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Best Selling Genuine Chevrolet Exhaust Manifolds

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  • Constantly Updated Inventory of Chevrolet Replacement Exhaust Manifold Parts

Dorman
2004 Chevrolet Cavalier Exhaust Manifold 4 Cyl 2.2L Dorman

P311-0A6147A    674-870  New

101469 , 90537679 , SK674870

Qty:
185.95
Dorman Exhaust Manifold
  • Product Attributes:
    • Color: Natural
    • Flange Bolt Hole Quantity: 0
    • Flange Stud Hole Quantity: 3
    • Grade Type: Regular
    • Heat Shield Included: Yes
    • Manifold Bolt Hole Quantity: 10
    • Material: Cast Iron
    • Mounting Hardware Included: Yes
    • Port Shape: Oval
Brand: Dorman
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
2004 - Chevrolet Cavalier L 4 Cyl 2.2L 134 2198
Dorman
2006 Chevrolet Cobalt Exhaust Manifold 4 Cyl 2.2L Dorman

P311-0A6147A    674-870  New

101469 , 90537679 , SK674870

Qty:
185.95
Dorman Exhaust Manifold
  • ; wo/Super Ultra Low Emissions Vehicle (SULEV)
  • Product Attributes:
    • Color: Natural
    • Flange Bolt Hole Quantity: 0
    • Flange Stud Hole Quantity: 3
    • Grade Type: Regular
    • Heat Shield Included: Yes
    • Manifold Bolt Hole Quantity: 10
    • Material: Cast Iron
    • Mounting Hardware Included: Yes
    • Port Shape: Oval
Brand: Dorman
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
2006 - Chevrolet Cobalt L 4 Cyl 2.2L 134 2198
Dorman
2005 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 HD Exhaust Manifold Dorman

P311-3F45A04    W0133-1866523  New

Qty:
185.18
Dorman Exhaust Manifold
Brand: Dorman
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2005 - Chevrolet Silverado 1500 HD
Dorman
2004 Chevrolet Express 3500 Exhaust Manifold Dorman

P311-3F45A04    W0133-1866523  New

Qty:
185.18
Dorman Exhaust Manifold
  • ; California - ULEV & Federal
Brand: Dorman
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2004 - Chevrolet Express 3500
Dorman
2009 Chevrolet Silverado 3500 HD Exhaust Manifold 8 Cyl 6.0L Dorman

P311-3F45A04    W0133-1866523  New

Qty:
185.18
Dorman Exhaust Manifold
  • ; [Gmb208][Pos.1]
Brand: Dorman
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel Body Wheel FeedBase Block Engine CID CC
2009 - Chevrolet Silverado 3500 HD WT Extended Cab Pickup 157.5 V 8 Cyl 6.0L 364 5967
Dorman
2009 Chevrolet Express 2500 Exhaust Manifold 8 Cyl 6.0L Dorman

P311-3F45A04    W0133-1866523  New

Qty:
185.18
Dorman Exhaust Manifold
  • ; [Gmb140][Pos.1]
Brand: Dorman
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
2009 - Chevrolet Express 2500 V 8 Cyl 6.0L 364 5967
Dorman
2010 Chevrolet Express 3500 Exhaust Manifold 8 Cyl 4.8L Dorman

P311-3F45A04    W0133-1866523  New

Qty:
185.18
Dorman Exhaust Manifold
  • ; [Gmb145][Pos.1]
Brand: Dorman
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Wheel FeedBase Block Engine CID CC
2010 - Chevrolet Express 3500 155.0 V 8 Cyl 4.8L 294 -
Dorman
2009 Chevrolet Express 3500 Exhaust Manifold 8 Cyl 6.0L Dorman

P311-3F45A04    W0133-1866523  New

Qty:
185.18
Dorman Exhaust Manifold
  • ; [Gmb144][Pos.1]
Brand: Dorman
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Wheel FeedBase Block Engine CID CC
2009 - Chevrolet Express 3500 139.0 V 8 Cyl 6.0L 364 5967
Dorman
2010 Chevrolet Suburban 2500 Exhaust Manifold Dorman

P311-3F45A04    W0133-1866523  New

Qty:
185.18
Dorman Exhaust Manifold
  • ; [GMB0110][2]
Brand: Dorman
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2010 - Chevrolet Suburban 2500
Dorman
2009 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 Exhaust Manifold 8 Cyl 6.0L Dorman

P311-3F45A04    W0133-1866523  New

Qty:
185.18
Dorman Exhaust Manifold
  • ; [Gmb032][Pos.1]
Brand: Dorman
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Fuel Type Block Engine CID CC
2009 - Chevrolet Silverado 1500 GAS V 8 Cyl 6.0L 364 5967
Dorman
2010 Chevrolet Avalanche Exhaust Manifold Dorman

P311-3F45A04    W0133-1866523  New

Qty:
185.18
Dorman Exhaust Manifold
  • ; [GMB0095][2]
Brand: Dorman
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2010 - Chevrolet Avalanche
Dorman
2009 Chevrolet Express 1500 Exhaust Manifold 8 Cyl 5.3L Dorman

P311-3F45A04    W0133-1866523  New

Qty:
185.18
Dorman Exhaust Manifold
  • ; [Gmb125a][Pos.1]
Brand: Dorman
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
2009 - Chevrolet Express 1500 V 8 Cyl 5.3L 325 5328
Dorman
2009 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 Exhaust Manifold 8 Cyl 5.3L Dorman

P311-3F45A04    W0133-1866523  New

Qty:
185.18
Dorman Exhaust Manifold
  • ; [GMB0100][2]
Brand: Dorman
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
2009 - Chevrolet Silverado 1500 V 8 Cyl 5.3L 325 5328
Dorman
2009 Chevrolet Tahoe Exhaust Manifold 8 Cyl 6.0L Dorman

P311-3F45A04    W0133-1866523  New

Qty:
185.18
Dorman Exhaust Manifold
  • ; [GMB0060][2]
Brand: Dorman
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
2009 - Chevrolet Tahoe V 8 Cyl 6.0L 364 5967
Dorman
2009 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 Exhaust Manifold Dorman

P311-3F45A04    W0133-1866523  New

Qty:
185.18
Dorman Exhaust Manifold
  • ; [GMB0085][2]
Brand: Dorman
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Fuel Type
2009 - Chevrolet Silverado 1500 ELECTRIC/GAS
Dorman
2009 Chevrolet Express 3500 Exhaust Manifold 8 Cyl 6.0L Dorman

P311-3F45A04    W0133-1866523  New

Qty:
185.18
Dorman Exhaust Manifold
  • ; [Gmb146][Pos.1]
Brand: Dorman
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Wheel FeedBase Block Engine CID CC
2009 - Chevrolet Express 3500 177.0 V 8 Cyl 6.0L 364 5967
Dorman
2004 Chevrolet Express 2500 Exhaust Manifold 8 Cyl 6.0L Dorman

P311-3F45A04    W0133-1866523  New

Qty:
185.18
Dorman Exhaust Manifold
  • ; Calif, ULEV Spec
Brand: Dorman
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
2004 - Chevrolet Express 2500 V 8 Cyl 6.0L 364 5967
Dorman
2003 Chevrolet Express 2500 Exhaust Manifold 8 Cyl 6.0L Dorman

P311-3F45A04    W0133-1866523  New

Qty:
185.18
Dorman Exhaust Manifold
  • ; Federal
Brand: Dorman
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
2003 - Chevrolet Express 2500 V 8 Cyl 6.0L 364 5967
Dorman
2005 Chevrolet Silverado 2500 HD Exhaust Manifold 8 Cyl 6.0L Dorman

P311-3F45A04    W0133-1866523  New

Qty:
185.18
Dorman Exhaust Manifold
  • ; Calif, LEV Spec
Brand: Dorman
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Fuel Type Block Engine CID CC
2005 - Chevrolet Silverado 2500 HD GAS V 8 Cyl 6.0L 364 5967
Dorman
2004 Chevrolet Silverado 3500 Exhaust Manifold 8 Cyl 6.0L Dorman

P311-3F45A04    W0133-1866523  New

Qty:
185.18
Dorman Exhaust Manifold
  • ; Exc.Calif, Exc.LEV, Exc.LEV Spec
Brand: Dorman
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
2004 - Chevrolet Silverado 3500 V 8 Cyl 6.0L 364 5967

Latest Car Advice

CarJunky AutoAdvice

Oil Leak on 2000 Chevrolet Metro LSi

Showing 10 out of 20 Posts | Show 10 Hidden Posts
Question From timdaniel on Oil Leak on 2000 Chevrolet Metro LSi

For a 2000 Chevrolet Metro LSi, 4 cylinder, 3-speed automatic transmission, 1.3 liters.

So I have put in UV dye into the engine and watched with a UV light to see where oil is leaking from, as it is coming out about 1 drop every 30 seconds while the engine is running. After doing this, I noticed it was coming from this sort of electrical connector that is between the oil filter and the exhaust manifold. I would call it by name but I don't know what it is called, or why there is oil coming from it. It does have a hexigonal shape, so I assume it can be loosened or tightened with a wrench. Could anyone please shed some light on this? I have some pictures here hosted on my google drive:

https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=0Bwtjzvm7qxfIVzdVdkRRWW53T2M&usp=sharing

Response From timdaniel

Just wanted to put an update for all those who might be interested. The repairs were successful.

See, I had done the crankshaft oil seal about a year ago, and I believe I did not put it in all the way so thing behind the harmonic balancer basically grinded and shaved the seal until it was leaking. This time I did follow the book and used a large socket to tap it into the hole and it is not leaking, not one drop. Also the oil pressure switch was indeed leaking quite a bit. This may have been because I noticed it leaking once and tried to loosen it or move it because I did not know what it was, and when I did that, I believe I made it leak. It was very confusing because the oil goes everywhere so it is hard to pinpoint exactly where it was coming from, but if your car is leaking from some unknown location, I recommend that you go and buy some ultra violet dye, and a ultra violet light which you can buy for about $10 cheaper at Target or Walmart by buying it in the pet department, as it works great for also finding pee stains on the floor. Putting that in the engine and using the light showed right away what the problems were. I also noticed a few drops coming from the valve cover seal and so I redid that and it is now not leaking at all and it has been a week.

So anyways thank you guys for helping me out. God bless.

Response From Hammer Time

The dye should be a very last resort for only very hard to locate leaks. A substantial oil leak will spread that stuff all over the place, including your driveway. It will hinder any future attempts to locate oil or even air conditioning leaks. Once it's all over the motor, there is no getting it off.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Agree - I don't find dye helpful at all for automotive use - even A/C not this issue.
OP: Just a warning on oil leak at harmonic balancer: A balancer is two rings of metal w rubber as a shock in between that will slip or up to wobble and fall off not tolerant of oil for long. Any vehicle failures have been rare but oil was the most likely cause IMO,


T

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Couldn't make your pics show but doesn't matter.
What you seem to have described is an oil pressure sender and they do leak thru them without being loose at all. Frequently just a special socket and a new one screws right in where old one came out.
Watch out. That 30 second drop of oil can flood out with no notice so you have your warning to be sure, name the part and replace it like yesterday!


T

Response From timdaniel

Thanks guys. Now does it have to be a special socket or can I use an adjustable wrench?

Response From Hammer Time

You're never going to get that out with an adjustable wrench. In fact if you intend to do any more work on your car, throw that wrench away. All it can do is destroy parts.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

I'm not going to search out the cost of the socket but should be under $10 bucks. They fit the switches without breaking them - who cares to get one out but not the new one going in. It's also one place generally allowed to use Teflon thread tape precisely and only on threads or what old pharts like me call thread sealer by Permatex, brush in cap again just on threads.
Your engine is at stake over this so if not sure how to this it's a while you wait job by any decent tech unless unusually hard to get at. Check for leaks like you would for a drain plug for oil as matter of good practice,


T

Response From timdaniel

Yes, you were right. However, the autoparts stores I went to (Pep Boys and OReilly's) both did not carry the size for the oil pressure sensor switch. But I went home and found out it was exactly a 15/16 socket. So, I also did not have a long one of those but I went to an Autozone and found one for 15/16. It is not leaking whatsoever from there now. However, it is still leaking from the crankshaft oil seal and the oil pump seal it looks like. So that is what I will work on now.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

I can't say they are all the same 15/16, think deep 12pt with a cut out so you don't bust the new switches. I have the right tools or even now would go get THE correct one as those if broken are a powered oil leak meaning you are pumping oil out as in gallons per minute.
Now if you think you have other leaks with one leaking as fast as that it also spilled so wipe area off without hosing down your engine just dry clean areas suspect and watch for them to have oil return actively or again and again keep checking.
It might be all done leaking but take a while to look just dirty and normal or not.
IMO and experience if you really need either crank seal it could be an early warning engine is wearing out via excessive blow-by pushing oil mist out of a front one and under pressure to most rear ones.
Rear main seals will put out as little as a drop every day, two or almost never from new to lube them, fronts don't show it.
Keep an eye out for any engine in your care as nothing is faster to kill an engine than running out of oil PRESSURE if by the level or not pumping doesn't matter it will quickly die so check it's level on a schedule by dipstick no more waiting for any warning lights.
Don't misunderstand oil or any warnings on dash. Red oil lights mean it's too late not time to check it. No dash indicator light is that good to tell you it's time just to simply add oil. Junkyards are full of those cars,


T

Response From timdaniel

No, it is not "exactly" a 15/16, but it did the job. I must say that it was pretty scary because it felt very tight going in. This was probably due to the fact that the thread was threaded with some kind of teflon it looked like. I tightened it up until I felt like it was starting to become more difficult, and then stopped.

So about the leaking though. I have had a leak at the rear main seal too. I put in some Bar's Rear Main Seal repair and that seems to have stopped that for now.

As for the crank shaft seal, I did the following to see if it was leaking:

1) Before all this I went to Target and bought a "spot detector" which is a UV light, and cheaper than what they sell it for at the auto parts stores. Then I got some UV dye from o'reilly's and put that in. That made the oil fluorescent. That was how I noticed that the oil pressure sender switch was in fact leaking.

2) Before actually putting in the UV dye, I did spray quite a bit of engine degreaser and clean up the engine as much as I could. I used a can and a half to be exact. I cleaned up all the spots that were really oily.

3) After replacing the oil pressure sender switch, I then noticed that the car was still leaking, but not from the oil pressure sender switch. That was nice and dry. It was coming from somewhere behind the timing cover. So,

4) I removed the drive belts, pullies, etc, and then the timing cover. I then sprayed all in there with engine degreaser and tried to clean it up as best as I could. Then I put the alternator belt, water pump and harmonic balancer back on and ran the engine with it all together. I watched as I noticed that no oil was coming from the cam shaft at all, except for a smiggen around the cam shaft and the valve cover, which was not much at all.

The crank shaft seal however, seemed to be spitting or spraying oil. Not a lot, but over time, it would easily form drops and drip. Not nearly as fast as the oil pressure sender switch, but pretty fast. I then determined that I would change the crank shaft front seal, as well as the fuel pump seal, because they both come in a kit for only $7.00.

P.S. I do always check the oil. I always keep it full. I don't drive that much but, when I do, I check the oil before I go. I am paranoid of anything I work on I guess. But there is always enough oil to be driven, and I always check it after it has sat for a long time, not right after driving like when you pull into the gas station.

Please shed any knowledge you might have, as I would appreciate it. Thank you again.

Response From Hammer Time Top Rated Answer

I must say that it was pretty scary because it felt very tight going in. This was probably due to the fact that the thread was threaded with some kind of teflon it looked like. I tightened it up until I felt like it was starting to become more difficult, and then stopped.

The thread is tapered pipe thread. that's why it get tighter as it goes in.

Response From timdaniel

On the actual switch though, should the thing be pressed up against the engine? What I mean is should it go until it cannot turn at all?

Response From Hammer Time

No, just enough to be tight enough so it won't leak, just like tightening a pipe into a fitting.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Sport - The damn switches use a special socket not just what might work. You could do that with an assortment of extractors too or possibly Vice-Grips of assorted types. The switch is sensitive so the wrong way or tool it might be torqued on incorrectly and blow out if you messed it up installing the new one, forget the old one as it's going in the trash anyway.


" I put in some Bar's Rear Main Seal repair and that seems to have stopped that for now."


Ya - that shows exactly what you DON'T KNOW! Or perhaps what you do know which is enough to get in more trouble.


Not sure why I'm bothering but you do understand how and engine uses oil as a bearing and lube itself? I know you don't. There are no roller bearings commonly used any engine so all parts are riding on the thinnest film of oil if perfect there's zero or so close to that there's never metal to metal contact or and engine wouldn't last a whole minute or much longer never minds years and many thousands of miles.
The wear on the crankshaft allows it to move too much from wear. That up down wear beats up seals so the can't last long.
An engine is only new once and made so precisely the bit that bore one only last a few times and new ones used. You can't take many parts out of one and put them in another the same day it was made never mind now.
Your engine is worn - they do that greatly over miles, conditions and how well lubed. Since you said you are cheap you probably think saving a buck on types or brands of oil doesn't matter too.
Bad luck happens to but if all was just right there's almost no wearing out a well made engine from new with care mind you.
Finding inordinate leaks us done assorted ways, UV dyes just one.
Already said now that the machine work of an engine in this case shows it's wearing and they do that normally a little bit at a time and the oil pressure switch was in the "Bad Luck" category. Many engines will fail to other leaks to wear over use and time.


I suggested strong observations of oil leaking now that you found a very active one. If you used the wrong tools or did it the wrong way somehow it's back on the watch list,


T

Response From timdaniel

Yes, for about 2 to 3 years now, I have been using the 10w30 Certified oil from Sam's Club. It comes out to be about $2.30 per bottle, which is why I use it. I did read about it though before making the decision to use it, and most people agreed it was acceptable oil.

Well, I guess I get what I paid for. It has about 187,000 miles on it. It was a rebuilt engine though, so in reality it has about half of that. Live and learn I guess.

Response From timdaniel

What do you think of these ceramic additives to engines like (links to makers of mechanic in a bottle makers not allowed) Since you mentioned blow-by, I looked it up. IF that is the case, then I guess it's time for a new car because this one is only worth about $1000 kelley blue book. But either way, if I can fix it for just $100, why not? What do you think?

Response From timdaniel

Yeah, I agree. I would not use it normally. I am just trying to not spend money

Response From Hammer Time

Well, that's the best way to end up spending double what you would have in the first place.

That doesn't even take a regular socket. It is a special socket for oil pressure senders only.

Response From Hammer Time

That's the oil pressure sender for the gauge/light. You need a special socket to remove it but they aren't expensive.

2005 Chevy Malibu Maxx chugging

Showing 2 out of 14 Posts | Show 12 Hidden Posts
Question From BUrrgarys on 2005 Chevy Malibu Maxx chugging

2005
Chevrolet
Malibu Maxx
3.5 liter v6
203170 miles

On my way to work today, I heard a loud pop from my engine and my car began to chug like a freight train. I pulled over and inspected the engine as best I could. The most I found was that it sounded like I blew a hose, and the oil under the cap looked milky. I think I might have blown a head gasket and a hose.

Does anyone have any incite as to how I can diagnose this properly? (private address removed)

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Took out an email address - you'll get spammed to death doing that.
Well, did a hose break? Milky coolant and running poorly all at once could mean a gasket leak. Pressure check, look at plugs for one not right or wet a strong clue.
Some cooling systems will get some milky look normally with cold weather and be normal but a little just up top. Not with a bang and running lousy so check for gasket or other reason.
By any chance (some places cold enough already) did this engine freeze with no antifreeze in it?) Not good if so,


T

Response From BUrrgarys

I don't know If a hose broke. But I plan on looking into that later today. The milky substance was on the oil cap. The weather this morning was cold, 31 F. But I had just topped off the coolant/anti-freeze last week.

Response From Hammer Time

You'd better make sure the coolant is mixed properly to give you the proper protection at cold temps.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Hey - from cold country and used to it. Engines don't crack or break a thing if run the day before at 31F or lower. If pure water and a windy mid 20sF still wont bust the engine just overnight but the radiator when you drive will bust and you'll actually overheat.


Oil cap goo: Placement of the cap can do that with condensation.


This all is stuff that's your responsibility to tend to. Busting an engine or running plain water for more than a quick test isn't right and you'll pay for it.


Already said, it's not running right so something happened. 31F alone is unlikely why even if no antifreeze,


T

Response From Hammer Time

No, but I guarantee you it will crack any plastic parts in the cooling system.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

No argument. Just don't play games with coolant protection. We don't even know if 31F is accurate either. What's worse is the testers are all the great either or accurate.


Been nice here HT but has been a bit chilly already. 23F on a remote under a deck. Had to be much less out in the open clearly enough to harm things the freeze and no surprise then warm up for nice days. Cracked up engines are NOT part of this scene!


T

Response From BUrrgarys

So I was able to get my car back to my house. A friend's dad took a look at it last night and believes I blew the exhaust manifold. Do any of you guys have experience in fixing that and could give me some tips?

Response From Hammer Time Top Rated Answer

Blew the exhaust manifold?

What on earth are you talking about?

Response From BUrrgarys

That's what his dad said. He said that I probably blew the gaskets on the exhaust manifold which caused the loud pop and the engine to begin to chug. When you open the hood with the engine running, you can loudly hear air escaping from somewhere.

My extent of knowledge in cars goes as far as tune ups, oil changes, and changing brakes and belts. So I'm going off his word on that.

Response From Hammer Time

OK, now we're talking about gaskets and that makes a little more sense. Exhaust gaskets burn away and cause a loud puffing noise. They do no make the engine run any differently and usually don't fail all at once.

Response From BUrrgarys

Would you know what steps I would need to take to replace them? I tried looking up videos on youtube, but I couldn't find any for my make or year.

Response From Hammer Time

Your first step should be to drive to a shop and get a second opinion and an estimate. I'm still not so sure your resident expert knows what he's talking about.

Response From BUrrgarys

True, that's great advice.