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Best Selling Genuine Oldsmobile Fuel Tanks

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LKQ
1974 Oldsmobile Omega Fuel Tank LKQ - Platinum Pro

P311-3A2C434    FTK010233  New

Qty:
$104.56
LKQ Fuel Tank
  • 21 gallon, w/o filler neck, 39 5/8 x 21 1/4 x 10 1/4, lock ring kit included
  • FUEL TANK; 73-81 NOVA/FBIRD/CA[1125]
  • Platinum Pro
Brand: LKQ
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1974 - Oldsmobile Omega
LKQ
1987 Oldsmobile Cutlass Fuel Tank LKQ - Platinum Pro

P311-2C3FADC    FTK010182  New

Qty:
$101.84
LKQ Fuel Tank
  • 17 gallon, w/o filler neck, 36 1/4 x 24 1/4 x 8 7/8, lock ring kit included
  • FUEL TANK; 78-88 GM MIDSIZE RWD
  • Platinum Pro
Brand: LKQ
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Doors
1987 - Oldsmobile Cutlass 2
LKQ
1992 Oldsmobile Cutlass Cruiser Fuel Tank LKQ

P311-161EC99    TNKGM9B  New

Qty:
$169.91
LKQ Fuel Tank
  • FUEL TANK; 82-96 CENTURY/CIERA GAS WITH EFI
Brand: LKQ
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Fuel Type Fuel Delivery Type Fuel Delivery SubType Fuel System Type
1992 - Oldsmobile Cutlass Cruiser GAS FI MFI Electronic
LKQ
2000 Oldsmobile Intrigue Fuel Tank LKQ

P311-33EB2FC    TNKGM60C  New

Qty:
$304.63
LKQ Fuel Tank
  • W/ 18 Gallon Tank. Includes Lock Ring Kit.
  • FUEL TANK; 98-99 CENTURY 18 GALLON; INCLUDES LOCK RING KIT
Brand: LKQ
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2000 - Oldsmobile Intrigue
LKQ
1985 Oldsmobile Delta 88 Fuel Tank 6 Cyl 3.8L LKQ - Platinum Pro

P311-5B6125B    FTK010065  New

Qty:
$105.61
LKQ Fuel Tank
  • 24 gallon, with filler neck, 39 3/4 x 26 1/2 x 10, lock ring kit included
  • FUEL TANK 24 GALLON; 80-85 LESABRE
  • Platinum Pro
Brand: LKQ
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Body Fuel Type Block Engine CID CC
1985 - Oldsmobile Delta 88 Coupe GAS V 6 Cyl 3.8L 231 3800
LKQ
1986 Oldsmobile Toronado Fuel Tank LKQ

P311-06D7D66    TNKGM36  New

Qty:
$281.53
LKQ Fuel Tank
  • FUEL TANK; 86-92 SEVILLE ELDORADO; 86-93 RIVIERA
Brand: LKQ
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1986 - Oldsmobile Toronado
LKQ
1997 Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme Fuel Tank LKQ - Platinum Pro

P311-059287A    FTK010008  New

Qty:
$106.75
LKQ Fuel Tank
  • 30-3/4 x 30-1/4 x 10-1/8 Lock Ring Kit Included
  • FUEL TANK; 88-97 CHEV M-SIZE [1467]
  • Platinum Pro
Brand: LKQ
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1997 - Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme
LKQ
1995 Oldsmobile Achieva Fuel Tank LKQ - Platinum Pro

P311-21D1FBE    FTK010013  New

Qty:
$89.10
LKQ Fuel Tank
  • 44 3/8x21x9 1/4, lock ring kit included
  • FUEL TANK; 92-98 CAVALIER/SUNFIRE
  • Platinum Pro
Brand: LKQ
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1995 - Oldsmobile Achieva
LKQ
1997 Oldsmobile Cutlass Fuel Tank LKQ - Platinum Pro

P311-21D1FBE    FTK010013  New

Qty:
$89.10
LKQ Fuel Tank
  • Tank only (does not include pump), 44 3/8x21x9 1/4, lock ring kit included
  • FUEL TANK; 92-98 CAVALIER/SUNFIRE
  • Platinum Pro
Brand: LKQ
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1997 - Oldsmobile Cutlass
LKQ
1999 Oldsmobile Cutlass Fuel Tank LKQ - Platinum Pro

P311-476BE05    FTK010032  New

Qty:
$91.09
LKQ Fuel Tank
  • 15 gallon, steel tank; 44 3/8 x 21 x 9 1/4, lock ring kit included
  • FUEL TANK; 15 GALLON; 99-01 CAV/SUNF
  • Platinum Pro
Brand: LKQ
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1999 - Oldsmobile Cutlass
LKQ
1994 Oldsmobile Bravada Fuel Tank LKQ

P311-03FEA14    TNKGM18B  New

Qty:
$143.58
LKQ Fuel Tank
  • 20 gallon
  • FUEL TANK; 85-95 S10 BLAZER S15 JIMMY; 20 GALLON; WITH EFI
Brand: LKQ
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Fuel Delivery Type
1994 - Oldsmobile Bravada FI
LKQ
1996 Oldsmobile Bravada Fuel Tank LKQ

P311-4F90D03    TNKGM56B  New

Qty:
$179.42
LKQ Fuel Tank
  • FUEL TANK; 96 S10 BLAZER/S15 JIM 4-DOOR
Brand: LKQ
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Doors
1996 - Oldsmobile Bravada 4
LKQ
1996 Oldsmobile Bravada Fuel Tank LKQ - Platinum Pro

P311-2B52CA0    FTK010028  New

Qty:
$93.40
LKQ Fuel Tank
  • Tank only, does not include fuel pump, 48 x 15 x 11 1/4, lock ring kit included
  • FUEL TANK; 4-DOOR; 96 BLAZER/BRAVADA
  • Platinum Pro
Brand: LKQ
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Doors
1996 - Oldsmobile Bravada 4
LKQ
1998 Oldsmobile Bravada Fuel Tank LKQ

P311-40268C2    TNKGM56C  New

Qty:
$173.96
LKQ Fuel Tank
  • FUEL TANK; 97-98 S10 BLZ/S15 JIM 4-DOOR
Brand: LKQ
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Doors
1998 - Oldsmobile Bravada 4
LKQ
1997 Oldsmobile Bravada Fuel Tank LKQ - Platinum Pro

P311-4F3694A    FTK010017  New

Qty:
$93.40
LKQ Fuel Tank
  • Fuel pump not included, 48x15x11 1/4, lock ring kit included
  • FUEL TANK; 97-98 S10 BLAZER/JMMY; 4-DOOR
  • Platinum Pro
Brand: LKQ
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Doors
1997 - Oldsmobile Bravada 4
LKQ
1998 Oldsmobile Bravada Fuel Tank LKQ - Platinum Pro

P311-4F3694A    FTK010017  New

Qty:
$93.40
LKQ Fuel Tank
  • Steel, fuel pump not included, 48x15x11 1/4, lock ring kit included
  • FUEL TANK; 97-98 S10 BLAZER/JMMY; 4-DOOR
  • Platinum Pro
Brand: LKQ
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Doors
1998 - Oldsmobile Bravada 4
LKQ
1980 Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme Fuel Tank 8 Cyl 4.3L LKQ - Platinum Pro

P311-2C3FADC    FTK010182  New

Qty:
$101.84
LKQ Fuel Tank
  • 17 gallon, w/o filler neck, 36 1/4 x 24 1/4 x 8 7/8, lock ring kit included, Fastback
  • FUEL TANK; 78-88 GM MIDSIZE RWD
  • Platinum Pro
Brand: LKQ
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Fuel Type Block Engine CID CC
1980 - Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme GAS V 8 Cyl 4.3L 260 -
LKQ
1979 Oldsmobile Cutlass Fuel Tank 6 Cyl 3.8L LKQ - Platinum Pro

P311-2C3FADC    FTK010182  New

Qty:
$101.84
LKQ Fuel Tank
  • 17 gallon, w/o filler neck, 36 1/4 x 24 1/4 x 8 7/8, lock ring kit included, Notchback
  • FUEL TANK; 78-88 GM MIDSIZE RWD
  • Platinum Pro
Brand: LKQ
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Fuel Type Block Engine CID CC
1979 - Oldsmobile Cutlass GAS V 6 Cyl 3.8L 231 -
LKQ
1980 Oldsmobile Cutlass Calais Fuel Tank 6 Cyl 3.8L LKQ - Platinum Pro

P311-2C3FADC    FTK010182  New

Qty:
$101.84
LKQ Fuel Tank
  • 17 gallon, w/o filler neck, 36 1/4 x 24 1/4 x 8 7/8, lock ring kit included, includes Fastback
  • FUEL TANK; 78-88 GM MIDSIZE RWD
  • Platinum Pro
Brand: LKQ
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Fuel Type Block Engine CID CC
1980 - Oldsmobile Cutlass Calais GAS V 6 Cyl 3.8L 231 3800
LKQ
1980 Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme Fuel Tank 6 Cyl 3.8L LKQ - Platinum Pro

P311-2C3FADC    FTK010182  New

Qty:
$101.84
LKQ Fuel Tank
  • 17 gallon, 36 1/4 x 24 1/4 x 8 7/8, lock ring kit included
  • FUEL TANK; 78-88 GM MIDSIZE RWD
  • Platinum Pro
Brand: LKQ
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Fuel Type Block Engine CID CC
1980 - Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme GAS V 6 Cyl 3.8L 231 3800

Latest Oldsmobile Repair and Fuel Tank Installation Advice

CarJunky AutoAdvice

96 ciera sl oldsmobile, replaced door and now car won't start

Showing 2 out of 2 Posts
Question From scott423 on 96 ciera sl oldsmobile, replaced door and now car won't start

i got into an accident a few weeks ago with my 96 ciera sl oldsmobile. another car came head on to the rear driver side door, pretty close to the fuel tank. I was able to drive the car home and it was running fine but door was really banged up. straightened out the rear axel which had been slightly bent due to collision. drove the car regularly for a few days inbetween before i found a new door and replaced, electrics and all. now that the new door is on, the car won't start.

checked the fuses, checked the battery, checked the fuel level. when trying to start it seems so close to getting there but ultimately won't. when replacing the door, i did a lot of banging near the fuel tank, thinking it may have something to do with that.

any suggestions gladly welcome.

Response From Discretesignals Top Rated Answer

Courtesy of HT. Please read:



http://autoforums.carjunky.com/Automotive_Repair_C1/General_Discussions_F5/IF_YOUR_STARTER_CRANKS_THE_ENGINE_BUT_IT_WILL_NOT_START_P75655/

gas and temperature gauges

Showing 2 out of 9 Posts | Show 7 Hidden Posts
Question From andie402 on gas and temperature gauges

Hello,
99 Chevy lumina 3.1 liter engine. Daughters car, temperature gauge pegs out almost instantly but car does not get hot. Never needed coolant. Replaced thermastat, temperature sender. Still pegs out. Water pump then went out replaced that along with front cover gasket and intake gasket, and bled the air pockets. I don't think that has anything to do with the gauge though because this was all going on before waterpump went out. Never had to add coolant till pump went out. believe probably just a coincidence because all is fixed, no leaks and still pegs out. Just found out today though that her gas gauge does not work either. Are they connected in some way that neither one is working?
Thanks for taking the time to help me. Andie

Response From Sidom

Andie, you need to stay with one thread for the same problem...You're having mods cover ground already covered, thus the reason for 1 thread....

http://autoforums.carjunky.com/...ge_pegs_out_P105672/

Response From Discretesignals


Response From andie402

Sorry, I'm only trying to help my daughter who is a single mom with 4 kids and can't aford to take her car to a shop. i don't think I deserve to be slapped
for that. Sorry if I wasted your time. And Thank you to all who tried to help, i appreciate it. Thanks again.

Response From Sidom

He was just kidding with you Andie.....

Actually there is more info in this thread right now than the other one so I'll lock the other one to avoid any more confusion... so stick to this one

Response From Hammer Time

It is very likely that it is low on coolant and has air pockets. That engine is notorious for that and very difficult to to get full and all the air out. you need to pressure test the system to look for leaks paying close attention to the in take manifold gasket.

Response From Discretesignals

Water pump then went out replaced that along with front cover gasket and intake gasket, and bled the air pockets

Looks like they may have already done the intake gaskets.

I do know if you trap air pockets in this motor, it will overheat and the cooling fans will stay on high. Done this a few times before I purchased a coolant lift tool.

You should check the wiring and connector for the engine coolant temperature sensor. Wiggle the wiring and connector and see if the gauge wigs out. There are three wires on that one because half the sensor is used for the gauge and the other half for the computer. If you have a pocket scanner with live data information, you can look at the coolant temperature the computer is seeing and see if it jives with what the gauge is reading.

What is your gas gauge doing? There is a TSB on the fuel gauge fluctuating.

Response From andie402

She said that the gas gauge will go up and down.

Response From Discretesignals Top Rated Answer

Bulletin No.: 99-06-03-007C

Date: April, 2001

TECHNICAL

Subject:
Fuel Gauge Inaccurate/Fluctuates, Premature Low Fuel Chime (Exchange Instrument Panel Cluster, Replace Fuel Level Sensor, Reprogram EEPROM)

Models:
1997-99 Buick Century, Regal
1997-99 Chevrolet Lumina, Monte Carlo
1998-99 Oldsmobile Intrigue
1997-99 Pontiac Grand Prix

This bulletin is being revised due to part number changes and deletion of the parts table. Refer to the parts information catalog for the correct part number. Please discard Corporate Bulletin Number 99-06-03-007B (Section 06 - Engine).

Condition

Some customers may comment on the following conditions:

^ The fuel gauge reads incorrectly.

^ The low fuel chime sounds prematurely. For example the chime may sound when 19-22 L (5-6 gallons) of fuel remains in the tank.

^ The fuel gauge may fluctuate from full to empty and then back to full after a fill up and a hot soak.


Cause

These conditions may be caused by several factors which are vehicle specific:

^ Fuel contamination to the resistor board (sender card) of the fuel level sensor in the fuel tank.

^ Calibration changes within the EEPROM of the PCM.

^ Software revisions to the I/P cluster.


Each of these factors affect the accuracy of the fuel gauge and/or the low fuel warning system.

Correction

1998 Oldsmobile Intrigue vehicles built prior to May 7, 1998.

Request an exchange I/P cluster from the A-C Delco(R) Service Center. This cluster must contain the software modifications in Delco Electronics Bulletin # 98 IDPD07ISA.

Installing this new cluster will result in the elimination of the low fuel chime.

Important: You must advise the customer about the elimination of the low fuel chime, as this is a change to the Owner's Manual information.

All 1997, 1998 and 1999 vehicles built prior to December 1, 1998.

In order to improve the accuracy of the fuel gauge, replace the fuel level sensor in the fuel tank. Refer to the procedure in the Engine Controls sub-section of the Service Manual.

1998-99 Oldsmobile and Pontiac vehicles built prior to October 1, 1998.

Reprogram the EEPROM using any Techline CD numbered higher than CD # 21 for 1998 or the TIS 2000 # 12 CD or higher.

Parts Information

For the correct part number for the fuel sender card, refer to the appropriate Parts Information Catalog.

88' Cutlass Supreme wont stay running

Showing 2 out of 4 Posts | Show 2 Hidden Posts
Question From Timw2003 on 88' Cutlass Supreme wont stay running

My cutlass has been dieing randomly over the past few months. And stupid me didnt fix the problem then. When i would take it up hills it would act like it would die, and sometimes would. Ive changed the plugs, fuel filter, O2 sensor, M.A.P. sensor, and the Airflow sensor. Ive also used fuel injector cleaner(the expensive one, $22 a bottle). The engine starts but runs a little ragged. Whenever i hit the gas the slightest bit the car chokes and dies. I'm hoping that the injectors arent needing to be replaced. Any tips or knowledge on how to fix the problem, or and idea whats wrong? thanks

Response From Double J

Take a Fuel Pressure Reading using a Fuel Pressure Gauge.

Low Fuel Pressure from a Weak Fuel pump could be causing this.

Response From Timw2003

i do not know if this is normal or not, but i pulled back the throttle manually, and when i release it i hear a clunking noise. Sounds kinda like dropping a plastic cup. Is this normal?

Response From flgmtech1 Top Rated Answer

Yes the noise you are hearing is the throttle plate in the throttle body closing metal to metal contact. this is normal.
However, as previously advised you need to obtain a true fuel pressure reading especially loaded, i.e., under load as static pressure may be correct but under engine load the volume drops, so you may have pressure but not enough flow or volume.
There have also been cases with the 86-90 Oldsmobiles having the internal baffles inside the fuel tank cracking and causing issues with pump strainers and senders alike.

Starting a car that's been sitting for years

Showing 2 out of 17 Posts | Show 15 Hidden Posts
Question From evansste on Starting a car that's been sitting for years

I have a 1985 Oldsmobile Cutlass Ciera that's been sitting for over three years. I've already read that before starting it, I should change all fluids -- including the transmission fluid. However, I've also read that in order to change transmission fluid properly, you're supposed to get the transmission to the right temperature by driving the car for a while. So what should I do? Do I change everything else, except the transmission fluid, start it up, drive for a while, and then change the transmission fluid? Or should I change the transmission fluid before driving it (because it's been sitting for so long), and therefore, not bother to get it to a warmer temperature before changing the filter and the transmission fluid?

In other words, would driving the car with old transmission fluid be a bad idea, even though I'm doing it to warm up the fluid so that I can change it?

Thanks for any, and all, help.

Response From Hammer Time

I wouldn't even worry about the trans fluid right now. It's not a big deal for now. The fuel and engine oil are the important things. The coolant should probably be flushed but that can be done later. Fuel, Fuel, Fuel!!!

Response From evansste

I greatly appreciate your response, since this is the biggest question that I've had on this issue.

The gas tank does have lots of fuel (about 3/4, or half a tank, if I remember correctly). My plan is to siphon all of it out and put in new fuel mixed with Marvel Mystery oil. An article that I read online suggests mixing 0.4 ounces per gallon. They also suggest putting 4 tablespoons of the Marvel Mystery oil in each cylinder.

When I parked it, had I known then what I know now, I certainly would have stored it differently. I laid up an electric generator for more years than the car, but I knew that it was going to be sitting for a long time. I put fuel saver, which I guess is like the marvel mystery oil, in the cylinder, before storing it. And of course, I had already run out all of the gas. I decided to sell the generator about a year ago, and it started right up -- as if it had never been stored.

I didn't expect to park the car for so long, otherwise, I would have been a lot wiser about it.

Thanks again for your help. It seems as if this forum is a great place to turn to for automotive advice.

Response From Hammer Time Top Rated Answer

Yes, fuel stabilizer would have saved you a real lot of work. I really don't know if your siphoning idea is going to work though. That doesn't work on most new vehicles. You may have to drop the fuel tank to get the fuel out. The fuel is your one big problem. It hasn't been sitting long enough for any other big issues but it has been long enough for the fuel to varnish up and go stale. You don't even need to be too concerned about the cylinders.

Response From evansste

What if it had been sitting for longer than three years? After my post, I remembered that it was about three years since I canceled my car insurance. However, the car was sitting before then. It's probably been more like five years, maybe even six. Would changing the gas, oil and coolant still be good enough for this length of time?

Also, thanks for letting me know about removing the gas tank. I'll siphon first, to get most of it out, and then remove the tank in order to get the rest.

Thanks again for your help.

Response From Hammer Time

How do you simply forget 3 years?

We answer questions based on the info you supply. Maybe someone else has time to start all over here, I don't.

Response From evansste

I wasn't trying to be difficult or sneaky about the time discrepancy. I parked that car and put it in storage a long time ago. I'm typing this correspondence via a community computer in a computer lab that's far from where I live, so I was trying to think of the most accurate record I could use to give a time frame. My wallet still has the expired registration in it, so I figured that would be better than a blatant guess in terms of when I parked the car. So I typed my post with that date in mind, which is where I got the three years.

Then you responded to my post and mentioned that if its been three years, then your suggestion would be sufficient. I then thought to myself, "well what if it was longer than three years? Would the remedy be different?" It was then that I started to think more precisely about when I parked the car, and it dawned on me that I had parked it before the insurance expired. So that's what made me think about how it's been longer than three years.

I understand your frustration, and am still thankful for your help. As my uncle once said, "All knowledge is good knowledge.", so any advice from someone who has experience, is always helpful (even if it is for a three year dormant stage instead of five or six).

So once again, thanks for your help.

Response From evansste

I now have another question. As I've mentioned before, I read online that I should put 4 tablespoons of Marvel Mystery Oil in each of the car cylinders.

How important is it that I put Marvel Mystery Oil in each of these cylinders. If I skip this step, will I run into real trouble? I only ask because I'm having a really difficult time removing the spark plugs without potentially getting dirt in the cylinders. I haven't removed any of the spark plugs yet, but the plugs are difficult to get to and there's lots of dirt and grime around them. I can't really clean around the plugs because of their location. If I removed the engine, I could obviously get to the plugs a lot easier and clean around them before removing them. Because removing the engine seems a bit extreme, I was wondering how critical it is that I put the marvel oil in the cylinders.

Instead of removing the engine, I suppose I could rent a high-pressure air compressor and spray compressed air around the spark plugs. I don't know whether this would work or not. So once again, is the marvel mystery oil really necessary? If it is, I'd rather pressure spray the engine, or even remove it, rather than ruin it. If not, I'd just skip this step.

Response From MarineGrunt

It's not going to cause any kind of catastrophic damage not adding the mystery oil although it wouldn't hurt. You'd probably be okay just changing the oil and starting it. Oil is going to get pumped around right when you start it anyways.

It probably wouldn't hurt to change the plugs anyways. I bet if you asked a local shop they'd let you use a blow gun to blow out the debris around the plugs. It would only take a couple minutes. Another good place to ask would be a local community college. You could even buy a cheap pancake air compressor for less than $100. If not, I'm sure a neighbor might have one and would let you borrow it.

Response From evansste

Thanks so much for your response. Getting a second opinion from a professional sure is helpful.

The other day, I tried spraying the engine with my air compressor through an air gun handle that I bought. Not much happened because my air compressor is pretty small and doesn't provide much flow. I'd need to use a more capable compressor. It's good to know that this "marvel mystery oil in the cylinders" step isn't critical.

Your input is extremely helpful, and I greatly appreciate it.

Response From MarineGrunt

Just so you know, I'm no professional, just a diy guy. Like HT said, the fuel is the biggest concern. Fuel goes bad fast so that's a concern.

It probably wouldn't hurt pulling the plugs and squirting some oil in there. Mystery oil or regular. Personally, I would, but I don't see it causing any kind of catastrophic damage if you don't. What you'd be doing is getting some oil on top of the pistons and inside the cylinders to provide some lube since most ran down into the pan. In a sense you're pre lubing the pistons.

You can count on the info HT gave you earlier. He is a master mechanic with over 40 years experience, plus a shop owner, so anything he says is 100% accurate.

Response From evansste

You may not be a professional, but I'm sure that you have a lot more experience working with cars than I do. This is the first time I've ever decided to work on my car myself. All I've known up till now is how to change oil and tires.

I think I may power wash the engine after all. I think my uncle has a good air compressor that I can use. But it's still good to know that skipping this "marvel mystery oil in the cylinders" step, is an option.

Once again, thank you so much for your time and help. I greatly appreciate it.

Response From MarineGrunt

You're welcome. Glad to help out.

I'm pretty sure I know what you mean when you say "power wash" but wanted to double check. Since you said your uncle has a compressor I assume you just mean blowing with air. In my neck of the woods "power wash" means using a pressure washer which shoots high pressure water. That's one thing you never want to do under the hood of a car. There are too many electrical components and there's a good chance you could damage something. Blowing air is fine though.

Like I said, I'm certain you mean air but just wanted to mention it just in case. I hate not to say anything, I end up being wrong, and you run into more issues when it could've been prevented.

Response From Hammer Time

Yes, listen to MG on that. NO WATER UNDER THE HOOD!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Response From evansste

Thanks so much to both of you! MG, I'm so glad that you took the time to clarify. I was, indeed, going to use a tool that uses water. It's called an "engine cleaning gun". I bought it from harbor freight tools.

Link deleted .......................... not allowed

It uses an air compressor, but it also sucks up a liquid solvent for cleaning. I'm sure glad that you two said something because I certainly was going to hook the thing up, open the hood, and spray away while using a solution of "simple green" that I bought from the store.

It now makes sense that this product is most likely intended for washing engine parts once the engine has been disassembled and removed from the car. So I'm certainly glad that you two spoke up!

As I've said in one of my earlier posts. I don't have much experience when it comes to working on my own car. I truly am a beginner. Therefore, your insight is a tremendous help. Imagine the heartache that you've saved me just based on your last post alone! I would have messed up my engine by improper use of this tool. So thanks again, so much, to both of you!

Response From Hammer Time

20 years ago you could do that stuff too much electronics under there now. The people selling that foolish thing don't tell you that.

PS, please read the FORUM RULES

You are not allowed to post links with the exceptions of your own photos or videos.

Response From evansste

Sorry about posting the link.

I think I'll just skip the step about putting the marvel mystery oil in the cylinders. I can see how it wouldn't be a bad thing to do. However, what MG said makes perfect sense. As long as the oil has been replaced, when I start the engine, the cylinder will be lubricated from beneath the piston within milliseconds. This seems more cautious than taking out the spark plugs and potentially getting dirt inside the cylinders. All of this is very helpful.

cutting off problem 95 olds cutalss ciera

Showing 4 out of 4 Posts
Question From timjohnson on cutting off problem 95 olds cutalss ciera

I have an 1995 Oldsmobile Cutlass Ciera. It currently has 90,xxx miles on it. I inherited it when my father passed away. It has the 3.1liter v6.

Within the last 6 months I have had problems with the car losing power on the interstate mainly. I will pull to the shoulder when it acts up and most of the time it will still be running. When I try to give it gas while on the shoulder it bogs down badly. Most of the time it will just die after that. Sometimes when I try to re-start it it will run fine immediately and other times it will take several attempts to get it to run right. At first I noticed it would only do it when the fuel level was less than half a tank and it would only do it in the afternoons. Most recently it has done this with a full tank of fuel and also during the morning commute.

So far I have replaced the fuel filter, air filter, spark plugs and plug wires. But none of those seemed to help it which I honestly did not think they would except maybe the fuel filter.

At first I was leaning towards the fuel pump or fuel tank maybe with the pickup or something because it only happened when the tank was less than half full. Now I believe that is not the problem area. Someone at work suggested it could be the car's computer. The check engine light has yet to come on that I know of.

Any help or suggestions that anyone could provide would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Tim

Response From steve01832

Tim, this could be a few problems. Fuel pressure is the first thing I would check when the problem is happening. You should also check for spark at all cylinders. I have seen these coils and modules become heat sensitive and open circuit when they get hot. This does sound to me like an electronic part going bad but could also be a weak fuel pump or a restricted exhaust. Start with fuel pressure and spark on all cylinders AS THE PROBLEM IS OCCURING.

Steve

Response From timjohnson

Thanks for the tips. The problem is going to be checking all this stuff while sitting on the side of the interstate in rush hour traffic. Is there anything that you can suggest I can check or have checked while it is running normally?

Response From steve01832 Top Rated Answer

Unfortunately when the vehicle is running normally, the problem is not happening at the time. All tests will show up as OK. Only when the problem is happening is when the fault can be proven. The only suggestion I can give you is you can try heating up components with a heat gun (being careful not to damage a good component of course). You can try wetting components with a spray bottle of water and see if the engine responds. Other than that, we have to wait for the problem to rear its ugly head.

Steve