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Best Selling Genuine Ford Pilot Bearings

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Dorman
1975 Ford P-400 Clutch Pilot Bearing 6 Cyl 4.9L Dorman

P311-5924F54    690-048  New

CP-50000 , 94022582 , 9000906790 , T3090310 , PB-15 , T3090115 , Z99503 , MH040024 , 900529

Qty:
$22.03
Dorman Clutch Pilot Bearing
  • ; Packaging Type: Box Package Quantity: 2
Brand: Dorman
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
1975 - Ford P-400 L 6 Cyl 4.9L 300 4917
Dorman
1973 Ford Courier Clutch Pilot Bearing Dorman

P311-1E4C930    690-049  New

1159800115 , 110098 , 7569809 , 6256202 , 1817998 , E7GZ7600A , F80111303 , 1159800105 , CP-70002 , PB-14 , 9711006202 , 8346868 , 9960622020 , 0059815125

Qty:
$24.81
Dorman Clutch Pilot Bearing
  • ; Packaging Type: Box Package Quantity: 2
Brand: Dorman
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1973 - Ford Courier
SKF
1966 Ford Country Sedan Clutch Pilot Bearing 6 Cyl 3.9L SKF

P311-03AF01C    6203-ZJ  New

Qty:
$14.46
SKF Clutch Pilot Bearing
  • Bearing
  • SKF invented the first self-aligning Ball Bearing in 1907, and is now a market leader in Bearing Technologies. Ball Bearings rely on sphere-shaped elements arranged in rows to carry loads and conduct motion. They are ideally suited for applications requiring low frictional resistance or high speed capabilities. For more than 100 years, the world's engineers, technicians and mechanics have turned to SKF for the best possible solutions. SKF products are designed and manufactured to the highest quality standards, ensuring long life and safety.
Brand: SKF
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
1966 - Ford Country Sedan L 6 Cyl 3.9L 240 3933
SKF
1993 Ford Festiva Clutch Pilot Bearing SKF

P311-065E870    6202-2ZJ  New

Qty:
$16.18
SKF Clutch Pilot Bearing
  • Bearing
  • SKF invented the first self-aligning Ball Bearing in 1907, and is now a market leader in Bearing Technologies. Ball Bearings rely on sphere-shaped elements arranged in rows to carry loads and conduct motion. They are ideally suited for applications requiring low frictional resistance or high speed capabilities. For more than 100 years, the world's engineers, technicians and mechanics have turned to SKF for the best possible solutions. SKF products are designed and manufactured to the highest quality standards, ensuring long life and safety.
Brand: SKF
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1993 - Ford Festiva
SKF
1970 Ford F-100 Clutch Pilot Bearing 6 Cyl 3.9L SKF

P311-2F8E14A    6206-2RSJ  New

Qty:
$23.53
SKF Clutch Pilot Bearing
  • Bearing
  • SKF invented the first self-aligning Ball Bearing in 1907, and is now a market leader in Bearing Technologies. Ball Bearings rely on sphere-shaped elements arranged in rows to carry loads and conduct motion. They are ideally suited for applications requiring low frictional resistance or high speed capabilities. For more than 100 years, the world's engineers, technicians and mechanics have turned to SKF for the best possible solutions. SKF products are designed and manufactured to the highest quality standards, ensuring long life and safety.
Brand: SKF
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
1970 - Ford F-100 L 6 Cyl 3.9L 240 -
SKF
1981 Ford C700 Clutch Pilot Bearing 8 Cyl 7.0L SKF

P311-0A18D29    6205-2ZJ  New

Qty:
$15.09
SKF Clutch Pilot Bearing
  • Bearing
  • SKF invented the first self-aligning Ball Bearing in 1907, and is now a market leader in Bearing Technologies. Ball Bearings rely on sphere-shaped elements arranged in rows to carry loads and conduct motion. They are ideally suited for applications requiring low frictional resistance or high speed capabilities. For more than 100 years, the world's engineers, technicians and mechanics have turned to SKF for the best possible solutions. SKF products are designed and manufactured to the highest quality standards, ensuring long life and safety.
Brand: SKF
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Fuel Type Block Engine CID CC
1981 - Ford C700 GAS V 8 Cyl 7.0L 429 -
Timken
2002 Ford Escort Clutch Pilot Bearing 4 Cyl 2.0L Timken

P311-30B789D    FC65354  New

Qty:
$9.50
Timken Clutch Pilot Bearing
  • Caged Needle Bearing
Brand: Timken
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
2002 - Ford Escort L 4 Cyl 2.0L 121 1989
Timken
1989 Ford Taurus Clutch Pilot Bearing 4 Cyl 2.5L Timken

P311-1265851    202SS  New

Qty:
$13.62
Timken Clutch Pilot Bearing
  • Conrad Deep Groove Single Row Radial Ball Bearing with 2-Shields
Brand: Timken
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
1989 - Ford Taurus L 4 Cyl 2.5L 153 -
Timken
1974 Ford Country Squire Clutch Pilot Bearing 8 Cyl 6.6L Timken

P311-4886E2D    FC65662  New

Qty:
$14.53
Timken Clutch Pilot Bearing
  • Caged Needle Bearing
  • ; Thru 5/1974
Brand: Timken
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
1974 - Ford Country Squire V 8 Cyl 6.6L 400 -
Timken
1973 Ford Ranchero Clutch Pilot Bearing 8 Cyl 6.6L Timken

P311-4886E2D    FC65662  New

Qty:
$14.53
Timken Clutch Pilot Bearing
  • Caged Needle Bearing
  • ; Thru 5/19/1974
Brand: Timken
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
1973 - Ford Ranchero V 8 Cyl 6.6L 400 -
Timken
1980 Ford E-150 Econoline Clutch Pilot Bearing 8 Cyl 5.0L Timken

P311-4886E2D    FC65662  New

Qty:
$14.53
Timken Clutch Pilot Bearing
  • Caged Needle Bearing
Brand: Timken
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
1980 - Ford E-150 Econoline V 8 Cyl 5.0L 302 -
Timken
2001 Ford E-450 Econoline Super Duty Clutch Pilot Bearing 8 Cyl 5.4L Timken

P311-3344FED    FC68329  New

Qty:
$11.30
Timken Clutch Pilot Bearing
  • Caged Needle Bearing
Brand: Timken
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Cylinder Head Type Block Engine CID CC
2001 - Ford E-450 Econoline Super Duty SOHC V 8 Cyl 5.4L 330 -
Timken
1989 Ford Mustang Clutch Pilot Bearing 8 Cyl 5.0L Timken

P311-0143198    FC65174  New

Qty:
$13.44
Timken Clutch Pilot Bearing
  • Caged Needle Bearing
  • ; From 5/1974
Brand: Timken
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
1989 - Ford Mustang V 8 Cyl 5.0L 302 -
Timken
1970 Ford E-200 Econoline Clutch Pilot Bearing 6 Cyl 2.8L Timken

P311-0143198    FC65174  New

Qty:
$13.44
Timken Clutch Pilot Bearing
  • Caged Needle Bearing
Brand: Timken
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
1970 - Ford E-200 Econoline L 6 Cyl 2.8L 170 -
Timken
1991 Ford Explorer Clutch Pilot Bearing 6 Cyl 4.0L Timken

P311-5C008D0    F33126  New

Qty:
$14.75
Timken Clutch Pilot Bearing
  • Caged Needle Bearing
Brand: Timken
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
1991 - Ford Explorer V 6 Cyl 4.0L 245 -
Timken
1972 Ford Mustang Clutch Pilot Bearing 8 Cyl 5.0L Timken

P311-4886E2D    FC65662  New

Qty:
$14.53
Timken Clutch Pilot Bearing
  • Caged Needle Bearing
  • ; Thru 4/1974
Brand: Timken
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
1972 - Ford Mustang V 8 Cyl 5.0L 302 -
Timken
1986 Ford Ranger Clutch Pilot Bearing 6 Cyl 2.9L Timken

P311-5C008D0    F33126  New

Qty:
$14.75
Timken Clutch Pilot Bearing
  • Caged Needle Bearing
  • ; Mazda Transmission
Brand: Timken
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
1986 - Ford Ranger V 6 Cyl 2.9L 177 -
Nachi
1990 Ford Probe Clutch Pilot Bearing Nachi

P311-14A2181    W0133-1640372  New

Qty:
$34.28
Nachi Clutch Pilot Bearing
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
Brand: Nachi
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1990 - Ford Probe
SKF
2002 Ford Escape Clutch Pilot Bearing 4 Cyl 2.0L SKF

P311-14F6C91    W0133-1639167  New

Qty:
$39.66
SKF Clutch Pilot Bearing
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
Brand: SKF
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel Transmission Block Engine CID CC
2002 - Ford Escape XLS Manual L 4 Cyl 2.0L 121 1989
Timken
2007 Ford F-250 Super Duty Clutch Pilot Bearing 10 Cyl 6.8L Timken

P311-2C5ADC9    W0133-1863873  New

Qty:
$43.86
Timken Clutch Pilot Bearing
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
Brand: Timken
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel Block Engine CID CC
2007 - Ford F-250 Super Duty XLT V 10 Cyl 6.8L 415 -

Latest Ford Repair and Pilot Bearing Installation Advice

CarJunky AutoAdvice

Need Help Changing Clutch 1988 F150

Showing 2 out of 10 Posts | Show 8 Hidden Posts
Question From txcwright on Need Help Changing Clutch 1988 F150

My clutch is slipping in my 88 f150. I have the clutch kit (clutch, pressure plate, throwout bearing, pilot bearing and pilot tool). I started removing the transmission today, but I can't figure out how to disconnect the hydraulic line that connects to the slave cylinder from the side of the transmission. Anyone know how to do this? Or, is there a way to remove the transmission without disconnecting the hydraulic line? I have changed F100/F150 clutches in the past, but all had mechanical linkages. Any help with this would be appreciated.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Pics didn't expand for a good look at this. It matters whether 4 or 5 speed - which?

Is the flex hose going right to the slave or just line? If you can't see how to disconnect it there it may be either done up to next connection OR it stays there while trans is removed then you could get at it. Listed clips that hold one style.

Hydraulic line stuff shouldn't deviate from common brake line tools used. Flare nut wrenches, crow footed flare nut wrenches/sockets if you will.

Look for info on replacing the slave cylinder as if that's all you were doing.

What engine, trans (# of speeds) and is this 4X4 or not??

T

Response From txcwright

1988 2WD 4.9L 5 speed. The master cylinder for the clutch is on the firewall, and the line runs down and into the side of the transmission. I'm guessing the slave cylinder is inside the bell housing? The '90 master cylinder is mounted on the transmission, so on that one, you just pull the tranny and it all comes with. This one, the tranny will only move back 3 or 4 inches before the slack in the line is used up. Also, this doesn't look like a conventional steel hydraulic line. It looks like hard plastic and is a little flexible. I would prefer not to disconnect in such a way that I get fluid everywhere or have to bleed the system. Seems like the designing engineer would have made it so that the clutch plate could be R&R without having to take apart this other system. Maybe that's why the '90 is different. I'm attaching a picture. The silver "nut" you see at the point the line goes into the bell housing is not a nut. It's just a collar and turns pretty freely. I was hoping there was some trick to getting this to come off, like a pnuematic quick-connect fitting or something.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

I'm struggling to find just what this sucker is all about. Below is about all I could find and there is a special tool for this IF and ONLY IF this info is close to what you have in front of you. Your pic was ok but I couldn't make any suggestions from just that.

I found the slave cylinder for the 5 spd and it's different as you've found and the diagrams that would have been nice were shut off for now????? Best I could grab out of the script was the trans does need to come out to replace it - not much help so far.

If the stuff below shows I still don't see how the tool would really help?? More questions than answers for you - hope someone's watching who has done this one - I haven't.

Guessing: Line needs to be removed and fluid will be lost meaning bleeding it out will be required. I can feel your frustration and don't have a quick answer - sorry,

T



_____________________________
Disconnects Ford Hydraulic Clutch Lines.
� Easily disengages the hydraulic clutch line from the clutch slave cylinder on some Ford manual transmissions.
� Tool prongs fit around clutch line above nylon sleeve.
� For 1989 and newer Mercury Cougars and Thunderbirds.
� 1988 & newer small trucks including Explorer, Ranger and Bronco II.
By Lisle.

Clutch Coupling Remover For Ford http://us.st12.yimg.com/us.st.yimg.com/I/rodi_2027_81515008 Item #: xxxw-lis11750 Availability: Usually ships the next business day. Our Price: $7.95 Sale Price: $6.95 You Save: $1.00 Quantity: Calculate Shipping Cost Zip Code: http://us.st12.yimg.com/us.st.yimg.com/I/rodi_2027_297643Province: Country: ArgentinaArubaAustraliaAustriaBahamasBarbadosBelgiumBermudaBrazilCanadaCayman IslandsChileChinaCosta RicaCyprusDenmarkEgyptFijiFinlandFranceFrance, MetropolitanGermanyGreeceGreenlandGuamGuatemalaHong KongIcelandIrelandIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanKorea, Republic ofKuwaitLuxembourgMacauMalawiMexicoMonacoNetherlandsNetherlands AntillesNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNorfolk IslandNorwayPanamaPapua New GuineaPeruPhilippinesPolandPortugalPuerto RicoSaudi ArabiaSingaporeSouth AfricaSpainSwedenSwitzerlandTaiwanThailandTrinidad and TobagoTurkeyUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUS Minor Outlying IslandsVenezuelaVirgin Islands (U.S.)

Response From Guest Top Rated Answer

Clutch Coupling Remover For Ford Can u give me the item number
Thank yiu John

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Clutch removal tools are available to rent free at AutoZone and places like that. It's a kit with assorted stuff to remove clutches that require the kit at all - some don't!

T

Response From DanD

You’re 100% right, it is a quick connect or that’s what it was designed to be. LOL
Take the line and gently push it into the slave cylinder.
There should be a white or black plastic collar that looks kind of like a bushing that should move fairly easily around the hub (for the lack of a better word) of the line. Slide this collar into the slave cylinder; you may need a screwdriver or something that you can use to push it in with. This collar, when pushed in all the way (evenly); should release the clips holding the line in the slave cylinder.
Once the collar is pushed in, the line should just pull out of the slave cylinder connector; that’s if you’re holding your tongue just right. LOL
Sometimes there is a bit of dinking around with the couplers to get them to come apart.

Have a look at the new slave/release bearing assembly; you should be able to see these clips that I’m talking about.

There is a check valve in both the slave cylinder and in the end of the line, to stop the fluid from running out.

If by chance you were only planning on replacing the release bearing and not the slave; I would maybe rethink that. The slaves were well known for leakage issues; especially if you’re putting it in behind a new clutch.

It would be a shame to have to pull the trany again.

Dan.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

THANK YOU DAN! I just spent over an hour trying to find how that's set up. Glad you were watching,

T

Response From DanD

De nada
Mi amigo

(Just practicing my Spanish for my Dominican trip)LOL

Dan.

Response From txcwright

Thanks a bunch, Dan. This will save the weekend. And thanks to Tom as well.

-cw

1987 Ford f150 slave clutch problem

Showing 2 out of 33 Posts | Show 31 Hidden Posts
Question From gdtractor on 1987 Ford f150 slave clutch problem

My old 1987 Ford F-150 manual transmission 4x4 - has set out a lot -- and the linkage to the slave drive broke and it would not go out of gear. I fixed the linkage lever that runs to the slave drive cylinder because it broke in two.

I drove it for a while like that .. then it sat for a month or two again and Now the clutch won't engage . if I rev it -- it will start to move. How do I know if the clutch is out or can I adjust the the slave drive linkage again because it could have "slipped" out of place -- because I had to weld it.

not sure the clutch is fully disengaging ..
again the truck has set a lot for about 3 years altogether.

also where do I check to see if the fluid is okay for the clutch drive cylinder

what do you suspect?

thanks much

Gary

(Just removed hyperlink not intended by poster, TG)

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Hmmm? Not quite sure what physically broke that could be welded and allow you to drive it for a while but no matter.

Right now it seems as though the clutch is ALWAYS engaged making it near impossible to get into gear while engine is running - right? If started it would probably take off on you if engaged and clutch was good itself.

This type linkage needs to be bled out of air and parts replaced that leak and whatever it was the needed welding checked to see if that repair is working.

There should be a reservoir - frequently near the brake's master cylinder that usually uses DOT 3 brake fluid and should have a line indicating the "full" mark. Some if low will begin to behave if just filled and pumped a few times but finding it low indicates a problem to be fixed.

It's really NOT good to force shift this when linkage isn't disengaging the clutch. Doing to is really not so hard on the clutch but is hard on the transmission and to be avoided.

Bleeding air out of master/slave clutch linkages can be tricky. If this shifts well now without engine running it would be a good idea to get help if this is confusing you now and possibly prevent damage it may not have yet,

T

Response From gdtractor

Tom -- thanks so much for your answer ---

I made some wrong statesments in my post ---

actually it shifts very well and the truck goes in and out of every gear very well but will not move when in gear -- however if I rev the engine - it will start to move -- I haven't moved it because I didn't know if it would hurt something ..

the piece of linkage that I had to weld is the small bolt like piece under the dash that the clutch pedal runs thru the firewall to the slave cylinder ....

hope this gives you a better picture of the problem ..
I will have to check the level of the fluid in the cylinder ..

thx much
Gary

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Ok: Somewhere between your typing and my eyesight to read we'll get this

IF - you can put this in gear and the truck holds the vehicle on a slope for example then I would say the clutch itself is ok to move the truck when running. If you are sure you are in gear and release the clutch with little effect to move the truck than I'm blaming the clutch itself as burned out.

Linkage for the clutch is to release it. The "HOME" of a clutch is engaged unless somehow some kind of linkage mess up is preventing from returning to "engaged" .. This is to say that if a vehicle had no linkage, no fluid and just a good clutch it would be able to move. Now - stopping and changing gears would be a real problem.

Note: If or when linkage adjustment which is primarily how much free area is at the top of pedal travel is wrong than a clutch can "ride" itself and wear out prematurely.

Think of the clutch as just means to disconnect the engine from the drivetrain at the push of the clutch pedal which is really it's whole job - the linkage is there to allow it to do that at the right spot for the driver,

T

Response From gdtractor

oooh!.. I am afraid you have the facts straight ...

and I don't even know where to BEGIN when it comes to "tending" to the clutch !!

this is a "wood-hauler" .. and I like the truck .. just haven't been able to use it much !!

Thanks for the info -- you have been VERY helpful !!

I have a friend that does "shade tree" jobs from his garage .. he might just help out ..

Gary

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Hey - a clutch on a 2wd F-150 isn't all that hard or expensive to diy! If you're up for it with a helper (couple spots where strength counts - trans is heavy) and some tools I'll help you get thru that one,

T

Response From gdtractor

Tom -- I thought I sent the last post to you but sent it to myself ..

anyway .. I thought if it took little to get the ranger running I wood have it to get wood until I could get the other larger truck fixed ..

crazy huh?

Gary

Response From Loren Champlain Sr

Hope it's okay if I jump in here? Every type of vehicle have their own little idiosyncrasies(mine is that I can't spell that word). Fords are notorious for ignition control modules and distributor pick-up coils going bad, causing the symptom you describe. Usually, they'll have to sit and cool for a bit before restarting. You may want to check the pickup coil before 'just replacing' it as there are other reasons an engine can die. Just a thought.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

gdtractor: One model please per thread - it's too confusing and archived stuff will be worthless with two different models on same thread.

Loren: Please do jump in! That goes for anyone with ideas on these things.

Clutch on F-150. Done a bunch but just don't recall any that were 4X4 so don't know exactly what obsticles if any await.
The biggest deal with a clutch job is having clearance to remove transmission and the large RWD layouts of trucks make for plenty of room in general. Weight of trans must be supported from when last bolt is loosened to remove it till first one is tightened when installing or the weight can allow it to sag bending the clutch disc - that's the only time where some help is needed - either another person or some awesome equipment that holds stuff in place.

Fords of the era in general: Ign modules, pick up coils and fuel pump relays used to be 99% of the problems when they would just quit running. I litterally carry a whole spare dist in my trunk for these and a universal spare relay!

Response From Loren Champlain Sr

Thanks, Tom. Didn't want to step on anyone's toes. The 4X4's are a job. We do quite a few. Transfer case, we usually seperate from the trans. One, it is hard to 'balance' on the trans. jack if still attached to the trans., Two, VERY HEAVY as a one piece unit. Other than that, no real difference. Once you've done a clutch, they're all the same. Well, in general. LOL. Just did one on a VW GTI. Have no idea why I took it in? We, normally, don't work on Euros', but, got it done. Never again! Had a weak moment, I guess?

Response From Tom Greenleaf


There's no "toe stepping" on me Loren. I simply haven't run across an F series truck 4X4 that wasn't also an automatic! Tons of "Three on the tree" standards.

By your description it sounds like wresling weight will be an issue for the 4X4 and could be a stopper for many and that's good to know,

T

Response From gdtractor

Tom
I checked the level of the fluid in the slave drive master cyl. and it is full ... but when pushing the clutch when it is running .. it doesn't sound like ANYTHING is moving ....
thought I would just update you since you have given me so much advice ...

is there another mechanism on the tranny/clutch housing that could be bad?

thx

Sorry for all the questions --

Gary

Response From Loren Champlain Sr

Gary; Just went back are re-read the posts; Like Tom said, sounds like a lack of clutch engagement. If you can let out the clutch pedal, with the engine running, and the transmission in gear, and the truck wants to move but won't....(If this is not the scenario, let me know):
I'm going to try and cover the bases, here, so bare with me.
1) The hydraulic system (master cyl. and slave cyl) operate the throw-out fork which, in turn, presses on the throw-out bearing to release the clutch. No real difference than the old type that used linkage. The reason for the hydraulics is that it requires less foot/leg pressure to operate the clutch. Sooooooo, if this is what is happening, I would have to say that it is a mechanical problem in the clutch, itself. Not a hydraulic issue.
2) When the throw-out fork pushes the throw-out bearing, the bearing then presses against the 'fingers' on the pressure plate, disengaging it from the clutch disc. There are only a couple of scenarios that I can bring to mind. First, being the clutch disc is just plain worn out; Or, something like a piece of 'something' has fallen into the area behind the 'fingers' of the pressure plate keeping it from locking up with the disc. Either way, trans removal will be required.
With that said; If you start the engine, push in the clutch pedal, and can't get it into first or reverse without grinding...Still could be a hydraulic or debris problem assuming that you welded the pedal assembly in the correct position.

Response From gdtractor

.. that's pretty much the scenario -- only thing is now I can put it in gear ... and with the engine running without my foot on the clutch .. I can easily shift to any gear including reverse .. NOTHING .... no grinding -- no movement .. nothing ..



Gary

Response From Loren Champlain Sr

Well, Gary, it's time to drop the trans. Sorry. It's a little more work, but makes the job much easier if you drop the transfer case seperately. Both the transfer case and the transmission are quite heavy. If you have a floor jack, you can use it to lower each piece, the use it to raise the pieces during reinstallation. I think you'll find the clutch disc grenaded. Be sure to have the flywheel resurfaced and replace the slave while you've got it torn down. Pretty easy one day job in your driveway. If you need any instructions during the process, feel free to ask.

Response From gdtractor

thanks Loren .. !!

going to have to "getter done" ....

thanks again you guys -- for your help ..

GED

Response From txcwright Top Rated Answer

I have the exact same problem with my '88. I have the clutch kit (clutch, pressure plate, throwout bearing, pilot bearing and pilot tool). I started removing the transmission today, but I can't figure out how to disconnect the hydraulic line that connects to the slave cylinder from the side of the transmission. Anyone know how to do this? Or, is there a way to remove the transmission without disconnecting the hydraulic line? I have changed F100/F150 clutches in the past, but all had mechanical linkages. Any help with this would be appreciated.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Just like a brake the air must be known bled out or just full at master cylinder means little. There could be other issues that disable it from disengaging clutch to shift and drive as normal. There's whatever the slave mounts to, a pushrod there to a fork that pushes on the throwout bearing that releases the pre-tensioned pressure plate which is doing the real grabbing force if and only if clutch is good enough to have any friction.

You should be able to see something move down at slave cylinder with a helper pushing on clutch pedal. Some are out of sight and I can't recall this one in particular,

T

Response From gdtractor

Tom and Loren ..

again .. I hate to "carry on" about this .. but as you mentioned I need a "helper" to push the clutch and me to watch ..

and YES the other day when I pushed in the clutch -- the truck would move when I reved the engine ..
now -- when I push the clutch -- it goes in all the gears easily -- but it doesn't seem like anything is happening at all .... goes into gear but no rubbing sound - NODA !! that is what has got me wondering ..

I will -- before I write again .. get someone to help me and watch the bottom to see what is going on with the lever .. etc ..

Thanks again ..

Gary

Response From Loren Champlain Sr

I guess I'm not clear on what the problem was, originally. If I understand correctly; If you start the engine, push in the clutch, you can get it into gear, but the truck won't move unless you rev the engine? Is this correct? If so, the problem is in the clutch, itself. Could be a disc or pressure plate problem.
On the other hand, with the engine running, push in the clutch, and can't get it into gear without grinding, then it is a clutch release problem. If this is correct, have someone push in the clutch pedal while you are watching the slave cylinder. You should be able to watch the piston push out against the throw-out fork. If this is happening, then you still may have a disc problem. Could be that one of the springs in the disc have fallen out and wedged between the pressure plate and the disc, disallowing enough throw. Try and be as specific as you can when answering. Thanks.

Response From Loren Champlain Sr

Not surprised. Seems like the area of the US makes a big difference. When I started, in Los Angeles area, I had never worked on a 3/4 ton or a 4x4. In the NW, we see a lot of manual trans./4X4 vehicles. As common as Jose Cuervo. In our travels, I notice that a lot. Small towns in AK have more planes than cars. Funny. Varies from climate to climate. And, you guys, back east have much harder winters than us. Seems that there'd be MORE 4X4s than here? Three on the tree? VERY RARE!

Response From gdtractor

I obviously have not seen too many .. but never seen a "three on the tree" truck in years !!

GED

Response From gdtractor

I haven't had a chance to do anything with the "clutch truck" because it has started snowing here and trying to get wood in on extra time .. we burn wood totally at our house ..

but anxious to check and see if the slave cylinder has any fluid or enough in it ..

Gary

Response From gdtractor

well -- guys... I am not sure what I will do immediately with the 4x4 F150 but I think I will try and fix the Ranger so I can move some firewood from the woods. then I will try and take care of the F150. It has gotten quite cold here in Michigan .. so that will slow me down a little .. :)

Have a great week ..

Gary

Response From gdtractor

Guys .. can I put a 12 volt "charge" -- to the distributor wire to test the coil ?

or that .. NOT GOOD >.

Response From gdtractor

thx so much for the input ..

the "pickup coil" .. is that what I would call the coil that is on top of the engine and I believe the condenser is located next to it .. ? is a pickup coil different than a regular coil?

and by the way -- the truck won't start at all now ..

again .. thx so much for your help ..

Gary

Response From Loren Champlain Sr

The electronic ignition system that you have doesn't use a "condensor". The condensor that you see is more than likely for RFI. The pickup coil is built into the distributor. Fords do not have "user friendly" distributors and is a lot easier and cheaper in the long run to replace the distributor as a unit than to pay someone to replace the pickup coil. The older GMs were a piece of cake to replace the pickup coil. However, I'd want to do some more diagnosing before dropping in another distributor.

Response From gdtractor

thx .. I am not sure where to start .. but perhaps taking the coil off and letting AutoZone check it ..

again thx

Gary

Response From gdtractor

Ford clutch problem: thanks for info.

Ford with NO Start prob: where is the fuel pump relay please but wouldn't the "no spark" thing be indicitive of the coil?

Note: sorry for running two threads here .. { i have too much junk I guess}
I have a Chevy 2006 but hate sctratch it up hauling wood -- (and yes I have TOO MANY trucks).

GED

Response From gdtractor

.. it is a 4x4 -- harder?

thx much

Gary

Response From gdtractor

Tom
i feel like this is taking advantage of you but here goes ..
I bought a 1991 Ford Ranger at an auction for $120 , anyway -- not the best looker but RAN Awesome!!

just recently -- it would run for a while then quit running --- it would stall sometimes but if I pulled the side of the road and let it coast -- pop the clutch it would start running again ..

the guys at AutoZone said it was the "ignition module" up by the radiator -- so I replaced it ..
still does it. Now it will not start at all ---

I tried to check the coil and plug wire - NOTHING .. no fire .. and I believe it is getting gas okay - it is a fuel injected unit ..

I have had it for 3 years -- NEVER failed to start and run --- but i did mess with the coil and condensor before putitng on the module .. and thought I got everything back okay ..

what would it be if it is not the ignition module -- the coil or condenser or is there a fuse somewhere?

thnks AGAIN !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Gary

Response From gdtractor

okay -- I am "redneck" of "country bunkin'" or something .. here is the truck I got it was all rusted out and was gray and red .. and believe it or not for a 4x4 I wanted to make "fender skirts" for it .. now you know -- why I am NO mechanic!! :)

Response From gdtractor

let me try the attachment again .. hmmmm ..

humm again .. don't see the attachment but here goes ..

http://autoforums.carjunky.com/cgi-bin/gforum.cgi?do=post_attachment;postatt_id=269;

(From Tom - there you go - you don't have to open an attachment now - nice truck!)

97 Ford Escort: Clutch Failed Twice in 1000mi

Showing 2 out of 2 Posts
Question From Buzzsaw007 on 97 Ford Escort: Clutch Failed Twice in 1000mi

I have a very interesting problem with my '97 escort. I was getting a scraping rotational noise (just noise, the response, feel, and function is all the same) when the clutch petal was depressed. I took it to three different mechanics, all of whom said it was likely the Throwout Bearing, and that the whole clutch may as well be replaced while they were in there. I got it replaced, then drove to Michigan for the holidays. Near the end of my return trip, the clutch started making the same noise (about 1000 miles later, almost all highway).

So in a nutshell, I replaced the clutch, and 1000 miles later, it started having the same problem.

What could cause a clutch to break? I'm thinking alignment, wheel bearings (I do get some front end vibration at high speeds), pilot bearings, bad CV joint... I don't know. Seems like something on the way to the wheel that's out of whack and stressing out the clutch. Does any of that sound plausible? Anyone else have any idea what could cause a clutch to go out, or do we think it was improperly installed?

What do you all think?

Thanks!

Response From steve01832 Top Rated Answer

It could possibly be a faulty part. Bring it back to the shop that did it, be nice, and let them warranty it. If it's a bad bearing out of the box, it's not the mechanics' fault. We don't make the parts, we only replace them. If they are a reputable shop they should take care of it for you.

Steve

2000 Ford F150

Showing 2 out of 9 Posts | Show 7 Hidden Posts
Question From julianns85 on 2000 Ford F150

My friend and I are working on his 2000 Ford F150 manual transmission. He hit a motorcycle helmet and damaged his oil tank. After much trouble trying to get it out, we lowered the tranny. Since we had it lowered we decided to replace the clutch as well. We had a lot of trouble getting the tranny back in but finally did. The day after it was all together, the only problem was a couple of censors. Now about 3 days later, the truck will not shift into reverse. We drained the clutch, but it didn't work. Since we did all this we are trying to avoid taking it to a shop. Can anyone help?!?!?!?!?

Response From Loren Champlain Sr

I'm really hoping that a head wasn't attached to the helmet?
Pretty sure that it is a hydraulic clutch in the Ford. Some can be a real pain to bleed. Most of the Ford clutch kits come with a new slave cylinder. Hopefully, yours did. Bleed the master cylinder, first. Then, move to the slave, and bleed it. Sounds like air in the system, to me.

Response From julianns85 Top Rated Answer

Hey. Thanks for the reply. That was my girlfriend trying to write what actually happened (without my consent :) LOL ). BTW There was no head attached, thank god. Anyway, to be more specific, it's the V6 model and we didn't "drain the clutch", lol, we bled the crap out of it though. There was loads of air coming out from beginning to end. I still don't think I got all of the air out. I figure the air in it is causing it to shift poor and even more so not at all in reverse. I was thinking it needs a slave. Does that sound about right? I probably used over a quart of brake fluid bleeding it and air was still coming out it came in spurts. Some pumps it had none then the next it had almost all air coming out. So I finally gave up and said I think he needs a slave. I will try bleeding the master first then the slave but I'm pretty sure they're not connected on this one, and the brake pedal is fine. Oh, also, we never even opened the lines when we did all of this work. The hydraulic clutch line was the only thing we left attached to the tranny when we
"removed" it. We actually just backed it up far enough to do the oil pan, and clutch( disc, pressure plate, throw-out bearing, pilot bearing, and flywheel).

Oh, another thing she didn't mention is that it worked fine for the first day, all gears and everything, the next day was when reverse stopped working. Also, as far as the "sensors" she was talking about, we accidentally broke the cylinder head temp sensor somehow (probably when we were using the prybar to remove the trans)........THANK YOU! Please wbs.

Response From Loren Champlain Sr

The hydraulic clutch has it's own master cylinder (seperate from the brake master cylinder). When you disconnected the hydraulic line from the trans (slave cylinder), the master cylinder probably drained until it was empty. Just like a brake master cyl., the clutch master has been 'pushed' in the same distance over a number of years. Beyond that point, sediment will build up. If you are not very careful during bleeding, and push the clutch in further than that point, you can rupture the cup on the piston inside the master, due to the buildup of debris/sediment. If this happens, the master will no longer be able to hold pressure, and sometimes, allow it to 'suck' air in from the back. I'm not saying this is what's happened, but it is possible. The slave cylinder should always be replaced when doing a hydraulic clutch. The renewed force of the new pressure plate is very often more than the old slave can handle. But....before you start replacing stuff, bleed the clutch master cylinder first. Depending on it's angle when mounted to the firewall, you may have to take it off and bench bleed it, then remount it, and continue bleeding the slave. Once the master is bled, I prefer to gravity bleed the slave so as to reduce the possibility of damaging the master. Also, depending on the position of the bleeder on the slave, that can be a chore. I'll have to check, but isn't the slave inside the bell housing on this one?

Response From julianns85

OK! Thanks for the reply. I've already done that, that was the first thing I did, kind of. I just didn't know that's what it was called(slave master). I thought that was the slave!(the one on the firewall). I guess the only thing I was bleeding was the slave, and yes it is inside the bell housing, but the bleeder sticks out enough to put a wrench on it. So, since all the air that I was getting was coming from that bleeder, on the slave, does that mean more than likely that the slave master is bad? Or the slave itself? Either way, I will start with that tomorrow and let you know. I'll bleed it from the slave master, then gravity bleed it from the slave itself. Correct? The thing I'm most unsure about is 1: if any of this would cause only reverse not to go in gear, which is the whole problem; and 2: if I cannot stop getting air then which one is bad? the slave master or the slave?............Please wbs.....thanks.

Response From Loren Champlain Sr

Just to be perfectly clear, as old Tricky Dick Nixon would say; Oh, and he wasn't a crook, either. The unit on the firewall is the master cylinder. The unit in the bell housing is the slave cylinder. Yes, do it in that order. The master cylinder, first, then the slave. Be sure to keep the master cylinder full while you are bleeding the slave.
If you can get it into the other gears, you must be getting close. Reverse is a very low gear. If you can't get the clutch to release completely, the input shaft of the transmission won't slow enough to get it into that gear.
I'm really surprised that your clutch kit didn't come with a new slave cylinder. That's gonna suck if you have to pull it all back out to replace that sucker. But, first things, first. If it comes to it, I'd recommend replacing the master cylinder, first. They are relatively inexpensive and are quite simple to replace. You might stick your head up under the dash. You'll see the pushrod that goes from the clutch pedal, into the back of the master cylinder. There will be a rubber boot on the back of the master that the pushrod goes through. Pull the rubber back and see if there is any moisture. If there is, the master needs to be replaced, regardless.

Response From julianns85

OK! Thanks...will do that and let you know what happens.....btw....let's say i do all that bleeding and it still doesn't go into reverse....do you think I could just reach through the peephole in the bell housing with a prybar and try prying back to see if that's even the problem?, or just go ahead and replace the slave?

Response From Loren Champlain Sr

I've never tried it before, but if you can somehow move the throwout bearing far enough to disengage the clutch, and it works, then you know that the problem is hydraulic. It won't tell you if it's the slave or master. As said before, I'd replace the master first. To replace the slave, you'll be pulling the trans. But, I wouldn't do either until you are darned sure that all of the air is out of the system. What you are lacking, assuming this isn't a transmission or pilot bushing problem, is throwout fork throw (amount of travel in the fork). Uh, that reminds me. You did replace the pilot bushing/bearing, right?

Response From Tom Greenleaf

J - reverse is a different bird. Try shifting it into reverse without the engine running - it should go right in. It may not because clutch isn't disengaging and reverse might grind or difficult vs any forward gear. I didn't think any reverse gears were synchro so would grind if clutch doesn't completely disengage engine. Does this also have that feature where you can't remove the keys without this being in reverse?

It still has a master and or slave issue going on with all that bleeding and no results yet IMO,

T