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Best Selling Genuine International Exhaust Manifolds

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Dorman
1998 International 9300 Exhaust Manifold Dorman

P311-07446FF    674-5002  New

CT1333359 , 1501914

Qty:
471.17
Dorman Exhaust Manifold
  • ; Manifold Assembly w/Mid-mounted Turbocharger
  • Product Attributes:
    • Color: Natural
    • Flange Bolt Hole Quantity: 4
    • Flange Stud Hole Quantity: 0
    • Grade Type: Regular
    • Heat Shield Included: No
    • Manifold Bolt Hole Quantity: 12
    • Material: Cast Iron
    • Mounting Hardware Included: Yes
    • Port Shape: Round
Brand: Dorman
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Engine Designation
1998 - International 9300 3406
Dorman
1975 International MS Exhaust Manifold - Left 8 Cyl 6.4L Dorman

P311-3A6B771    674-187  New

101108 , 309222C1

Qty:
98.95
Dorman Exhaust Manifold  Left
  • Product Attributes:
    • Color: Natural
    • Flange Bolt Hole Quantity: 3
    • Flange Stud Hole Quantity: 0
    • Grade Type: Regular
    • Heat Shield Included: No
    • Manifold Bolt Hole Quantity: 3
    • Material: Cast Iron
    • Mounting Hardware Included: Yes
    • Port Shape: Square
Brand: Dorman
Position: Left
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Position Block Engine CID CC
1975 - International MS Left V 8 Cyl 6.4L 392 -
Dorman
1975 International Scout II Exhaust Manifold - Right 8 Cyl 6.4L Dorman

P311-3A6B771    674-187  New

101108 , 309222C1

Qty:
98.95
Dorman Exhaust Manifold  Right
  • Product Attributes:
    • Color: Natural
    • Flange Bolt Hole Quantity: 3
    • Flange Stud Hole Quantity: 0
    • Grade Type: Regular
    • Heat Shield Included: No
    • Manifold Bolt Hole Quantity: 3
    • Material: Cast Iron
    • Mounting Hardware Included: Yes
    • Port Shape: Square
Brand: Dorman
Position: Right
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Position Block Engine CID CC
1975 - International Scout II Right V 8 Cyl 6.4L 392 -
Dorman
1997 International 4700LP Exhaust Manifold - Right 8 Cyl 7.3L Dorman

P311-1B82D33    674-380  New

F4TZ9430B , 1820198C1

Qty:
146.63
Dorman Exhaust Manifold  Right
  • Product Attributes:
    • Color: Natural
    • Flange Bolt Hole Quantity: 2
    • Flange Stud Hole Quantity: 0
    • Grade Type: Regular
    • Heat Shield Included: No
    • Manifold Bolt Hole Quantity: 8
    • Material: Cast Iron
    • Mounting Hardware Included: Yes
    • Port Shape: Round
Brand: Dorman
Position: Right
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Engine Designation Position Block Engine CID CC
1997 - International 4700LP T444E Right V 8 Cyl 7.3L 444 -
Dorman
1998 International 4700LPX Exhaust Manifold - Right 8 Cyl 7.3L Dorman

P311-1B82D33    674-380  New

F4TZ9430B , 1820198C1

Qty:
146.63
Dorman Exhaust Manifold  Right
  • ; To 12/31/97
  • Product Attributes:
    • Color: Natural
    • Flange Bolt Hole Quantity: 2
    • Flange Stud Hole Quantity: 0
    • Grade Type: Regular
    • Heat Shield Included: No
    • Manifold Bolt Hole Quantity: 8
    • Material: Cast Iron
    • Mounting Hardware Included: Yes
    • Port Shape: Round
Brand: Dorman
Position: Right
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Engine Designation Position Block Engine CID CC
1998 - International 4700LPX T444E Right V 8 Cyl 7.3L 444 -
Dorman
2008 International CXT Exhaust Manifold - Left 8 Cyl 6.0L Dorman

P311-4B6F86C    674-943  New

1840994C1 , 101485 , 3C3Z9431AB

Qty:
147.10
Dorman Exhaust Manifold  Left
  • Product Attributes:
    • Color: Natural
    • Flange Bolt Hole Quantity: 2
    • Flange Stud Hole Quantity: 0
    • Grade Type: Regular
    • Heat Shield Included: No
    • Manifold Bolt Hole Quantity: 8
    • Material: Cast Iron
    • Mounting Hardware Included: Yes
    • Port Shape: Round
Brand: Dorman
Position: Left
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Engine Designation Position Block Engine CID CC
2008 - International CXT VT365 Left V 8 Cyl 6.0L 365 -
Dorman
1978 International Scout II Exhaust Manifold - Left 8 Cyl 5.6L Dorman

P311-1FE39C7    674-188  New

323518C12 , SK674188 , 101107

Qty:
102.78
Dorman Exhaust Manifold  Left
  • Product Attributes:
    • Color: Natural
    • Flange Bolt Hole Quantity: 2
    • Flange Stud Hole Quantity: 0
    • Grade Type: Regular
    • Heat Shield Included: No
    • Manifold Bolt Hole Quantity: 3
    • Material: Cast Iron
    • Mounting Hardware Included: Yes
    • Port Shape: Square
Brand: Dorman
Position: Left
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Position Block Engine CID CC
1978 - International Scout II Left V 8 Cyl 5.6L 345 -
Dorman
1979 International Scout II Exhaust Manifold - Right 8 Cyl 5.6L Dorman

P311-1FE39C7    674-188  New

323518C12 , SK674188 , 101107

Qty:
102.78
Dorman Exhaust Manifold  Right
  • Product Attributes:
    • Color: Natural
    • Flange Bolt Hole Quantity: 2
    • Flange Stud Hole Quantity: 0
    • Grade Type: Regular
    • Heat Shield Included: No
    • Manifold Bolt Hole Quantity: 3
    • Material: Cast Iron
    • Mounting Hardware Included: Yes
    • Port Shape: Square
Brand: Dorman
Position: Right
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Position Block Engine CID CC
1979 - International Scout II Right V 8 Cyl 5.6L 345 -
Dorman
1997 International 1652SC Exhaust Manifold - Left 8 Cyl 7.3L Dorman

P311-259A666    674-383  New

1820503C1 , F5UZ9431A , 101186

Qty:
Dorman Exhaust Manifold  Left
  • Product Attributes:
    • Color: Natural
    • Flange Bolt Hole Quantity: 2
    • Flange Stud Hole Quantity: 0
    • Grade Type: Regular
    • Heat Shield Included: No
    • Manifold Bolt Hole Quantity: 8
    • Material: Cast Iron
    • Mounting Hardware Included: Yes
    • Port Shape: Round
Brand: Dorman
Position: Left
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Engine Designation Position Block Engine CID CC
1997 - International 1652SC T444E Left V 8 Cyl 7.3L 444 7277
Dorman
2002 International 3000RE Exhaust Manifold - Left Dorman

P311-259A666    674-383  New

1820503C1 , F5UZ9431A , 101186

Qty:
Dorman Exhaust Manifold  Left
  • ; Engine Desg. T444E V8 444CID 7.3L
  • Product Attributes:
    • Color: Natural
    • Flange Bolt Hole Quantity: 2
    • Flange Stud Hole Quantity: 0
    • Grade Type: Regular
    • Heat Shield Included: No
    • Manifold Bolt Hole Quantity: 8
    • Material: Cast Iron
    • Mounting Hardware Included: Yes
    • Port Shape: Round
Brand: Dorman
Position: Left
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Position
2002 - International 3000RE Left
Dorman
2001 International 3000RE Exhaust Manifold - Left Dorman

P311-259A666    674-383  New

1820503C1 , F5UZ9431A , 101186

Qty:
Dorman Exhaust Manifold  Left
  • ; V8 444CID 7.3L
  • Product Attributes:
    • Color: Natural
    • Flange Bolt Hole Quantity: 2
    • Flange Stud Hole Quantity: 0
    • Grade Type: Regular
    • Heat Shield Included: No
    • Manifold Bolt Hole Quantity: 8
    • Material: Cast Iron
    • Mounting Hardware Included: Yes
    • Port Shape: Round
Brand: Dorman
Position: Left
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Engine Designation Position
2001 - International 3000RE T444E Left
Dorman
2002 International 3400 Exhaust Manifold - Right 8 Cyl 7.3L Dorman

P311-2113D77    674-745  New

1831025C1 , 101396 , F81Z9430AA , SK674745

Qty:
137.12
Dorman Exhaust Manifold  Right
  • Product Attributes:
    • Color: Natural
    • Flange Bolt Hole Quantity: 0
    • Flange Stud Hole Quantity: 2
    • Grade Type: Regular
    • Heat Shield Included: No
    • Manifold Bolt Hole Quantity: 8
    • Material: Cast Iron
    • Mounting Hardware Included: Yes
    • Port Shape: Round
Brand: Dorman
Position: Right
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Engine Designation Position Block Engine CID CC
2002 - International 3400 T444E Right V 8 Cyl 7.3L 444 -
Dorman
2001 International 3000RE Exhaust Manifold - Right Dorman

P311-2113D77    674-745  New

1831025C1 , 101396 , F81Z9430AA , SK674745

Qty:
137.12
Dorman Exhaust Manifold  Right
  • ; V8 444CID 7.3L
  • Product Attributes:
    • Color: Natural
    • Flange Bolt Hole Quantity: 0
    • Flange Stud Hole Quantity: 2
    • Grade Type: Regular
    • Heat Shield Included: No
    • Manifold Bolt Hole Quantity: 8
    • Material: Cast Iron
    • Mounting Hardware Included: Yes
    • Port Shape: Round
Brand: Dorman
Position: Right
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Position
2001 - International 3000RE Right
Dorman
1998 International 4700 Exhaust Manifold - Right 8 Cyl 7.3L Dorman

P311-2113D77    674-745  New

1831025C1 , 101396 , F81Z9430AA , SK674745

Qty:
137.12
Dorman Exhaust Manifold  Right
  • ; From 1/01/98
  • Product Attributes:
    • Color: Natural
    • Flange Bolt Hole Quantity: 0
    • Flange Stud Hole Quantity: 2
    • Grade Type: Regular
    • Heat Shield Included: No
    • Manifold Bolt Hole Quantity: 8
    • Material: Cast Iron
    • Mounting Hardware Included: Yes
    • Port Shape: Round
Brand: Dorman
Position: Right
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Engine Designation Position Block Engine CID CC
1998 - International 4700 T444E Right V 8 Cyl 7.3L 444 7277
Dorman
2007 International 3300 Exhaust Manifold - Right 8 Cyl 6.0L Dorman

P311-0181E86    674-942  New

3C3Z9430AB , 101484 , 1840770C1

Qty:
99.62
Dorman Exhaust Manifold  Right
  • Product Attributes:
    • Color: Natural
    • Flange Bolt Hole Quantity: 2
    • Flange Stud Hole Quantity: 0
    • Grade Type: Regular
    • Heat Shield Included: No
    • Manifold Bolt Hole Quantity: 8
    • Material: Cast Iron
    • Mounting Hardware Included: Yes
    • Port Shape: Round
Brand: Dorman
Position: Right
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Engine Designation Position Block Engine CID CC
2007 - International 3300 VT365 Right V 8 Cyl 6.0L 365 -

Latest Car Advice

CarJunky AutoAdvice

95 pontiac sunfire SMOKING EXHAUST MANIFOLD

Showing 6 out of 6 Posts
Question From bigchillenhustla on 95 pontiac sunfire SMOKING EXHAUST MANIFOLD

CAR History
I recently did a "head job" changing the head gasket and all seals and valves because the car overheated. I've been driving the car for six months and on only three cylinders because one spark plug wire didn't work which is why the engine was idling so hard. I fixed that and the engine is silent and has more power. Two weeks later I drive it on the freeway, it broke down on me.
Problem
IT WONT START, AND WHEN IT BARELY DOES START, IT MAKES INTERNAL LOUD NOISES, A LOT OF SMOKE COMES OUT FROM THE EXHAUST MANIFOLD, IDLES ROUGH, WHEN I PUT THE GEAR IN DRIVE AND LIGHTLY STEP ON THE GAS PEDAL THE CAR SHUTS OFF, MY CATALYTIC CONVERTER IS ALSO BROKEN, MAKES LOUT NOISES, ALSO ...ALL FOUR OF MY SPARK PLUGS WERE BLACK SO I CHANGED THE SPARK PLUGS BUT STILL THE SAME....
My Guess
Could it be the rings??? Is the piston hitting my valves causing the loud noise??? No compression???

HELP!

Response From Loren Champlain Sr Top Rated Answer

bigchillen... You drove it on three cylinders for six months and are just now having problems? And your cat is bad?
Go figure! You should get down on your knees and thank that poor little thing for giving you six more months of it's life. It sounds, from your symptoms, that is over fueling. There are many reasons this could be happening. A common fault is a loss of vacuum to the MAP sensor. If it's been over fueling all this time, the crankcase could have more fuel in it than oil, which would explain the noise. You need to address the over fueling first, then change the oil and filter, and pray. If it survives, then, you will be looking at replacing the catalytic converter.

Response From bigchillenhustla


I forgot to mention that two of my fuel injectors were badly leaking, I bought two new ones, but one was defected and its still leaking but the other one is fine.

So... I should get another fuel injector, change the oil and filter and ask god for forgiveness.

Or whats the best way to address the over fueling???


Any suggestions.

Thank you.

PS ..im not too familiar with the MAP sensor, whats that again?? This is my first semester in amech!

Response From Loren Champlain Sr

Oh, my. I'm almost at a loss for words. (almost). I don't think automobiles are on the Good Lords' short list of priorities. Sorry. This leaky injector; Is it leaking internally, or externally? If it's leaking internally, that would definitely cause a flooding condition and a misfire. The misfire could cause low manifold vacuum which would make the MAP sensor and fuel pressure regulator to go rich, causing a domino effect.
If it's leaking externally, and you know it...Post your address and we'll supply the weenies and marshmallows.
First semester at amech? Not familiar with that.

Response From bigchillenhustla

I am sure that the fuel injector is leaking externally. The seal just does not work, no matter how many new seals I get. The old one leaked internally from the plug. This one is leaking around it. It's a "push-in-fit" injector.

So you think my fuel pressure regulator is messed up??? I will get a new one. If it works, I'll get some steaks, salmon a grill and we could start a bbq.

Maybe I have a blown head gasket again. I did a compression test before this problem and two cylinders in the middle are extremely low, but the car ran fine until I drove it on the freeway a few weeks later.

God is a forgiving person.

thank you.

amech is an engine rebuilding class at my community college.

Response From Loren Champlain Sr

Installing the injector rail with the injectors connected can be very tricky...Easy seasoned veterans can damage an O ring during replacement. There is a small O ring at the top of the injector where it attaches to the fuel rail and a larger one where the injector goes into the manifold. Also, it is not uncommon for the injector bodies to leak, which requires replacement of the injector. But, regardless of what's leaking, you can't drive it like this. The marshmallows and weenies were for the engine fire that is going to happen if you don't fix this. NOW.
And, yes, God is a forgiving God. Thank God!

Transmission replacement / 97 Honda accord

Showing 2 out of 7 Posts | Show 5 Hidden Posts
Question From kgriffiths on Transmission replacement / 97 Honda accord

I have a 97 Honda accord w/ 300k mile. 2.2 /4 cylinder engine. I am a Saturday mechanic with limited means to do stuff.
I got a used transmission from the junkyard (pullapart Nashville) from a 95 accord. Should be the same, the part looks good. Put it in the car, I followed the Haynes manual as best I could and in the reverse order of removal. did not use a torque wrench but am a good guesser, Everything went back in pretty well, except for breaking the plastic parts that connect to sensors. The problem seems mechanical and don't think the sensors are at fault.
I put other parts back in place, Ie... Starter, hoses, battery, specific bolts that keep pressure in the transmission, exhaust manifold, axels , control arms, ext. ( I did skip the cross-member support but as it is just there as a guard I don't know what it matters).
-Start the engine, get the fluid to correct level. Temperature up. When I put it in gear I got nothing till D4 which makes a light grind, no attempt to move or clunk to indicate it engaged. Park also is a grind.
That's where it sits. Thank you for helpful comments. Kyle

Response From Discretesignals Top Rated Answer

As long as the shift linkage is connected and adjusted properly and you have enough fluid in it, the transmission has an internal problem. Do you have warranty on it?

Response From DanD

Are the drive axles fully seated in the transmission?

Dan.

Response From kgriffiths

Hi Dan,
No they weren't thanks for your answer.
Kyle

Response From DanD

Response From Discretesignals

Good catch Dan, you da man!

Closed as Solved. Can be reopened upon request by the OP.

Response From GC

Nice one Dan.

Still smoking after complete rebuild

Showing 2 out of 26 Posts | Show 24 Hidden Posts
Question From drivewaymech on Still smoking after complete rebuild

I've been working on a 1988 Chevrolet C1500 with a 4.3 Vortec engine for about six months now and did almost a complete rebuild replacing almost every internal part of the engine except for the cam shaft and piston rods. I also had a machine shop hone out the cylinders to .030 over spec, and replaced the pistons and rings accordingly. They also did some other work to ensure no head gasket leakage, rebuilt the cylinder heads and tested it for compression.

Now, after six months of work, three tear-down and rebuilds, and a couple thousand dollars in parts, the #2 and #4 combustion chambers still have oil leaking into them. The problem seems to only occur under a load (when driving, not when parked). After driving for a little while, the truck starts to smoke. Then I remove the #2 and #4 plugs and they are covered in oil. There seems to be a significant amount of oil in the #2 and #4 combustion chambers.
I know of only two ways that oil can enter into the combustion chamber.

1. Oil seepage past the piston rings.
2. Through the valves from the top-end of the heads.

If anyone has any insight into this, please help!

Response From Discretesignals

What happened to the engine to warrant an overhaul? Did it have the same problem your having now?

I believe you are spot on in stating that ring or guide problems can cause that. I don't believe a PCV system problem would cause only two cylinders to have excessive oil. Appears you might have to tear down, inspect, and measure again to see what is going on.

Response From drivewaymech


What happened to the engine to warrant an overhaul? Did it have the same problem your having now?

I believe you are spot on in stating that ring or guide problems can cause that. I don't believe a PCV system problem would cause only two cylinders to have excessive oil. Appears you might have to tear down, inspect, and measure again to see what is going on.

Response From drivewaymech

My fault. It was supposed to be under the quoted section...

It was pretty much doing the same thing as now, except worse. When I first got the truck, the #1 and 3 valve lifter rods were broken. I had a head job done at the machine shop, which checked the valve seals.

After the head job, I put it together and it was still smoking, and I determined that to be the #2 and 4 cylinders. I did a resurfacing job on the cylinders myself and put it back together... same problem, smoking, and oil in #2 and 4.

Response From Discretesignals

Have you been adding brake fluid to the master?

You could put a homemade catch can in the PCV line just to see if the smoking stops and the can is collecting a bunch of oil. That would eliminate a PCV system problem. The only way the PCV system could be sucking that much oil is if you have a whole lot of blow by or there is a problem with the valve cover baffle.

Another thing that comes to mind is if the oil is being sucked up into the intake runner from the lifter valley where the head and intake meet . You would have a vacuum leak under the intake. You could find out by installing a vacuum gauge on the dipstick tube and then blocking off the PCV valve and breather hose. If your gauge builds up vacuum, you have a leak under the intake.

Response From drivewaymech

Is the valve cover baffle supposed to have something in it to prevent oil from escaping?

I just ran the engine to operating temperature in my garage again. No smoke from exhaust (although it smells bad). Pulled #2 spark plug afterward, and ther eis no oil on it.

If I were to drive it down the street a ways and come back, it would be smoking huge plmes of white smoke, and the #2 and 4 plugs would be coated in black sticky carbon-oil mixture.

Response From drivewaymech

Thank you for your reply, but actually, they were. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GM_Vortec_engine

Response From Hammer Time

Thank you for your reply, but actually, they were. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GM_Vortec_engine

I'm afraid you are wrong. The Vortec (VIN W) was not offered in the C1500 truck in 1988. The TBI 4.3 was the only V6 available in that year.

Response From drivewaymech



Thank you for your reply, but actually, they were. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GM_Vortec_engine

I'm afraid you are wrong. The Vortec (VIN W) was not offered in the C1500 truck in 1988. The TBI 4.3 was the only V6 available in that year.


Ok, I don't know if it is or is not a Vortec. COme to think of it, I think you are right. It doesn't say "Vortec" anywhere on it.


Response From Hammer Time

Calling it a Vortec will get you a lot of wrong parts.

Response From drivewaymech

That would explain a lot.

I have found another issue that may have something to do with my issue. The Vacuum Modulator Assembly, which has a vacuum line that goes from the right hand side of the transmission to the top of the intake manifold directly over the #2 and 4 pistons, has transmission fluid in it.

This could explain why the smoking only happens while in Drive.

Response From Discretesignals

Yep, that would cause smoking and loss of transmission fluid. You must have the 3 speed turbo 400 option.

Response From drivewaymech

All it says on the tranny is "Hydromatic DIV OF GMC"

Response From Tom Greenleaf Top Rated Answer

Good find with the trans vacuum modulator. Hope you have filled trans fluid to proper level.


You said it sounds like crap and NO that's not normal. You should pull the plugs just because to see if the ATF messed them up.
Noises a pest by nature. Does it sound external to you? It might be loose things, brackets holding any accessories or exhaust noise from any where, heat shields or just a lousy connection(s) from "Y" pipe to exhaust manifold or a crack in a manifold?
Some things that help it take belt off and see just quickly if the noise is gone and spin items for a bad bearing. Other tricks up to tap on exhaust parts (cool engine) with a rubber hammer and loose things should show up.


If just plain RPMs at any load produce this noise and helps narrow it down,


T

Response From drivewaymech

So, I just replaced the Transmission Vacuum Modulator. I took it for a ride around the block, and NO SMOKE!!!

The engine, however still sounds really crappy. When it revs to a certain RPM, it sounds like it is going to fall apart. Is that normal for this type of engine?

Thank you all for your input. You have been a big help.

Response From Discretesignals

The baffle acts an oil vapor separator. If it gets plug up, the oil that gets separated can't drain back down into the head, so it gets sucked into the intake.

This is kind of rare, but if your engine is smoking and you keep having to add brake fluid. The master could be leaking into the vacuum brake booster causing the engine to suck in brake fluid.

Response From drivewaymech



Here is a you-tube of how the engine running after warm-up. The #2 spark plug was bone dry after this test. As I said before, the oil and smoke problem only occurs after driving on street.

Response From Discretesignals

Another thing that comes to mind is if you have a intake runner leak between the head and intake manifold sucking oil up from the lifter valley.

You would have a vacuum leak under the intake. You could find out if that is a problem by blocking off the PCV valve and breather and installing a vacuum gauge on the dipstick tube. If the gauge builds a vacuum while the engine is idling, you have a leak under the intake as long as the rest of the engine gaskets are sealed up really good.

Response From drivewaymech

Ok. I removed the pcv hose from the valve and plugged the end with a spark plug. Then, because I couldn't find my vacuum gauge, I wet a finger and held it over the oil dipstick. I thought I could feel a small amount of vacuum sucking on my finger.

If this is the problem, is there a fix?

Response From Tom Greenleaf

You bored this engine .030 over! What's the question? Engine is junk,


T

Response From drivewaymech

I put a new master cylinder on. Brake fluid level hasn't reduced since I did that job.

Response From Discretesignals

Then that isn't the problem. I would probably make a homemade catch can just too see how much oil is being collected in the PCV line and too see if the smoking stops.

If that doesn't work, you have a problem with the valve guides/seals or cylinder wall/ring issues.

Response From drivewaymech

I did do a brake job several moths ago, but what would that have to do with my oil in the #2 and 4 cylinders?

Response From nickwarner

You have an 88 with a Vortec motor? They didn't exist then. Is this a transplant from something newer or did you have a typo?

Response From drivewaymech

The reason I thought it was the PCV is because it sits directly over the two cylinders that I'm having the issue with.

Response From Discretesignals

You never answered my questions.

1992 Cadillac Sedan Deville Oxygen Sensors

Showing 3 out of 8 Posts | Show 5 Hidden Posts
Question From kmfmgk on 1992 Cadillac Sedan Deville Oxygen Sensors

The check engine light comes on and car runs rough as if on 6 or 7 cylinders. I had the plugs replaced. They were original plugs with 154,000 miles on them. It ran pretty good for about a week, good gas mileage and then it did it again. I check the fault codes and have E-13 and E-44 which means oxygen sensors. Where will these be located on my vehicle and are they hard for a novice to replace. Any and all advice will be appreciated.

Response From Discretesignals

E-13 basically means the O2 sensor isn't active. Could be from a wiring issue, the sensor has oil leaking all over it, the sensor got contaminated by something, or the sensor has failed.

Your Caddy only has one O2 sensor. It should be located in the exhaust manifold near the engine firewall. You might need a special O2 sensor socket to get it out if you can't get a 7/8 inch wrench on it.

If the O2 sensor is contaminated because the engine is burning oil or coolant or it is being leaked all over, you'll wreck the new sensor if you don't correct those issues.

E-44 is o2 lean. Could be either because the engine is actually leaned out, you got a misfire going on, you have an exhaust leak before or around the sensor, the sensor is stuck lean internally, the crkt is shorted to ground, or misfiring cylinders.

Being the age of the vehicle, if the sensor is original and is not contaminated by something, it probably wouldn't hurt to replace the sensor and check its voltage output. You can do that with a volt meter back probing the O2 sensor connector. It should fluctate between 0 and 1 volt DC. Your sensor does not have a heater, so you will need to heat up the sensor by raising the engine rpm or driving the vehicle at cruising speeds.

I recommend NTK, Denso, or a Delco sensors. Don't install a Bosch or universal one.

Response From kmfmgk

Thanks, Discretesignals. A lot of good info. I will follow up on it. Jim

Response From kmfmgk

I want to thank both Hammer Time and Discretesignals for all their help and advice on the oxygen sensor problem. I have located it and it is completely dry and does not appear to be contaminated in anyway. I am currently looking for a vacuum leak. I have no leaks anywhere that I can find. One of you mentioned burning oil or coolant. I can smell coolant after I drive the car for a short time, but it goes away quickly. Does this give you any idea of what to look for if it is a coolant problem that is affecting the oxygen sensor?

Response From Hammer Time

You can't see contamination in an 0/2 sensor. The sensor is internal.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Quote now important noted ">> I can smell coolant after I drive the car for a short time, but it goes away quickly."
Are you losing coolant? Not from the recovery bottle I mean any air at the radiator? If that's really burning coolant that's first thing to chase down IMO or what's the point in continually trashing sensors?
Pressure checks, look for one or more spark plugs even now newer that are different up to a compression check and of course anything visual seen,


T

Response From kmfmgk Top Rated Answer

E-13 basically means the O2 sensor isn't active. Could be from a wiring issue, the sensor has oil leaking all over it, the sensor got contaminated by something, or the sensor has failed.

Your Caddy only has one O2 sensor. It should be located in the exhaust manifold near the engine firewall. You might need a special O2 sensor socket to get it out if you can't get a 7/8 inch wrench on it.

If the O2 sensor is contaminated because the engine is burning oil or coolant or it is being leaked all over, you'll wreck the new sensor if you don't correct those issues.

E-44 is o2 lean. Could be either because the engine is actually leaned out, you got a misfire going on, you have an exhaust leak before or around the sensor, the sensor is stuck lean internally, the crkt is shorted to ground, or misfiring cylinders.

Being the age of the vehicle, if the sensor is original and is not contaminated by something, it probably wouldn't hurt to replace the sensor and check its voltage output. You can do that with a volt meter back probing the O2 sensor connector. It should fluctate between 0 and 1 volt DC. Your sensor does not have a heater, so you will need to heat up the sensor by raising the engine rpm or driving the vehicle at cruising speeds.

I recommend NTK, Denso, or a Delco sensors. Don't install a Bosch or universal one.

Response From Hammer Time

First understand one thing. There is NO code that means any component is bad. The component referred to in a code is not necessarily the cause of the code, especially when you are talking about 0/2 sensors.

The E-13 is 0/2 not ready and the E-44 is a lean code. Something as simple as a vacuum leak can do that.


Code E44 will set when:

  1. There is an oxygen sensor circuit fault giving a false lean indication. OR
  2. When the air fuel ratio is actually lean due to a vacuum leak or fuel control system fault.



Possible causes of code E13 are:
  1. An open in CKT 412 or 413.
  2. A short to voltage on CKT 412 or 413.
  3. An oxygen sensor that cannot respond.

1986 Honda multiple problems

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Question From Slaytounge on 1986 Honda multiple problems

My car is a 1986 Honda Prelude 2.0 Si with like 180,000 miles on it. When I start driving the car kind of jerks a little and the RPM's go up and down. It also smells like burning oil. I put Mobil clean 5000 in it the other day and thats when it started happening. Also the hood is smoking and the fan under my hood runs long after I turn the car off. I don't know much about cars at all and would like to have someone maybe tell me whats wrong with it.

Response From danny345671

hi there. read your post and this is my opinion, it could be burning oil because the head gasket is gone/head cracked/hole in a piston etc etc. my advice to you is to go to a garage just to ask for a compression test/head gasket test and possibly a cylinder leakage test if the compression is low but you cannot go too far on a car that has done 180k if it says it is low on compression because it could be very expensive. this will gaurantee if it is the internals of the engine or not. all of these tests at any reasonable garage if you just ask for what i said should charge you about half an hours labour. much more than this is unacceptable because it doesn't take very long. i hate to be the bearer of bad news but 180k is a huge amount of milage for a vehicle like this and im pretty sure you aren't going to like the results of these tests but it is the fastest and most cost efficient way of getting to the conclusion. hope this has been of some use. danny

Response From Sidom Top Rated Answer

A diag INCLUDING a comp & leakdown test for .5?????? Danny, book time for a compression test on this vehicle alone is .8

Obviously you don't make your living doing this. There isn't any problem with other folks jumping in and offering advise as long as it's good but please check your facts and make sure it's realistic before you make a post where you are trying to pass yourself off as an expert. As far as going into a shop and asking for specific tests, that can get very expensive, especially if you don't know how to interpret the data. The best & cheapest course would be to go in, tell them the problem you are having and let them decide which tests would be best to perform to track down the problem once they has test driven the car and confirmed the failure.....

Slaytounge.

There could be a few things going on with your car, Danny kind of jumped to the worst case scenario. The 1st and easiest thing would be to check for oil leaks. Make sure your valve cover gasket isn't leaking on the exhaust manifold. As for the cooling problem, when the car is cold, check your coolant level in the radiator. If its low this can cause it run warm. If it's low then that mean there is a leak......somewhere and that would need to be tracked down. As far as the jerking. You could double check the basics, pull a couple plugs & take the cap off and look at the condition. It could be something as simple as a plug breaking down or wire arching......

It's also possible there could be an internal problem going on, with all the things going on at once with your car that can't be ignored.... If you do decide to take it in......Just tell them the problem you are having and let them tell you the cause. If you take Danny's advise you'll wind up paying a lot of money and possibly not finding your problem..... Also I'm not sure what planet Danny comes from but here on Earth any shop who's techs are trained & tooled properly to find and fix your problem, they will be in 1.0 to 1.5hr range to check your car out.......Anyone charging less than that is more than likely taking shortcuts & guessing a bit.........