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MacKay
2000 Honda S2000 Radiator Coolant Hose MacKay

P311-16B1545    W0133-1621601  New

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MacKay Radiator Coolant Hose
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2000 - Honda S2000
Gates
2003 Honda Pilot Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-57D81A7    W0133-1709727  New

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$14.81
Gates Radiator Coolant Hose
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Brand: Gates
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2003 - Honda Pilot
Gates
1988 Honda Accord Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-23BAA1D    W0133-1634685  New

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$15.39
Gates Radiator Coolant Hose
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1988 - Honda Accord
Gates
1986 Honda Accord Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-23BAA1D    W0133-1634685  New

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$15.39
Gates Radiator Coolant Hose
Brand: Gates
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1986 - Honda Accord
MacKay
2001 Honda Civic Radiator Coolant Hose MacKay

P311-15B1AC4    W0133-1713094  New

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$13.08
MacKay Radiator Coolant Hose
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Brand: MacKay
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2001 - Honda Civic
MacKay
1988 Honda CRX Radiator Coolant Hose MacKay

P311-5C62B14    W0133-1637824  New

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$13.04
MacKay Radiator Coolant Hose
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Brand: MacKay
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1988 - Honda CRX
MacKay
1989 Honda CRX Radiator Coolant Hose MacKay

P311-5C62B14    W0133-1637824  New

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$13.04
MacKay Radiator Coolant Hose
Brand: MacKay
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1989 - Honda CRX
Gates
2005 Honda CR-V Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-5CCF3F5    W0133-1776347  New

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Brand: Gates
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2005 - Honda CR-V
Gates
2002 Honda Civic Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-53564FB    W0133-1713220  New

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$12.67
Gates Radiator Coolant Hose
Brand: Gates
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2002 - Honda Civic
MacKay
1992 Honda Accord Radiator Coolant Hose MacKay

P311-4ABE478    W0133-1636250  New

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$14.30
MacKay Radiator Coolant Hose
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1992 - Honda Accord
MacKay
2003 Honda Civic Radiator Coolant Hose MacKay

P311-59F7645    W0133-1713371  New

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2003 - Honda Civic
Gates
2003 Honda Element Radiator Coolant Hose Gates

P311-41AA4E6    W0133-1799570  New

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Gates Radiator Coolant Hose
Brand: Gates
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2003 - Honda Element
MacKay
1994 Honda Accord Radiator Coolant Hose MacKay

P311-044D143    W0133-1635160  New

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$18.00
MacKay Radiator Coolant Hose
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Brand: MacKay
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1994 - Honda Accord
MacKay
1995 Honda Accord Radiator Coolant Hose MacKay

P311-28449D0    W0133-1639054  New

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$20.82
MacKay Radiator Coolant Hose
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Brand: MacKay
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1995 - Honda Accord
Ohno
1992 Honda Civic Radiator Coolant Hose Ohno

P311-119885E    W0133-1636314  New

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$14.51
Ohno Radiator Coolant Hose
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
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1992 - Honda Civic
MacKay
1992 Honda Civic Radiator Coolant Hose MacKay

P311-34AB973    W0133-1636314  New

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MacKay Radiator Coolant Hose
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Brand: MacKay
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1992 - Honda Civic
Ohno
1993 Honda Civic Radiator Coolant Hose Ohno

P311-119885E    W0133-1636314  New

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$14.51
Ohno Radiator Coolant Hose
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
Brand: Ohno
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1993 - Honda Civic
MacKay
1995 Honda Odyssey Radiator Coolant Hose MacKay

P311-0FEBC92    W0133-1636921  New

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$21.00
MacKay Radiator Coolant Hose
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Brand: MacKay
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1995 - Honda Odyssey
MacKay
1998 Honda CR-V Radiator Coolant Hose MacKay

P311-1BF187F    W0133-1636934  New

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$17.99
MacKay Radiator Coolant Hose
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Brand: MacKay
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1998 - Honda CR-V
MacKay
1997 Honda Prelude Radiator Coolant Hose MacKay

P311-11B1DF3    W0133-1714471  New

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$12.54
MacKay Radiator Coolant Hose
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Brand: MacKay
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1997 - Honda Prelude

Latest Honda Repair and Radiator Hose Installation Advice

CarJunky AutoAdvice

Burst Radiator Hose. Battery dead?

Showing 7 out of 7 Posts
Question From HondaMusician on Burst Radiator Hose. Battery dead?

Hey guys,

first time here. Was driving my 1989 Honda Accord DX yesterday in record heat and the upper radiator hose burst. Temp gauge dropped and car started smoking. Stopped driving and got a tow home.

I replaced the hose, but now the car isn't starting. It wants to turn and almost catches, but won't start. The battery light is on. Could the burst radiator hose have killed the battery? Maybe a short circuit?

When I replaced the hose some red liquid came out, looked like oil or coolant. no idea. any thoughts?

any help is appreciated.

Response From Hammer Time

OH, your problems are going to be a lot worse than that. You drove it hot until it just stopped. It's pretty likely fried now. You can take a compression test to confirm this but I'm betting you just turned a $20 radiator hose into a blown motor..

Response From dmac0923

the red was probably automatic transmission fluid. like hammer said if u ran your engine overheating until it stopped you likely seized something up and bye bye

Response From HondaMusician

no I didn't drive it much farther after it blew, although it was maybe a minute. just got off the road right away.

Response From Hammer Time

Was the smoke coming out the tailpipe or around the engine area?

Response From HondaMusician

it was coming from the engine area. it came from where the hose was broked, and also on the other side of the engine, from underneath.

Response From Hammer Time Top Rated Answer

The only other possible explanation is the coolant got into the ignition system. Your going to have to perform some tests to find out. Check for spark at the plug end of the wire with a spark tester and if you have spark, you'll have to do the compression test.

1997 Honda Civic Running Hot

Showing 3 out of 4 Posts | Show 1 Hidden Posts
Question From bbqnc1 on 1997 Honda Civic Running Hot

1997 Honda Civic EX, 1.6L, 179k Mileage
The top radiator hose split and shot coolant all over and I caught this before overheating. Prior to this happening my engine has been fine and cool. I replaced the hose and filled the res tank with coolant with a 50/50 coolant\Water mixture as I was told to do. Now the car is running hot and I shut down the car before it over heats. Any advice? Thank you.

Response From Hammer Time

You probably don't have all the air bled out of the system yet.

Fill the radiator to the top and put the cap back on. Run the engine until the thermostat opens and the top hose gets hot. Shut it off and let it cool all the way down and refill it again. Run the engine untill the fan cycles twice and cool it down again. Check the level one more time and you should be good.

Response From Guest

The problem was solved. Thank you for your advice.

Response From Hammer Time Top Rated Answer

Gladf you got it fixed. Thanks for report back.

03 honda element no heat

Showing 3 out of 41 Posts | Show 38 Hidden Posts
Question From toolman0007 on 03 honda element no heat

have this 2003 honda element again. with this cold snap it's putting out very little heat. after a good bit of running
top hose was good and warm, bottom hose was cold. thought it might be thermostat. replaced it not much of a change.
because it has A/C it's my understanding it would have a heater control valve, or bypass valve when you go from heat to A/C. if so where is it located ? or is there something else I may not be aware of. just replaced the leaking water pump about 12 days ago.

Response From Hammer Time

With the engine at full operating temp, locate the 2 heater hoses where they go into the firewall and feel them to see if they are both hot to the touch. If not too hot to hold, then you have to look at the actual engine temp and if that is up, if it is, then your looking at a restricted heater core or poor circulation for another reason.
If you find that they are both too hot to hold, then the heat in that vehicle is controlled by a blend door that regulates heated air flow. it is operated by an electric motor/actuator. The problem can be that the actuator is stripped or inoperative or the door itself could be damaged. This is what needs to be determined by examining the actuator and see if it is responding to heat change commands or not.

Response From toolman0007

kinda put off anymore checking till the am. thanks for the info, and putting me in the right direction.
I was informed that a stop leak product was used when they noticed the coolant leak.(water pump) whats your input on that. my view is it is unhealthy for the cooling system and could cause blockage.

Response From Hammer Time

Very bad.............. That could be your whole problem. The heater core could be all plugged up with the sealer but do the testing to find out.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

From first post " after a good bit of running
top hose was good and warm, bottom hose was cold."


Yep - now knowing stop leak was used that would easily be the whole problem. So little coolant can get thru it that what does would cool to airflow temp fast and produce little to no heat.


Flush it out forward and backward. In fact do whole cooling system and get that sealer stuff out.


Sealers are useful for one last run to junk a car driving it there vs paying for a tow and that's about it on that,


T

Response From Hammer Time

I think the radiator hose temps are irrelevant here. The issue is lack of heat in the heater, not overheating in the radiator. That would have no bearing on the heater temp. Concentrate on the heater hoses and their temp. It's normal for the lower radiator hose to be cooler if the radiator has done it's job as long as the truck is not overheating.

Response From toolman0007

the element is back. ok after a good bit of running, checking heater hoses one facing fire wall, on the right very warm. one on the left very cold. conclusion no flow through heater core. some one advised flushing it.? have a new one on hand. looks like a real bear to get to. thinking dash has to be dropped . going to try flushing just the core and see if I can get flow. just on the chance anyone ever replace one on these things before, what kind of nightmare am I looking at ? LOL

Response From GC

Havent had the joy of doing one, but I went with the Ex since I wasnt sure what you had. It shows about 8rs labor. Have to recover and recharge a/c system on top of that, if you have a/c. Definitely try flushing it.

Response From toolman0007

well took the reversible pump I have a good bucket of hot water and I have good flow in both directions. I even pulled the inline flow valve. it moved before but wanted to check how easy by hand. there was mention of a flow door actuator in above responses. will be checking that as well. so far still have not found why this had no heat ??

Response From Hammer Time

Don't worry about the blend door until you have 2 hot hoses.

Response From toolman0007

ok heater core has flow. put it all back together. and using just water, let it run for about 15 min both hoses at the core are warm. took it for a good 5 mile ride. both hoses at the core much warmer but bottom hose on the radiator was still cold. peeking in to the radiator I can see quite a bit of build up of what i would presume to be the stop leak that was put in. it does not appear to have flow through the radiator. it tends to back up when throttle is applied heat getting to the inside better but it's not zero out today

Response From Hammer Time Top Rated Answer

I told you to stop worrying about the radiator hoses. They won't prevent the car from having heat. The lower hose is supposed to be cooler. That's what a radiator does.

Response From toolman0007

hammer I get how it works. but with the length of time running I would think the thermostat would be open or had been open enough to warm the bottom hose. apparently not. so how long do you feel this thing should run before it should be putting out heat. temp today is 30

Response From Hammer Time

The temp of the radiator has no bearing on the heater temp. Engine coolant starts circulating through the heater core long before the thermostat lets it into the radiator. The temp of the upper hose is an accurate comparison of engine temp once the T-stat opens. Don't even worry about the lower hose. Heater temp should gradually increase starting almost immediately after start up.

Response From toolman0007

ok have had this thing running for a good 45 min enough where cooling fans kick in (should both come on) ? hoses at heater core the one with the flow valve is hot, the other is just good and warm. hot being I can't hold it for long . I know im getting circulation through the core, but still feel what heat I am getting is still low in temp. while I'm at this thing I want to do a complete flush to attempt to get all the stop leak out, just a good long flush with hot water should do. whats your take

Response From Hammer Time

I would remove both heater hoses and use a garden hose under pressure and blast it in both directions. I wouldn't be trying to do this in freezing temps. that will be a losing battle. If that doesn't work, then you just have to replace the core.

Make sure you are getting hot on both sides of that heater control valve too.

Response From toolman0007

ok I'm in doors in a garage. to old for the out doors LOl. as I stated earlier I set it up with a pump 6gpm and had good flow both ways. you feel I could use more pressure ? house psi 65-70

Response From Hammer Time

70lbs of water pressure in your house? Are you sure about that? I would expect the average house to be 10 to 20 PSI. That's about all city water pressure is. There isn't a garden hose in the world that will survive 70 PSI. You don't want to exceed 20 in that core. If it's not working, just replace the core.

Response From toolman0007

this can be considered closed as it has been well over a week and the heat is working fine now thanks for every ones help and advice

Response From toolman0007

yes on the pressure can't use a standard garden hose. heavy commercial rubber hose standing psi 65 and running is about 59 psi. been that way for a long time. are there any products out there that are designed to brake up or neutralize stop leak ?.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

#1 - Don't use that much pressure as you can blow your new water pump and too much for radiator ends and about everything not made for that pressure.


IDK what help or harm the isle of assorted junk can do or what harm. Among them is flush for cooling systems. There has to be 20 different brands of sealer and think most is just concoctions of saw dust and perhaps fine ground rubber bits. Containers will claim anything to sell products and could care less if the work or cause harm.


Haven't needed the radiator shops for ages and most gone that I knew of. They would dunk whole radiators in some acid bath and don't know what type of acid but when parts were brass and copper would come out stripped of paint then ready to solder leaks or put a new core on reusable end tanks but not practical any more.


Never done it have heard of using automatic dishwasher soaps and flush all that out too. So many bogus claims but the junk in a bottle stuff I'll just say AYOR if you try one as a flush product,


T

Response From toolman0007

I am cautious and aware on the hole pressure thing. did a good 20 min flush both through the heater core and rad and block, separately. I'm getting heat but it sure does take a bit of time to get there. at least 20 min of run time or more. it was suggested that I just replace the heater core. kinda hard to justify with the amount of flow there is through it. I personally am not a fan of any stop leak products. internals were never meant for that crap. better to fix the problem than to apply a band aid to it. in the long run one is better off

Response From GC

I have had some success with filling the heater core with CLR and letting it sit for 20 min or so, then flushing core again. Only as last resort, since its not recommended by manufacturer. Ive never had it cause a problem with a core, but I suppose it could, so I dont do it unless the only other option is replacing the core.

Response From toolman0007

another thought i had considered, even more so now given the orientation of the core. my goal was to fix the problem but was only going to consider replacement as a last resort. time will tell as she drives the car. still holding the part for a few days.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Tell me toolman the orientation of the blower motor to the heater core if you would as I can't look that up? Some you get a good view of it and can touch it or IR thermo it to see if it's got a cold spot. Flow on this stuff as DS brought up may not be straight line for cleaning out so easy or at all.


All but so very few are a LOT of time and careful attention to just remove and replace plus little crap and things can break easily, how well sealed and with what messed up. Hate them as you can see. There's no doubt to me that everything is tight for work space in this and about everything


Never mind what a new one costs but what a waste of time if not conclusive to change it out and be done with this problem,


T

Response From Hammer Time

It's been very clear throughout this question that he has a temperature problem, not an air flow problem and a plugged up heater core is the only possibility out there. He has already determined that by the temp of the heater hoses.

His only options at this point id to either get it flushed which has been futile for the reasons DS pointed out or replace the core.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Was on PMs about this with him that's it's open. He can take it out (very used to dash work as an auto body guy) and will try to clear it or replace. Waiting to get some funky temp measuring stuff that I'm about sure will prove it has cold spots or whole area.


It's the challenge now not the bucks. Might be good archives for what sealer can really wreck. Of all things in the junk fix isles there should be one that reverses effects of stuff of the sort that really works IMO! Tom


PS: @ HT. Do you recall the brand name Zerex antifreeze? 1960s or so. TV ads they poked holes in the gallon jug of it and it sealed them! Haven't seen the brand name on anything. It wouldn't or couldn't be useful on H.E. cooling systems and was supposed to be proactive not after the fact. Never used it then either.........

Response From Hammer Time

PS: @ HT. Do you recall the brand name Zerex antifreeze? 1960s or so. TV ads they poked holes in the gallon jug of it and it sealed them!

No, that's a new one on me.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

I swear it's not a brain phart. Still long ago and might have been a metal qt. can........



Best I could find. ?? Tom

Response From Hammer Time

Back when radiators were copper and the passages were like tunnels. That stuff was pretty harmless back then. Not any more.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Unlocked as not quite done yet and he has a plan......... Tom

Response From Discretesignals

It's not so much the orientation, but the flow design. It doesn't take much to clog up those small transfer tubes. You may not be able to use water flow through the inlet and outlet pipes to flush out the clogged tubes, because the water flow will go through the good tubes. Water is going to flow through the path of least resistance. That is why radiator shops have to remove the tanks on radiators to rod tubes out.


edit:

Good to see you got it figured out. Closed per request by OP. Can be reopened upon request.

Response From toolman0007

just a thank you for your time. calling this one a wrap,

Response From toolman0007

just a thought, why would the manufacture suggest a fix when they would much rather sell the labor and parts LOL,
tricks of the trade, what we learn when we just don't follow what we are told. or apply a bit of critical thinking.
thank you

Response From Discretesignals

Another thing to consider is the heater core is a parallel flow design. That means that half the core could be clogged and you would still have flow through it, but only half the heating ability. Sometimes you can't effectively flush out something like that because there is more than one passage for the water to flow through.

&imagekey=3607500-0&width=450

Response From toolman0007

a point I did not consider, core orientation. another engineer design flaw LOL. inverted the other way would seem better,
just not sure if air would be an issue. thanks for your point

Response From Tom Greenleaf

? Didn't see it mentioned but does this car have good air flow thru vents? Does it use a cabin air filter? Rodent issues chewing up or nesting with junk even a maybe?


The flushes scare me more with so much assorted alloys used and would think an acid. Never did use it on anything so difficult to comment much.


You did say takes a while to warm up in this somewhere. That's a bit unusual to me for this generation of vehicle as warming up quickly helps reduce emissions and sooner to get the best MPGs.


General: Heat should be direct engine coolant temp available. Must be free of air. Thermostat should stay pretty much shut off to radiator till it reaches the rating of it. If the hose from thermostat to radiator gets warm much at all before up to operating temp there's a problem with that IMO. Check that as so far this isn't fixed so something still isn't right so check what you can,


T

Response From toolman0007

yes there is plenty of air flow, but the filter is a very good point, not sure if it has ever been serviced. I will note that thanks. I timed it this morning a 10 min run and it was putting out heat. temp climbed a good bit when rpms were brought up to about 2000. all seems well

Response From Discretesignals

30 degrees with pure water in the system? Is that a good idea?

Response From toolman0007

water is just for the testing, had to drain to check heater core will be putting coolant back in. planning a complete flush to get rid of stop leak

Response From toolman0007

DUH you have a point there. thanks