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Bosal
Qty:
$115.31
Bosal Exhaust Pipe  Front
  • 95-7 CHRY / MITS
  • Bosal Replacement Exhaust Pipe
Brand: Bosal
Position: Front
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Region Aspiration Engine VIN Position Block Engine CID CC
1999 - Mitsubishi Eclipse United States Naturally Aspirated Y Front L 4 Cyl 2.0L 122 1997
Bosal
Qty:
$86.37
Bosal Exhaust Pipe
  • 1994-93 SUMMIT/COLT/MIR OVERSIZE
  • Bosal Replacement Exhaust Pipe
Brand: Bosal
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Vehicle Doors Region Block Engine CID CC
1996 - Mitsubishi Mirage 2 United States L 4 Cyl 1.5L 90 1468
Bosal
Qty:
$86.37
Bosal Exhaust Pipe
  • 1994-93 SUMMIT/COLT/MIR OVERSIZE
  • Federal Emissions
  • Bosal Replacement Exhaust Pipe
Brand: Bosal
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Doors Region Block Engine CID CC
1996 - Mitsubishi Mirage 2 United States L 4 Cyl 1.8L 112 1834
Bosal
Qty:
$136.39
Bosal Exhaust Pipe  Front
  • 94-7 MITS GALANT
  • Bosal Replacement Exhaust Pipe
Brand: Bosal
Position: Front
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Region Position Block Engine CID CC
1997 - Mitsubishi Eclipse United States Front L 4 Cyl 2.4L - 2351
Bosal
Qty:
$136.39
Bosal Exhaust Pipe  Front
  • 94-7 MITS GALANT
  • Federal Emissions
  • Bosal Replacement Exhaust Pipe
Brand: Bosal
Position: Front
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Region Position Block Engine CID CC
1998 - Mitsubishi Galant United States Front L 4 Cyl 2.4L - 2351
Bosal
Qty:
$87.73
Bosal Exhaust Pipe  Front
  • 97 MITS MIRAGE
  • Federal Emissions
  • Bosal Replacement Exhaust Pipe
Brand: Bosal
Position: Front
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Position Block Engine CID CC
2002 - Mitsubishi Mirage Front L 4 Cyl 1.5L 90 1468
Bosal
Qty:
$126.76
Bosal Exhaust Pipe  Front
  • 97 MITS MIRAGE
  • Federal Emissions
  • Bosal Replacement Exhaust Pipe
Brand: Bosal
Position: Front
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Position Block Engine CID CC
2002 - Mitsubishi Mirage Front L 4 Cyl 1.8L 112 1834
Bosal
Qty:
$136.39
Bosal Exhaust Pipe  Front
  • 94-7 MITS GALANT
  • Excluding California Emissions
  • Bosal Replacement Exhaust Pipe
Brand: Bosal
Position: Front
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Region Position Block Engine CID CC
1999 - Mitsubishi Eclipse United States Front L 4 Cyl 2.4L - 2351
Walker
2003 Mitsubishi Lancer Exhaust Pipe 4 Cyl 2.0L Walker - Walker Front Pipe

P311-47C4948    53455  New

Qty:
$66.23
Walker Exhaust Pipe
  • Fed. Emiss.; If welded assembly, replace all required parts.
  • Walker Front Pipe
  • Product Attributes:
    • Class: D
    • Finish: Aluminized
    • Inlet Connection Type: 2 Bolt Welded Flange
    • Max Year Covered: 2004
    • Min Year Covered: 2002
    • Most Popular Make / Model: Mitsubishi Lancer
    • Most Popular Year: 2003
    • Outlet Connection Type: 2 Bolt Welded Flange
    • Overall Length: 31.875
    • Product Grade: Economy
    • Total Part VIO: 91037
Brand: Walker
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Aspiration Block Engine CID CC
2003 - Mitsubishi Lancer Naturally Aspirated L 4 Cyl 2.0L - 2000
Walker
2004 Mitsubishi Lancer Exhaust Pipe 4 Cyl 2.0L Walker - Walker Front Pipe

P311-47C4948    53455  New

Qty:
$66.23
Walker Exhaust Pipe
  • If welded assembly, replace all required parts.
  • Walker Front Pipe
  • Product Attributes:
    • Class: D
    • Finish: Aluminized
    • Inlet Connection Type: 2 Bolt Welded Flange
    • Max Year Covered: 2004
    • Min Year Covered: 2002
    • Most Popular Make / Model: Mitsubishi Lancer
    • Most Popular Year: 2003
    • Outlet Connection Type: 2 Bolt Welded Flange
    • Overall Length: 31.875
    • Product Grade: Economy
    • Total Part VIO: 91037
Brand: Walker
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Aspiration Block Engine CID CC
2004 - Mitsubishi Lancer Naturally Aspirated L 4 Cyl 2.0L - 2000

Latest Mitsubishi Repair and Exhaust Pipe Installation Advice

CarJunky AutoAdvice

bad catalytic converter errors...please advise me

Showing 2 out of 8 Posts | Show 6 Hidden Posts
Question From abstruseoni on bad catalytic converter errors...please advise me

I have a 2004 Mitsubishi Galant with about 110,000 miles. I took it to the shop for a check up only to find out my check engine light is burnt out and I have two engine codes popping up. I think the codes were P0420 and P0422, which the mechanic said was my left and right catalytic converters.. and he said that a dealership would have to fix it because it's a Mitsubishi. the dealerships quoted me (over the phone) about $2,400!!! I've googled catalytic converters and the parts (i'm not 100% which parts i would need to make this the easiest) range from $50-$400..Much cheaper than the dealer. My concerns are, I've read this requires a welder or sawzall, which in it's self is dis-concerning ...and i've read the CATs don't just GO bad, that it's usually from another issue, but i'm not sure what issues to check. plus I don't have a gas analyzer, so i can't even properly diagnose that it's the CATs. and if a mechanic told me I must take it to the dealership, what hope do I have of doing it? am i in over my head? I definitely don't have $2300 to throw at a dealer, but they charge $100 for a full diagnostic which might tell me for sure it's the CATs and might tell me what caused the issue to begin with, but I don't know for sure. Any advice on my situation would be appreciated. Thanks in advance

Ryan

Response From Hammer Time

Your only hope is to take it to a Midas or other exhaust shop. If there is an aftermarket cat available and there might not be, they will have access to it.

Response From abstruseoni Top Rated Answer

Thanks for the quick reply Hammer. I've googled 04 mitsubishi galant catalytic converters and got only a few results, but i noticed several different parts and kinds ranging from $80 - $500. and most of them show a picture of what looks like the whole exhaust pipe...but they're really only selling the CAT right? I would need to weld their cat onto my exhaust, right? (excuse my ignorance if i'm using the wrong name, i'm not use to this stuff) So wouldn't the CATs i get have to match my current exhaust system, for the most part? how do I know i'm getting the right part?

and could you enlighten me a little on "direct fit" parts? do those not require welding?

Thanks again :)

Response From Hammer Time

You've got the right idea but this is nothing for you to attempt yourself. Take it to an exhaust shop. That's what i did ffor my own vehicle. they are the only ones equipped for this.

Response From abstruseoni

You're right, it probably is too much for me, but I have a friend that's done a few catalytic converters before and he has most the tools we would need. However, I'm taking your advice and monday i'll drop my car off at midas for them give me a full diagnostic and quote me a price. depending on how that goes, i'll either have them do it or try to fix some of it myself. Thanks for all your help

Response From Hammer Time

If you can buy a direct fit "Y" pipe at a reasonable price, then fine but don't attempt to cut and weld that converter in yourself. It's not easy and requires a lot of experience to get it right.

Response From abstruseoni

I took my car to midas and for $30 bucks they were able to tell me what i already knew, lol. I thought they'd have something to check the gas levels and actually be able to tell me for sure that it was my left and right CATs...instead they just checked my computer codes and said it's my CATs for sure. and they told me I currently have OEM parts...oh and said my O2 sensor didn't need to be checked because it would give a code if it was bad... and apparently they charge $1200 for fixing the CATs.

I've got a friend that's done this before, so with his help I think we can replace it, but i'm still not 100% positive what part or parts to get. Here's a list of Galant 04' CATs:

http://www.thepartsbin.com/catalog/?N=9190&Nr=OR%28AND%28make:Mitsubishi,model:Galant,year:2004%29,AND%28universal:1%29%29&Vi=1676+11327+4294962849&y=2004&mk=Mitsubishi&md=Galant can you recommend any parts? I have a V6

the first one is listed as an Eastern Front Manifold Catalytic Converter and it looks like it has both the right and left CATs in it...is that right? or is this a different part completely?

and I was told my car has 3 CATs and that one of them is unmonitored, and since i can't test them individually should i replace them all?

Response From Hammer Time

Your codes are for bank 1 which would be the rear pipe.
You can do what you want but I wouldn't touch those parts with a 10 foot pole.
By the way, that 2 year warranty they are giving is not even legal in the US. Converters are required to be warranted for 50K and at least 8 years. You might want to check for warranty coverage on yours if you are the original owner.

Sputtering after drive through puddle

Showing 2 out of 12 Posts | Show 10 Hidden Posts
Question From Guest on Sputtering after drive through puddle

Year: 1995
Mike: Mitsubishi
Model: Mighty Max pickup truck, 2 wheel drive
Engine size: small 4 cylinder...not sure how many ltrs
Mileage: 155k

Will try to be as detailed as possible:

Last Thursday we had massive amounts of rain in our area. Was driving home at night and saw a large puddle of water by a backed up drain. I slowed down to about 10mph--thinking that would be slow enough and drove through the puddle of water.
Immediately after, my truck started sputtering and shaking. I only had a couple of blocks more to drive so I made it home and turned off the engine. Next morning (Friday) I got up and started the engine. Engine still sputtering. I opened up the hood and saw that the engine was shaking vigorously. I tried to drive it but it had no power and giving it more gas didn’t seem to give it any more power.
I took the cap off the distributor, all dry. I checked the spark plugs externally, looked all dry. Checked spark plug wires too, also dry.
The engine still sputtered and shook. At times it would correct itself and run normally--when I would press consistently on the accelerator and find an RPM sweet spot. Also, sometimes at idle it would stop shaking and sputtering but for only a few seconds. It wasn’t drivable, so I took a friends car to work.
So, today I thought maybe there is a pool of water somewhere that is causing a short or something, so I'll warm the engine up and see if I can evaporate the water. Started the engine up again--no problem. Same thing--still sputtering and shaking badly. I let the engine warm up and then drove it around the block--seemed a little bit better--at least I made it all the way around the block this time. When I got back I noticed smoke coming up from the gap between the cab and the bed of the truck. I turned the truck off and after a couple of minutes the truck stopped smoking. I am pretty sure the smoke was oil--smelled like it. Wasn’t thick smoke but dark enough to tell it was oil.

I am not very mechanically inclined. There is a repair shop about 1/4 mile away. I don't know if my little work truck's problems will go away on its own or if I need to take it into the repair shop.
What’s wrong with my truck? Any advice?

Thanks!!

-Michael

Response From Loren Champlain Sr

Michael; Sure sounds like a secondary ignition problem (cap,rotor, wires, plugs). Tom's idea of spraying a light mist of water on the wires and dist. cap to watch for arcing works very well. Also, look carefully inside the distributor cap for carbon tracking between the coil tower and the four plug wire contacts. The smoking may be the catalytic converter burning off the unburnt fuel (from the misfire).

Response From Guest

Thanks guys!

Yeah the water wasn't super deep...maybe about a foot or so. But like you said, at 10 mph is still created a pretty good splash up seen or unseen. can see the parts of the pavement through the engine compartment too...probably not enough of a sheild to protect from a splash up into the engine compartment.

I will try spraying the wires and cap this evening when its a little darker outside.

The distributor is on the drivers side of the engine towards the top. The spark plugs are all on the passenger side towards the middle on the side of the engine.

So a blast of water can ruin spark plug wires that instantly?

The air intake is on the top of the engine. The engine starts up fine. Does that rule out water in the engine?

So my plan of heating the car to evaporate the water probably won't work eh?

-Michael

Response From Tom Greenleaf

It's the shock of cold on hot parts that would be the issue now. The heat probably already dried out moisture.

As far as intake: If and only if the water went in thru intake fast enough it could "hydraulic" lock the engine OR when RPMs are high enough it could bust piston, bend a rod - who knows? You can't compress a liquid so the weak link would break - that would be real bad luck if so. I doubt that happened but I wasn't there to witness how much how fast water sprayed about.

If that did happen and it still runs at all it may take some help to diagnose just how bad it hurt what.

Hey - a foot of water at 10 real MPH is a lot!

T

Response From Guest

So I used a spray bottle and squirted water on all the spark plug wires, distributor cap, and down into the spark plugs. No arcing at all on anything I squirted water on. It was dark outside so arcing visibility was good. I was pretty liberal with my water too.

Is it possible the spark plugs cracked, or otherwise broke?

I noticed my exhaust manifold and pipe is right under where my plugs are and is totally exposed to under the car.

What should I try next?
Think it is severe enough to have to take it to the shop?

Thanks!

Response From Tom Greenleaf


>>What should I try next?
Think it is severe enough to have to take it to the shop?<<

Arching may not show up at all. It's tough but cancelling one spark plug at a time could find which one if it's only one. By that I mean it's probably just one and with one wire dangling or grounded such that it can't fire ONE of them won't change much and the rest would probably disable the engine entirely in a four cylinder.

There's a high chance this is only picking on a wire, plug or distributor cap. YES - it's that easy for them to fail just like that! Coil wire right at the coil is also a trouble spot and might not show either. Could be wire or the plastic of the coil itself - it's much like the plastic of the dist cap.

I'm VERY reluctant to suggest that you might feel the electric shock if you ran your hand around so don't. Leave that to those who are up for that as the shock is minimal but surprising if found that way - dangerous for some so plain don't. You could use a jumper wire to ground a long screwdriver to body metal and run it along and close to items that carry the high voltage and might find arching that way vs feeling it.

If you have the time and ability, take the plugs out and see if one is greatly different than the others. Don't mix up which one belongs to which plug wire in doing that either.

If you can keep it idling at all you could also feel at the tailpipe for a regular putt, putt or a random misfiring action. At some point it will be best to get help. Anything is doable and waiting too long could ruin an expensive item. The cat converter and any o2 sensors won't be happy with a misfiring engine for long and permanant damge to those could result.

Don't feel bad about seeking pro help. It takes years, lots of cuts, burns, busted knuckles to gain the automatic know how of some things. Can't alway just explain everything for every possiblity so easy.

Again: If this damaged something mechanical with the engine it could be elusive for even a pro at first and a series of test would reveal what the trouble is. Some could be engine rendered junk even! Hope not but if that is true you want a good diagnosis that it is true.

Hey - I could be missing some suggestion that just isn't coming to mind right now too. Hope other watch and will suggest away too. Good luck,

T

Response From Guest

I will try canceling the spark plugs in the morning. By canceling I assume you mean disconnecting the spark plug wire from the spark plug one at a time until the engine doesn't start or something changes.

Is there any other possibility that hasn't been discussed yet? Water somehow getting g in the catolitic converter or somehow getting in the exhaust system or getting on something that was hot and causing it to warp or break or somehow getting into the engine or oil or something?? What if steam got sucked into the intake somehow??

Thanks again!

-Michael

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Cancelling plugs: Let me expound more on that. It's an old trick of isolating which cylinder IF it's only one cylinder which one is the culprit.

With a plug wire disconnected at the plug and grounded (jumper wire to ground- hard metal engine part would do) that plug is still taking the current but not making or trying to make that cylinder run anymore.

When just one cylinder is the problem, doing that one at a time will result in NO change on the BAD cylinder. All the rest would make it run worse or not at all in lesser cylinder engines. It's just a way to find which one to chase down.

If that finds which one - may not - then you can suspect the plug, wire, (possible problem at the dist cap) OR a problem with the cylinder itself not being able to fire for any reason - sometimes a bent, broken valve, or anything but you then know it's that one for further testing.

Know that liquids don't compress: Example, if you took a syringe (medical, automotive, or for cooking type) and it had just air (vapor) in it you could compress it down almost completely without much trouble and it would spring back. If that item was full of liquid it would not compress and the sidewalls of it would explode, plunger (piston) would fail or the weakest link. Got it? You engine is compressing gassous vapor not liquid (fuel is evaporated for use to combust) AND if enough water entered thru air intake it could and would try to compress it and a weak link (piston, rod, valve ??) would fail - a mechanical break or bent something would result. There's no one way it would absolutely fail so you would then find out what the item(s) are that are damaged and decide on what to do from there.

Another note: The longer and more testing the higher the chances of fouling up a good spark plug and making the diagnosis elusive if not impossible without some new or known good parts - like plugs and wires to begin with. You can get caught replacing parts to an engine that later will be declared junk so I'm trying to avoid that waste.

Yet another note: Boats are designed for water - not vehicles! The brake parts, bearinged items have air gaps and seals essentially to keep minor moisture and dirt out but not necessarily good at sealing out water. That much like a wristwatch! The sudden shock of cool/cold will make the air gaps shrink hence sucking in water with greased items for a host a failures to come over some time. Car's don't do boating! Let's find out just what was unhappy mechanically about the situation,

T

Response From Guest Top Rated Answer

Very happy to announce I was able to fix everything thanks to everyones help on here!

I pulled out the spark plug wire from the spark plugs one at a time and tried to start the engine. Working from the back of the engine to forward plug 1 wouldn't start, plug 2 engine did start, plug 3 started but just barely, plug 4 engine started.
I replaced 4 plugs and tried again. Truck still started but still ran the same. I took another look at the distributor cap and in the good light I was able to see a very small crack between two of the posts on the inside of the cap going around the perimeter. It was so small I didn't see it the first time, and even if I did I wouldn't have thought much of it side the crack really didn't even look like a crack--looked more like a fine line of dirt.
Anyway I replaced the cap and boom everything worked again and ran pefectly!

I did notice something unrelated to this perticular thread though.
On the passenger side of the engine, where the exhaust pipe connects to the pipe coming out of the engine (manifold?) there is a small hole in the exhaust pipe--more like a small tear really, less than an inch across. When the engine is running I can see a small bit of exhaust coming out. I really had to look hard to see it, it's that small. Probaby the water got on it and caused it to crack?
Is this something I need to worry about?

Thanks again for your help! I have learned my lesson about driving through water!!

-Michael.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

That's pretty good news and glad to hear you found it and got to try that "cancelling" trick.

The dist crack can even be so fine it might even look like a pencil mark between posts inside and cause all hell. They can be bad and show nothing also.

The manifold/pipe or what exactly I'm not sure. If pipe metal and still strong it might take being welded or brazed over as a permanant fix. Cast metal is hard or near impossible to weld or at least I've had no luck.

Shock of cold sure could do it. That tear could get worse. IMO the puttys sold won't help much there - a real weld or braze might last forever. I do have to suggest taking care of that too as you just don't need any exhaust gasses that could enter cabin of this vehicle,

T

Response From Loren Champlain Sr

Running the engine with a misfire can damage other things. It can cause the catalytic converter to overheat/plug up/or, just plain kill it. The unburned fuel can wind up in the crankcase, dilluting the oil and causing engine damage from lack of lubrication. Note, fuel is still going into the cylinder that is not firing..It can wipe the cylinder wall of lubrication, also. Really best to find cause of misfire and correct it.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Hard to say for sure but the "secondaries" meaning high voltage items like cap, coil(s), wires, even plugs are weak links when suddenly doused. They were warm/hot when soaked and may have cracked or found a weak spot in a wire crossing up the firing - runs like crap and converter could glow hot trying to eat up all the unburned fuel while misfiring.

Those are the likely items that have failed. Sometimes you can see the "arching" of electricity if dark enough to know which item(s) are in trouble.

Notes: Water deeper than the bottom of a center line of wheel is too deep! If a true 10 mph - that's just fast enough to water ski and would make quite a spash unseen perhaps. Sometimes air intake will suck in water and that can blow the engine!

Tons of failures can result from driving thru water - starter motors, brake parts, washed out front end and driveline parts, bearings and lots more - not a good idea to drive thru deep water at all - guess you know that especially now,

T

04 Mitsubishi Lancer - Cylinder 4 Misfire

Showing 2 out of 5 Posts | Show 3 Hidden Posts
Question From tjk100 on 04 Mitsubishi Lancer - Cylinder 4 Misfire

Hello, this is my first post here and this problem is a little convoluted so I apologize in advance, but I'll try and keep it simple. A forewarning: I'm a good driver, but I'm terrible with car knowledge. Go easy on me. :)

For starters, I drive a 2004 Mitsubishi Lancer, 4-door with a 4-cylinder engine (I don't know the engine size, unfortunately, any advice on how to quickly find that information?), and about 120,000 miles on it, with automatic transmission.

As a quick background, last spring when I had my last inspection I was noted I had failing engine mounts, but that the car should last fine through the summer so long as I got them fixed before winter came back. Well, it's been winter a couple months now and I've been putting off the repair. (was quoted $350, which I can't easily spend right now)

When we started getting heavy snow here, I noticed my car struggling to get in gear while driving. It bumps a bit every now and there's frequent resistance with it getting into gear properly. Never so bad that the car's not driveable, but it slows it down from time to time. It's especially bad when I first turn it on in the morning, often having to floor the gas pedal just to get up to 40. The problem's gotten smoother as the weather's gotten warmer, but it hasn't gone away, either.

When this first started happening, the "Service Engine" light came on. I didn't think to check it out because it would only pop up when the bumpy getting-into-gear problem was occurring, so it seemed to make sense. I was guessing that the engine mounts were the cause of the driving problem and the "Service Engine" light coming on.

Tonight, however, I decided to get the service light checked by an auto parts store to be on the safe side. Their reading said the light was on because of a "Cylinder 4 Misfire" and they gave me 4 probable causes (ignition system fault, fuel system fault, vacuum leak or "engine mechanical condition").

I hope it doesn't sound like I'm squeezing a bunch of problems into one message, because I'm trying to find it if these problems could be related at all. Could my failing engine mounts have caused the cylinder misfire AND be the driving problem I've been experiencing? Or are these all completely separate issues?

I hope this hasn't been confusing, and I'd be happy to provide any extra information for help. Thanks in advance!

Response From MarineGrunt

Sounds like a whole different issue. What were the exact numbers of the trouble codes? There are some professional mechanics on this site and will be around first thing in the morning. They'll want the exact codes in order to help diagnose.

Response From nickwarner Top Rated Answer

You have two separate issues here. I'm guessing the code number you got was a P0304. Would be interesting to know if any other ones were present.

This misfire is just on the #4, and with you already mentioning your financial concerns and having to put off repairs, I'm guessing you haven't tuned it up recently either. That would be the first thing I would look at, is the condition of your spark plugs. If they are original they would be starting to fall on their face right about now with 120,000 on them and cold weather which needs a hotter spark to ignite cold fuel. This is a job you could do yourself and would be inexpensive to get the plugs at the parts store. Don't think you would be doing yourself any favors by getting the most expensive plugs either, get the exact factory replacement ones for this. Even if right now they are not the issue I can tell you they are about to be. If the cylinder isn't burning its fuel, that raw fuel goes down the exhaust pipe into your catalyst and will wreck it if you neglect this for long. That would cost quite a bit more to repair than the motor mounts you really do need to change.

If you have some basic sockets and wrenches and aren't afraid to get a bit dirty for the sake of saving some cash, We can explain to you how to do this job yourself for the cost of parts. You would need to look at the information we give you and decide for yourself if you have the tooling and ability to then complete these tasks. You don't want to get halfway in and find you are over your head. Then you end up paying a tow truck and it will cost more to have a mechanic put it back together after its been fooled with than it would to have him do the job from start to finish himself.

Think of what resources you have available to you and how handy you are with basic hand tools. Determine your comfort level with it. The spark plugs would be a good icebreaker to decide if you feel up to the task of trying to tackle those mounts. If you neglect a $350 repair long enough, it will cost you a lot more than that when it fails. We all see that happen on a daily basis in this field.

Response From tjk100

Thank you for your reply, sorry for not getting back sooner.

By "two separate issues" I assume you mean the failing engine mounts are one issue, and the cylinder 4 misfire/driving problem are the other issue, correct?

I wanna focus on fixing the cylinder 4 issue first since it seems more urgent. I'd like to get the spark plugs checked and replaced, can you tell me how I might check them out and determine if they need replacing? From there, where can I best learn how to fix them?

I'm okay with learning some basic car maintenance to get the spark plugs fixed, but I think I'll just take it to a mechanic when it comes time for the engine mounts.

Thanks again for your help!

Response From nickwarner


1.6L, 2.0L DOHC, & 2.4L DOHC Engines



Fig. Ignition system component locations-1.6L and 2.0L DOHC engines

  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2. Tag and remove the spark plug wires from the ignition coil by gripping the boot and not the cable.
  3. Detach the electrical connectors for the coil.
  4. Remove the retaining screws and coil from engine.
  5. Installation is the reverse of the removal procedure.

1.8L & 2.4L Engines



Fig. Ignition system component locations-1997-00 1.8L engine shown, 1999-00 2.4L engine similar
  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2. Detach the electrical connector(s) for the coil(s).
  3. Remove the spark plug wire(s) to the companion cylinder(s).
  4. Remove the coil retaining bolts and lift the coil from the cylinder head.
  5. The installation is the reverse of the removal.




Fig. Ignition system component locations-1.8L engine shown, 2.4L engine similar
  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2. Detach the electrical connector(s) for the coil(s).
  3. Remove the spark plug wire(s) to the companion cylinder(s).
  4. Remove the coil retaining bolts and lift the coil from the cylinder head.
  5. The installation is the reverse of the removal.


You will want to check the gap of the spark plug. Parts store sell a cheap gapping gauge that is useful for this. Also look for heavy buildup of crud. Some residue is normal. Oily deposits aren't.

Engine mounts are a seperate issue than the misfire, but most like the ones for your car are a bolt-on deal.

Starting motor/solenoid replacement

Showing 2 out of 13 Posts | Show 11 Hidden Posts
Question From Egas on Starting motor/solenoid replacement

Hi all,

I wanted to check with you how much labor wise could it cost me to replace the starter motor (and the solenoid as i think they are done both most of the times). I'm trying to evaluate a shop for future work, but somehow I think their estimation was high. $185.00 for replacement (parts aside).

Mitsubishi Lancer 2005 ES. 2.0L with 134,000 Kmts.

I thought in the future I can replace it myself, but don't have a garage and I needed to get it fix right away.

Thanks for the future input!

Cheers!

Response From GC

Are you sure that price did not include parts?

Are there mods done to this car? I know a lot of these cars are modded and could possibly require more time to replace starter.

If it was a stock vehicle, calls for 1.2 hrs on the 2.0. Multiply by the shop hour rate.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Quick look at a lifetime reman whole starter and solenoid was at cost $104USD. Shop would mark up part(s) and IMO not worth just doing part of it and did NOT find solenoid sold separately fast but it's out there. Remember that labor for place (wherever remans get done) is NOT the rate of a tech.


You said you can't do this yourself right now so your leverage for saving bucks is lost. It could/does cost to be without the car too and counts if done right the first time,


T

Response From Egas

Thank you both for your prompt responses.

To answer the questions: nope, is not modified or anything.. stock car.

Yes, they are charging ~180 only for labor. The freaking part (and I hope they are saying BOTH) charge is 230!

I did search for parts from rock out for example, and the price range is wide but a bosch remanu goes for 226, while a TYC is 71 bucks.. the solenoid (they do sell it separately there) is another 71 bucks.. I will ask them if they replaced both parts and will ask them for the replaced motor (maybe i can get it reman and sell it again? )

Yes, i said i cannot do it myself right now, but i was hoping to use this situation as a reference for that shop's rates on labor (they told me i can bring my own parts) so when i change other things i dont have time for, or the tools/experience i woudl want to go back to them (if they are not expensive).

Thoughts?

180 labor
230 parts..

Too expensive if is only motor? ok if is both solenoid and motor?..

Thanks!

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Some here IDK. Rob said labor I would expect is 1.2 hours for R&R = remove and replace whole starter and solenoid remanufactured unit in stock.


FYI - when time allowed (done with all this) and situation right I still had to wait for just a solenoid or a drive gear and some take some time anyway. Yes you could buy starter and alternator parts bit by bit and do yourself or just the part that is the up front problem not the whole thing.


You should know that unless YOU requested just do it part by part that's what you'll get. Shop usually decides on the approach and brand of new or remans, marks it up to "list price" but takes responsibility for the job. Meaning if their part failed in X amount of time parts and labor would be free to you. If by agreement you are going to try to bring your own parts you own the whole job whether it works or not would be my call.


Said - done with this for a long time now and longer since I've seen a true failed solenoid only on the piggy back style that you have. Who diagnosed this at all? If YOU just go in and say to do XYZ work that's just what you may get if it's the problem or not.


Yes that some shops will deal with "bring your own" parts by agreement up front but still who is responsible if it fails for any reason?


Seems right now you just need this done and over with and not mess with it anymore yourself so ask around for another quote if you wish or find out what the one you got really included,


T

Response From Egas

Thank you Tom.

Shop pretty much told me "the problem is starter" and then quoted me on labor and parts. They did say "low end is 190 bucks 1 yr warranty, top shelf is 230 lifetime" and both were reman.

I'll ask them for more info, or will ask the itemized invoice then i'll compare out there with other shops.

Thanks for the info!.

PS: related to me bringing my own parts, they said they wouldn't provide warranty for the parts.. i assumed they would provide it for the labor itself (that they installed it correctly, and such) if that is even feasible to get.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

This car might be an exception I've never seen for what I call piggy back starters/solenoids. They come together ready to bolt on new or reman units. Of course total new is more money. Quality of remans varies and by nature more defect rates than new.


Now this general biz is much like a restaurant if you follow me. You don't bring your own food then say it's not good after they cook it.


Some starters are so easy the labor doesn't matter and some a nightmare of obstacles that takes more time. The general idea is the repair place is also the parts outlet to final consumer. If you bring them a defective anything why would they want to redo it with another unless they clearly broke it or something?


Parts markup is just plain part of doing about any business. That is profit when nothing fails or defective OR covers the cost of doing it again at no cost to you is the way I see it.


If you buy the parts you are not paying retail prices. Parts places on line or stores also got some markup but will stand by (or should) the product they sold.


There's something missing with the "meeting" of minds for this job. Ask what that place's policy is up front. I say no free labor for a second starter if defective if you brought it in,


T

Response From nickwarner

I doubt they would warranty the labor if you bring your own parts. I don't. The reasoning for the shop is simple. They are going to order the parts from a supplier they know and have had good experience with to get a part that doesn't make a comeback. They then mark up the part, which is a part of doing business and if they did not they would be out of business in a hurry. They don't buy the cheapest made in india crap from ebay so you cannot compare internet pricing as it is an unfair comparison. You can get burned badly on internet parts.

This is a rebuilt starter, so it is going to have a core charge. This is the charge you have to front until they get back your old one so they can rebuild it. Core charges vary by part. Sometimes I have seen core charges more than the part itself. If you wish to keep the old starter that they take out, you will have to pay the core charge as they aren't going to pay it for you.

Bottom line is, if you are going to have a shop do the job, they buy the parts and do the job. If those parts fail they stand behind the work. If you do it yourself, you get the parts and you are left with the issue if it fails early. You don't go half and half on it.

The only time I allow customers to supply parts is if for instance they ask me to patch up a car after hitting a deer and have gone to a salvage yard to pick up the broken body parts. Done a decent amount of them. But if I am expected to stand behind any part of a job with free labor if it fails, I am only going to go so with my parts that I trust to outlast the warranty period.

Like Tom pointed out, you don't bring your own food to a diner and then expect no charge if you don't like the result.

Response From Egas

Picked up the car, it starts, it's a win.

So Tom, I did ask about the "BYOP" (some restaurants do allow you to bring some of the "parts" like the booze ).

You were right, no free replacement of the part if the part was defective. I was't expecting for them to do that free labor due to a bad part. What I do expect is that if they performed a bad installation (regardless if I brought my part or not) they should be accountable for. That is why i stated in my previous post under PS: "if that is even feasible to get" as it would be tremendously hard to prove (unless blatantly).

I also asked about the solenoid and yes, it is attached to the motor and they did change both. Should i assume they sell the old solenoid and motor back to the remanufacturer?

Nick,
I wouldn't understand why a business would not stand behind their activity. Their primary function is the service, not the reselling of parts, isn't ? For them not to warranty labor (or you for that matter) is something I cannot understand. Actually, I would argue that the best thing to do is to also include in the "bring your own parts" menu, the right to decline installing parts that either are semi-used or from a brand/company which quality really is below standards. This in order to minimize the amount of times a complain comes to the shop due to failure on a part installed.

Now, related to "online" purchases. Ebay is not the only online store. Rock auto, OReilly and some other good places carry a lot of original brand parts (not knock offs) including the same parts this store supplier carry (Car Auto Parts, Autozone, NAPA, etc ). So yes it is fair to compare their prices just as it was fair to compare prices between Amazon and Bestbuy for electronics.

Thank you for the core comment.. iwas really wondering what the heck was that and how that worked. I asked above if the shop would re-sell the old parts, so i guess is part of the Core description you made. My only question is, so if they did not charge me for the core, then is really marked up in terms of cost. In the comparison from rock auto the core charges were pretty much 50-50. That BOSCH part i mentioned is the more expensive and is still below price than the $234 dlls i paid for this remanu from the shop.

Thank you for the observations. I really appreciate the replies and this does provide me with good information on what to expect for future jobs that my cars might need.

But since i really like debate, and to finish with a reply to the food analogy. If i bring a piece of steak to a grill master, and in turn he/she burns the meat.. then for sure the grill master is to blame and not the steak. Even if the steak was from a Indian cow.


PS: URL to starter and solenoid for this specific car
Starter (solenoid attached)
links deleted ........... not allowed

Response From Hammer Time

You let me know where that restaurant is that lets you bring your own steak. In my over 60 years of life, I have never seen one.

Don't try to tell up about the quality of parts from different suppliers. Believe me, we know a lot more about what you are buying that you do and nearly everything you are going to buy online will be Chinese made junk.

If I reluctantly agree to install someone's own parts, they get no warranty at all. When there is a failure, who is going to determine whether it was a part failure or an installation problem. I'm not having that argument with anyone.

I supply the parts, you get a parts an labor warranty. If you supply the parts, you are probably going to be shown the door. Good shops don't play that game.

Response From Discretesignals

We get the customers that brings their own parts in sometimes. All the boss does is add more to the labor to make up for the loss. They think they are getting a great deal, but in the end they are pretty much paying the same without the labor warranty.

I don't know if it is actually true, but the area rep for Autozone told us that the Firestick down the street jacked their labor rate up to $120/hr. They got tired of customers giving them hell because the customers found parts or tires on the internet cheaper, so Firestick jacked the labor and now sell parts for what they get them for. Not sure if that will hurt them or not.

Response From Tom Greenleaf Top Rated Answer

Egas: Just beating on this some more. Repair shops are a biz that sells parts and installs them such that YOU the customer doesn't have to own a tool or understand diddle except how much it will cost to do what as THEY diagnosed and in a perfect job it's fixed and warrantied by that shop for a time or miles.


I (now ages and ages ago) didn't mind folks getting their own parts as it saved me the time for some situations like older and obsolete stuff or hard to find odds and ends. Universal agreement on just getting something done and fully understanding the risks.


Just your subject line suggests you don't know squat about a starter motor of the sort. I said back a few I haven't seen them sold separately unless somehow requested for some reason new or remanufactured. Yes there are reasons you might want to do just a part of an assembly not the whole thing - this isn't some collectible antique so forget that for now.


The old one or starter that doesn't work is saved as a "core" to go back and has a deposit on it. It could be cracked for some reason and you would lose the core deposit. All those cores go and get dismantles for what can be reused, cleaned up and wearing parts replaced then tested that it works. With starters most remanufactured ones (decent ones) would all have new solenoids, brushes, starter drive (gear thing) no matter what they looked like. The rebuilder really wants a good shell to fill with good parts again.


When you do enough of this as the tech or shop you get to know which brands really work best and a rebuilt part is really done well and checked as everyone loses if a part fails. Forget bargains - doing it all over again is just a total waste of your time and the shop's.


Screw the on line thing fast becoming about the only way for some things sucks. You can't touch and feel assorted parts first before wasting everyone's time that it doesn't fit properly, cheap junk parts or see a flaw then you need to ship it back which wastes valuable time too - what a PITA for all.


This is a service biz and hope job ONE is to fix something right the first time, be on time so you get your vehicle back all set and nothing to worry about except pay for the work. Again - that shop takes all responsibility. Sh*t - if they drop the dang new part on the floor and break it they deal with it. What happens when YOU brought it in gets too messy if something goes wrong for any reason.


The bring food to a restaurant is just a decent analogy. A good restaurant takes full responsibility for the quality of what they sell and how it's prepared. In the case of bringing your own steak and they overcooked it then why the fruck didn't you stay home and just do it yourself?


Cars or other these are trades and the work thereof.


Two common reasons to do things yourself. #1 is to save a buck mostly on labor and you have the time and tools for whatever you are doing. #2 to me is I WANT TO DO IT MYSELF BECAUSE I WANT TO NO MATTER THE COSTS.


From the top you were really scoping out a shop really it seemed. The auto biz has historically been high on the list of complaints for costs and plain rip offs. So could any trade or any biz. The web crap is faceless for "things" of any sort.


Back to the auto biz. As trades go it takes more training, time, huge money in tools and equipment plus a place to do it. Get cut, burned, inhale chemicals and get covered in dirt and crap working your butt off, get nothing (sometimes) but complaints about the cost and go home smelling like an exhaust pipe. That and dumb enough to do it again the next day.


Give them their due. The rip off artists will fail on their own,


Tom

Response From Egas

Hi Hammer,

In Chicago there is/was a restaurant called Mickey's Bar and Grill that on Tuesdays let you do that specifically; bring your own steak and they'll cook it for you as well as other places for fish and such. I would supply a link to the Chicago Tribune , but they are not permitted it seems. My bad for not following rules. I apologize for that. I thought of posting the actual picture and thought "i might be breaching copy rights and so on if i do that". I saw the URL button to include them and thought it was Ok as they were pictures to show Tom how motor and solenoid were bundled up for this specific model.

I'm not going to argue about quality of things made in other countries. But i will be hard pressed to answer the question: where was the part the car shop put in my car? Goes back to trusting a shop i never been there, and having to do my homework comparing prices as Tom suggested.

Thank you for the comments and perspectives. I do believe this is very healthy exchange of opinions that do help me a lot.

oh!, and I was just going through the entire thread.. i think they are on the pricey side. They ended up chargning me $197 for labor.. The entire assy was purchased from a supplier so no remanu labor on the shop.. and they told me their hourly rate (depending on what they do) is up to 86 per hr.. so using their max rate they charged me for 2 hrs and 17 minutes of labor
I guess I am not going back there again...but still will do comparison with a shop nearby my home (Mobile gas station with mechanic).

-egas