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1999 Kia Sportage Radiator Coolant Hose Genuine

P311-0F6825F    New

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Genuine Radiator Coolant Hose
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
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1999 - Kia Sportage
Dayco
2002 Kia Spectra Radiator Coolant Hose Dayco

P311-4A7E3BC    New

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Dayco Radiator Coolant Hose
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2002 - Kia Spectra
MacKay
2001 Kia Rio Radiator Coolant Hose MacKay

P311-34A2E8D    New

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MacKay Radiator Coolant Hose
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2001 - Kia Rio
Gates
2002 Kia Sedona Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-442F006    New

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Gates Radiator Coolant Hose
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2002 - Kia Sedona
Gates
2002 Kia Sedona Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-42C8E44    New

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Gates Radiator Coolant Hose
  • Pipe to radiator.
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2002 - Kia Sedona
MacKay
2003 Kia Rio Radiator Coolant Hose MacKay

P311-1B5D5A7    New

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MacKay Radiator Coolant Hose
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2003 - Kia Rio
MacKay
2006 Kia Rio Radiator Coolant Hose MacKay

P311-14BD6AF    New

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MacKay Radiator Coolant Hose
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2006 - Kia Rio
Gates
2005 Kia Sportage Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

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2005 - Kia Sportage
Gates
2005 Kia Sportage Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

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2005 - Kia Sportage
MacKay
2004 Kia Spectra Radiator Coolant Hose MacKay

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2004 - Kia Spectra
Gates
2008 Kia Optima Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

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2008 - Kia Optima
Gates
2007 Kia Optima Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

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Gates Radiator Coolant Hose
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2007 - Kia Optima
Gates
2006 Kia Optima Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

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Gates Radiator Coolant Hose
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2006 - Kia Optima
Gates
2008 Kia Optima Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-4E4EAD8    New

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Brand: Gates
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2008 - Kia Optima
Gates
2006 Kia Optima Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-4E4EAD8    New

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Gates Radiator Coolant Hose
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2006 - Kia Optima
MacKay
2003 Kia Rio Radiator Coolant Hose MacKay

P311-133CB22    New

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MacKay Radiator Coolant Hose
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2003 - Kia Rio
Gates
2006 Kia Rio Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-1BC5164    New

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2006 - Kia Rio
Gates
2005 Kia Sportage Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-41B3ED8    New

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2005 - Kia Sportage
Gates
2004 Kia Spectra Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-5A794DE    New

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2004 - Kia Spectra
Gates
2008 Kia Optima Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-18AEA2E    New

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$23.38
Gates Radiator Coolant Hose
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2008 - Kia Optima

Latest Kia Repair and Radiator Hose Installation Advice

CarJunky AutoAdvice

High Pitch Squeal at start up -'04 Kia Optima 4cyl.

Showing 2 out of 4 Posts | Show 2 Hidden Posts
Question From Guest on High Pitch Squeal at start up -'04 Kia Optima 4cyl.

My '04 Kia Optima makes a high pitch squeal (perhaps from the power steering pump) at start up. The sound goes away after about 5-20 seconds and doesn't come back in normal driving. Any thoughts?

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Possibly just needs a new belt. Check that tension is proper. In that it goes away the belt itself is a likely problem,

T

Response From sjessen

Hello Tom,
Thanks for the reply.
The belt is new and the high pressure hose was just replaced as well.
The belt seems to be adjusted okay... Is it time to replace the pump? 60K
Steve

Response From Tom Greenleaf Top Rated Answer

Life expenctancy of the assessorie pulleys and pumps is chiefly unknown. By main pressure hose do you mean the upper radiator hose? Did it blow out or leak on you? If so the anti-freeze may have caused a stickyness or something on the belt new or not some will make noise.

Try sparying some WD-40 on the belt grooves before you start up and would expect the squeal. If it stays quiet I'm blaming the belt. They aren't all created equal and some are just noisy. Various aftermarket belts are sold as "quiet" belts - ask for that or an original.

If no change try taking if off and spin the pulleys and feel for something wrong. Might be tricky because you said it went away.

You should make certain fluids are properly filled and if you really suspect the PS pump I'd suggest changing its fluid first,

T

Temperture Sensor

Showing 2 out of 4 Posts | Show 2 Hidden Posts
Question From huffy47 on Temperture Sensor

I have a 1999 Kia Spotage with a 4 cyl engine has an automatic trans. My problem is when driving it the temperature gauge reads and then it drops down as if the car has been shut off and then it will read again. The temp is fine and I have looked at both the radiator and reservoir and they are at the proper level. My question what could cause this and does anyone no where the temp sensor is and how do I check it or should I just replace it if I can find it.Thanks for your time Huffy.

Response From Discretesignals Top Rated Answer

The temp gauge is controlled by the temperature sender on the engine. It could be a problem with the sender, wiring, or gauge itself. You'd have to monitor the voltage at the back of the instrument cluster to figure out which one of those things it could be.

You might want to start out by doing a visual inspection of the temperature sender and the connector that plugs into it. Pull the connector off and make sure the terminal is good and there is no contamination. Wiggle the wire and harness while someone is watching the gauge to see if it acts up.

Temperature sender is located in the housing the upper radiator hose connects too. It is the sender with the one yellow wire.

Response From Discretesignals

Glad to see you got it resolved. Thanks for the follow up. Locking due to problem being solved. Can be reopened upon request.

Response From huffy47

Just wanted to thank Discretesignals for his help found the sensor with no problem the contacts were clean so I replace the sensor and that solved the problem. Once again thanks for the help and giving of you timr Huffy

kia sedona rear heater

Showing 3 out of 18 Posts | Show 15 Hidden Posts
Question From Guest on kia sedona rear heater

i just had the rear lines replaced do to them rotting out, now the rear heater does not work i have had it back two the shop they told me i had an air blockage, they told me it was fixed but nope. i have tried to fix it myself twice, both times by letting the van run with the rad cap off, after a while a do have heat ibn the back but when i replace the rad cap it starts to blow cold again, any thoghjts on this?
Thanks in advance

Response From Guest

How old is your Kia van? We just had to have our lines replaced because they rotted out. Our van is a 2002. I am wondering if this is a common problem. Kia told us no but the dealership had the parts in stock to fix it. NOt something they should typically stock if it is not a common problem.

Response From Guest

I had the same problem the dealer wants to charge me 405.00 to replace and their is a tech doc out there for dealers on this issue

Response From Guest

hi have read the above coments and just replaced my heater pipes so i thought i would raise the front and yes its cleared the air out of the system no problem, i will also concour that the pipes are a common fault and the hand break linkage which i replaced for £14 pounds due to no grease on it at service. this i find is a common fault at services yes having an eye for detail. i find a smaller garage now more reliable than the dealer

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Martin - old thread and still valid issues. Some of this could be prevented by asking for items to be greases like cables and the corrosion-likely spots on fittings, lines of all kinds. Include hood latch the the mechanisms, trunk (boot) door lock and hinges all thru the vehicle.

Some of that is going to be itemized as a routine and once a year is enough for some things. There's a lot to be said for local shops and the personal touches for some common sense maintenance.

I really like aerosol grease, real oil squirt cans and WD-40 by brand (others may be just as good) for areas that might get on paint or cake up too much grease but it's less likely to make permanent damage, grease up clothing on latches etc.

The purging problems vary one vehicle to another. There is now a machine that can apply vacuum to an entire cooling system which I don't own and most won't but speeds up this process for shops as so many are a pill and once vacuum achieved you switch to add just coolant back which will find more hiding places that just gravity. Cooling systems are NOT meant to be under a full vacuum as rubber hoses would collapse in most so it would just be a slight vacuum and advantage. I think the day will come those will be more affordable and or available for rent,

T

Response From Guest

It's a very common problem also with the ac line under the van as well, i am in the mist of have a bleeder valve installed in the lines to get rid of this air in the system as well.

Response From Guest

I just had the problem with my 2004 Kia van. After filling the system, the rear heater core / pipe assemblies can be bled of air by temporarily clamping off either FRONT heater core connection while raising the engine speed to approximately 2500 RPM for about one minute.

Response From Guest

.
Just a thought here..
Is there anywhere in the cooling system with a bleeder to vent out air after the system has been opened?
I don't know Kia's at all but many GM vehicles have this available and as the car heats up the bleeder can be cracked open with a screwdriver and allow trapped air to vent out thus relieving the system of air leaving only coolant as intended. The bleeder is often near where the thermostat is.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Guest mentioned it was a 2002,

T

Response From Guest

sorry it's a 2002 v6 3.5 litre engine

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Probably does have air in it but that should be the shop's problem to purge out. I might hoist up the front pretty high and run it so air purges to the front and perhaps pinch off the front heater a bit to allow more flow thru the rear core??

T

Response From Guest

I took this van back to the dealer today to try to get rid of the air, only to have them tell me after 20 mins that they think my head gasket is gone, thats why i have air in my system. the is no antifreeze in the oil and no smoke coming out of the tail pipe, temp on van runs right were it always has. Can they be right? i don't feel like spending 1200 dollars (on a i think thats the problem) Man i hate Dealers.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Don't blame "dealers" just because they are but rather the way any shop operates on any problem and the amount of time allowed to really get a job done or even diagnosed. 20 minutes is hardly enough time to be reasonably sure about a head gasket with minimal evidence that you pointed out.

A head gasket is sealing everything from everything else and COULD leak in any direction between anything it's sealing.

For this I would diag with a pressure test, fill and purge cooling system, run a while and if air shows up in cooling system repeatedly then the diagnosis is by preponderance (sp?) of evidence.

With your symptoms and the lack of classic head gasket failures I would check to see if the cooling system built up pressure from ZERO faster than just heat expansion of coolant by either a pressure tester or with lots of experience just feeling an upper radiator hose can tell this.

You said you had it behaving when running without pressure and that's a clue! The diagnosis shouldn't be taken so lightly. It's a lot of money and there's room for being wrong with the best of testing as sometimes it can be a flaw or problem with head or block itself and not just the gasket.

Where do you want to go with this?

T

Response From Guest

Thanks for the reply Tom, i ahve it going in for a pressure test to be sure. do you have ant tricks to really make sure the air is out of the rear heater core, if i was sure there was no air back there i feel a little bit better about putting out another thousand dollars on this van Thanks in advance.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Obviously this one is a pest. I might separate the rear heater and bleed out just the front and engine and at least get this thing stable ruling out any head gasket causing this. At your first post you indicated this all started with just replacing the rear hoses so I don't know why it's all of a sudden a head gasket in the picture at all.

I also don't really know why it worked for you with the cap off.

Ok: With this much fuss I'd try to bleed out the back with the two hoses off and just pour coolant thru till it came out the return hose - plug that off sealed for hook up back to the system. So if front can be ok and back now known it would be fast work to hook it all up without letting more air in or just minimal.

For a tough one I might jack up the vehicle as said before with the radiator cap as high up as reasonable to just let air rise to the top. It's only going to purge out air on its own when the thermostat is open. That can be done by warming up the whole engine to operating temp and shut if off and wait like 2-3 minutes. Heat should rise and unseen the thermostat is likely wide open with the hot coolant rising at it when waterpump is not circulating the whole mix. That's a great moment to start it up and the air about has to burp out to rad and to recovery tank.

That and when close to fully purged just driving on a windy road shifting the gravity on the vehicle back and forth can persuade some bubbles to come out of hiding.

It can take as long for a shop to get this right as it did to replace a hose(s) or something and they don't like spending the time on it. I simply up and left two shops I worked at because they didn't like me spending time at the end of a job to really test it out. Who the heck wins if a ticked off customer is back the next day?? They look bad, tech looks bad as you know. I had to just up and open up for myself and do things my way. There is equipment to speed this up that I've never owned and would hope a dealership would have it as lots of vehicles are fussy like this.

I suggest talking to the tech that will handle this for you not just the white coat at the desk. This shouldn't be that big of a deal!

T

Response From Tom Greenleaf Top Rated Answer

This below was posted to help with understanding the problems encountered with air in the cooling system. It migh be of interest to take peek. We are working on writing up something like this for re-use as it takes a lot of work to write these one at a time,
T


Ok: Let me give this a shot at explaining. I spent the day thinking of how I could write something about this that could easily explain this problem and the solutions so it could be referred to for many as this is a common problem. There are some tricks for exact makes and models but basically the same thing.

* Think of the cooling system as two areas - engine side and radiator side. About always a thermostat is at the highest point between them and shuts when cold and gradually opens when it approaches the set temp then fully open to circulate the coolant to radiator and return the cooled, coolant to the engine.

* The T-stat is capable of being somewhat air tight when cold/closed. When coolant is drained or lowered on purpose or from a leak it will lower the level in the engine side and the radiator side. When filled again at the radiator side the coolant fills what it can but can't push the air on top of remaining coolant in engine back thru the T-stat so it's locked in there till the thermostat opens and the air (naturally at the top) goes out to radiator, liquid coolant should return thru the lower radiator hose to the engine and you would notice the drop in coolant level at the radiator - a good time to fill again BUT.......... vehicles without a radiator cap on the radiator itself just don't manage to get that air out to where you would fill it at the pressure recovery tank so you have to be assertive with them.

!! I'm winging it here so bear with me. The idea is getting the air out of the locked engine side to where you can replace it with coolant of the side you are supposed to be able to add directly to, to replace air with coolant. By itelf it would purge air out to recovery and return just liquid... note the tank has a little hose at the bottom that allows coolant flow to and from the radiator. Just that smaller hose is slow to accomplish this without intervention when system has been drained.

It's hard with these to just let the engine warm up enough to have the T-stat open and stay there long enough to on the difficult ones you would let air out of the engine side before the thermostat with a bleeder if equipped or taking a hose off on that side as high up as possible and fill it there and re-attach. When you have most air out just normal driving around will get any remaining insignificant air out to that recovery tank a little at a time over the cycles of warm and cold - expansion/contraction of the coolant.

Warning: When dealing with a cooling system don't open up when under pressure. You can feel that there is pressure fairly easily at an upper radiator hose - use a rag and don't get burned. Water/coolant is a liquid at temps below 212F (rough ave) and a vapor above that with no pressure on it. Water/coolant will remain a liquid at about 3 extra degrees per lb of pressure. If that pressure is released it can and will flash to a vapor and can cause serious injury! Apply common sense folks.

Now a snag with assorted ways the heater operates. When filling and testing the heater should be on full temp request and low fan. Feel for the heat. That proves that liquid coolant is there as even hot air going thru a heater core won't exhange much heat. Some heaters have a constant flow of coolant and adjust the temp desired by controlling flow of the coolant itself or use a diverter door to blend heated and ambient air temp to deliver disired air temp to cabin. This will vary in assorted vehicles.
NOTE: Some vehicles use the heater/core - coolant flow as part of the by-pass system which allows the water pump to maintain even temps inside the engine's coolant. This is necessary so that the thermostat gets the real overall engine temp or it would fluctuate and cause problems of its own.

Note again: This is with the components of the cooling system all in good shape and able to work properly. Debris in cooling system, leaks, head gasket problems, or defects of assorted kinds can and will complicate the success of purging air out of a cooling system.


Ask away as needed. I'll try or others please jump in and edit this as needed. This is a common problem. Techs and DIYers alike have to deal with this frequently,

Hope that helped for now..........

Tom Greenleaf, 2-3-2008

Response From Guest

I'll keep you posted Thanks Tom.

Response From Guest

Thanks for the replay Tom, i am going to take it back to the dealer 1 more time, if they can t get it i will try your suggestion myself. I have no faith in this Kia dealer the van is not a bad veichle but the service is????????????????. Thanks again.

2006 kia rio oil in the radiator

Showing 2 out of 11 Posts | Show 9 Hidden Posts
Question From bandit12 on 2006 kia rio oil in the radiator

I have a 2006 Kia Rio and had a Auto repair shop replace the head gasket and now he is saying their is oil in the radiator and their was no water in the oil when the car was check before I need help to because people are telling me that my daughter cars has a cracked block but their was water in the oil before the auto shop touched.

Response From bandit12

My daughter sertenaie belt broke and then the car started getting hot and my daughters friends said pull over and when the pulled over the seen smoke and they let the car cool off before they change the oil and their was no water in the oil and the put water in the car and it came out the bottom of the car and they check the dip stick again and their was not any water in the oil and the auto shop man told me the same thing.

Response From Discretesignals

Was this overheated?

You would be seeing coolant in the oil if there was a cracked block.

Response From Discretesignals

Your posts are confusing.

If they were filling the radiator up with water and it was pouring out the bottom that doesn't sound like something a head gasket would do. Did they pressure test the coolant system and find any leaks?

Response From Discretesignals Top Rated Answer

If the belt that drives the water pump broke, the engine would overheat while running. If she drove it overheating or didn't know it was overheating until it was too late, it could warp the cylinder head and blow the gasket.

When that happens either the engine will burn coolant (white smoke), coolant gets into the oil drain back ports and ends up in the crankcase, and/or engine oil ends up in the coolant system because there is pressurized oil that feeds the camshafts on the top of the cylinder head.

If it cracks a cylinder wall, you'll end up with combustion gasses in the coolant system, coolant in the oil, and/or the cylinder fills up with coolant.

If the head cracks, you could end up with coolant in the crankcase and if it cracks in the combustion chamber, you'll have coolant in the cylinder.

There is no telling what kind of damage is done until it is torn apart and inspected. When they did the headgasket they should have sent the head out for inspection and resurfacing.

Cracks in the block and cylinder walls are a little harder to find.

The coolant pouring out the bottom of the vehicle as your pouring it in usually means you have an external engine leak or the radiator/hoses let go.

There are no guarantees when it comes to repairing an overheated an engine. Overheating damages rotating and sliding components in the engine, so there is no telling what is going to happen or how the engine runs and sounds until you repair the leaks.

As for oil being in the coolant, it could be still having camshaft feed oil leaking in the coolant system or maybe even a broken transmission cooler inside the radiator.

Your mechanic should be able to figure it out if he/she is competent enough. If not, I suggest you get a second opinion at other shop.

Response From bandit12

Thank You for you help sorry I was eating dinner and I just did not understand when my daughter told me that the water was coming out from the bottom of the car and the water was clear and know he said that their is oil in the water and i am taking it to another shop tomorrow.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Seems like "another" shop is in order and the job went wrong so far?

T

Response From bandit12

I am sorry I am just upset because the auto shop told me that the thermostat need to be changed because it was not any good and my daughter said they did not see any oil in the water when it came out the bottom and I am her mother say I am trying to get help and not get ripped off.

Response From bandit12

No he did not coolant at all for leaks

Response From bandit12

no he did not tell me if he checked that at all

Response From bandit12

My daughter said that her friend and the tow truck driver check the oil dip stick and their was in water in the oil at all the guy at the auto shop did not say she had a crack block just the head gasket needed to be replace and he replaced the head gasket and it is making a tapping noise it did my before my daughter said.

car runs hot while idling

Showing 2 out of 5 Posts | Show 3 Hidden Posts
Question From railgal on car runs hot while idling

I have a 2004 Kia Optima that I just paid off . However, as with every time I pay off a car something goes wrong.
My can started running warm while sitting and idling at a drive thru - normally it runs and stays right below the 1/2 way mark. It was up right where the red begins. I turned on my heat and it soon began to drop. It has done this twice but doesn't run hot going down the road. My coolant was a little low but now it's full and still doing it. What can it be? I noticed that there are 2 fans both run when the AC is on and when the AC is off only 1 kicks on when it gets a certain temperature. However. I guess that is neither here nor there since my AC was running when my car ran hot so both fans were running at that time. Does anyone know what this could be?
I appreciate any tips out there - I'm a single mom on a limited resources and don't want to get taken advantage of with several uneeded repairs.

Thanks!!

Response From Tom Greenleaf

How low was the coolant and has that ever been low before?

At the moment it seems as the radiator is not adequate to cool the engine by itself. Leaves, other debris, in need of cooling system flush and pressure check cooling system for now. Do NOT let it overheat if at all possible,

T

Response From railgal

Thanks Tom. Well, I filled up the resevoir. I had a friend check it out and he put 1/2 gallon directly in the radiator on Sunday. It hasn't done it since but I also have not sat anywhere idling.... We'll see. I don't understand how it was so low - I haven't seen a leak. Well - I'm going to watch it and if I see it getting warm again I'll have a flush done.
Thanks for the help!!
Take care!

Response From Tom Greenleaf Top Rated Answer

Yes - watch this daily or more! Cars do not normally consume coolant so there's a leak somewhere - perhaps a head gasket that you didn't want me to say if you don't see evidence

Carry some pre-mixed coolant with you and learn how to add AND avoid getting burned. Opening a radiator when warm or hot can explode at you - use all caution! Feel (can be hot too) upper radiator hose as an indicator of how much pressure is in there before checking at the pressure cap. Hose may be too hot so use a towel or glove OR wait till it's totally cooled off if in doubt.

Nobody likes an expense coming and I suspect one is for this. Better to catch it early as with most things,

T

Response From RadiatorsRus

Your cooling system is starting to become plugged try and flush outside of radiator to remove debris. If that doesn't work i would check on repair or replacemant costs