Select Your Vehicle to Shop For Your Ignition Coil

Choose a Year for your vehicle's Ignition Coil

  • 2016
  • 2015
  • 2014
  • 2013
  • 2012
  • 2011
  • 2010
  • 2009
  • 2008
  • 2007
  • 2006
  • 2005
  • 2004
  • 2003
  • 2002
  • 2001
  • 2000
  • 1999
  • 1998
  • 1997
  • 1996
  • 1995
  • 1994
  • 1993
  • 1992
  • 1991
  • 1990
  • 1989
  • 1988
  • 1987
  • 1986
  • 1985
  • 1984
  • 1983
  • 1982
  • 1981
  • 1980
  • 1979
  • 1978
  • 1977
  • 1976
  • 1975
  • 1974
  • 1973
  • 1972
  • 1971
  • 1970
  • 1969
  • 1968
  • 1967
  • 1966
  • 1965
  • 1964
  • 1963
  • 1962
  • 1961
  • 1960
  • 1959
  • 1958
  • 1957
  • 1956
  • 1955
  • 1954
  • 1953
  • 1952
  • 1951
  • 1950
  • 1949
  • 1948
  • 1947
  • 1946
  • 1945
  • 1944
  • 1943
  • 1942
  • 1941
  • 1940
  • 1939
  • 1938
  • 1937
  • 1936
  • 1935
  • 1934
  • 1933
  • 1932
  • 1931
  • 1930
  • 1929
  • 1928
  • 1927
  • 1926
  • 1925
  • 1924
  • 1923
  • 1922
  • 1921
  • 1920
Show More Years

Shop By Brand

The Following brands are available based on your search.

  • ACDelco
    ACDelco
  • Auto 7
    Auto 7
  • Beck Arnley
    Beck Arnley
  • Beru
    Beru
  • Bosch
    Bosch
  • Bremi
    Bremi
  • Delphi
    Delphi
  • Denso
    Denso
  • Diamond
    Diamond
  • Eurospare
    Eurospare
  • Febi
    Febi
  • Forecast
    Forecast
  • Genuine
    Genuine
  • Hella
    Hella
  • Hitachi
    Hitachi
  • Huco
    Huco
  • Karlyn
    Karlyn
  • Lucas
    Lucas
  • Mitsubishi Electric
    Mitsubishi Electric
  • Mopar
    Mopar
  • Motorcraft
    Motorcraft
  • Original Equipment
    Original Equipment
  • Perma-Tune
    Perma-Tune
  • Prenco
    Prenco
  • Spectra
    Spectra
  • Spectra Premium
    Spectra Premium
  • Standard Ignition
    Standard Ignition
  • True Tech
    True Tech
  • URO Parts
    URO Parts
  • Vemo
    Vemo
  • Volkswagen
    Volkswagen
  • WSO
    WSO
  • Walker
    Walker
Show More Brands

Best Selling Genuine Replacement Ignition Coils

  • Constantly Updated Inventory of Replacement Ignition Coil Parts
  • We stock Discount Ignition Coil OEM Parts
Genuine
1996 Mazda Miata Ignition Coil Genuine

P311-2FA382E    New

Qty:
$232.26
Genuine Ignition Coil
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Production: 04/03/1995-
  • Includes Igniter
Brand: Genuine
Free Ground Shipping on this item
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1996 - Mazda Miata
Genuine
1997 Mazda Miata Ignition Coil Genuine

P311-2FA382E    New

Qty:
$232.26
Genuine Ignition Coil
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Includes Igniter
Brand: Genuine
Free Ground Shipping on this item
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1997 - Mazda Miata
Genuine
1999 Mazda Miata Ignition Coil Genuine

P311-5BAF4B7    New

Qty:
$397.20
Genuine Ignition Coil
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • includes Igniter
  • 1 Per Vehicle
Brand: Genuine
Free Ground Shipping on this item
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1999 - Mazda Miata
Genuine
1999 Mazda Miata Ignition Coil Genuine

P311-5BAF4B7    New

Qty:
$397.20
Genuine Ignition Coil
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • 1 Per Vehicle
Brand: Genuine
Free Ground Shipping on this item
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1999 - Mazda Miata
Genuine
2000 Mazda Miata Ignition Coil Genuine

P311-5BAF4B7    New

Qty:
$397.20
Genuine Ignition Coil
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
Brand: Genuine
Free Ground Shipping on this item
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2000 - Mazda Miata
Prenco
2001 Mazda Miata Ignition Coil Prenco

P311-296C522    New

Qty:
$45.65
Prenco Ignition Coil
Brand: Prenco
This Product is Eligible for Free Ground Shipping
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2001 - Mazda Miata
Prenco
1992 Mazda MX-3 Ignition Coil Prenco

P311-3DEDE56    New

Qty:
$31.10
Prenco Ignition Coil
  • 1 Per Vehicle
Brand: Prenco
This Product is Eligible for Free Ground Shipping
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1992 - Mazda MX-3
Hitachi
1992 Mazda MX-3 Ignition Coil Hitachi

P311-3095632    New

Qty:
$125.62
Hitachi Ignition Coil
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • 1 Per Vehicle
Brand: Hitachi
Free Ground Shipping on this item
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1992 - Mazda MX-3
Prenco
1993 Mazda MX-3 Ignition Coil Prenco

P311-3DEDE56    New

Qty:
$31.10
Prenco Ignition Coil
Brand: Prenco
This Product is Eligible for Free Ground Shipping
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1993 - Mazda MX-3
Original Equipment
1990 Mazda Miata Ignition Coil Original Equipment

P311-23E6918    New

Qty:
$254.80
Original Equipment Ignition Coil
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Melco
  • 1 Per Vehicle
Brand: Original Equipment
Free Ground Shipping on this item
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1990 - Mazda Miata
Prenco
1989 Jaguar XJ12 Ignition Coil Prenco

P311-545D59D    New

Qty:
$34.47
Prenco Ignition Coil
  • Chas: 157118-, with Marelli Ignition
Brand: Prenco
This Product is Eligible for Free Ground Shipping
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1989 - Jaguar XJ12
Prenco
1990 Jaguar XJ12 Ignition Coil Prenco

P311-545D59D    New

Qty:
$34.47
Prenco Ignition Coil
  • with Marelli Ignition
Brand: Prenco
This Product is Eligible for Free Ground Shipping
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1990 - Jaguar XJ12
Prenco
1993 Jaguar XJRS Ignition Coil Prenco

P311-545D59D    New

Qty:
$34.47
Prenco Ignition Coil
Brand: Prenco
This Product is Eligible for Free Ground Shipping
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1993 - Jaguar XJRS
Prenco
1982 Jaguar XJ12 Ignition Coil Prenco

P311-279AC35    New

Qty:
$47.15
Prenco Ignition Coil
  • with Lucas Distributor - Auxiliary Coil - Dual Coil System
Brand: Prenco
This Product is Eligible for Free Ground Shipping
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1982 - Jaguar XJ12
Prenco
1989 Jaguar XJ12 Ignition Coil Prenco

P311-279AC35    New

Qty:
$47.15
Prenco Ignition Coil
  • Chas: -157115, with Lucas Distributor - Auxiliary Coil - Dual Coil System
Brand: Prenco
This Product is Eligible for Free Ground Shipping
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1989 - Jaguar XJ12
Prenco
1987 Jaguar XJ12 Ignition Coil Prenco

P311-279AC35    New

Qty:
$47.15
Prenco Ignition Coil
  • Production: 01/1987-, Single Coil System
Brand: Prenco
This Product is Eligible for Free Ground Shipping
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1987 - Jaguar XJ12
Prenco
1988 Jaguar XJ12 Ignition Coil Prenco

P311-279AC35    New

Qty:
$47.15
Prenco Ignition Coil
  • Single Coil System
Brand: Prenco
This Product is Eligible for Free Ground Shipping
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1988 - Jaguar XJ12
Prenco
1989 Jaguar XJ12 Ignition Coil Prenco

P311-279AC35    New

Qty:
$47.15
Prenco Ignition Coil
  • Chas: -157115, Production: -05/1989, Single Coil System
Brand: Prenco
This Product is Eligible for Free Ground Shipping
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1989 - Jaguar XJ12
Prenco
1990 Jaguar XJ12 Ignition Coil Prenco

P311-279AC35    New

Qty:
$47.15
Prenco Ignition Coil
  • Production: -05/1989, Single Coil System
Brand: Prenco
This Product is Eligible for Free Ground Shipping
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1990 - Jaguar XJ12
Lucas
1976 Jaguar XJS Ignition Coil Lucas

P311-25DDDE7    New

Qty:
$37.23
Lucas Ignition Coil
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • with Lucas Distibutor
Brand: Lucas
This Product is Eligible for Free Ground Shipping
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1976 - Jaguar XJS

Latest Ignition Coil Repair and Installation Advice

CarJunky AutoAdvice

Ignition Coil Failure at 40K?

Showing 2 out of 2 Posts
Question From Guest on Ignition Coil Failure at 40K?

I've got a 2004 Volvo S40. I was told by the mechanic that the ignition coils needed to be replaced. Is it possible for ignition coils to be damages at 40,000 miles? Could it also be possible they got damaged when they replaced the spark plugs?

Response From Double J Top Rated Answer

Ignition components can and do fail at any time/mileage.

You mentioned that the coils are "damaged".

Explain how they are "damaged"



Jim

Ignition Coil +/-

Showing 2 out of 4 Posts | Show 2 Hidden Posts
Question From gtaro80 on Ignition Coil +/-

All,

I have a very stupid quesiton. I have a 65 Falcon and I'm confused the +/- leads on the ignotion coil. Does the negitve lead of the coil go to the cap or does that postive go to the distrubutor cap? Please dont laugh at the rookie : )

Response From Tom Greenleaf Top Rated Answer






***********

Tried to find a "generic" pic of wiring. Neg from coil goes to distributor. In graphic above ignore "choke, backup lights, idle cut off. "N" means NEGATIVE shown on the coil.

Hope that helps. I'll try harder if your still stuck with this,

T

Response From Tom Greenleaf

To add:

Coil may say "dist" on the coil which means NEGATIVE........... that's also where you would put a dwell tach or read RMPs....

T

Response From gtaro80

thank you again for your help!!!

Replacing an ignition coil 2001 jetta

Showing 3 out of 3 Posts
Question From Guest on Replacing an ignition coil 2001 jetta

I have a 2001 jetta I need to replace the Ignition Coil. But I am not sure if it is an easy or more difficult task. Is there anyone who can provide steps on to replace the ignition coil. THe coil for the jetta has the 4 in a row and not the 2 on each side. I hope that makes since. Please help!!!!

Response From Double J

Never done one on this type vehicle, but i did hear that they had many problems with these are were recalled by Volkswagon.

check with your dealer to see if yours is affected by the recall and /or was already done...

Response From way2old Top Rated Answer

Looking at the picture of ignition parts, the coil seems like it is held in place by 2 bolts. Looks like you need to remove the plug wires, disconnect the wiring connector and remove the 2 mounting bolts. I am like JIM N, I do not work on these and only have the book to look at. Good luck.

"Electronic" Ignition Coils and Contact Points

Showing 4 out of 10 Posts | Show 6 Hidden Posts
Question From Tham on "Electronic" Ignition Coils and Contact Points

Those electronic reluctor-triggered distributors,
typically used in cars builit since the 90's, are normally
used with an "electronic" ignition coil, such as
those made by Bosch or Diamond of Japan. They
usually do not have an external ballast resistor.

I wonder if these type of coils can be used with older
contact-points distributors too ?

Response From DanD

You could use a newer style of coil it would work fine but I’m not sure how much of a benefit it would be. The new style of electronic ignition system coils are meant to run on full system voltage and probably would produce a lot less secondary voltage if the primary voltage was reduced by a ballast resistor (Chrysler) or like GM and Ford a resistance wire built into the harness.
The purpose of the ballast resistor/wire on a point style ignition system is to protect the points: if the voltage in the primary was not reduced the points would fail quite quickly due to arcing; it’s not there to save/help the coil.
If you’re wanting to do this to get more punch from the secondary voltage, go to an after market performance ignition coil that was designed to run on 5 to 7 volts. They are much larger with more windings and have a larger case for oil or whatever they used to cool the windings.
The main purpose of electronic high energy ignition systems was to lengthen the spark duration because of the lean fuel mixture conditions not because they needed 80,000 volts to fire the plug but they just needed to keep it lit longer.
Maybe if you told us why you wanted to know, it would make things clearer as to where you’re going with this.
Just being nosey. LOL
Dan.

Response From Tham

Thanks, Tom and Dan. (Author asked me to delete this post but for now I won't but there may be some mistakes so take all under advisement, Tom)

The reason I asked the above is because I am using a standard coil
(with ballast resistor) with a 'high energy" electronic ignition unit.
This unit is made from a Dick Smith Electronics (Australia) kit
and was designed by Silicon Chip magazine of Australia in their
issue of June 1998. It's quite a popular design actually, and it
appears many people are using it.

It's based on the Motorola MC3334 IC (as a coil current regulator)
and the MJH10012 power transistor, which have both been used
in General Motors' own stock high energy system in some of their
cars. It can be triggered by the contact points, magnetic reluctor
or Hall effect sensor. I'm using the points.

The ignition unit was designed to be used with a standard coil,
but I think it is overheating my coil due to the dwell extension
incorporated. Several times, I had to pull by the road with the
engine idling badly and erratically, almost sputtering. I don't think
it is due to vapour lock. The coil was not leaking oil, but running
extremely hot, way too hot to be touched for more than a second
or two. After cooling down and jumping the circuit to use back
normal points ignition, the car appeared to run fine again.

Thus I am guessing that my coil cannot handle the extended dwell,
and am thinking of switching to an "electronic" coil. However, if
the ignitor should fail anytime, I would have to jump back to points
ignition again, and it would be a good thing if the electronic coil
was compatible with points.

I have an old Bosch blue coil and I wonder if that can be used.
Checking on the net, it is supposed to be a high performance
coil with built-in internal resistance.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Comment: Coils don't like heat. Points don't like high voltage and ballast resistors weren't even used when cars were all 6V. T

Response From Tham

(Sorry, I forgot to log in when posting the above.
Please delete the above post, Mr Greenleaf.
Thank you.)


I finally found out why the coil was overheating,
when I was replacing the points distributor with
an electronic reluctor-type one bought from the
salvage yard.

The positive wire, which is supposed to be
connected from the ignition key switch's "Run"
position to the ballast resistor before going to the
coil's positive terminal, had been connected direct
to that terminal itself instead.

When this was corrected, the coil ran very
much cooler, even with the electronic ignitor,
which is supposed to give out a higher current
to the coil.

Must have been modified that way by the previous
owner or wrongly assembled at the factory.

The shortness of that wire coming out from the
chassis would indicate that it was likely the latter.
Cars in Malaysia were very badly assembled in
those days. This is the case even now, as with the
indigenous Proton cars here.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

I didn't delete the post but added that it might not be right at the top. You need to tell me which post you want out or I won't just take one out. I won't mess with clean stuff but here to help you. I trust we all are.

Back to your inquiry about points vs electronic. I find it best to stick with what that car was made with unless you are building a race car.

There's nothing wrong with points. Some of the most powerful cars ever make used them. They just need to be looked at now and then or replaced. T

Response From Tham

Thanks, Mr Greenleaf.

I actually meant deleting the same last post
above (about me finding out the miswiring
of the coil), because I only realized later that
I was posting as a guest and had not logged in.

Apparently, logging in later and posting the
same message has self-deleted that earlier post,
because I do not see it here anymore.

Coming back to the topic, I believe the coil did not
overheat when I was using standard points
originally (without the Silicon Chip transistorized
kit), even though it had been wrongly wired at the
factory with the ballast resistor bypassed,
because normal points ignition gives out a
relatively low current.

When I used the points later to trigger the Silicon
Chip kit, which gives out a higher current output,
the coil started overheating.

Response From carjunky Top Rated Answer

Sorry Guys.... I deleted the "extra post" should ahve posted this sooner ;-)

Response From DanD

The current flow through that system must be pretty high to get the coil that hot.
You could maybe try one of these coils; their large case and cooling fins may do the trick.
The link below the picture takes you to their site and it looks like they have a tech support that may be helpful.
Dan.



http://www.accel-ignition.com/

Response From Tom Greenleaf

I would use a coil meant for points with a balast resistor. I think but have no way of checking but electronic ignition probably uses much higher voltage.

FYI - Ford had an option called "PermaTune" in the 1960s so it's nothing new. T

low voltage to ignition coil

Showing 2 out of 2 Posts
Question From quintin9 on low voltage to ignition coil

i have a 93 dodge dakota 3.9 w/192k igot it started the other day and it started fine but every time after that it had trouble running comp and fuel are fine but have low voltage to ignition coil 10+volts on one side and 4+ on the other changed some relays but did not help checked some fuses they seem fine can i get a little insight help please thanks

Response From Tom Greenleaf Top Rated Answer

Please - just one post per issue - more serves to get you LESS attention and confuses the issue,

T (this thread locked)