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Best Selling Genuine Volvo Fuel Filters

  • We Stock the following top leading brands, including Hengst
  • Constantly Updated Inventory of Volvo Replacement Fuel Filter Parts

We stock Fuel Filter parts for most Volvo models, including C30, C70, S40, S60, S80, V40, V50, V70, XC70, XC90, 122, 240, 242, 244, 245, 740, 760, 850, 940.

Hengst
2006 Volvo V70 Fuel Filter 5 Cyl 2.4L Hengst

P311-3A88E4E    W0133-1627554  New

Qty:
$15.64
Hengst Fuel Filter
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
Brand: Hengst
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
2006 - Volvo V70 L 5 Cyl 2.4L - 2435
Hengst
2001 Volvo S60 Fuel Filter Hengst

P311-3A88E4E    W0133-1627554  New

Qty:
$15.64
Hengst Fuel Filter
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Chas: 18764-
Brand: Hengst
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Chassis Range
2001 - Volvo S60 18764 and up
Hengst
2001 Volvo S80 Fuel Filter Hengst

P311-3A88E4E    W0133-1627554  New

Qty:
$15.64
Hengst Fuel Filter
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Chas: 184993-
Brand: Hengst
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Chassis Range
2001 - Volvo S80 184993 and up
Hengst
2001 Volvo V70 Fuel Filter 5 Cyl 2.3L Hengst

P311-3A88E4E    W0133-1627554  New

Qty:
$15.64
Hengst Fuel Filter
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Chas: 83268-, with Factory Code #1 - If " Factory Code " is needed, you must look at the Product/ ID plate looking from left to right on the 1st line, this code is in the 5th position.
Brand: Hengst
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC Chassis Range
2001 - Volvo V70 L 5 Cyl 2.3L - 2319 83268 and up
Hengst
2001 Volvo V70 Fuel Filter Hengst

P311-3A88E4E    W0133-1627554  New

Qty:
$15.64
Hengst Fuel Filter
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Chas: 16634-
Brand: Hengst
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel Chassis Range
2001 - Volvo V70 X/C 16634 and up
Hengst
2001 Volvo V70 Fuel Filter 5 Cyl 2.3L Hengst

P311-3A88E4E    W0133-1627554  New

Qty:
$15.64
Hengst Fuel Filter
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Chas: 77342-, with Factory Code #2 - If " Factory Code " is needed, you must look at the Product/ ID plate looking from left to right on the 1st line, this code is in the 5th position.
Brand: Hengst
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC Chassis Range
2001 - Volvo V70 L 5 Cyl 2.3L - 2319 77342 and up
Hengst
2006 Volvo V70 Fuel Filter Hengst

P311-24E8F89    W0133-1661667  New

Qty:
$42.82
Hengst Fuel Filter
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
Brand: Hengst
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Engine Designation
2006 - Volvo V70 B5254T4
Hengst
2014 Volvo XC90 Fuel Filter Hengst

P311-24E8F89    W0133-1661667  New

Qty:
$42.82
Hengst Fuel Filter
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • In-Line Filter
Brand: Hengst
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2014 - Volvo XC90
Hengst
1981 Volvo 242 Fuel Filter Hengst

P311-1F15550    W0133-1975280  New

Qty:
$17.86
Hengst Fuel Filter
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • (Outlet seal 947282, Inlet seal RCS 14x18)
Brand: Hengst
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1981 - Volvo 242
Hengst
1984 Volvo 760 Fuel Filter 4 Cyl 2.3L Hengst

P311-1F15550    W0133-1975280  New

Qty:
$17.86
Hengst Fuel Filter
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
Brand: Hengst
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
1984 - Volvo 760 L 4 Cyl 2.3L - 2316

Latest Volvo Repair and Fuel Filter Installation Advice

CarJunky AutoAdvice

2001 volvo c70 hesitates

Showing 4 out of 4 Posts
Question From pittbully2727 on 2001 volvo c70 hesitates

i just baught a 2001 volvo c70 and it hesitates when i take off and when i am not accelerating around 2400 rpms, i have changed the fuel filter, air filter, spark plugs, added a bottle of Lucas fuel treatment, also patched a hole in the ecu cooling hose.

Response From zmame


Who's to say damage hasn't been done to ECU injectors are run by transistors in ECU could be powder from aluminum housing floating around in there who know what els could be affected.. Any codes?.. could be coil, or bad coil boot.

Response From pittbully2727

no codes but there was some oil on two of the plugs that leads me to belive there is a bigger problem... doing a compression check today to check rings and exaust valve....

Response From zmame Top Rated Answer

you sure its oil not just wet.. or possibly oil leaking into plug cavity from leaking valve cover gasket.. wouldn't hurt to do a compression test anyways.

by oil on the plugs just making sure you mean on the tips and your sure its oil not just gas mixed with carbon from the plug.

1988 Volvo Advice

Showing 3 out of 4 Posts | Show 1 Hidden Posts
Question From Axplosion on 1988 Volvo Advice

I have a 1988 Volvo 244 that hasn't been run in over four years and I need to know what has to be done before I start it. I did the oil change and I know about the oil and fuel filter replacements. I got the radiator filled and I think I'm almost ready to start it after replacing the spark plugs, but here's what confuses me. I've heard from some sources that the gasoline has to be drained and replaced, but I've heard from others that just topping off the tank a little is fine for now. Do you have any input?

Response From DanD

There are a lot of variables that come into play with this situation; to many to mention.
What I suggest to do, is get a sample of the fuel (approx 1 quart) and have its volatility tested.
Most of the better shops will have what is called a Reid Vapor Pressure test kit. The test will tell you whether the fuel has gone stale or not. They’ll only need a couple of ounces of fuel too perform the test.
One other quick thing too do is have a smell of the fuel; if it smells like turpentine or anything other then gas; then its gone bad.
No; even if there is only a little bit of fuel left in the tank and that fuel has gone stale; don’t just top up the tank; drain out all the old and then fill the tank with fresh.
Sounds like a royal pain but you’ll be happy you did it; stale fuel could cause all kinds of grief.
Have a look at the bottom of the fuel tank; some of the older Volvo’s had a drain plug?

Dan.

Response From Axplosion

It could very well have a drain plug on it but the only problem is access. Even draining the oil is pure hell, the bolts are rusted over and you need to use Naval Jelly to loosen them. Is there any, dare i say, "quick and easy" way to do this?

Response From DanD Top Rated Answer

There are not a whole lot of options.
You could disconnect a fuel line from under the hood and then energize the fuel pump; but you’ll need to know what lines and how to jumper the electric pump.
You could try siphoning the fuel from the fuel filler; probably won’t work to get all the fuel out, if any.
Maybe try disconnecting a fuel line that is accessible under the vehicle; which may allow the fuel to siphon on its own.
So no there’s no easy way; but like I said, if the fuel is stale get it out of there.

Dan.

Volvo 850 randomly shuts down while driving

Showing 5 out of 10 Posts | Show 5 Hidden Posts
Question From cbchameleon on Volvo 850 randomly shuts down while driving

I have a 95 Volvo 850 with 105,000 miles on it and I live at high altitude in Colorado. About two years ago it started giving me a problem. It would randomly shut off while driving. I will all of a sudden not be able to give it any gas and all the lights on the dash come on and the engine shuts off and then I'll need to pull over. For a while it would start right back up again and it didn't happen very often so I didn't really address the problem. But in the last year it has happened much more frequently and now it has become an issue because it won't start right back up again. Now I'll have to leave it wherever it is for about an hour and then it will start back up again.

The fuel filter, fuel relay, spark plugs have all been replaced. I took it back to the mechanic and then he changed the crank sensor. This didn't fix the problem. At this point I don't want to keep taking it back to him to just pay him to keep guessing. What should I do? Any ideas of what the problem might be?

Response From Hammer Time Top Rated Answer

and now it has become an issue because it won't start right back up again.

That should make it real easy for a qualified tech to find the problem.

Response From cbchameleon

"That should make it real easy for a qualified tech to find the problem."

Well last time it happened the mechanic came out and hooked up diagnostics and that's how he came to the conclusion of crank sensor but that didn't fix the problem.

Response From Hammer Time

Sounds like it's time for a more qualified tech.

Response From cbchameleon

"Sounds like it's time for a more qualified tech." Probably :-), unfortunately I live out in the middle of nowhere and don't have very many options, that's why I'm trying to do some research

Response From Sidom

I wish I had an easy answer and fix for you....but unfortunately don't...

I don't know if this will make more sense but in this business, there are different levels of expertise.... Depending on the type of problem you are having is where you will notice it or not......If the failure is something common or simple, then most techs can find & fix it and all is good.....
When the problem isn't so common, this is when the trouble starts. It takes a tech that understands how the systems work and who can systematically go thru those systems looking for the failure and knows what it looks like when he finds it....

The less experienced techs can't do this and reley on guessing.......

From your post, it sounds like this may not be something common.....You guy has already tried one of the most common items.....There are a few other common things but without the right equipment...it would be guessing....

At this point while it won't sound like the cheapest, easiest option at this point.....For this problem...It would be best to find a shop that can actually diagnose problem.....It's not going to be for free or even cheap......but in the long run....it'll probably be the cheapest....

Response From Hammer Time

If the car will stay dead long enough, then it's just a matter of going through a test sequence. This is real basic stuff for any qualified tech.

Here's what needs to be done.


All "crank, no start" conditions are approached in the same way. Every engine requires certain functions to be able to run. Some of these functions rely on specific components to work and some components are part of more than one function so it is important to see the whole picture to be able to conclude anything about what may have failed. Also, these functions can ONLY be tested during the failure. Any other time and they will simply test good because the problem isn't present at the moment.
If you approach this in any other way, you are merely guessing and that only serves to replace unnecessary parts and wastes money.



Every engine requires spark, fuel and compression to run. That's what we have to look for.

These are the basics that need to be tested and will give us the info required to isolate a cause.

1) Test for spark at the plug end of the wire using a spark tester. If none found, check for power supply on the + terminal of the coil with the key on.


2) Test for injector pulse using a small bulb called a noid light. If none found, check for power supply at one side of the injector with the key on.


3) Use a fuel pressure gauge to test for correct fuel pressure, also noticing if the pressure holds when key is shut off.

4) If all of these things check good, then you would need to do a complete compression test.

Once you have determined which of these functions has dropped out,
you will know which system is having the problem.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

With Hammer on this.


Quote ">>The fuel filter, fuel relay, spark plugs have all been replaced. I took it back to the mechanic and then he changed the crank sensor. This didn't fix the problem. At this point I don't want to keep taking it back to him to just pay him to keep guessing. What should I do? Any ideas of what the problem might be?"


That suggests guesses on both fuel problems and ignition/spark problem. Tech should have narrowed it down by now even if they don't have enough info for a Volvo at hand,


T

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Is this cranking when it doesn't start or not cranking at all? Makes a huge difference on what to chase down. Glad you mentioned high altitude AND Colorado. Fuel injected shouldn't care about altitude and Colorado cars (owned two) have less corrosion problems than places that use road salts and as I recall CO doesn't,


T

Response From cbchameleon

"Is this cranking when it doesn't start or not cranking at all?" It does crank, like it's trying to start.

1990 Volvo 240DL Stalling

Showing 2 out of 2 Posts
Question From Ed Wrench on 1990 Volvo 240DL Stalling

This car had been sitting for a few years. I took it for a drive and after about 15 or 20 miles it started to miss very badly or stall out. I replaced the fuel pump and fuel filter. No change. It always runs fine for a good 10 to 20 minutes on the road. I put some gas treatment for water contamination in, waited a few days, then drove again. Same problem. Then I think it must be no ventilation on gas tank and it is pulling a vacuum. But no hissing sound when remove gas cap. But this time it runs fine for 30 minutes or more. BUT, it stalls out now only when I put it in reverse!! Now I'm thinking something like a big piece of rust is moving around in the tank covering the output for the gas. But maybe it isn't even a fuel problem. I don't want to drop the gas tank for nothing.

Response From dave284 Top Rated Answer

gas treatment won't help dead gas and new gas on top of that = bad/weak gas. I would drop tank/ clean it out/ add fresh gas / install new fuel filter, and what you described does sound like a fuel problem.