802.589.0911 Live Chat With Us

Finish Selecting Your Vehicle to Shop For Your PCV Valve

Choose a Year for your Mitsubishi 's PCV Valve

  • 2010
  • 2009
  • 2008
  • 2007
  • 2006
  • 2005
  • 2002
  • 2000
  • 1999
  • 1998
  • 1997
  • 1996
  • 1995
  • 1994
  • 1993
  • 1992
  • 1991
  • 1990
  • 1989
  • 1988
  • 1987
  • 1986
  • 1985
  • 1983

Shop By Brand

The Following brands are available based on your search.

  • Beck Arnley
    Beck Arnley
  • Genuine
    Genuine
  • Mopar
    Mopar
  • Novo
    Novo
  • Standard Ignition
    Standard Ignition
  • Standard Motor Products
    Standard Motor Products

Best Selling Genuine Mitsubishi PCV valves

  • We Stock the following top leading brands, including Novo, Mopar, Standard Ignition
  • Constantly Updated Inventory of Mitsubishi Replacement PCV Valve Parts

We stock PCV Valve parts for most Mitsubishi models, including 3000GT, Diamante, Eclipse, Galant, Mirage, Montero, Montero Sport, Outlander.

Novo
1999 Mitsubishi Eclipse PCV Valve Novo

P311-2EE25D1    W0133-1841895  New

Qty:
$36.63
Novo PCV Valve
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
Brand: Novo
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Aspiration Cylinder Head Type
1999 - Mitsubishi Eclipse Naturally Aspirated DOHC
Novo
1995 Mitsubishi Eclipse PCV Valve Novo

P311-2EE25D1    W0133-1841895  New

Qty:
$36.63
Novo PCV Valve
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Production: 01/1994-
Brand: Novo
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Aspiration Prod. Date Range
1995 - Mitsubishi Eclipse Naturally Aspirated Fr:01-00-94
Mopar
2009 Mitsubishi Raider PCV Valve Mopar

P311-033B15A    W0133-1880750  New

Qty:
$21.21
Mopar PCV Valve
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
Brand: Mopar
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2009 - Mitsubishi Raider
Standard Ignition
1997 Mitsubishi Mirage PCV Valve 4 Cyl 1.5L Standard Ignition

P311-1A23A4E    V247  New

PV1059 , MD308787 , 94845871 , 28019 , PCV212 , FV279DP , PCV142 , 17130-PH1-003 , 045-0263 , HV111 , PV1013 , FV279 , CV937C , PCV348 , 6P1173 , 76-2640 , PCV338 , PCV132 , PCV291 , 94843655 , 76-2675 , 6P1177 , HV191 , 12353453 , FV340 , 28117 , 6-1011 , PC190

Qty:
$5.24
Standard Ignition PCV Valve
  • PCV Valve
  • Genuine Intermotor Quality
  • Product Attributes:
    • Connector Gender: No Connector
    • Contents: Valve
    • Hose Size - Inches: 3/8"; 9/16"
    • Hose Size - mm: 8 Mm; 16 Mm
    • Nipple Orientation: Straight
  • With industry leading expertise, when original equipment fails our products are designed to fix the inherent failure issues. As a global manufacturer of emission components, complete quality control is maintained through the manufacturing process from componentry to finished product.
Brand: Standard Ignition
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
1997 - Mitsubishi Mirage L 4 Cyl 1.5L 90 1468
Standard Ignition
1984 Mitsubishi Cordia PCV Valve 4 Cyl 1.8L Standard Ignition

P311-5EBD019    V226  New

MD026613 , 19110589 , 6-1013 , 6-1036 , CV5026C , 014-0004 , 9N2 , HV119 , FV266DP , PCV186 , PC203 , PCV120 , MD024719 , 6P1064 , 28097 , 76-2518 , PC120 , 8-94111-642-0 , FV318 , FV288DP , FV266 , 26740-21330 , 26740-21320 , PCV293 , PV1021 , PCV115 , 26740-21304 , 045-0247 , 26740-21314

Qty:
$11.34
Standard Ignition PCV Valve
  • PCV Valve
  • Genuine Intermotor Quality Exhaust stock and reorder
  • Product Attributes:
    • Connector Gender: No Connector
    • Contents: Valve
    • Hose Size - Inches: 3/8
    • Hose Size - mm: 10 Mm
    • Nipple Orientation: Straight
  • With industry leading expertise, when original equipment fails our products are designed to fix the inherent failure issues. As a global manufacturer of emission components, complete quality control is maintained through the manufacturing process from componentry to finished product.
Brand: Standard Ignition
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
1984 - Mitsubishi Cordia L 4 Cyl 1.8L - 1795
Standard Ignition
1984 Mitsubishi Cordia PCV Valve 4 Cyl 1.8L Standard Ignition

P311-41B55AE    V231  New

28080 , 76-2540 , 8-94152-859-0 , 045-0285 , MD024719 , 28028 , MD041519 , 6P1133 , 6-1015 , 76-2634 , 014-0018 , HV120 , PC231 , 045-0252 , PCV282 , 6-1022 , PCV131 , 6P1077 , MD012947 , PV1022 , 12353446 , 6-1008 , PV1033 , 28085 , CV930C , 26740-32804 , FV288 , 2674032800 , 6-1012 , PCV495 , 26740-21310 , PCV167 , PCV148 , PV1010

Qty:
$10.33
Standard Ignition PCV Valve
  • PCV Valve
  • Genuine Intermotor Quality Alternate Number
  • With industry leading expertise, when original equipment fails our products are designed to fix the inherent failure issues. As a global manufacturer of emission components, complete quality control is maintained through the manufacturing process from componentry to finished product.
Brand: Standard Ignition
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
1984 - Mitsubishi Cordia L 4 Cyl 1.8L - 1795
Standard Ignition
1986 Mitsubishi Tredia PCV Valve 4 Cyl 2.0L Standard Ignition

P311-41B55AE    V231  New

28080 , 76-2540 , 8-94152-859-0 , 045-0285 , MD024719 , 28028 , MD041519 , 6P1133 , 6-1015 , 76-2634 , 014-0018 , HV120 , PC231 , 045-0252 , PCV282 , 6-1022 , PCV131 , 6P1077 , MD012947 , PV1022 , 12353446 , 6-1008 , PV1033 , 28085 , CV930C , 26740-32804 , FV288 , 2674032800 , 6-1012 , PCV495 , 26740-21310 , PCV167 , PCV148 , PV1010

Qty:
$10.33
Standard Ignition PCV Valve
  • PCV Valve
  • Genuine Intermotor Quality
  • With industry leading expertise, when original equipment fails our products are designed to fix the inherent failure issues. As a global manufacturer of emission components, complete quality control is maintained through the manufacturing process from componentry to finished product.
Brand: Standard Ignition
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Aspiration Block Engine CID CC
1986 - Mitsubishi Tredia Naturally Aspirated L 4 Cyl 2.0L 122 1997
Standard Ignition
2005 Mitsubishi Endeavor PCV Valve 6 Cyl 3.8L Standard Ignition

P311-1910DF6    V303  New

6P1175 , FV331 , PCV172 , MD152772 , 6P1078 , 76-2561 , PCV188 , PCV337 , MD153242 , 045-0288 , FV331DP , PCV288 , 76-2638 , 19110599 , CV5036C , 28046

Qty:
$8.55
Standard Ignition PCV Valve
  • PCV Valve
  • Genuine Intermotor Quality
  • Product Attributes:
    • Connector Gender: No Connector
    • Contents: Valve
    • Hose Size - Inches: 3/8
    • Hose Size - mm: 10 Mm
    • Nipple Orientation: Angled
  • With industry leading expertise, when original equipment fails our products are designed to fix the inherent failure issues. As a global manufacturer of emission components, complete quality control is maintained through the manufacturing process from componentry to finished product.
Brand: Standard Ignition
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
2005 - Mitsubishi Endeavor V 6 Cyl 3.8L 230 3828
Standard Ignition
2006 Mitsubishi Raider PCV Valve 6 Cyl 3.7L Standard Ignition

P311-411EABA    V373  New

76-2679 , PCV502 , 6P1150 , PCV343 , 214-1999 , 53032800AA , 78158 , PV1084 , 19146028 , FV408

Qty:
$9.52
Standard Ignition PCV Valve
  • PCV Valve
  • With industry leading expertise, when original equipment fails our products are designed to fix the inherent failure issues. As a global manufacturer of emission components, complete quality control is maintained through the manufacturing process from componentry to finished product.
Brand: Standard Ignition
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
2006 - Mitsubishi Raider V 6 Cyl 3.7L 226 -
Standard Ignition
2000 Mitsubishi Mirage PCV Valve Standard Ignition

P311-4A4C9B0    V387  New

045-0309 , 19187362 , HV167 , FV350 , PC263 , MD183457 , MD183547 , PV1054 , PCV391

Qty:
$6.79
Standard Ignition PCV Valve
  • PCV Valve
  • Genuine Intermotor Quality
  • Product Attributes:
    • Nipple Orientation: Straight
  • With industry leading expertise, when original equipment fails our products are designed to fix the inherent failure issues. As a global manufacturer of emission components, complete quality control is maintained through the manufacturing process from componentry to finished product.
Brand: Standard Ignition
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2000 - Mitsubishi Mirage

Latest Mitsubishi Repair and PCV Valve Installation Advice

CarJunky AutoAdvice

working with vacuum gauge

Showing 2 out of 28 Posts | Show 26 Hidden Posts
Question From zoggnoff on working with vacuum gauge

I can't seem to figure this thing out.
The only reading I could get off the gauge was when I took the PCV valve off and shoved the tapered end fitting into the pcv line, it read 13 in.
Not sure if I had the intake manifold vacuum line, is it the line that connects to the air assembly duct?? because that was 0 in.
and I can't find the EGR at all.

This book gives me one picture, sometimes no picture at all.

it's an 03 eclipse v6 3.0L

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Vacuum gauge is an excellent diagnostic tool. Not sure if PCV gets true "Manifold Actual Pressure" (meaning vacuum) or not. A pwr brake booster should! Best to use a "T" so the device still is enabled.

FYI: Atmosphere is 14.7 PSI at sea level. Vacuum gauges are measuring "inches of mercury or HGs" so not the same math. At sea level you see the full # which if perfect is 29.92 Hg. Engine vacuum at sea level should be around 18 or so and with a rev show over 20 then be stable again.

You can deduct ONE Hg per 1,000 feet of elevation.

Hope that helped??

What is your elevation? Google Earth will tell you by the foot! I'm at 232' for example!
T

Response From zoggnoff

google earth puts me at elev 9ft

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Consider that true readings or "Sea Level" for any use of the device. I do at under 1,000 which is most of the populated world. The day's atmospheric pressure has an impact as well. Once in a while someone will ask me about some #s and live at "mile high" Denver, CO or even higher!

Just for fun - heard that aircraft sets cabin pressure as if you were at up to 10,000 ft and hope you aren't working on a car in the plane but it clearly has a different feel to it to me anyway and air is drier.

Vacuum is a great tool as said for auto engines and air conditioning of course. Look for steady needle (valves good) - drifting needle (a gasket leak) - consistently low - (valve timing off perhaps) -- there's lots.

Learn where to check such that it's "actual" vacuum and not "venturi" vacuum.

Vacuum can tell of an exhaust restriction as well!

T

Response From zoggnoff

I've been sick for 4 days now. I was in the middle of doing this test when I saw the news today.
wow.

moving on though. The test results were 14 in
bobbled between 12 and 14 in as the idle bobbled between 800 and 1100 rpms

dropped even lower when I unplugged the pcv valve but then the idle speeds up and the in Hg go back up
could this be a vac leak?
if so i'd like to replace all the vac lines, where can i buy new vac lines?
are they all the same size?
they seem to be nearly the same to me

Response From zoggnoff

also according to the multimeter i used on the TPS it went from 0.2 to 4.8
supposed to be 3.5 to 6.5 k when moving the throttle while hooked up to the meter.

could this be the source of all these damn problems?

Response From Loren Champlain Sr

zoggnoff; You should be seeing 17-19hG at idle. As Tom suggested, 'T' into the vacuum booster line or find a manifold vacuum hose. If your vacuum is lower than it should be, it could be caused by poor running condition. Retarded timing, overfueling, misfiring, ect. The TPS voltage wouldn't come into play, at idle. However, as you sweep the TPS with your multimeter, watch for 'glitches'. If there are any, it should be replaced. Also, what kind of symptoms are you dealing with?

Response From zoggnoff

Not sure where the booster line is but I was able to get hold of a Factory Service Manual for my specific vehicle, much better pictures of where things are.
was able to pin point all the parts that eluded me before, also according to it the best place to T-in is between the fuel pressure regulator and the intake manifold plenum, which I found and T'd into. Had to trim some tube from my new gauge to make it possible but I was able to get a 14 in reading from it.
Stepping on the gas then letting off quickly went from 14 in hg quickly to 0 in hg then quickly to 25 in hg then slowly back to 14 in hg... but the RPMs drop very slow as well and settle at about 1100 RPMS.
figured it should have dropped quickly in park but didn't.

My symptoms are rough somewhat irradic and sometimes high idle and low vacuum.
the oil leaks and the car smells bad sometimes.
had to recently replace the IAC because it was rough like this before, but instead of idling high it would just stall and the IAC eventually stuck closed and tested dead.

Im affraid that under whatever stress that is going on under the hood that this new part may soon be tossed into the trash with the old one.
part was hella-expensive

What should i do?

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Rough idle and 14 reading - not right. What vehicle and engine are we talking about and how many miles?

T

Response From zoggnoff Top Rated Answer

2003 mitsubishi eclipse gt
v6 3.0L
133,000 miles

Response From Tom Greenleaf

The fact that it could do that snap to 25 is good. Rough idle will not give you a steady, dependable reading but normally would be 17-19 as Loren said.

It's one tool in tool box. Need to chase down the rough idle now - manifold vacuum leaks, tune up items etc,

T

Response From zoggnoff

Just got in the mail, vacuum pump/brake bleed kit so i can check the EGR & solenoid among other things.
too late in the day to use it now but I did spray carb spray all over the throttle body where it butted up to the manifold and there was no change in idle.
sprayed the manifold itself too but i'm not familiar with that part of the engine so i may not have sprayed the right spots but i did try to spray everything on it that wasn't rubber or plastic because i now the solvent destroys those materials. still no change in the idle.

if it's not the manifold leaking and if I replace all the vacuum hoses and if the EGR and solenoid pass a vac test could it be the spark plugs and or wires, rotor and cap? the plugs were replaced once but the engine has been running hot, very hot. I'd say for the better part of 2 years the engine would overheat until eventually the radiator blew a hole in the top and had to be replaced, still overheated, replaced the thermostat and problem with heat solved.

what steps should i be making?

Response From Loren Champlain Sr

zoggnoff; Check for a vacuum leak at the EGR valve, itself. Sometimes a chunk of carbon can get stuck between the pintle and seat. Be careful not to try and apply too much vacuum to the EGR as you could rupture the diaghragm. It may not hold vacuum if it is a backpressure type valve, so don't condemn it if it doesn't. EGRs are usually quite easy to remove and inspect. Once off, if nothing is visible, you can pour liquid in one side and see if leaks through. It shouldn't.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Good one Loren. Pintle can be cleaned - push up and down on it with carb cleaner in the inlet side. Real good one will not leak out even thin viscosity of carb cleaner! You may be able to save gasket with high temp Permatex sealer.

Vacuum. That one I disagree with. Diaphragm should hold a hand held vacuum at max. If it ruptured at full vac it tisn't good IMO. Remember or know that atmosphere is only 14.7 psi that we live in. Expressed in "inches of mercury" max vacuum ism 29.92. Engines run on creating a vacuum to draw then compress vaporized fuel and air. Short of pushing air (turbo type/ram air stuff) the most the can get is the 14.7 in PSI and they don't ever show that. Said earlier by Loren engines will show 17-19 Hg at a smooth idle.

Pun intended - vacuum is a cool tool which sucks! Laugh!



T

Response From Loren Champlain Sr

Tom; Backpressure type EGR valves won't hold vacuum unless backpressure is present. Weird, I know. Don't ask me how it works.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

My only point was 100% vacuum is only 14.7 psi in reverse pressure. Any vacuum item that fails with just that probably tisn't any good.

Please understand we are all here to help and LEARN too! It's a never ending cycle to keep up with what parts do what and what they tolerate.

Old Pharts unite!

T

Response From Loren Champlain Sr

>>It's a never ending cycle to keep up with what parts do what and what they tolerate.

Old Pharts unite! <<
Oh, how very true! Didn't mean that thing about the backpressure EGR valve to be anything other than informative. Didn't know if you'd run into one before. Sorry if I stated it wrong.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

We (speaking of regulars) are here to help and we learn too! If any one of us thought they knew everything it's proof we don't!

The only failure is not trying. It's my opinion that any vehicle diaphragm will hold full vacuum. As to back pressures - that's a different problem/issue,

T

PS: Thought for the day. If you took a tire with 1lbs of true air into outer space or a complete vacuum it would read 14. something PSI! A tire at 35 psi would increase by the 14.7 - just examples from my out of space missions

Response From Loren Champlain Sr

>> If any one of us thought they knew everything it's proof we don't!

The only failure is not trying.<<
How True!!!! I'm trying to remember my emissions class...Were dealing with a GM EGR valve. With vacuum going to it, it wouldn't open unless it sensed exhaust backpressure and the diaghragm wouldn't hold vacuum unless the backpressure was present? On the other hand, that was back when I had a brain. Probably, 20yrs ago? Hopefully, one of the younger guys with some brain cells left will jump in here. LOL.

Response From Hammer Time

Feedback EGR valves are very common and you are correct, they won't hold vacuum unless they get exhaust pressure first.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

I'm good and confused. I can see that and EGR could be designed to sense pressure one way before activating vacuum to a diaphragm but don't understand if full vacuum it damaging??

T

Response From zoggnoff

book says 5-to-10 in-Hg vacuum to EGR valve with engine idle, if speed does not drop considerably (or stall) indicates possible faulty EGR valve, blocked or plugged EGR tube or passage in intake and exhaust manifolds may be plugged with carbon build-up.
EGR vavle unbolted apply 15 in-Hg vacuum, if stem moves it's good.

Picked up 3 spark plugs and some anti-seize compound for the front. I figure why not change the easiest plugs first, see if any changes, they were $2 a piece
had a random misfire code at idle again, cleared, didn't come back.

have not tested nor replaced parts yet (plugs included) still waiting for some tools to arrive

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Interim note: Watch out for anti-seize (alum stuff) - make sure on threads only - It can conduct electrical energy and mess us diagnostics.
T

Response From zoggnoff

changed the front three plugs, no effect on how it ran.
currently getting a p0401 code.
so definitely need to check the valve and stuff... but could that code just be a result of having a low vacuum reading of 14 in-hg?
engine was knocking.

I have some new silicone tubing on order to replace vacuum lines, will have soon, i figure once that arrives i will clean out the metal parts of the tubing on the vac system with wire pipe cleaner brush and some carb spray, also sometime on that day test the vac system integrity itself with the pump etc etc.

what do you think?

Response From carsinsc

Have you done a compression test on this motor? If it was overheated, you may have low compression causing your problems. A leak down test would help verify wether your valves are sealing properly. Start with the basics before you throw a bunch of money at a problem that can't be fixed by just replacing parts. Poor compression = poor running.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

carsinsc: This thread is well over a year old. Welcome to the site but take note of the dates of the threads,

T

Response From Hammer Time

It's not being damaged. The vacuum just get bypassed until the exhaust backpressure closes the vent.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Got it - thanks!

Tom

p0300 & p0401

Showing 4 out of 4 Posts
Question From zoggnoff on p0300 & p0401

2003 Mitsubishi Eclipse GT 3.0L-V6

I have been getting these codes for a while now so I decided to replace the ignition components (new wires, plugs, cap and rotor)
the codes all came back and engine runs same as before.

Could an incorrect PCV valve cause a random misfire? (looks different than the original)

I put the EGR valve under pressure and it worked within specs.
the EGR tube did not seem to be cloged to me all though I didn't remove the entire piece so couldn't be sure.
I did not check the vacuum control valve or the egr solenoid (could these cause both the codes?)

The upper intake manifold and throttle body - new gaskets, torqued to specs, also the air assembly is tight.

Response From DanD

There are more things that can cause a random misfire then the ignition system; even though it is the most common reason.. Have you checked the ignition coil’s maximum output; it should be no less then 25KV (25,000 volts).
Yes the wrong PCV could cause an intermittent misfire; likely a lean misfire; the valve might be drawing to much vacuum.
Other things are engine mechanical; low compression, worn valve guides, worn/loose timing belt, or just general overall engine wear.
The fuel system; low fuel pressure, low fuel volume, plugged or leaking fuel injectors, injector(s) beginning to fail electrically, injector drivers (computer).
The exhaust system; a converter partially plugged; as in the monolith catalyst inside the converter is breaking up into pieces and intermittently plugging up the outlet of the converter. This could also answer the EGR flow insufficient code?
Keep it fun; random multiple misfires can be a bugger to pin down sometimes.

Dan.

Response From zoggnoff Top Rated Answer

I think it must have something to do with the cylinders in some way, when I replaced the ignition components I was able to do a compression test on all 6 cylinders

1st test:
(210) (180) (210)

(210) (160) (210)

each inital stroke started at 120 (less on the middle two cylinders) and jumped about 15 with each additional stroke until maxing out at those numbers.
I added oil to the middle cylinders and then tested (or wet tested), here is what i got

2nd test:
(210) (240) (210)

(210) (210) (210)


The service manual states that I should have 83psi - 119psi without vic
and 149psi - 212psi with vic (variable induction control)
by the diagram in the manual my car is the one WITHOUT VIC

engine uses a distributor so i thought i didn't have a coil
the 4 cylinder version eclipse there is a lot of talk about coil packs and no distributor.
am i wrong or does every car have an ignition coil?

thanks

Response From DanD



All Gas engines have some form of ignition coil. This vehicle's is inside the distributor.

Dan

2003 eclipse misfires and idles high

Showing 2 out of 2 Posts
Question From zoggnoff on 2003 eclipse misfires and idles high

2003
mitsubishi
eclipse gt
3.0L V6
140,000 miles

I bought an inexpensive scan tool that is throwing the code p0300.
I've replaced the IAC, PCV, throttle body gasket, radiator and changed the oil & filter.

I'm pretty sure the engine was misfiring before I replaced the IAC but it never idled this fast and is very random from 600-1000-1500 then back down again or sometimes not back down at all. the old IAC would stall when stopped and the AC was on. then one day it wouldn't idle at all... tested the ohms and they were near zero on one connector. bought a new one, mikuni brand.

also I think i have air in the brake lines which really makes me notice it at 1500 rpms... last time i did the brakes i didnt bleed the lines, just strong armed the piston back into place and by that i mean used a clamp :)

also i think the guy at the auto store gave me the wrong pcv valve, the picture on the computer was all black, the one that was in the car before was all black but the one they gave me is half white half black.

I have a vacuum gauge being shipped to me that im not sure where to plug in... intake manifold vacuum line? not sure where that is.

also it seems to be leaking oil.. i have checked under the car and it seems to be dropping out close to the alternator and not the plug nor the filter..
also i may have put too much oil in because recently there was some white smoke coming off the belt near the alternator.
threw water on the belt, let it cool... it stopped for a while then happened again but hasn't happened again since that day.

im thinking that the misfire could be plugs, wires, rotor, cap.
first i want to find if there is a vacuum leak though right?
and if i drain some of the oil , she might stop leaking oil? or is that a blown ring?
idle baffles me... could it be the wrong pcv valve? stuck open egr? is that cleanable?

ive got a scan tool, multimeter, haynes manual, internet, some borrowed sockets and soon that vacuum gauge.
and i have my eye on that actron pump/bleeder at sears

any advice would be appreciated.
thanks
mike

Response From Hammer Time Top Rated Answer

Duplicate question already responded to

http://autoforums.carjunky.com/...d_idles_high_P50417/
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.

2003 eclipse misfires and idles high

Showing 5 out of 5 Posts
Question From zoggnoff on 2003 eclipse misfires and idles high

2003
mitsubishi
eclipse gt
3.0L V6
140,000 miles

I bought an inexpensive scan tool that is throwing the code p0300.
I've replaced the IAC, PCV, throttle body gasket, radiator and changed the oil & filter.

I'm pretty sure the engine was misfiring before I replaced the IAC but it never idled this fast and is very random from 600-1000-1500 then back down again or sometimes not back down at all. the old IAC would stall when stopped and the AC was on. then one day it wouldn't idle at all... tested the ohms and they were near zero on one connector. bought a new one, mikuni brand.

also I think i have air in the brake lines which really makes me notice it at 1500 rpms... last time i did the brakes i didnt bleed the lines, just strong armed the piston back into place and by that i mean used a clamp :)

also i think the guy at the auto store gave me the wrong pcv valve, the picture on the computer was all black, the one that was in the car before was all black but the one they gave me is half white half black.

I have a vacuum gauge being shipped to me that im not sure where to plug in... intake manifold vacuum line? not sure where that is.

also it seems to be leaking oil.. i have checked under the car and it seems to be dropping out close to the alternator and not the plug nor the filter..
also i may have put too much oil in because recently there was some white smoke coming off the belt near the alternator.
threw water on the belt, let it cool... it stopped for a while then happened again but hasn't happened again since that day.

im thinking that the misfire could be plugs, wires, rotor, cap.
first i want to find if there is a vacuum leak though right?
and if i drain some of the oil , she might stop leaking oil? or is that a blown ring?
idle baffles me... could it be the wrong pcv valve? stuck open egr? is that cleanable?

ive got a scan tool, multimeter, haynes manual, internet, some borrowed sockets and soon that vacuum gauge.
and i have my eye on that actron pump/bleeder at sears

any advice would be appreciated.
thanks
mike

Response From Hammer Time

The PO300 is a random misfire code. If the engine is due for ignition parts, then by all means, replace them first. As for the high idle problems, that generally means the engine is finding unmetered air from somewhere. Look around for any type of vacuum or air leaks that will contribute to that. You can use a can of carb cleaner to spray a little in any suspect areas to listen for engine change to indicate a leak.
See what you have after this and we will go from there.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.

Response From zoggnoff

Okay, I used carb spray, found no leak.
friend suggested using soapy water.. used a gallon, still found no leak.
haven't received vacuum gauge yet.

I think my EGR is either stuck open or the EGR solenoid is broken.
I tapped on the TPS and moved around the wires to see if idle speed would change, it did not, so i think that is okay.
will test it with voltmeter tomorrow to be sure.
scan tool shows zero codes but also has 2 Incompletes - EVAP and EGR

The idle is rough and so is the exhaust

every once in a while I will be driving and the car feels like it shifts itself into neutral, the rpms jump, i left off on the gas it rights itself.
I think that may be an unrelated transmission problem though.

so what do you think?

Response From Hammer Time

I don't know where you got the soapy water idea but that will do nothing all for finding a vacuum leak. You use a combustable substance so the engine will react to inhaling it. If you suspect the EGR, then first pull the vacuum line off while it running, if that changes nothing, then remove the valve and examine it to see if the pintle is seated or not. If something is holding it open, then that was your problem.

Response From Guest Top Rated Answer

The PO300 is a random misfire code. If the engine is due for ignition parts, then by all means, replace them first. As for the high idle problems, that generally means the engine is finding unmetered air from somewhere.


put the old PCV back on, p0300 code went away.

still have idle problem. idles 600 RPMs in (D)rive, shifting to (P)ark jumps 1300 then gradually descends to 1100, put in (D)rive back down to 600. I noticed jump in RPM is less when shifting to (P)ark on an incline, e.g. drive way. Also when I drive around in 30mph zones i let off the gas pedal and the RPMs seem to just stay at about 1000 and the car doesn't slow much unless i step on the brake then it will idle back to 600 and stay that way unless i hit the gas... im not sure if any of this is normal.

haven't looked for leaks yet

To fix or to scrap...that is the question!

Showing 2 out of 5 Posts | Show 3 Hidden Posts
Question From jnsantoro333 on To fix or to scrap...that is the question!

Hi, I need advice and intelligent options. I have a 1993 Mitsubishi 3000 GT (V6 3.0L 2972cc 181CID FI GAS N B). Since I first got her back in 2003, she has only broken down twice. The first time was in May of 2007. It was the transmission…and that was five years ago. I had the entire tranny rebuilt at a place called “Daffy Daves” in Key West. While she was there, he also replaced the water pump, crank kit, TIMING BELT, oil pump, crankshaft, balancer, oil filter, battery, and rear wheel bearings. Over the next five years, following these repairs…Mitsy ran perfectly. Mileage at that time was at 157,338. That ran me about $2,300.
In December of that same year, the exhaust flex connector deteriorated and my car started to sound like it had a jet engine. She had also begun to show signs of other wear and tear. While I had it in the shop, I also had the A/C fixed (retrofit/out of Freon), bypassed a leaky heater core, and mounted/balanced 4 new tires. Mileage was at 165,941. Again, another great experience $697.03 later.
It wasn’t until June 2010 that Mitsy had to go back to the shop again. She was making some odd noises, and I’d begun to notice that cars were flashing their bright lights at me. It turns out my headlights needed adjustment. While there I also had them do a rotation and alignment, a lube, oil, and filter service, replace a l/r wheel hub assembly that was grinding, replace the outer tie rod ends, replace the serpentine belt, replace the valve cover gasket, and replace an axle seal. Mileage was 172,453 and my pocket was $1,306.97 lighter.
About a week later, while doing a routine check of the oil level during a fuel stop…I noticed I was REALLY low on oil. The mechanic said he couldn’t see any leak…and would need to do a dye test to be certain…to which I concurred. The dye test showed a slight leak at the oil pan gasket. To repair this they needed to remove the exhaust system. I also needed to have my engine torque struts replaced, so I had them take care of that at the same time. The mileage was at 174,633 and when all was said and done…cost was $724.33.
Within the week I made it a point to check the oil following their latest repairs. To my dismay, I was once again leaking a significant amount of oil…at the same rate it had been leaking previously. I took it back the following week and the mechanic indicated it might be the REAR MAIN SEAL, but that to get to that area of the car he would have to remove the entire exhaust system AGAIN to determine if this was the case. In the interim, he replaced the PCV Valve to avoid excessive back-pressure. At that time, I just wasn’t feeling too good about their diagnostic skills. I felt like I was being milked. I parked Mitsy and went in search of a reputable mechanic. At that time, the mileage was 175,591, and that only cost me $54.68.
At the end of August, I took Mitsy for a second opinion to a dealership. Niles Chevrolet had worked on my wife’s new Aveo and she seemed very pleased with their work. Following about 20 minutes of diagnostics, they determined that the leak was coming from the REAR MAIN SEAL. They did not need to do any DYE TEST in order to see the source of the leak, which they said, “…was as clear as day.” In fact, after showing them the maintenance records from M&M automotive, they were shocked to see that they had just replaced the oil pan gasket in mid-July. They noted, “You’d have to be blind to miss a rear main seal leak…especially a leak this bad wehn changing out the oil pan gasket.” They said these areas were only inches apart, and that the mechanic should’ve caught that…not only during the DYE TEST…but whenever he was poking his head around the areas of the oil pan and rear main. I’d heard enough. Mileage was 177,285. I had Niles do the rear main seal fix, as well as fix a reservoir fluid indicator that had begun acting up. That was $1,136.86 later.
A little over two weeks later Mitsy died completely. She made the weirdest sounds I’d EVER heard before…and just stopped running. She wouldn’t start back up…and from the sound of it when I tried to crank her back up…I knew better than to keep trying to start her. I had her towed back to Niles, and waited for the news. A day later, it came…“You’ve got an interference engine system. Your timing belt has failed…and you may have some serious engine damage.” Right now, you’re looking at about $700 to replace the timing belt…but before we proceed…we need to check the valves and cylinder heads.” The next day they told me, “You may want to consider NOT completing these repairs…the cost is going to be in the thousands…because most of your valves are bent and there could be other associated repairs needed, as well.”
I am going to have her towed, to YET ANOTHER MECHANIC…and get a second opinion about the damage to the valves, etc. It would just make me feel better to get a second opinion from someone who didn’t work at a car dealership. I’ve already spent quite a bit on Mitsy. Most of the major components have been replaced or repaired. She was running perfectly until that damned belt snapped. I love her…and in another 7 years…she’s going to be a classic. I am not sure if I should repair Mitsy or if I should find another used car. I am definitely not going to buy a new car.
Here are the options I see at this point:
1. The safe bet: I buy a new vehicle. I am NOT going to buy someone else’s potential problem. I’ve been looking, and I can easily see spending at least $25K-$35K for a “mediocre” sports car or SUV. Of course, I would also have to eat a $400+ MONTHLY payment for the next 4-5 years. But then, I could ride with confidence knowing the bumper to bumper warranty would cover any major issues. That is VERY important to me. With two jobs that both require a fair amount of travel…reliability is crucial. Of course, it’s also going to cost me around $4,800 in car payments…each year…to get that warm, fuzzy feeling. This would be a last resort.

2. A logical bet: Salvage Mitsy and buy another used vehicle. The problem with that, is that I won’t know a thing about that car’s history. I may be going from the frying pan to the fire!

3. The risky bet: Fix Mitsy, again…which will likely cost around $3,000. Take on a nice, easy $150+ payment for the next three years. BUT also be prepared to freak out anytime I hear the slightest noise…and with every repair…wonder, “Now what?!” I know MItsy isn’t getting any younger…but then again…the older she gets the more valuable she will become. And then of course, there is the argument that what I would spend on NEW car payments over the next 4 years…($19,000)…could easily cover any major repairs for Mitsy that remain (I mean really, what’s left?)…and have enough left over to get her a paint job, all NEW interior, and a better sound system. I could probably do this for HALF of the cost of what I’ll pay for a new car.

What would your decision be if you were in my shoes? New or used or keep Mitsy? What are your thoughts…in general? For the time being, I’m riding my motorcycle…but at some point…I need overhead cover. This is Florida…and I can only duck the rain so often. In addition, I have to make a decision about what I am going to do with Mitsy…and her insurance coverage. I could really use advice.
Thanks for any wisdom you can offer,
“Kate at the crossroads”

Response From Sidom

Well going by your post, it's pretty obvious you are very attached to this car.

From a strictly financial point, it would probably be better to get something new. Older cars typically start having more failures as time goes on, as you are already aware of.

The one big plus is it sounds like this car has been well maintained and that's huge so that needs to be factored in.

Any car is going to have problems, they don't make one that doesn't. Some of the aftermarket warranties are pretty good, especially for powertrain problems.....

This is a decision you are going to have to make. Your 2 options here would be either installing a low mileage used engine or going with a reman. I would compare prices and if it was even remotely close I would go with the reman. Repairing yours would probably be the most costly option...........

With this old of a car, while I don't usually recommend it, if you can find a good tech that does side work, that may be the route to go. But there is some cons doing this. Like timely repairs....It would be when he could do it... Warranty.....There would be none. Liability insurance.....Once again....there would be none.... but this is where you would probably find your cheapest price......

I just reread a bit of your post. Not to stir things up but there is no way you could've got all that stuff listed on the 1st invoice for $2300. A complete tranny rebuild, crank kit, timing belt, water pump, component kit. Any one of those three done with quality parts would be at the 2K mark or over.... There must be a miscommunication on what was actually done....

Response From jnsantoro333

First, thanks for taking the time to read that novel...twice! Yeah, not only do I love the car...but I also hate to waste things. I feel like there has been so much work done to keep her running well and maintain her, that she's got some years left in her that may be relatively trouble free. I'd be much more comfortable investing $3000 a year into her...than paying the same amount (or likely much more) for a new car each year. I am certain you are correct, the older she gets, the more things that will likely go wrong...I just have to make it relative to what new car payments would cost me each year.

Regarding the cost for the transmission...I actually got that done in April 2005. I checked the invoice from Longwood Imports and it shows they "replaced transmission." The invoice lists the A/T and Torque Converter at $1860.18 and labor was $449.70. So from what you indicated...I did okay?

In the process of tracking that receipt down, I took a CLOSER look into my Mitsubishi "file"...and there were ALOT MORE repairs that I had forgotten about in the past. Brakes, water pump, belts, fuel injectors...lots of stuff. Oddly, now I'm even more determined and convinced that I should keep her...and the decision regarding a remanufactured vs. a low mileage engine is all that remains from what I understand? As I "casually" typed in engines...a TON of Mitsubishi engines came up for sale...and in a WIDE range of prices. It seems so sketchy. Is there any type of well-known vendor who sells remanufactured engines...with a warranty for parts and labor? Presuming you know ALOT more than I do about cars...is it feasible to drop a V8 in her? I mean...if I'm going to do it...I'd like to DO IT. I've heard the V8 (which I have heard has a twin turbo system?) in the "big boy" 3000GT's is a monster...I like that. Would it be an easy transistion...or would it require a boatload of retrofits and fabrication? Are the tranny's compatible?

I was pretty surprised to hear that you thought the most financially sound idea would be to go with a new car. Believe me, I'm tempted. But I just don't see how I could spend more than $4,800 a year on Mitsy with all that she's had done already. If the gentleman at the last garage had suggested a change in the timing belt (ESPECIALLY knowing it was an interference engine)...we wouldn't even be having this conversation. I CAN NOT believe they didn't even SUGGEST it. Really upsetting. I'm not a big gambler...but I KNOW that I'm going to spend the big nut each year on a new car...no two ways around it. With Mitsy...if I keep the miles low and easy...I may be able to get around spending NEARLY AS MUCH for several years.

So again, THANK YOU. If you don't mind...I'd like to continue our conversation as I begin getting more details about how much damage was done to the engine...and what they think it will cost to repair it. With this information, I can then have something to contrast against what it would cost for a remanufactured engine. If you could guide me to some vendors/sites/people who are reputable...I will definitely look into the options available to me and consult with you for further advice...if you're okay with that? I'm in no hurry...and will research on my end too...but there are just SO MANY offers out there...I'm not sure what is really a deal...or what is probably a scam. Plus there is the whole aspect of "protocol" when it comes to buying an engine. How do I get it? Who manages the deal? How does the mechanic I use know if I've chosen the right one...I presume they need to be involved in the process?

Here's the ironic part. We live in Big Pine Key...which is about 30 miles from the college in Key West...where I work and go to school. We've decided to move BACK to Key West. This means that I'll be about 3 miles from the college. I'm probably going to take a mountain bike or motorcycle to work anyhow! Now, I also do property inspections all the way up to Key Largo...about 100 miles from Key West. I can rent a car for the day for about $40 and use it to do the inspections I conduct ONCE a week. Now that my travel needs are changing...and I can compensate on inspection days with a rental car...I'm really wondering if it's going to be a wise choice to bother at all...

Which leads me to the MOST IMPORTANT question. If I decide (oh, my aching heart) to scrap Mitsy...don't you think it'd be a shame to toss away all those repairs...and wheels...and accessories...and years of TLC...and just ALL THAT METAL in general? I've heard I'll probably only get a few hundred bucks anyhow. Man, that seems like such a waste!

Argh! What to do!

You're a saint for walking this thought process with me. I know I'm tossing a bunch of options out there...and maybe some would say the best thing would be to cut my losses now...but what if...what if?

Thanks,

John

Response From Sidom Top Rated Answer

I think the thing you have to look at here is the age of the car and what you need it for. This is a 17 year old car that you would be using as main transportation.

The big unknown right now is the cost of repairing the engine, if it's just top end and the cost isn't too bad that may be the route to go. If the pistons got decked I would probably go with a reman & good warranty. We've dealt with Jasper a few times and haven't had any problems and they have a good warranty.

If you go this route the best thing to do would be to find a shop that does this work, that offers a good warranty and let them do all the work. They will already have their suppliers and everything else needed. Really the only research you will have to do is finding the right shop. Ask around, friends, neighbors, relatives, BBB, you can use ase.com or iatn.net both have shop locators to get some names....

I don't get into custom work but converting that to a V/8 would be huge undertaking and very expensive. Not only getting the engine to fit but swapping the PCM & related wiring & sensor and then you would have emission laws to worry about. It would be next to impossible to get that street legal unless there was some street production model you could try to spec it to......

You've done a lot of work to it and I'm sure you could get more years out of it.

My honest opinion on this is, you should go new if you can or aleast mid 2000 range with a good AM warranty, keep the Mitsubishi fix the engine in it if it just has top end damage and turn it into your Sunday driver. From what you've posted, you'll regret getting rid of it and with your new possible situation it would probably work but would you trust taking it out of town on a long trip?

This is just my opinion but I consider anything under 2000 as old school.

Maybe Tom will jump in on this one he has some older rides he likes to fix up. The only thing to keep in mind here would be while you two probably share close to the same maintenance schedules......He's doing all his own work.............

Response From re-tired

Once you name a car your done ,you have bonded . It's only money . You will always find a way to justify the next check . Fix it and the two of you go on a nice trip.