the same for what models and years. I don't think any of us have the software for all of that but a good clue on some. Mercury made the Monarch which was the same body and most mechanical parts - just trim and sheet metal style, shape to look a bit different. I just dunno what other Ford products used the same exact body and think this one was on it's own. I actually don't know this car that well. There were Fairmonts, Zephyrs that might share many parts to Granada. TMK and FORD used names randomly for a while around then it could be also the same platform as once a smaller LTD and Marquis - none with V8s TMK and were unit body cars not chassis. Even Lincoln made a Versailles (sp?) that was really a dressed up Granada. Any decent salvage yard should know what can interchange,

T

Response From irishmantx

Dear Tom,


With all of that said, worst case scenario, if and when there is a 'Warp Core Breach'
and a new warp engine is needed, chances are, it might be towed to a mechanic that
my folx trust, and would likely tell the mechanic to go find a new total long block that
will fit the car. My dad owns a 1994 Buick Century, and had to replace the engine since
a shade tree idiot did not change the oil and burned up the motor. The 'idiot' left town,
and stuck my folx a $3,500 front wheel drive engine. OR so the price for a front wheel
drive engine for a 1994 Buick Century. (NOT A NEW THREAD!)

Push comes to shove, its not 'my' car to make any decisions. It's the "mom and dad
back up utility car since dad don't want to drive his car as often as he wants" kind of
car. LOL. Tom thank you for the help, looks like I beg my mom and dad not to scrap
this cream puff, but get a new motor, after my obligated expected offer to help pay for
half of it. Full LONG BLOCK 3.3 Liter, 200ci, 6cylinder engine.

Since I drive it a lot, and did 'front' most of the repairs and parts, I hope to have some
say in keeping this car. It's a solid machine and scares a lot of the plastic car toy drivers,
when they see a "REAL" car on the road. :)

Shalom,
irishmantx
76531