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MacKay
2007 Hyundai Santa Fe Radiator Coolant Hose MacKay

P311-35662CF    New

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MacKay Radiator Coolant Hose
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2007 - Hyundai Santa Fe
MacKay
2008 Hyundai Santa Fe Radiator Coolant Hose MacKay

P311-2554305    New

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2008 - Hyundai Santa Fe
Genuine
2003 Hyundai Tiburon Radiator Coolant Hose Genuine

P311-2FD36D4    New

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Genuine Radiator Coolant Hose
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Upper
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2003 - Hyundai Tiburon
Genuine
2003 Hyundai Tiburon Radiator Coolant Hose Genuine

P311-4ADF153    New

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$15.16
Genuine Radiator Coolant Hose
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  • Upper
Brand: Genuine
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2003 - Hyundai Tiburon
Genuine
2001 Hyundai Elantra Radiator Coolant Hose Genuine

P311-57993C5    New

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$18.67
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2001 - Hyundai Elantra
Gates
2005 Hyundai Tucson Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-418880E    New

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  • Upper
Brand: Gates
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2005 - Hyundai Tucson
Gates
2005 Hyundai Tucson Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-0314B3F    New

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2005 - Hyundai Tucson
MacKay
2001 Hyundai Accent Radiator Coolant Hose MacKay

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2001 - Hyundai Accent
MacKay
2003 Hyundai Accent Radiator Coolant Hose MacKay

P311-5EA6A87    New

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MacKay Radiator Coolant Hose
  • Production: -05/25/2003
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2003 - Hyundai Accent
MacKay
2004 Hyundai Accent Radiator Coolant Hose MacKay

P311-26229B5    New

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2004 - Hyundai Accent
MacKay
2003 Hyundai Accent Radiator Coolant Hose MacKay

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MacKay Radiator Coolant Hose
  • Production: 05/26/2003-
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2003 - Hyundai Accent
Genuine
2001 Hyundai Santa Fe Radiator Coolant Hose Genuine

P311-38FC0EB    New

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Genuine Radiator Coolant Hose
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2001 - Hyundai Santa Fe
MacKay
2001 Hyundai Santa Fe Radiator Coolant Hose MacKay

P311-4D270EB    New

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MacKay Radiator Coolant Hose
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2001 - Hyundai Santa Fe
Genuine
1996 Hyundai Elantra Radiator Coolant Hose Genuine

P311-5E2CB0A    New

Qty:
$14.66
Genuine Radiator Coolant Hose
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  • Upper
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1996 - Hyundai Elantra
MacKay
1989 Hyundai Sonata Radiator Coolant Hose MacKay

P311-5AF7AAC    New

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$12.62
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1989 - Hyundai Sonata
Dayco
2007 Hyundai Santa Fe Radiator Coolant Hose Dayco

P311-40CB60D    New

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Dayco Radiator Coolant Hose
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2007 - Hyundai Santa Fe
Gates
2003 Hyundai Tiburon Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-49F1DAF    New

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Gates Radiator Coolant Hose
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Brand: Gates
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2003 - Hyundai Tiburon
Gates
2003 Hyundai Tiburon Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-07B984C    New

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2003 - Hyundai Tiburon
Genuine
2001 Hyundai Elantra Radiator Coolant Hose Genuine

P311-50D58CD    New

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$27.37
Genuine Radiator Coolant Hose
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  • Lower
Brand: Genuine
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2001 - Hyundai Elantra
Genuine
2001 Hyundai Elantra Radiator Coolant Hose Genuine

P311-2113AB8    New

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$23.22
Genuine Radiator Coolant Hose
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Lower
Brand: Genuine
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2001 - Hyundai Elantra

Latest Hyundai Repair and Radiator Hose Installation Advice

CarJunky AutoAdvice

Car repair

Showing 2 out of 4 Posts | Show 2 Hidden Posts
Question From Guest on Car repair

I have a 2001 Hyundai Sonita that needs to have the coolent temperature sensor replaced. Can you tell me the location of the sensor?

Response From Tom Greenleaf Top Rated Answer

Have to admit I don't know Hyundais but it should be near the engine's thermostat which should be at the engine side of the upper radiator hose.

Why do you think you need this? T

Response From Guest

Tom,

Thank you for the information. To answer your question, after the check engine light came on I went to my local AutoZone and they used a scanner to plug in and get the code. The scanner said the car needed the coolent temoerature sensor replaced.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

I would buy that part and replace it. If tough to locate just match up the new one to the old one that looks the same. You problably should lower coolant perhaps a half gallon as the sensors do touch anti-freeze. Recheck that it is full again a couple times as they can be tricky to get air pockets out. Suggest NOT using straight anti-freeze as it doesn't have the heat transfer power of the 50/50 mix. Pay attention to that, T

2000 Hyundai Accent High Temperature...

Showing 3 out of 8 Posts | Show 5 Hidden Posts
Question From Coda on 2000 Hyundai Accent High Temperature...

I have a 2000 Hyundai Accent with 127,000 miles on it. Today, while driving on the highway (in traffic), I noticed that the temperature gauge started climbing. I pulled off to the side of the road, and let it cool down. Once I got going again, the gauge started climbing again. I then turned the heater on full blast, and the temperature stayed in the mid-rage area. I'm not sure what the problem is.

I attempted to test the thermostat my squeezing the upper hose at temperature. Once the fans kicked on, I gave it a squeeze, and was able to squeeze it all the way down. However, I then felt the lower hose, and it felt cool.

The oil looks normal (no milky shade), and it has plenty of coolant. What would cause the engine to heat up that high, and then regulate it by keeping the heater on full?

Response From Tom Greenleaf

OK - do use all care touching a hose especially for a hot engine. It's not really informative by pressure which will change with fans that come on and off.


It may just be low on coolant and then the question is why. You said it was full but bet that's just a recovery tank not really telling of how much is in the engine which should always be totally full and free of vapor or air. Many vehicles don't give you direct access to check radiator's themselves so must still know. If your coolant recovery bottle has the pressure cap it might not be allowing coolant back to radiator and staying the same level hot or cold a sign it has a problem.


Running heater should take away some heat. Know that if you request full heat and get plain air not heated does suggest you are either low on coolant in engine or overheating and boiling which oddly doesn't transfer heat to interior despite showing a hot engine.


1st step is know for sure it's truly full and then if not why. If full and running warmer than usual then at the age wonder if radiator is still capable and other things to check. You did say fan(s) come on so I'll rule that out for now,


T

Response From Coda

The coolant level is actually well above the high mark of the reservoir tank. Perhaps it is the radiator cap?

Response From Tom Greenleaf

If the only cap is on that recovery tank the cap is the pressure cap so YES it can let coolant out just normally from expansion and NOT let it back in when it cools so if cap or hose to it can allow air back when system is cooling down (shrinking volume) that would make it low.


Test if that exact set up when totally cold squeeze that upper hose and look for turbulence in the recovery tank - back and forth no bubbles should show in tank,


T

Response From Coda

Which hose am I squeezing to test it? The upper radiator hose? or the hose from the cap to the reservoir?

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Upper hose is good. Both hands if needed. Idea is you are making pressure without the heat just seeing it move to the tank and when you let go hose should draw back liquid after blowing out some liquid -- that's when you can see the turbulence in reservoir.


If it doesn't work or prove anything we move on to another way. Anything to do with overheating is VERY important to know why fast for an easy fix or prevent a bad something from being worse, that's all for the first step here,


T

Response From Coda Top Rated Answer

Ok. I did the squeeze test, but really didn't see much change. I noticed that there were some cracks on the upper gasket on the radiator cap, and thought that may be it. However, the cracks were very small, and did not even extend to the outside of the seal. This should be replaced, and will...after the next payday.

I then figured it had to be the thermostat. I went a picked one up, and put it in. After 30 mins of driving, the temperature stayed level...right where it should be. I didn't do any highway driving, but I pushed it up to about 65 a few times, and nothing seemed to changed. I also noticed that, after checking when I got back, the lower radiator hose was warm to the touch, where as earlier, it was cold. I am hoping I got it figured out...

Response From Tom Greenleaf

New cap is called for as it's important. Seems the thermostat has done the trick if I read this properly? Actually for eons do not find many thermostats the cause except for some that will stick OPEN and run cold more than the other way.


Hoses and temps: Upper (most anything made) comes out top of engine from thermostats. Easy - heat rises anyway so that where you would want it. It's supposed to stay shut and allow water pump to mix coolant inside engine to be all the same temp as it runs and warms up and during demands while running. It opens a little when close to it's rated temp and really not earlier so upper hose should stay pretty cold to the touch away from the engine towards radiator you can hold there when starting cold and allow it to warm up and feel the heat come to the top of radiator. Same deal, heat rises, cool falls so it passes the coolant along thru and it's supposed to cool for return from lower hose to engine again and again as needed.


If lower hose was returning coolant too hot (need real temp readings for each situation when troubles are at hand) it wouldn't cool engine and show higher temps up to overheating. Either radiator is not capable (clogged) coolant itself wrong - too strong can be a problem - fans didn't come on in time and assorted whacked reasons like an obstruction blocking air flow.


What you want to avoid is not knowing if air is confusing the show. Vapor is a better word because it can easily be combustion gasses from the engine usually from head gasket failures. With those, pressure felt in upper hose would be fast from a cold start and even show bubbles in recovery tanks. That's something you don't want but do need to know if happening as the fix would be easier if not allowed to wildly overheat.


Air and vapor (either) don't cool well yet hoses can be hot.


Don't do this but it gives you the idea as an example: Plain hot water out of an average home sink will be too hot to touch at about 115 to 120F or so. Say what you might think? But you can put your hands in an oven for a second cooking something at over 300F of air and not get burnt. Point is air has little ability to transfer heat vs a liquid.


Cars have to make the most out of limited space so radiators are usually flowing side to side and down not just top to bottom or some will vary the path of flow, use lighter metals and smaller passages so if clogging quickly don't transfer heat enough and the usual fix is a new one, flush out systems.


The game of not putting the pressure cap on a radiator is both it saves a buck per car and no room sometimes but makes filling and checking a real pest to a real problem. I beat on it all the time that folks MUST know systems are full and rely on just the recovery tanks and it's not reliable for all but systems that don't have any problems you can glance and know it's ok but with a problem it doesn't mean much right away.


With that comes the use of a low coolant warning sensor for some vehicles and with age I personally don't want to only rely on a sensor for engine fluid levels only but know for real but we are stuck with it on some. Trouble is it's so costly to overheat and warnings on dash from sensors for all this junk is too late IMO for most.


So do get the new cap and do check like a hawk gauges and clues that it's really solved for some time on this to really know it's fixed. Dang air in cooling systems is still possible and should slowly cycle/purge out last little amounts by itself,


T

2002 Hyundai Elantra GLS - replacing radiator fan

Showing 2 out of 4 Posts | Show 2 Hidden Posts
Question From strat440 on 2002 Hyundai Elantra GLS - replacing radiator fan

Hi,

The left of two radiator fans on my 2002 Hyundai Elantra GLS has been making a grinding/clicking noise as it turns, and after I turn the car off, you can really hear it turning with that sound, as if it is hitting something or having its spin somehow impeded (it also stops spinning much sooner than the other fan, which glides to a stop eventually). I figured I would try replacing the radiator fan with a new one if it's not too difficult a job. My question is, is removing a radiator fan as simple as taking the bolts out and unplugging the power connector, or do I need to remove the entire radiator (or other parts of the radiator) to get at it? It seems to me like a pretty simple job, but I don't want to start it only to realize that I have committed to a much bigger repair job.

The details of the car are:
2002
Hyundai
Elantra GLS
2.0L Engine
65,000 miles

Thanks!

Ted

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Just hunted down step by step and it was wrong

Your eyes for now. Take a real good look. whole assembly or perhaps just the motors. It might require removing radiator, might come up and out, or down and out.

Any chance this has string or something messing it up? Are blades broken? debris in there?

Know this:Some fans use counter rotate (counter clockwise to remove) nuts to hold them on. Don't break it if you decide to take this on - check new one if just motor only job,

T

Response From strat440 Top Rated Answer

You were right -- I took a closer look and realized that a rubber hose is coming into contact with the back of the fan blades, getting worn away in the process! Any idea what the hose might be? It is wrapped in foam-like insulation, and the fan blades have worn it down to the point where a few metal lines are showing through. It goes down below the radiator and attaches to a thinner metal tube....and it starts near the engine where it connects to another thin metal tube.

With my limited automotive knowledge, I'm guessing that the wire reinforcement and insulation mean that it is a coolant hose running from somewhere between the engine to somewhere before the water pump. It's not the radiator hose, so that would mean it is part of the system that bypasses the radiator when the thermostat is closed. Is that right or way off base?

Thanks!

Response From Tom Greenleaf

strat: Web is cool as we know but not a replacement yet for being there looking. Have to trust your eyes. Basics - engine's thermostat is on engine and allows coolant to flow to radiator to return cooler thru a lower hose - both larger hose. If hoses or motor mounts allow too much motion of engine/trans assemblies or if wiring not held in place there's a problem with that.

If fan(s) can hit something, then something is wrong. Checking mounts with a helper and hood open to observe motion and brake stand (meaning hold brakes hard and do forward and reverse but not move) can show excessive movement. Observer should stand on side of car NOT in front.

Wiring should be fixed away from harm and fasteners could have broken. Your eyes to see but know that fan(s) should not be touching anything,

T

Is the water pump bad?

Showing 2 out of 3 Posts | Show 1 Hidden Posts
Question From B52-Cyclone on Is the water pump bad?

Hello all
I am driving a 2006 Hyundai Elantra GLS with an automatic transmission
yesterday I just replaced the radiator, thermostat and gasket, as well as the upper and lower hoses and clamps.
strangely enough however, I only have heat if I drive the car or I have been driving for awhile (like down the highway) even when idling at operating temps

I don't see any leaks.
The only thing that seems to stick out is the lack of heat.
I popped the cover off again and checked the fluid levels/released air and topped off the reservoir

The top radiator hose is hot but the bottom is cold and almost seems to be lacking pressure, or had a lot less pressure than the top.

Could this be the water pump??? The is no whining noise or leaking. Is the a way to treat the water b pump without having to unbury the thermostat and take it out

Looking forward to your replies

Response From Discretesignals Top Rated Answer

What was the condition of the coolant before your repairs? Did it have heat before you did your repairs? Are the heater core inlet and outlet hoses hot when the engine is at operating temperature?

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Huh? How can you have less pressure in one hose than another unless wildly revving it up they are all the same. Of course it's cooler on the bottom - that's what a radiator does is cool hot coolant.


Add to questions by DS above: You may not be really full of coolant at all. Feel inlet and outlet hose of heater for the same temp or real close hot to touch - careful. Liquid coolant will not lose that much heat in a heater just some but if air in it would be cold coming out strongly suggests either clogged or air/vapor in system for any reason,


T

2002 Hyundai Elantra Bad Head Gasket

Showing 6 out of 11 Posts | Show 5 Hidden Posts
Question From thedudeabides on 2002 Hyundai Elantra Bad Head Gasket

2002 Hyundai Elantra
2 liter engine
108,000 miles

A little history. I've owned this car since 2002. Around 2007 I was driving home late at night and didn't notice my car was overheating until I saw smoke from the engine. By that time it was too late. Warped head gasket, all places recommended a new motor. So it was replaced.

About a year ago I noticed the temperature of the engine would creep up occasionally to about 3/4 of the way up, then go back down.

I spent the next year trying to get the issue sorted, and ended up replacing the radiator and water pump a few months ago, thinking it was fixed.

Literally two days before I move to NYC from Seattle, the check engine light comes on. Cylinder 1 misfire, after diagnostic I'm told I have yet another bad head gasket.

At this point a) could not afford the repair b)didn't have time anyway I was schedule to leave in a couple days and they couldn't have gotten it done in time

So I took a gamble and drove across the country with a bad head gasket. The car luckily got me to NYC, the only issue I had was springing a leak in the upper radiator hose in Wyoming, once it was fixed I was on my way. And surprisingly the check engine light turned off about 1/2 way across the country.

Since I've been in NYC, in the last week the temperature would creep a bit and then go back down. And then the other day it started smoking and I had it towed to a mechanic. Another leak in the upper radiator hose and he said the thermostat needed to be replaced.

The car was running again at least but today it was creeping up too high and staying at 3/4 up and not going back down. Its looking like I've gone as far as I can go with this car without dropping some more serious cash on it.

The head gasket job is definitely worth more than the car at this point.

My question: Even if that's the case, would it be so ridiculous at this point to go ahead with the repair? If the job costs me $1500-$2000 and I have a reliable car again, it seems to me that would still be cheaper than buying another car.

Is it possible to get a reliable used car for under $2000?

I know I'm in NYC and most would assume I don't need a car but I still do. I live in Brooklyn and work in Long Island, Queens, Connecticut...all over.

Given this info, do you think the head gasket job would solve my issues?

Thanks in advance.

Response From thedudeabides

Well after I got it back the second time it seems to be running fine now. It seems he adjusted the thermostat to release coolant sooner or something, I dunno. Not a car guy myself as you can tell. And I don't know if this is a band-aid fix or addressing the real issue but either way I really don't want to have to drop a bunch of money on my car right now.

And now my heat works when I'm idling, which hasn't been the case in years.

Anyway, thanks for the info.

Response From Mycar Isjunk

Wouldn't a simple compression test reveal a bad head gasket?

Response From Hammer Time

No, not usually. There is usually some compression loss but not usually enough for a confirmation. The loss could be due to other reasons also.

Response From Hammer Time Top Rated Answer

You need to find better repair shops. There is no such thing as "adjusting a thermostat" and installing a lower temp stat or even worse, removing it would be a big no,no. The engine requires a minimum temperature.

Response From thedudeabides

Well I think he might have installed a lower temperature thermostat. Adjusting it was just my vague recollection him telling me about something I don't understand. I'm sure you're right either way however. Could I see if he just pulled it out altogether by popping the hood?

Response From Hammer Time

No, you won't be able to see it. Either ways, it's the wrong thing to do.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

An IR thermometer could be telling without taking t-stat out and looking and if no thermostat it's big trouble as HT has said,

T

Response From thedudeabides

Hammer Time,

Thanks for your response. I found the diagnostic notes here, maybe this will shed some light onto the situation. I didn't mention that I omitted the opinion of the blown head gasket to the guy working on my car now to see what he says. After bringing my car back to him, he said that's what he suspects given what I told him. I also forgot to mention that I was leaking coolant during the past year and would periodically have to pull over and re fill.

Today when I did that as soon as I cracked open the radiator cap the coolant came shooting out with a bunch of steam.

Here's what the guys in Seattle said:

"Coolant System Diagnostics.

Includes verifying proper coolant level, pressurizing coolant system to check for coolant leaks, test radiator for cold spots (blockage), testing coolant for quality and freezing point, verify proper thermostat and radiator cap operation, check water pump belt tension (when accessible) and verifying proper coolant fan/fan clutch operation.

Vehicle did not overheat, stayed just below 1/2 on temperature gauge, based on customers description, sustpect possible heade gasket issue. Checked coolant and oil levels and condition. Coolant slightly low (1 pt) wet on right inner fender area around over flow. Oil is dirty and has some water droplets on dip stick. Topped off coolant, started vehicle with pressure tester on - light steam from exhaust and builds pressure failry rapidly. Turn vehicle off and removed pressure tester and performed block test. Block test and fluid turned yellow pretty quickly and tube filled also with exhaust smoke. Scanned computer and confirmed code :P0301 = Cylinder misfire detected.
Bad head gasket and possible cracked head. Ignition wires are original as well.
Recommend complete head gasket job, pull head send out for pressure test and re surface, recommend timing belt and ignition system tune up at the same time."

Response From Hammer Time

I really question the initial diagnosis of a blown head gasket. I find it very hard to believe that it would drive across the country with a blown gasket. I think I would get a second opinion now. If you do ultimately confirm it, I think it would be worth fixing and I wouldn't expect it to cost over $1200, assuming the rest of the car is in decent enough shape. Make sure the transmission is still healthy before making that investment.

Response From Hammer Time

There is something about those notes and your driving experience that just don't jive. I've done many chemical tests for blown head gaskets and to say they are easy to verify a blown head gasket would be a stretch. Everything you are saying about the way the car drives would indicate a very small leak if any at all and to say that the fluid test turned yellow quickly is very hard for me to believe. I think I would want a better form of verification than that. That is the only actual test that all this is being based on. Everyone else is basing things on symptoms that you describe and that isn't reliable at all. The only reliable ways to confirm a blown head gasket is with either using and exhaust analyzer to sniff HC at the radiator or to actually see coolant in a cylinder after a long pressure test. Pressurizing the cylinders with air pressure and looking for bubbles in the radiator with the engine off would be another reliable method.