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Spectra Premium
2010 Chrysler Town & Country Ignition Coil Spectra Premium

P311-3D77923    W0133-1954193  New

Qty:
$66.74
Spectra Premium Ignition Coil
Brand: Spectra Premium
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Engine VIN
2010 - Chrysler Town & Country E
Standard Ignition
2007 Chrysler Aspen Ignition Coil 8 Cyl 4.7L Standard Ignition

P311-5D35DE2    UF-270  New

C1231 , GN10456 , 56028138 , E232 , 19145617 , 5041 , 2-50065 , C1653 , 52-2034 , 5C1710 , C1231VC , 56028138BA , 353C , 178-8483 , 5C1114 , 89057951 , 430002 , U5053 , 56028138AD , 52-2065 , E593C , C-522

Qty:
$21.39
Standard Ignition Ignition Coil
  • Coil on Plug Coil
  • Blue Streak Premium Quality
  • Product Attributes:
    • Coil Type: Electronic
    • Color/Finish: Black
    • Connector Gender: Female
    • Connector Shape: Rectangular
    • Connector Type: Plug In
    • Mounting Location: Valve Cover
    • Terminal Type: Blade
  • Engineered and tested to match or exceed OE for spark energy output, impedance, and durability. Tested at extreme engine performance condition at 7200 RPM. Advanced thermoplastic coil connector ensures proper connection and resists fractures caused by heat and thermal cycling. High-temp boot prevents high-voltage leaks, while stainless-steel spring provides proper connection with spark plug. High-impact housing material ensures superior bond to epoxy for longer life in all operating conditions. Internal, neodymium permanent magnet core surrounded by grain-oriented, magnetic-laminated steel maximizes high-voltage output at all speeds. Primary (22 gauge) and Secondary (45 gauge) copper wire ensure high-voltage availability for peak performance while reinforced bobbins prevent voltage flashover for extended service life. Copper wires using higher insulation grade ensure heat resistance and prevent high voltage breakdown.
  • Suggested Purchase Quantity: 8
    • Most jobs typically require 8 of this item.
Brand: Standard Ignition
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
2007 - Chrysler Aspen V 8 Cyl 4.7L 287 -
Standard Ignition
2002 Chrysler Grand Voyager Ignition Coil Standard Ignition

P311-1F90C98    UF-305  New

C1442VC , 56032520AB , 356Y , C-595 , F560 , E887 , 89057972 , 9Q3 , 5C1432 , C1403 , 52-1775 , 26350 , C1442 , GN10181 , 2-50092 , U2057

Qty:
$54.54
Standard Ignition Ignition Coil
  • Ignition Coil
  • Blue Streak Premium Quality
  • Product Attributes:
    • Coil Type: Electronic
    • Color/Finish: Black
    • Connector Gender: Female
    • Connector Shape: Rectangular
    • Connector Type: Plug In
    • Mounting Location: Engine Bay
    • Terminal Type: Blade
  • Engineered and tested to match or exceed OE for spark energy output, impedance, and durability. Tested at extreme engine performance condition at 7200 RPM. Advanced thermoplastic coil connector ensures proper connection and resists fractures caused by heat and thermal cycling. High-impact housing material ensures superior bond to epoxy for longer life in all operating conditions. Internal core surrounded by grain-oriented, magnetic-laminated steel maximizes high-voltage output at all speeds. Primary (22,5 gauge) and Secondary (43 gauge) copper wire ensure high-voltage availability for peak performance while reinforced bobbins prevent voltage flashover for extended service life. Copper wires using higher insulation grade ensure heat resistance and prevent high voltage breakdown. Optimum wire distribution developed by extensive testing ensures superior functional parameters and durability.
Brand: Standard Ignition
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2002 - Chrysler Grand Voyager
Standard Ignition
2005 Chrysler Crossfire Ignition Coil Standard Ignition

P311-5A98634    UF-359  New

E389 , 0001587303 , 19162128 , 1587803 , E500E , 5C1226 , GN10015 , 00107 , 52-1776 , 50981388AA , 52-1720 , GN10361 , 5C1434 , 352R , U3004 , C1361 , 0001587803 , E539A , C1444 , 5098138AA , 178-8301 , 1587303 , C1215 , 0221503035 , C-671

Qty:
$57.48
Standard Ignition Ignition Coil
  • Coil on Plug Coil
  • Genuine Intermotor Quality
  • Product Attributes:
    • Connector Gender: Female
    • Mounting Location: Engine Housing Cover
    • Terminal Type: Blade Terminals
  • Our ignition coils use 100% pure copper windings in the primary and secondary bobbins to improve durability and provide higher resistance to internal shorts and dielectric breakdown. Our premium ignition coils consist of a special blended formula for the best performance, longest life and better heat dissipation. A full E-Lam core of silicon steel and solid brass high voltage terminals protects against corrosion. Our ignition coils are built for maximum output voltage. Primary and Secondary windings feature enamel magnet wire for the highest temperature rating in the aftermarket. As a tier I manufacturer with engineering and design capabilities second to none, our ignition coils are made to the highest quality standards. As a global manufacturer of original equipment ignition products, we maintain complete quality control throughout the manufacturing process from componentry to finished product.
  • Suggested Purchase Quantity: 8
    • Most jobs typically require 8 of this item.
Brand: Standard Ignition
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2005 - Chrysler Crossfire
Standard Ignition
1997 Chrysler Chrysler R/T Ignition Coil 4 Cyl 2.4L Standard Ignition

P311-45796DA    UF-403  New

C-665 , 5C1089 , 4609103. , GN10142 , 4609103AB , 2-50013 , M05269670 , 52-1569 , M04557468 , C1136VC , 4609103 , 20372 , 19145620 , C1136 , 19145618 , U2073 , 4609103AC , 26339 , C-583 , 346B , 920-1060 , E423 , 920-1023 , 88921267

Qty:
$54.77
Standard Ignition Ignition Coil
  • Coil on Plug Coil
  • Blue Streak Premium Quality
  • Product Attributes:
    • Coil Type: Electronic
    • Color/Finish: Black
    • Connector Gender: Female
    • Connector Shape: Rectangular
    • Connector Type: Plug In
    • Mounting Location: Engine Bay
    • Terminal Type: Blade
  • Engineered and tested to match or exceed OE for spark energy output, impedance, and durability. Tested at extreme engine performance condition at 7200 RPM. Advanced thermoplastic coil connector ensures proper connection and resists fractures caused by heat and thermal cycling. High-impact housing material ensures superior bond to epoxy for longer life in all operating conditions. Internal core surrounded by grain-oriented, magnetic-laminated steel maximizes high-voltage output at all speeds. Primary (22,5 gauge) and Secondary (43 gauge) copper wire ensure high-voltage availability for peak performance while reinforced bobbins prevent voltage flashover for extended service life. Copper wires using higher insulation grade ensure heat resistance and prevent high voltage breakdown. Optimum wire distribution developed by extensive testing ensures superior functional parameters and durability.
Brand: Standard Ignition
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
1997 - Chrysler Chrysler R/T L 4 Cyl 2.4L 148 2429
Standard Ignition
1996 Chrysler Cirrus Ignition Coil 4 Cyl 2.4L Standard Ignition

P311-45796DA    UF-403  New

C-665 , 5C1089 , 4609103. , GN10142 , 4609103AB , 2-50013 , M05269670 , 52-1569 , M04557468 , C1136VC , 4609103 , 20372 , 19145620 , C1136 , 19145618 , U2073 , 4609103AC , 26339 , C-583 , 346B , 920-1060 , E423 , 920-1023 , 88921267

Qty:
$54.77
Standard Ignition Ignition Coil
  • Coil on Plug Coil
  • 3 Blade Term. Blue Streak Premium Quality
  • Product Attributes:
    • Coil Type: Electronic
    • Color/Finish: Black
    • Connector Gender: Female
    • Connector Shape: Rectangular
    • Connector Type: Plug In
    • Mounting Location: Engine Bay
    • Terminal Type: Blade
  • Engineered and tested to match or exceed OE for spark energy output, impedance, and durability. Tested at extreme engine performance condition at 7200 RPM. Advanced thermoplastic coil connector ensures proper connection and resists fractures caused by heat and thermal cycling. High-impact housing material ensures superior bond to epoxy for longer life in all operating conditions. Internal core surrounded by grain-oriented, magnetic-laminated steel maximizes high-voltage output at all speeds. Primary (22,5 gauge) and Secondary (43 gauge) copper wire ensure high-voltage availability for peak performance while reinforced bobbins prevent voltage flashover for extended service life. Copper wires using higher insulation grade ensure heat resistance and prevent high voltage breakdown. Optimum wire distribution developed by extensive testing ensures superior functional parameters and durability.
Brand: Standard Ignition
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
1996 - Chrysler Cirrus L 4 Cyl 2.4L 148 2429
Standard Ignition
1995 Chrysler Sebring Ignition Coil 4 Cyl 2.0L Standard Ignition

P311-45796DA    UF-403  New

C-665 , 5C1089 , 4609103. , GN10142 , 4609103AB , 2-50013 , M05269670 , 52-1569 , M04557468 , C1136VC , 4609103 , 20372 , 19145620 , C1136 , 19145618 , U2073 , 4609103AC , 26339 , C-583 , 346B , 920-1060 , E423 , 920-1023 , 88921267

Qty:
$54.77
Standard Ignition Ignition Coil
  • Coil on Plug Coil
  • Pigtail Required, Sold Separately 3 Blade Term. Blue Streak Premium Quality
  • Product Attributes:
    • Coil Type: Electronic
    • Color/Finish: Black
    • Connector Gender: Female
    • Connector Shape: Rectangular
    • Connector Type: Plug In
    • Mounting Location: Engine Bay
    • Terminal Type: Blade
  • Engineered and tested to match or exceed OE for spark energy output, impedance, and durability. Tested at extreme engine performance condition at 7200 RPM. Advanced thermoplastic coil connector ensures proper connection and resists fractures caused by heat and thermal cycling. High-impact housing material ensures superior bond to epoxy for longer life in all operating conditions. Internal core surrounded by grain-oriented, magnetic-laminated steel maximizes high-voltage output at all speeds. Primary (22,5 gauge) and Secondary (43 gauge) copper wire ensure high-voltage availability for peak performance while reinforced bobbins prevent voltage flashover for extended service life. Copper wires using higher insulation grade ensure heat resistance and prevent high voltage breakdown. Optimum wire distribution developed by extensive testing ensures superior functional parameters and durability.
Brand: Standard Ignition
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
1995 - Chrysler Sebring L 4 Cyl 2.0L 122 1996
Standard Ignition
2010 Chrysler 300 Ignition Coil 6 Cyl 3.5L Standard Ignition

P311-3066517    UF-502  New

921-2092 , C-739 , 4T7 , 4606869AC , U5105 , 4606869AA , 2-50096 , 4606869AD , 4606869AB , C1720 , GN10310 , 5C1565 , 178-8517 , 52-1827 , E1002 , 7B0 905 715 , C1522

Qty:
$29.29
Standard Ignition Ignition Coil
  • Coil on Plug Coil
  • Blue Streak Premium Quality
  • Product Attributes:
    • Coil Type: Electronic
    • Color/Finish: Black
    • Connector Gender: Female
    • Connector Shape: Oval
    • Connector Type: Plug In
    • Mounting Location: Valve Cover
    • Terminal Type: Blade
  • Engineered and tested to match or exceed OE for spark energy output, impedance, and durability. Tested at extreme engine performance condition at 7200 RPM. Advanced thermoplastic coil connector ensures proper connection and resists fractures caused by heat and thermal cycling. High-temp boot prevents high-voltage leaks, while stainless-steel spring provides proper connection with spark plug. High-impact housing material ensures superior bond to epoxy for longer life in all operating conditions. Internal core surrounded by grain-oriented, magnetic-laminated steel maximizes high-voltage output at all speeds. Primary (22 gauge) and Secondary (44 gauge) copper wire ensure high-voltage availability for peak performance while reinforced bobbins prevent voltage flashover for extended service life. Copper wires using higher insulation grade ensure heat resistance and prevent high voltage breakdown.
  • Suggested Purchase Quantity: 6
    • Most jobs typically require 6 of this item.
Brand: Standard Ignition
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
2010 - Chrysler 300 V 6 Cyl 3.5L 215 3518
Prenco
2004 Chrysler Sebring Ignition Coil Prenco

P311-5C5D27B    W0133-1975128  New

Qty:
$61.20
Prenco Ignition Coil
Brand: Prenco
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Engine VIN
2004 - Chrysler Sebring X
Delphi
2010 Chrysler Town & Country Ignition Coil Delphi

P311-149E2A4    W0133-1954193  New

Qty:
$85.90
Delphi Ignition Coil
  • 3/36 Warranty
Brand: Delphi
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Engine VIN
2010 - Chrysler Town & Country E

Latest Chrysler Repair and Ignition Coil Installation Advice

CarJunky AutoAdvice

chrysler codes p0355 and p01391

Showing 2 out of 3 Posts | Show 1 Hidden Posts
Question From mikevacc on chrysler codes p0355 and p01391

1999 concorde codes p0355 and p1391, The symptoms are: runs fine until the engine reaches operating temperature and then the engine may misfire randomly. Sometimes the engine will miss quite a bit and then sometimes the engine won't. This miss seems to be a "hard" miss when it happens. Every once in a while the engine will die at idle speed but will immediately start back up and then may not die again. I was told that it was probably the ignition coil on the #5 cylinder which is the cylinder described in the code p0355. I was wondering why the code p1391 would show up but a mechanic told me that the coil misfire could also cause the code p1391 to show up. Help would be much appreciated.

Response From Loren Champlain Sr

I suspect that your mechanic is correct, but if the crank sensor is dropping out, which is very common on Chrys. products, that can cause your symptoms, as well. Have him check the crank sensor with a lab scope while heating it with a heat gun, from cold to hot. These are at their worst when hot.

Response From mikevacc Top Rated Answer

Thanks for the advice. I did replace the #5 ignition coil but the codes came back again.(both P0355 and P1391). I was wondering why the code P0355 would come back if the ignition coil was replaced on the #5 cylinder. Could the P0355 be caused by anything else?

Town and Country Rough Running, P2308 code, Coil? Wires? Plugs?

Showing 2 out of 5 Posts | Show 3 Hidden Posts
Question From djs789 on Town and Country Rough Running, P2308 code, Coil? Wires? Plugs?

I have a 2006 Chrysler Town and Country 3.3l. The check engine light is on and I am getting P2308 error code. The Parts store print out says this is an erratic signal from the ignition coil secondary circuit.
The probable causes are:
1.Faulty spark plug or coil boot or 2.Failed ignition coil.
The van is running rough, Has a rough idle, Hesitation, Sputtering, Excessive engine vibration.
I replaced the spark plug wires a month ago. I replaced the coil and the spark plugs today.
The van is still running rough any suggestions?

Response From Hemi Guy Top Rated Answer

First make sure the ignition wire boots are dry and free of al moisture. If that doesn’t do it
Chrysler has a pcm update (re-flash) for p2308. (TSB number 18-008-05).

Response From djs789

Update:
I traced a bad coil driver signal going into the coil all the way back to back to the pcm for coil#3. I determined the pcm had a bad coil driver for the #3 coil. I ordered the remanned computer from Auto Computer Exchange in FL.
I installed the new computer. It seems to work. The computer has a lifetime warranty so I think I am golden. Thanks for your help.

Response From Sidom

There are a few more other things that can cause this problem then what you have listed. That code is for the coil circuit for #3 cyl. You should've had a P0303 as well...strange...

Since you've changed the plugs with no change, what you can do is clear the codes and switch the #3 wire to a different cyl. If you get a code for the cyl you moved the wire to then you have a bad wire...

After that it gets a lot more indepth and you will need a scanner and some other equipment to check out the circuit out to see where the problem lies..........

Response From djs789

Update:
I checked for arcing at night. No arcing. I rechecked and set gaps on the new plugs I put in.

The p2308 code is an error in the ignition coil #3. Coil #3 fires cylinders 2 and 5.
Erased the code. Then I flopped sprk plug wires from another cylinder for the number 2 wire.
I get the same p2308 code come. I did the same with the 5 cylinder wire with the same results.
So I am pretty sure its not the wires, plugs, and coil (which is new).

I checked with a TEST LIGHT the control wires for all three of the coils with the engine running.
Pin #1 (brown/orange wire) control wire for coil #3 LIGHT GLOWS CONSTANT. I think this is wrong.
Pin #4 (dark blue/tan wire) control wire for coil #2 LIGHT FLASHES - I think this is normal.
Pin #3 (dark blue/dark green wire) control wire for coil #1 LIGHT FLASHES - I think this is normal.

Since the control wire glows the wire must not be bad or grounded. I think the pcm must be bad.
Probably a good bet the computer is bad and should be replaced?

I don't know. Is there anything else I should check? The pcm is expensive. What do you think?

Any suggestions on replaing the computer if you think I should?

Engine missfiring

Showing 4 out of 4 Posts
Question From revgreg on Engine missfiring

1996 Chrysler Town & Country
3.8 L engine
Was driving the vehicle when it completely died. No spark was found at all. Replaced the ignition coil pack, the camshaft sensor and the crankshaft sensor. Also replaced the spark plugs and wires. The engine now runs but runs roughly as it is misfiring. At least 2 plugs do not seem to be firing at all. What could be the problem?

Response From Discretesignals

Which cylinders are missing?

Response From revgreg

I believe they are cylinders 2 & 5

Response From Discretesignals Top Rated Answer

2 & 5 are companion cylinders and share the same coil. You have spark at the coil for 2 & 5?

"Electronic" Ignition Coils and Contact Points

Showing 2 out of 10 Posts | Show 8 Hidden Posts
Question From Tham on "Electronic" Ignition Coils and Contact Points

Those electronic reluctor-triggered distributors,
typically used in cars builit since the 90's, are normally
used with an "electronic" ignition coil, such as
those made by Bosch or Diamond of Japan. They
usually do not have an external ballast resistor.

I wonder if these type of coils can be used with older
contact-points distributors too ?

Response From DanD Top Rated Answer

You could use a newer style of coil it would work fine but I’m not sure how much of a benefit it would be. The new style of electronic ignition system coils are meant to run on full system voltage and probably would produce a lot less secondary voltage if the primary voltage was reduced by a ballast resistor (Chrysler) or like GM and Ford a resistance wire built into the harness.
The purpose of the ballast resistor/wire on a point style ignition system is to protect the points: if the voltage in the primary was not reduced the points would fail quite quickly due to arcing; it’s not there to save/help the coil.
If you’re wanting to do this to get more punch from the secondary voltage, go to an after market performance ignition coil that was designed to run on 5 to 7 volts. They are much larger with more windings and have a larger case for oil or whatever they used to cool the windings.
The main purpose of electronic high energy ignition systems was to lengthen the spark duration because of the lean fuel mixture conditions not because they needed 80,000 volts to fire the plug but they just needed to keep it lit longer.
Maybe if you told us why you wanted to know, it would make things clearer as to where you’re going with this.
Just being nosey. LOL
Dan.

Response From Tham

Thanks, Tom and Dan. (Author asked me to delete this post but for now I won't but there may be some mistakes so take all under advisement, Tom)

The reason I asked the above is because I am using a standard coil
(with ballast resistor) with a 'high energy" electronic ignition unit.
This unit is made from a Dick Smith Electronics (Australia) kit
and was designed by Silicon Chip magazine of Australia in their
issue of June 1998. It's quite a popular design actually, and it
appears many people are using it.

It's based on the Motorola MC3334 IC (as a coil current regulator)
and the MJH10012 power transistor, which have both been used
in General Motors' own stock high energy system in some of their
cars. It can be triggered by the contact points, magnetic reluctor
or Hall effect sensor. I'm using the points.

The ignition unit was designed to be used with a standard coil,
but I think it is overheating my coil due to the dwell extension
incorporated. Several times, I had to pull by the road with the
engine idling badly and erratically, almost sputtering. I don't think
it is due to vapour lock. The coil was not leaking oil, but running
extremely hot, way too hot to be touched for more than a second
or two. After cooling down and jumping the circuit to use back
normal points ignition, the car appeared to run fine again.

Thus I am guessing that my coil cannot handle the extended dwell,
and am thinking of switching to an "electronic" coil. However, if
the ignitor should fail anytime, I would have to jump back to points
ignition again, and it would be a good thing if the electronic coil
was compatible with points.

I have an old Bosch blue coil and I wonder if that can be used.
Checking on the net, it is supposed to be a high performance
coil with built-in internal resistance.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Comment: Coils don't like heat. Points don't like high voltage and ballast resistors weren't even used when cars were all 6V. T

Response From Tham

(Sorry, I forgot to log in when posting the above.
Please delete the above post, Mr Greenleaf.
Thank you.)


I finally found out why the coil was overheating,
when I was replacing the points distributor with
an electronic reluctor-type one bought from the
salvage yard.

The positive wire, which is supposed to be
connected from the ignition key switch's "Run"
position to the ballast resistor before going to the
coil's positive terminal, had been connected direct
to that terminal itself instead.

When this was corrected, the coil ran very
much cooler, even with the electronic ignitor,
which is supposed to give out a higher current
to the coil.

Must have been modified that way by the previous
owner or wrongly assembled at the factory.

The shortness of that wire coming out from the
chassis would indicate that it was likely the latter.
Cars in Malaysia were very badly assembled in
those days. This is the case even now, as with the
indigenous Proton cars here.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

I didn't delete the post but added that it might not be right at the top. You need to tell me which post you want out or I won't just take one out. I won't mess with clean stuff but here to help you. I trust we all are.

Back to your inquiry about points vs electronic. I find it best to stick with what that car was made with unless you are building a race car.

There's nothing wrong with points. Some of the most powerful cars ever make used them. They just need to be looked at now and then or replaced. T

Response From Tham

Thanks, Mr Greenleaf.

I actually meant deleting the same last post
above (about me finding out the miswiring
of the coil), because I only realized later that
I was posting as a guest and had not logged in.

Apparently, logging in later and posting the
same message has self-deleted that earlier post,
because I do not see it here anymore.

Coming back to the topic, I believe the coil did not
overheat when I was using standard points
originally (without the Silicon Chip transistorized
kit), even though it had been wrongly wired at the
factory with the ballast resistor bypassed,
because normal points ignition gives out a
relatively low current.

When I used the points later to trigger the Silicon
Chip kit, which gives out a higher current output,
the coil started overheating.

Response From carjunky

Sorry Guys.... I deleted the "extra post" should ahve posted this sooner ;-)

Response From DanD

The current flow through that system must be pretty high to get the coil that hot.
You could maybe try one of these coils; their large case and cooling fins may do the trick.
The link below the picture takes you to their site and it looks like they have a tech support that may be helpful.
Dan.



http://www.accel-ignition.com/

Response From Tom Greenleaf

I would use a coil meant for points with a balast resistor. I think but have no way of checking but electronic ignition probably uses much higher voltage.

FYI - Ford had an option called "PermaTune" in the 1960s so it's nothing new. T

51 Chrysler 6 cyl

Showing 5 out of 15 Posts | Show 10 Hidden Posts
Question From Norman@two2cool on 51 Chrysler 6 cyl

I have a 51 Chrysler with a 6 cyl. engine and a positive ground electrical system. It was starting fine untill I let it set for a few weeks. It has allways spinned over slow so I had the starter checked and one bushing was replaced. I replaced the cables and a new battery was installed. it spins slightly bettter now.

I replaced the points, condensor and wires. I also bought a new standard ignition coil 6v with an internal ballast resistor (it says no resistor needed).

My questions are:

1. since it has a positive ground what post on the coil +- do I hook up the wire coming from the ignition switch.

2. question one would answer this but which the wire from which post on the coil +- goes to the distributor.

3. Does anyone know the timing procedure for these engines?

4. can anyone tell me about the electrical box that is on top of the engine? It looks like it has a resistor on it and another device. It is also wires connections to two places on the carburator.

4. What would be considerd acceptable compression for this engine with all plugs removed.


any help willbe appreciated Norman

Response From Loren Champlain Sr

The electrical box? Surely, this has a mechanical choke? Can't imagine what the wires would be going to. Most of the old 6 flat heads had a hole in the engine/bell housing area at the rear of the engine. The trick, not being an electrician, will be getting a timing light that works with 6v, pos. ground.
Back when,...battery companies made 8V batteries just for the starting problem. Unsure if they are still available.
Okay, I'm dating myself.

Response From Norman@two2cool


The electrical box? Surely, this has a mechanical choke? Can't imagine what the wires would be going to. Most of the old 6 flat heads had a hole in the engine/bell housing area at the rear of the engine. The trick, not being an electrician, will be getting a timing light that works with 6v, pos. ground.
Back when,...battery companies made 8V batteries just for the starting problem. Unsure if they are still available.
Okay, I'm dating myself.



The electrical box has wires coming from different areas. One was from the ignition. The wires exiting this is connected to two areas on the carb. The carb has a manifold heated choke and isnt electrical.

One wire attached to something in the bottom of the bowl. the ohter wire connects to a post at the lower part of the oppisite end of the carb.

This is my fathers car. he was driving it daily for fun. Then it wasnt started for a few weeks and wont start now. Im a fix it all while youre there kind of guy. especially when you cannot easily pinpoint a problem. I grabbed the plug wires and was getting some leakage in my hands. I knew this is drawing away some of the spark so i changed them. The starter was slow so we helped thaty a little by changing to all big battery cables and had the starter freshened up. I know that helped.

It still wont start. I did remove the plugs and placed number one plug so it would fire. Put my thumb over the plug hole and it fire when compression hits. This doesnt mean its not off a tooth or something but close.

Does this engine have a timing chain or is it gear to gear?

Response From Loren Champlain Sr Top Rated Answer

>>The electrical box has wires coming from different areas. One was from the ignition. The wires exiting this is connected to two areas on the carb. << I can't for life of me figure what those two wires would be for. They surely didn't try electrically heating the fuel bowl???? I did find an old Motors manual out in the garage. Here's some specs if you don't have them: Plugs .035, points .020 (35-38 dwell), firing order 153624, timing mark=second line before "0" on the vibration damper. The timing procedure is a bit weird: Bring #1 piston up on its compression stroke and stop when the pointer on the timing case cover is in line with the mark mentioned above. Loosen the distributor and rotate until the points close. Then, turn it the opposite way until the points just begin to open, tighten the dist. To compensate for octane being used, it may be necessary to alter the timing slightly. (Hey, it really says that).
The carb; Need to know what brand. Carter, Stromberg, Zenith, ect. Might be able to find some more info.
(116hp @ 3600rpm)
Engine is chain driven, btw.
Did a little more looking; Looks like it's going to be a Carter WCD or Carter BB, but neither are showing any electrical connections.

Response From Guest

Loren,

It would make sense to turn the distributor in the direction the rotor travels to close the points?

Then turn it oppisite direction the rotor spins to open them? Then this would be just like it was firing.

I also have a aircraft ignition timing box. I can easily attach to the dist wire and it will light or buzz when Im dead on points opening.

I will take a look at the carb. to see what model/manufacturer it is. Also the connections dont look dainty. They are doing something inside of the carb for sure. Allmost scary.

The carb was working fine. if it wasnt a good newer generation one barrel would be on it.

Response From Loren Champlain Sr

Norman; Is there any way that you could take a couple of pics of that electrical box and the carb, showing the wires?

Response From Norman@two2cool

I will try and take pics by the weekend. I got busy at the shop.

Response From Guest

I have pics of the carb will try and post soon. It seems this car is out of time. It is backfiring out of the carb.

Weeks before it stopped running it sgtarted running a little hot. I believe this was due to it skipped time. Then it finally got so far out it quit.

Does this engine have a timing chain? Gear to gear? Online I see it keeps refering to a timing belt but not much info.

Can anyone direct me to where I can find parts for this engine?

Response From Norman@two2cool

This car sure cranks well on a 12v battery. I disconnected the regulator before doing so. Whats needed to be done to change this car to 12 negative ground? If I get rid of the generator and add a delco 10si self exciting altenator, change the bulbs and put an internal resistor coil to take place of a ballast resistor. What else would I need to do?

All help will be appreciated.

Response From Loren Champlain Sr

I had a '40 Ford Coupe that was 6V positive ground. I changed it over to 12V neg after many years of problems.
EVERYTHING electrical has to be changed. Heater, wipers (if not vacuum), all bulbs, guages, ect. When I did it, I also rewired everything as, originally, all the wiring had a 'fabric' type of insulation, rather than plastic. Starter will have to be replaced, too.
It's a heck of a job, but can be done. Fortunately for me, Ford stuff is very obtainable. The older Chrys. stuff is, many times, made out of unobtainium.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Loren - May not be too many of us who recall these pups! Pos or neg ground alone for lights doesn't matter but a powered timing light would want 12V for power to "enhance" the light. Voltage in plug wire is about the same so lights that don't need boosting work just fine - bet I still have one!

If you are brave enough you can just use a test light and turn the engine by hand and watch the test light for when it goes off at the mark watching for #1 to line up. SLOW is key as engine could start or fire! AYOR with that way or have cap and rotor off while trying that if you know you are approaching #1.

Now I'm getting confused about which terminal on coil goes to dist. It may still be the neg, (-) or marked ) (dist) on the orig coil. They can work backwards I think and behave but everything must be backwards for the whole circuit.

Been way too long but I recall you can check the direction of the spark with a lead (graphite really) pencil in the line of spark and it's going in the direction of the flash if the lead point is in path of the spark it will glow downstream from pencil head. Plugs will fire either direction - I do recall that much and not sure it matters??

T

Response From Loren Champlain Sr

Ya got me on the coil polarity! If it's backwards, the pattern on the scope will be upside down, shows up like a sore thumb! Good luck finding a scope that will work on 6V pos. ground. I remember installing a stereo in my '40 Ford when I was a kid. Let the smoke out of that sucker in a heartbeat. (I was, probably 14 or 15, and remember just sobbing..all that money, literally going up in smoke) LOL. Seems that my '61 MGA was pos. ground, also. Hmmm? And, I'm even older than you! If that's possible? LOL.

Response From Guest

Maybe you guys can work with me on this one. Its obvious we are dealing with a positive ground system. The coil is sealed and naturally ungrounded.

So if one attaches the wires either way on the coil it cannot be to a ground. In a normal negative ground system the lead from the ignition switch goes to the positive post on the coil and the negative post is attached to the points/condensor.

The only time the ignition system is grounded is at the electrode when spark occurs.

So if the coil is ungrounded as is the points and condensor. The wire coming from the ignition switch doeant matter if its positive or negative. It it only matters that its attached to the positive side of the coil. Then the negative is attached to the points.

I am thinking this is correct. Just like a light bulb. it doesnt matter which way politarity runs through it. On a coil it only matters which way the current flows.


Does anyone think Im on the right track?

Response From Norman@two2cool

Sorry, I didnt log in. The last post was from me. Thanks for everyone help

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Just some notes on 6V pos ground systems as I own one and fortune would have it that it has needed almost nothing in the 41+ years I've owned it - original 61 YO coil and all!

Just checked mine as it caused me to wonder all over again. Wire to dist. show "pos" with test light and I could read the coil itself for markings but that clearly means the + (pos) on coil goes directly to distributor.

No ballast is needed on 6V ingitions - that's to reduce voltage to 6V for 12V systems once running to save points if I recall which is getting old too * By that you should see full votage to points when cranking and part voltage when running if thru a ballast resistor. Less than 6V probably won't fire.

If somehow "ballasted" right at the new coil it may need to be removed or another used. Any coil from any 12v car with points that I know of could work - untested but told so.

Battery cables: Don't use anything but FINE STRANDED ONE GAUGE WIRE. Seek real copper even with the higher price. Ground can be a massive braided strap and gauge counts big time in 6V systems - the real reason for 12v was it only needs 1/2 the copper.

Compression: If it ran a few weeks ago it's probably fine. The exact pressure could be elusive but I'd guess you'd see about 120ish on fourth compression stroke, increasing from the first to that. It would be momentarily higher while under operating speeds.

The slow cranking: Normal! It's flaming magic to me how an engine cranking so slow will start but they do??

Point gap guess: .016 or .017 - shouldn't be fussy - know that gap gets smaller over time and timing advances as it does that. Minimize that by applying a smear of dielectec (silicone) grease on leading edge of nylon that rides cam for points - NOTE - LEADING EDGE! You may find points with a felt oiler on wrong side for something newer by now.

More notes on pos Ground: Everything will test with test equipment for 6V in this case if you just keep in mind everything we now normally think of as ground will show positive. Mind warp but is so.

You can jump start 6V vehicles with 12V batteries AYOR but leave anything with light bulbs or if with a radio OFF. Starter itself can take it no problem and will spin like nuts!

My own is a GM based block custom made for John Deere using Delco named parts everywhere which is handy now. I've never converted to 12v as it never gave me enough trouble to bother. Also never went to negative ground as starter drive would need to be changed and not sure if I can find one so easy.

A must have if you don't!! :: Right now at WallyWorld they sell a 6 and or 12V "Battery Maintainer" which does do float mode even for 6V batteries! I've seen them for ages for 12v but was just on or off when put to 6V. This one will float - meaning you can just leave it on and it will come on and off by itself as needed using insignificant power to just leave it on. This is a charger but just at a very low amp rate. I've never been able to get a good two whole years out of 6v batteries with the random use my own gets - can be many, many months without touching it. Like any lead/acid batteries drained to flat don't like it AND if it gets caught in cold that way they absolutely do freeze and can self destruct - even crack the case!

Good luck. I can check my own original ign set up to compare which way what goes again if you are unsuccessful at getting it running. Should be all the same concepts,

T