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ATP
1999 Kia Sportage Exhaust Manifold 4 Cyl 2.0L ATP

P311-0B99911    101423  New

OK08A13451C , 101423 , 674665

Qty:
221.17
ATP Exhaust Manifold
  • ATP Exhaust Manifold
  • ; Includes (1) Manifold Gasket, (1) Flange Gasket, (5) Studs, (5) Washers, (5) Nuts
  • Product Attributes:
    • LineCode: Atp2
  • ATP exhaust manifolds transport burnt exhaust gasses from the engine to the exhaust system. Over time exhaust manifolds can crack or warp releasing hot exhaust gas into the engine compartment. These gases can find their way into the passenger cabin creating a dangerous situation. The best way to repair the broken manifold is to replace it with a new one. ATP Exhaust manifolds are designed to fit and function like the original part restoring the exhaust system by eliminating the dangerous leaks.
Brand: ATP
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
1999 - Kia Sportage L 4 Cyl 2.0L 122 1998
DEC
2008 Kia Sportage Exhaust Manifold 6 Cyl 2.7L DEC - with Manifold

P311-3DF60DE    W0133-1922569  New

Qty:
877.49
DEC Exhaust Manifold
  • EPA Vehicle Specific Loading
  • ; Radiator Side (Bank #2)

    This exhaust manifold / catalytic converter assembly is NOT approved for sale or use in California.
  • EPA Federal Compliant - Vehicle Specific Loading Catalyst - Not Legal for sale or use in California. Legal in New York and Maine on EPA Federal Emission Equipped Vehicles only.
  • with Manifold
Brand: DEC
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
2008 - Kia Sportage V 6 Cyl 2.7L - 2656
DEC
2007 Kia Sportage Exhaust Manifold 6 Cyl 2.7L DEC - with Manifold

P311-58EBC10    W0133-1922570  New

Qty:
973.22
DEC Exhaust Manifold
  • EPA Vehicle Specific Loading
  • ; Firewall Side
    This DEC Catalytic Converter is 49-State Compatible and OBD-II Compliant.
    It is NOT LEGAL for Sale and Use on California Registered Vehicles for this
    specific vehicle application.
  • EPA Federal Compliant - Vehicle Specific Loading Catalyst - Not Legal for sale or use in California. Legal in New York and Maine on EPA Federal Emission Equipped Vehicles only.
  • with Manifold
Brand: DEC
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Drive Type Block Engine CID CC
2007 - Kia Sportage AWD V 6 Cyl 2.7L - 2656
Bosal
2006 Kia Spectra5 Exhaust Manifold Bosal - w/Manifold

P311-33D5692    W0133-1924005  New

Qty:
926.45
Bosal Exhaust Manifold
  • EPA Premium Load Direct Fit
  • ; This exhaust manifold / catalytic converter assembly is NOT approved for sale or use in California.
  • EPA Federal Compliant - Premium Loading Catalyst - Not Legal for sale or use in California. Legal in New York and Maine on EPA Federal Emission Equipped Vehicles only.
  • w/Manifold
Brand: Bosal
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2006 - Kia Spectra5
Bosal
2008 Kia Spectra5 Exhaust Manifold Bosal - w/Manifold

P311-33D5692    W0133-1924005  New

Qty:
926.45
Bosal Exhaust Manifold
  • EPA Premium Load Direct Fit
  • ; with Federal Emissions

    This exhaust manifold / catalytic converter assembly is NOT approved for sale or use in California.
  • EPA Federal Compliant - Premium Loading Catalyst - Not Legal for sale or use in California. Legal in New York and Maine on EPA Federal Emission Equipped Vehicles only.
  • w/Manifold
Brand: Bosal
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2008 - Kia Spectra5

Latest Car Advice

CarJunky AutoAdvice

exhaust

Showing 2 out of 6 Posts | Show 4 Hidden Posts
Question From whinnierose on exhaust

ok my exhaust is a pipe coming from the manifold with a small coffee can shaped canister on it . it is broken inside the manifold. it's a 2003 kia spectra. can i remove this and fix myself.

Response From Jeff Norfolk

What do you mean by broke inside the manifold. Is the bolt broke inside the manifold? Or is the manifold broke? Or is the pipe that connects to the manifold broke?

Response From whinnierose

the pipe leading into the manifold is broken right at the manifold.

Response From Tom Greenleaf Top Rated Answer

Don't know Kia at all but is this an smaller tube that puts air into exhaust manifold the rusted/broke right at the heavier casting of the exhaust manifold? If so, depending on how that attaches you may find a kit to fix this, or might have to get a piece out of manifold for a new pipe. Little can thing seems like it might be a check valve and may or may not come with replacement parts and be difficut also to reuse if this is all what I'm thinking??

T

Response From Jeff Norfolk

I agree with Tom. You may be able to find replacement parts online or at the dealer if the pipe will unbolt where it attetches opposite the maniflod. If not an exhaust shop should be able to weld a ne piec of pipe in place for relativly cheap. Good Luck

Response From Double J

Here is a pic of the exhaust system....


2000 Kia Sportage start and idle problems

Showing 2 out of 10 Posts | Show 8 Hidden Posts
Question From usmc2037 on 2000 Kia Sportage start and idle problems

Have a 2000 Kia Sportage with a 2.0 DOHC engine. Recently replaced headgasket after car overheated due to bad fan clutch. Fuel pump has also been replaced. The engine still has the same problem as it had after it overheated. Very difficult to start. Have to pump the gas pedal like it has a carb instead of fuel injection. After getting it started it runs but is rough(seems to run smoother at higher rpms). It will then go dead once the engine warms up and it goes to low idle. As long as the rpms are kept high the engine will run, but let the rpms go down and it will die. Any help would be appreciated.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Start by taking a hard look at what had to be unplugged, wires, vac hoses etc., and see if any were left unplugged or damaged. Good luck,

Response From usmc2037 Top Rated Answer

Thanks for the advice, already did the check several times. The intake manifold, cylinder head, and exhaust manifold came off as a single unit, just a few wires on the back of the valve cover gasket, a hose and a ground wire to disconnect that are not in plain site. By the way, while I had it all apart, put in new plugs and wires since you have to take the breather assembly off the top of the engine to get to them.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

If the rough running seems regular it is probably isolated to one cylinder. Feel for the exhaust flow out tailpipe. If it has a steady "putt" it's generally one cyl. Pull plug wires one at a time, the problem cylinder won't make as much change as the others. Check plug and wire (even new stuff happens). With cooler engine spray window cleaner on wires, dist cap or coil pack - one at a time - changes noted indicate trouble there and sometimes you even see arcing.

If a random rough condition - vacuum leaks are common. Spray carb cleaner around intake manifold gasket and any suspect area - changes noted are a problem spot. Use all care as some carb/throttle body cleaners can catch fire - be ready and best done with a cooler engine, but that trick works pretty good.

You had an over heating problem and lots of things don't like that. There is probably an idle speed motor - see if it moves to raise idle when engine is about to stall. It's there to keep idle constant like with added load from A/C or hard use of power steering.

If you didn't send the head out to a machine shop there are more not so nice possiblilties. Let's not go there yet. Keep at it, hope you find something simple, I'm with you here,

Response From usmc2037

Thought I could get away with the head not going to shop, famous last words of many a repair. I'll try the new procedures this weekend. Then I'm going to be out of touch for a couple of weeks before I can try any new suggestions. I appreciate your time and effort in my project.

Response From usmc2037

Finally got out to work on her again, did a compression test, wet and dry. Dry compression for cyclinders 1-4 was 85psi, 44psi, 55psi and 85psi. Wet compression test for cyclinders 1-4 was 95psi, 52psi, 65psi, and 90psi. I read this that I have problems with the heads due to the low compression psi in cyclinders 2 and 3. Should the rise in the compression on all the cyclinders after the wet test be of concern or is the rise is pressure about right due to the wet test. Any comments welcome.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

The "wet" test is really to check Rings. All #s are too low! - could just be the way test was done but the #s should be within about 10% of each other. A head gasket could be at fault, but I would think you'd have more troubles is that was the whole problem. Doesn't look encouraging sorry to say,

Response From usmc2037

Thanks for the info. The test was done by removing the plugs(all 4) and then, using a new craftsman compression tester, I screwed in the compression tester hose and turned the engine over several times until the compression gauge needle did not rise any further on the gauge. I then went on to the other cyclinders in sequence. I was not able to find what the compression numbers should of been, even have a book with specs and it doesn't say. Guess its time to start looking at a complete rebuild.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Don't mind exact #s as much as how close they are to each other. Two cyl side by side can be a head or head gasket. If they are away from each other it's less likely.

These sites are awesome but get some local assistance. A model year 2000 needing an engine is early in my opinion! Good grief --I own stuff decades older that's still fine?? It's worth some $ to check this out, good luck,

Response From usmc2037

Thanks for all the advice, did some looking around, cheapest I could get the heads rebuilt was close to $600. Seems like a lot of money but others wanted more than that. The local machine shop I have sent heads to over the years was bought out due to retirement and then closed. So if I am going to spend $600 for the heads and $80 for the gasket etc.. I might as well put it on a good block. Got the shop I buy remanufactured short blocks to redo the engine and heads, take out and install as well as tow for $2000 and got 36,000, 36 month warrenty on the work. So to get the wifes car running I let them do the work. Once again, thanks for all the encouragement and advice.

95 Kia Sportage Broke Timing Belt

Showing 2 out of 8 Posts | Show 6 Hidden Posts
Question From jkostur on 95 Kia Sportage Broke Timing Belt

I looking into buying a 1995 Kia Sportage for $150 but need a new timing belt. Looks Easy enough to replace but What i'm wondering what else should I check (Valves, Water Pump, Plugs, ETC) Is there likely damage to the Valves????? should I go ahead and replace the water pump while im in there Maybe use car as planter????. NOt sure, so if anyone has steps I should follow and things to check Please let me know. Thanks

Alittle info. My friend was driving at low turning corner speed when belt went and car died and was towed. I'm thinking Valves might be ok. But again Any input would be great.

Response From DanD

This is an interference engine; so I think you probably only have about a 10% chance that the valves are not bent.
Without taking some of the valve train apart; the easiest way to find out if there are bent valves, would be too time the engine and stick a new belt on. Cross your fingers and try starting it; you’ll only loose the cost of the belt and your time?
Don’t worry about the water pump (unless it was the cause of the belt breaking), until you’ve proven the engine is still ok; you can always take it back apart to do the pump later?

Dan.

Response From jkostur

Thanks alot. Do you happen to know the best way to check the valve prior to the belt install. and what the best way to time the engine ( are there marks to line up???) Again thanks for your time

Response From DanD Top Rated Answer

Like I said you would have to remove some of the valve train components to allow all the valves to be closed and then apply air pressure to the cylinders through the spark plug holes. If there was a large amount of air escaping into the intake manifold or exhaust manifold, you would know that there is bent valve(s).
By the time you got all that apart, ie: the camshaft and or rocker arms off you’d be able to have a new belt on and just try the thing.
Yes there are specific marks and procedures to go through to timing an engine and installing the belt.
It’s not real hard to do but it needs to be done properly the first time or you will bend valves.
The best advice I can give you, is to buy some time on Mitchell on demand or all-data repair manual web sites. Read up on the procedures and print off all the information and diagrams they have to offer.
I’m not sure because we don’t have auto zone here in Canada and I have my own manuals but I’ve seen some of the regular people here post links to their site and it was good repair information.


Hey guys, is there a link to auto zone to help this person out?

I would help you out with my info but the RCMP (Mounties) get a little upset when you disregard copyright laws. LOL

Dan.

Response From Double J

Sorry Dan
Autozone doesnt have repair info on the 95 sportage


Jim

Response From jkostur

Thanks Jim

Response From way2old

Hey Dan. Alldatapro does not list a sportage for 1995. Only the Sephia. Sorry.

Response From jkostur

Thanks Dan. I see what you mean I guess I will just try my luck and throw on a belt and see what happens. Now my next task is to find a repair manual for the sportage. Again thanks for your time I do appreciate it

1998 Kia Sportage 4X4: Engine Issues!!!!

Showing 2 out of 2 Posts
Question From aqualls2206 on 1998 Kia Sportage 4X4: Engine Issues!!!!

Ok I have a serious issue I can not figure out! I'm from Arkansas and its understandable that when it's cold outside a car will have the tendency to lag a little in horse power till they warm up. Ok well When I start the car in the morning and let it warm up I back down my drive and press the brake it takes my entire weight to stop the vehicle. Every time I try to back out the brake does this. That's not all!! When I come to a complete stop then try and go again it feels as though gas is not getting delivered. My car rolls forward VERY SLOWLY which in turn makes me a danger to other drivers. The other day I got off the interstate and when I got to the stop sign to turn left I pressed the gas and NOTHING!!!! It rolled in the middle of the road and I almost got hit by both lanes of traffic. Then after 5-7 seconds of this stall the gas finally delivers and it shoved me forward so hard that I almost it the wall!! THAT'S NOT ALL!!! When I am on the interstate I have to FORCE the Kia to shift so it will go faster. It has no chance of maintaining speed, It will stop accelerating at 45, 65, & 75 MPH. I have to force it to shift to keep going faster or even the speed limit. THAT'S NOT ALL!! When I go up the smallest of hills I loss 5-15 MPH (depending on height of climb). PLEASE HELP!! I am desperate! I don't have the money to keep putting into this and I don't have the money to buy a new vehicle! I have gotten a new catalytic converter, new timing belt, completely new exhaust system, new exhaust manifold and O2 sensor, even new tires to improve gas mileage but NOTHING has worked!! Next we are going to try replacing all the filters! But any suggestions will be greatly appreciated!

Response From Tom Greenleaf Top Rated Answer

the connection here is the brakes! This should use engine vacuum for the power boost and I suspect there is a problem there. This would cause the brakes to need much extra force to stop and any leak would throw off the engine performance.

Take a look behind the master cylinder for a round thing - that's the booster. Follow the vacuum hose from it to the engine and see if that looks good and is in place. There should be like an elbow check valve at the booster where the hose attaches and that could be bad/cracked - who knows. If you plug this vacuum source off as just a test the engine will probably run well and have full power. Remember this is just to test as you won't have power assist for the brakes. They are NOT very good without the power assist but should still work but with extreme force. That's not too safe so if you try that do it completely out of harms way like an empty parking lot (ya right - this time of year!) or you may just notice with it still.

It could be the booster itself if everything else looks good.

This is the likely problem from what you described,

T

2000 Kia Sephia - Leak Behind/Under Intake Manifold

Showing 3 out of 3 Posts
Question From JamesRyann on 2000 Kia Sephia - Leak Behind/Under Intake Manifold

I'm a "redneck geek" of sorts, just getting off my first major repair work on my car (so just knowledgeable to be stupidly and incredibly dangerous), and I've got a leak that I can't identify (either location or type of fluid).

2000 Kia Sephia
1.8L DOHC 16V
185,000 miles

Background:
I had to take the cylinder head off in order to drill out (yes, *drill out*) a broken spark plug that had apparently welded itself to the cylinder head and would not budge using an "easy out." (Fun, very exciting issue: breaking tools, four-foot breaker bar, etc., but not the subject of this post . . . .) Anyway, I tore everything down to the engine block (intake and exhaust manifolds, power steering pump, alternator, and even the pre-cat just for fun), fixed the spark plug issue (drilled out, rethreaded, and installed a spark plug helicoil), resurfaced the cylinder head (probably would have been fine, as it was still within spec, but I did it anyway, just to be safe, and because it was already off), cleaned all mating surfaces, installed new gaskets and cylinder head bolts (properly torqued to Chilton's specs), and put everything back together. After refilling and double-checking all the fluids, I performed a dry compression test on the cylinders (175, 170, 170, 155 psi 1-4 respectively), installed the spark plugs, and took her for a test drive. She drives nicely.

Problem:
She sounds and feels like she's new until she gets up to operating temperature, then I get a rough idle (that increases in "roughness" the longer she's driven) kind of a like a slowly pulsating shimmy-shake about once a second or so. Never happens until she's up to temperature though, and as long as we're moving, she still feels and sounds beautiful. After we stop, she shows a pretty severe leak of something from somewhere (apparently behind or under the intake manifold). It doesn't smell like fuel, doesn't feel or smell like oil, doesn't look or smell like coolant, it gets all over the underside of the car, all the way back to about two feet before the tail pipe, all over the passenger side of the firewall, and extends into the passenger side wheel assembly, but everything left (driver's side) of the intake manifold is bone dry. Plus, it never happens if she's driven only a short distance where she doesn't get up to operating temperature, and after she's cooled down, she won't keep leaking. To me, in all of my un-edumacted lack of expertise, it seems like power steering fluid.

I'm not finding any coolant in the oil, oil in the coolant, or a drop in oil or coolant levels. I am noticing a *small* drop in my power steering fluid, more so than might be reasonably explained by a cooling of the engine, but not necessarily enough to correspond to the amount of fluid that's leaking out. It's not condensation, as it doesn't evaporate, and it's still clearly visible as a nice dark shiny liquid all over the underside of the car and inside the engine compartment (as previously described) after she's been sitting overnight. I'm also finding traces of fluid (not a lot) on the alternator/water pump V-belt, but none on either the AC/power steering pump V-belt or the timing belt. I replaced the crush washers on the high-pressure power steering pump banjo fitting, and rechecked all of the hoses that I could identify to make sure they were properly clamped. I'm not finding any indication of leakage from any hoses or on the visible mating surface seams of the cylinder head with engine block or manifolds. In other words, I cannot yet pinpoint a specific location from which anything is leaking.

One final thought . . . . I don't think she's leaking while I'm actually driving. I think she starts leaking after I've shut the engine off, as after she's been sitting for 10 seconds or so (maybe a little longer, but not much), she'll start steaming (from what I believe is the leaking fluid contacting the hot engine surfaces), and the steaming will significantly increase for about 60 seconds, and then subside, but she doesn't steam at all while I'm driving or idling.

I'm somewhat at a loss (though that loss may be more related to my lack of expertise than an easily identifiable problem).

Thanks for your thoughts!

Response From Discretesignals

We really can't tell you what is leaking because we are not there to see it. First you need to determine what kind of fluid it is. If it is all over the back of the engine, you need to clean it off. Then get it up on a rack and let the engine run while you watch to see where the leak is originating from.

As for the drive-ability issue, is the check engine light on? Might need to look at some scan data while the engine is idling rough to grasp an idea where to look for the issue.

Response From JamesRyann Top Rated Answer

That's part of my problem. When I'm looking at it while it's running, I see no active leak. All I see is the fact that the liquid's there. I've cleaned it off to see if I can tell where it's coming from, and when I go to check it again, it's just kind of magically returned, again with no indication that I can see as to its source.

Really, I think that checking, cleaning, and rechecking may be the only option I have, unless you possibly could guess at some potential sources that might make sense, and then I could specifically check those more closely.

Regardless, I'll be checking it again tonight when I get home.

As for the check engine light, no, it's not lit. But I do have an OBD scanner, and it comes up clear anyway (if for some reason the check engine light just wasn't working for whatever reason). However, I haven't actually checked the running data, so that's something I'll definitely check tonight as well.