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Best Selling Genuine Replacement Evaporator Cores

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TYC
2009 Ford Focus A/C Evaporator Core TYC

P311-011820E    W0133-2052155  New

Qty:
$157.41
TYC A/C Evaporator Core
Brand: TYC
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2009 - Ford Focus
Four Seasons
2009 Ford Focus A/C Evaporator Core Four Seasons

P311-0556349    W0133-2052155  New

Qty:
$197.54
Brand: Four Seasons
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2009 - Ford Focus
Air Products
1999 Volkswagen Golf A/C Evaporator Core Air Products

P311-4FE1B1C    W0133-1605885  New

Qty:
$119.43
Air Products A/C Evaporator Core
  • Evaporator w/o Case - with Manually Regulated Air Conditioning
Brand: Air Products
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel Engine Designation Manuf. Body Code
1999 - Volkswagen Golf GL AEG A4
Air Products
1998 Volkswagen Beetle A/C Evaporator Core Air Products

P311-4FE1B1C    W0133-1605885  New

Qty:
$119.43
Air Products A/C Evaporator Core
  • Evaporator w/o Case - with Manually Regulated A/C Models W/Manually Regulated Air Conditioning System
Brand: Air Products
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1998 - Volkswagen Beetle
Behr
2012 BMW 335i A/C Evaporator Core Behr - w/o O-Rings

P311-31A52CD    W0133-1976087  New

Qty:
$246.24
Behr A/C Evaporator Core
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • with Valeo
  • w/o O-Rings
Brand: Behr
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Body
2012 - BMW 335i Coupe
Valeo
2012 BMW 335i A/C Evaporator Core Valeo - with O-Rings

P311-48A8E35    W0133-1976087  New

Qty:
$262.81
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • with Valeo
  • with O-Rings
Brand: Valeo
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Body
2012 - BMW 335i Coupe
Behr
2018 BMW X4 A/C Evaporator Core Behr - w/o O-Rings

P311-31A52CD    W0133-1976087  New

Qty:
$246.24
Behr A/C Evaporator Core
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • w/o O-Rings
Brand: Behr
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2018 - BMW X4
Valeo
2018 BMW X4 A/C Evaporator Core Valeo - with O-Rings

P311-48A8E35    W0133-1976087  New

Qty:
$262.81
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • with O-Rings
Brand: Valeo
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2018 - BMW X4
Behr
2015 BMW X1 A/C Evaporator Core Behr - w/o O-Rings

P311-31A52CD    W0133-1976087  New

Qty:
$246.24
Behr A/C Evaporator Core
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Vendor:VALEO
  • w/o O-Rings
Brand: Behr
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2015 - BMW X1
Valeo
2015 BMW X1 A/C Evaporator Core Valeo - with O-Rings

P311-48A8E35    W0133-1976087  New

Qty:
$262.81
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Vendor:VALEO
  • with O-Rings
Brand: Valeo
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2015 - BMW X1
Mopar
2011 Dodge Grand Caravan A/C Evaporator Core Mopar

P311-19014EF    W0133-1913906  New

Qty:
$335.81
Mopar A/C Evaporator Core
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Auxiliary Unit
Brand: Mopar
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2011 - Dodge Grand Caravan
Motorcraft
2004 Ford Expedition A/C Evaporator Core Motorcraft

P311-3A9492E    W0133-1883941  New

Qty:
$295.67
Motorcraft A/C Evaporator Core
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Main Unit
Brand: Motorcraft
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel
2004 - Ford Expedition XLT Sport
Motorcraft
2007 Ford Expedition A/C Evaporator Core Motorcraft

P311-3A9492E    W0133-1883941  New

Qty:
$295.67
Motorcraft A/C Evaporator Core
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Production: -07/2006, Main Unit
Brand: Motorcraft
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel Prod. Date Range
2007 - Ford Expedition Max Limited To:07-00-06
Motorcraft
2005 Ford F-150 A/C Evaporator Core Motorcraft

P311-3A9492E    W0133-1883941  New

Qty:
$295.67
Motorcraft A/C Evaporator Core
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
Brand: Motorcraft
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2005 - Ford F-150
TYC
2004 Chevrolet Express 2500 A/C Evaporator Core 8 Cyl 4.8L TYC

P311-29B572A    W0133-1886162  New

Qty:
$157.51
TYC A/C Evaporator Core
  • For Main Unit
Brand: TYC
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel Block Engine CID CC
2004 - Chevrolet Express 2500 LS V 8 Cyl 4.8L 294 -
TYC
2006 Chevrolet Express 3500 A/C Evaporator Core TYC

P311-29B572A    W0133-1886162  New

Qty:
$157.51
TYC A/C Evaporator Core
  • ForMain Air Cond.
Brand: TYC
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2006 - Chevrolet Express 3500
TYC
2008 Chevrolet Express 3500 A/C Evaporator Core TYC

P311-29B572A    W0133-1886162  New

Qty:
$157.51
TYC A/C Evaporator Core
  • ForMain A/C
Brand: TYC
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2008 - Chevrolet Express 3500
TYC
2018 GMC Savana 3500 A/C Evaporator Core TYC

P311-29B572A    W0133-1886162  New

Qty:
$157.51
TYC A/C Evaporator Core
  • For Primary HVAC
Brand: TYC
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2018 - GMC Savana 3500
TYC
2018 GMC Savana 4500 A/C Evaporator Core TYC

P311-29B572A    W0133-1886162  New

Qty:
$157.51
TYC A/C Evaporator Core
Brand: TYC
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Fuel Type
2018 - GMC Savana 4500 FLEX
TYC
2007 GMC Savana 3500 A/C Evaporator Core 8 Cyl 6.0L TYC

P311-29B572A    W0133-1886162  New

Qty:
$157.51
TYC A/C Evaporator Core
  • For Main A/C
Brand: TYC
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel Block Engine CID CC
2007 - GMC Savana 3500 Base V 8 Cyl 6.0L 364 5967

Latest Evaporator Core Repair and Installation Advice

CarJunky AutoAdvice

How to Replace an Air Conditioning Evaporator Core

Showing 9 out of 17 Posts | Show 8 Hidden Posts
Question From shadowsgone on How to Replace an Air Conditioning Evaporator Core

Hello i own a pontiac bonneville 2001 and its air conditioning evaportator core has a leak and needs replaced. i need to know how to take the dash off and how to replace the evaportator core. any help would be very nice thank you

Response From Sidom

Yes you have to take it out. Book time is almost 6 hrs so that tells you it's a big job.

I'm not sure of you skill level or trying to shy you away from it but will give you my take on it....

I haven't done this exact model but on all the other evaps & heater cores I've done I have found that the aftermarket databases do leave a lot to be desired in dash removal on some models. If you've done enough of them, you'll notice they all have a certain pattern to mounting bolts and there is always 1 or 2 they hide .

If you've got a price on it.....I'm sure your jaw dropped.. Like I said, I don't know you skill level but if you do it. pay attention to all connectors & ground straps & support brackets. Alldata offers online manuals for single cars, might not be a bad idea. This isn't something someone is going to be able to do online......

And just a sidenote, if you start it, finish it...... If you get it tore half down & take it to a shop the price won't be 1/2, it will be almost double. The only job worse than a evap/heater core is one someone has already pulled 1/2 apart.... The logic is " I made it easier by taking it apart" but it's not the case, now you have a jigsaw puzzle that you have to try to figure out and you can't test all the dash functions to see what worked & what didn't.....

Response From shadowsgone

i figured it would take alot of time and what not. i have no skill what so ever lol. im only 17. lol my dad is bad at forms and stuff so im doing this for him he does have some skill for it but just doesnt know how. i have looked for a manual on the car but i can find one so if u know of a place online that would have it could u tell me. i looked at alldata but i couldnt find any of their online manuals

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Shadow - bite the bullet from what I see and just pay to have proper repair. You would spend now $27.99 for a complete www.AllData.com manual which would be best for this. You probably lack the tools if for a one time thing won't pay off.

Never mind tools and the right diagrams you also need some "been there done that" experienced for that stuff.

Mopars are famous for evaporator failures - stinks but true. Again from what posted - get competent help even at the price and you should be shocked but happy if done right the first time. This ain't for the timid,

T

Response From shadowsgone

like i said im only 17 and my dad is the one doing this not me. he could do it he just need to know how and all he needs is a manual to get into it. and we would go to a repair shop but its to much and we cant afford it. the pontiac bonneville 2001 has had a lot of air conditioning problems and has been worked on many times. so my dad decided to fix it him self. he has done it before on a different car but he had a manual for that and we need a new manual for my pontiac bonneville 2001

Response From Tom Greenleaf

You aren't alone with wanting to save some labor - parts cheap actually for this. I may/probable passenger's air bag to disable per exact instructions I don't have and YES anything can be done with the right info.

I still think you'll save hair loss by having down loadable info for this job by AllData.com ,

Who and how came to the conclusion this was an evaporator leak? Not that common on Ford products but anything possible. Tricky to diagnose and a total waste if that wasn't the problem!

T

Response From shadowsgone

will my dad took it to a shop and they did some tests but found nothing my took this stuff that u put in the engine (idk if it was put in the engine im not a car person idk ok) and when it gets to the leak (the stuff he put in the engine is to find leaks) and leaks out the stuff glows under a some kind of light (i dont remeber it was server years ago) he found the leaking spot but cant patch it and took it to the shop and told them the look in that area the make sure and the found it to be the Evaporator Core leaking and told him they could replace it for a lot and he turned it down so now he finaly has time to work on it so i need to find a manual for it. also the car is a pontiac not a ford

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Ultra Violet (it's green to the eye) was likely put in. If a slower leak I like to charge it up to make it run which itself is a two page instruction listed above - then use UV light or while paper towel (clean) and check drain where water comes out normally with an operating system - water will dry but leave an oily residue or the dye evidence if trouble. Electronic sniffers are helpful as there's no color or real odor to refrigerant and if any is detected inside at vents instantly when system is shut down that's somewhat conclusive of an evaporator core leak.

You said you weren't a tech (mechanic) - that's fine but you can learn and learn that this is a difficult job.

Do you have your terms right? Evaporator is in dash, Condenser (more popular to go bad) is the radiator looking item in front of the radiator for the engine. Hoses and compressor are also leak possibilities - sometimes just a silly "O" ring but still need to know how to do it and charge the exact weight back in.

2001 GMs used dye (many) when new and an oil to lube compressor during operation that is "hygroscopic" (aborbs moisture) so if this is left un fixed (system empty) the oil would become acidic and in a year or two the whole system would deteriorate.

It's a whole course of study not a parts toss to do this stuff.

I think I speak for all the regulars here that we want you to succeed at the fix even if it takes sending this job out.

BTW - I'm just 17 also ----- just depends on when you start counting

Good luck - all are here to help,

T

Response From shadowsgone

yea it was that ultra violet light stuff and found the area of the leak so like i said we took it in and the found it to be the Evaporator Core i might be stupid at this stuff but my dad was told it was the Evaporator Core

tom im glad to hear ur 17 also but i know serval guys at my HS that r 17 and know a lot about cars. i on the other had have hardly an interest in cars i am more of a computer geek so thats y im asking all this stuff lol

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Hi,

Sorry for messing up this thread on you. What I meant by being 17 is that I have been over 3 times now if you added that # up!

I was aggressive at automotives for ions even younger than that.

Yes the UV dye shows well with a UV light or even by eye if in an open area to see. Oil spots on any A/C item are clues as well.

Again - the drain for A/C water that it makes should be oil and dye free. If you (or your Dad) find the outlet and get an oily finger or dye that's fairly conclusive for an evaporator leak.

Different cars have weak areas from new - some will have issues and others of the same not?? GMs tend to leak at the shaft seal of compressor more than average IMO. Look there as it should be dirty buy dry at the head of compressor.

Any vehicle can catch a stone thru grille and cause a leak too.

With this much effort (evaps possible) taking the time to be sure is worth its weight in gold!

Good luck with the project,

T

Response From Hammer Time

I think Tom was referring to his Kitty being 17 years old not him....................LOL He can't remember 17.

Response From shadowsgone

u didnt mess anything up tom ur helping and thats what counts lol
yes my dad found the outlet and got dye/oily fingers

Response From Hammer Time


Mopars are famous for evaporator failures - stinks but true.
Not that common on Ford products but anything possible.


OK Tom, which question are you reading? The car is a Bonneville.............LOL

Nobody has mentioned the need of a recovery and charging station here. I'm one that believes A/C is not a DIY repair and most will do even more damage by trying this themselves. You really have to know this business to avoid problems.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Kitty needs new glasses and is pooped to boot!

Yes - any system need have remaining refrigerant recovered - work on it empty and plug off open ends avoiding contamination. Drier replacement a strong suggestion for short bucks usually and maintains warranty on some parts.

Kitty needs her coffee or mixes up threads - sorry,

T + K

Response From Sidom Top Rated Answer


Who and how came to the conclusion this was an evaporator leak?


Didn't think of that Very good point sir..... Done tons of Rams... Not too many Pontiacs...

Response From Sidom

As HT & Tom stated.... An online manual might be the way to go if you're gonna do it...
Try this link alldatadiy.com (don't forget the Ws)

Response From Hammer Time

Your talking about numerous pages of instructions. I suggest you either purchase a service manual or a one car subscription to Alldata to get all the instructions.

Instructions on Replacing AC Evaporator Core on 98 Chevy Cavalier, Z24

Showing 3 out of 11 Posts | Show 8 Hidden Posts
Question From jmwkk341 on Instructions on Replacing AC Evaporator Core on 98 Chevy Cavalier, Z24

I'm completely over-hauling the AC system on a:

1998
Chevrolet Cavalier Z24
2.4L
Mileage: 166,000 miles.

Background: The AC Compressor was on its way out so installed a new one and have replaced the Accumulator, Condenser, Evaporator Tube, Serpentine Belt and Belt Tenionser. I had no intention of bothering the Evaporator, but I butchered one of the aluminum evaporator line connections coming out of firewall that goes to the condenser.

I know that replacing the Evaporator is a big job that (presumably) involves alot of work removing instrument panels, etc.

I have not been able to find good step by step instructions on the web as to on how to replace the evaporator core, perhaps because it appears to require alot of work and effort to access the part in the first place.

This is my 1st post, so have mercy upon me.

Would appreciate any help!

Response From Hammer Time







Remove or Disconnect

  1. Negative battery cable.
  2. Recover refrigerant.
  3. Drain cooling system.
  4. Raise vehicle.
  5. heater hoses from heater core.
  6. Evaporator fittings from the evaporator and discard O-ring seals.
  7. Moisture drain tube from HVAC module.
  8. Lower vehicle.
  9. Instrument panel and console.
  10. Heater outlet cover and heater core cover.
  • There is a mounting screw located in a recess in the center of the cover.
    1. heater core mounting clamps and heater core.
    2. heater core shroud and evaporator core.
  • There is a mounting screw located at the middle of the front of dash.

  • Install or Connect

    1. Evaporator.

    Tighten
  • Screws to 1 Nm (9 lb in) .
    1. heater core should heater core and heater core mounting clamp.

    Tighten
  • Screw to 1 Nm (9 lb in) .
    1. Heater core cover and heater outlet cover.

    Tighten
  • Screws to 1 Nm (9 lb in) .
    1. Instrument panel and console.
    2. Raise vehicle.
    3. Moisture drain tube to the HVAC module.
    4. Evaporator fittings to evaporator using new O-ring seals lubricated in clean 525 viscosity refrigerant oil.

    Tighten
  • Fittings to 24 Nm (18 lb ft) .
    1. heater hoses to heater core.
    2. Lower vehicle.
    3. Fill cooling system and check for leaks.
    4. Evacuate and charge the A/C system.
    5. Negative battery cable.
    Tighten

    Response From jmwkk341

    Thanks, Hammer Time!!!

    This undertaking looks daunting as hell.

    Taking on this job should be good therapy for my anal-retentive OCD nature.

    Not sure if I want to tackle this now or get back to rebuilding the carbs I have totally disassembled on my 1976 Yamaha XS650C.

    I'm having to fight the urge to remove that new compressor I just bolted up and slapping on a $60 Bypass Pulley and avoid the entire AC quagmire until warmer weather approaches in a few months,

    Response From Hammer Time

    You don't have to respond to posts separately. We all see every post.

    Response From Tom Greenleaf

    jmwkk341:

    Hammer just found the "daunting" task for you - way to go Hammer!

    Quick read - sorry, I'm way behind. Evaps in a CCOT (clutch cycling orifice tube) system like this car are not usually a problem spot alone. As said the dang alloys are like welded after even less years.

    No oil from old compressor could be normal the noise suggests it was trashed. Do your thing. Read charging procedures up top and I can or someone provide more if you are up to it like total system capacities or educated guesses for how much oil to use for what was replaced and it is guessing unless you start from completely flushed out empty. No dipstick for that and it's imperative to be close.

    Even I own one that when the time comes for a compressor hope I can catch it before a meltdown and when much newer started putting PB on those just in case so evap wouldn't be involved!

    Good luck. "Measure twice, Cut once" as they say

    T

    Response From jmwkk341

    Thanks Tom. I appreciate the offer of help.

    Going into this, I had absolutely NO intention of replacing the evaporator core due to its location. All connections came loose rather easily, but on that last disconnect I just did not take the care necessary to avoid twisting the damn tube coming out of the firewall. I should have used some PB Blaster and put a wrench on the hex connection to immobilize it while wrenching off the black nut on the AC Evap tube.

    BTW, I did have a local shop recover the R134a in the system prior to be tearing into it. Cost me $27.00.

    I have come across a couple Youtube videos on removal of the Cavy's dash/instrument panels and so forth in order to access and replace the factory radio, so I'm hoping that footage will be of some help.

    i do have some questions - I was not able to pour any oil out of the old Accumulator either. Is that unusual?

    When I get to the point of charging the system, how (or) will the lower ambient temps (even in my garage) affect pressure readings and charging conditions as compared to performing this work in warm or hot weather?

    Response From Tom Greenleaf

    OK - A chart and they can be totally wrong for a '98 Cavalier (say all engines) 24 ounces 134a and 9 oz. PAG 150 oil but that's from totally empty and I'm surprised that much. To get oil out of an accumulator drill a hole in the bottom but some is still held up for sure. Heat it if you wish for more. My guess is that plenty of oil settles in condenser but varies by car and designs.

    General: When/if a component is replaced you add how much you could dump out plus a couple for a system with that oil capacity IMO and it is subject to opinion and what happened. A blowout from a rock thru condenser may blow a lot of oil out or any sudden loss.

    Know that normally a plain vacuum pull and that's critical should not remove significant oil. If you don't have your own pump then rent one. Don't just count on a shop down the street as YOU want to see it hold steady and if good you can add thru high side into the vacuum engine off with liquid into that vacuum till it reads positive pressure so NO air gets in. Purge lines with a spit (just a spit) of new gas before hooking them up. Air is the enemy with its moisture.

    Done (retired) from this but still check out stuff live if asked. Hasn't been that hot here in a couple years for that long and the extremes seem to bring out the weak links/leaks in system faster with the higher pressures.

    Just to refresh and remind you once you have refrigerant and a gauge set or whatever you are using is to think hard what is pressure, what is known vacuum and what/where the pure gas is. Be fast but don't choke compressor when charging when all done if forcing compressor to run. Once some cooling at vents is happening the compressor should be getting some lube - critical.

    Hang in there,

    Tom

    Response From jmwkk341 Top Rated Answer

    My new vacuum pump is a U.S. General Two Stage, 3 CFM, 1/3 HP unit that I bought from Harbor Freight.



    Response From Tom Greenleaf

    Great. Anything that can just pull a full vacuum is fine. Really expensive ones are just faster and those venturi ones can't pull the full 29.92 Hg at sea level adjust 1 Hg/1,000 ft. of elevation is ok



    Tom

    Response From Tom Greenleaf

    Instructions exist but I don't have specifics with step by step and at the age things may break doing the evap and it may not fit right as the original. Damage is done and too bad because depending on what was wrong with compressor you frequent aren't going to get that dang alloy stuff apart without damage to do the accumulator and yes most compressors will want a new one or give you a hard time for warranty.

    If nobody here has the specifics AllData.com will for I think $27.50 but that is unlikely to tell you or discuss a poor fit and it's hard to say depending on any complications. Not to discourage you but A/C is not very DIY friendly without some comprehensive know how or your work so far may be all in waste.

    1. What was wrong with the compressor?

    2. Did it leave debris and how did you guess at how much oil to use?

    That's just the tip of the iceberg and hope you bought a new compressor no a reman,

    T

    Response From jmwkk341

    Thanks, Tom.

    The old compressor had been making a shrill, high pitched metal on metal grinding noise when the clutch was engaged. Also, there was a fair amount of shiny metal shavings around the compressor.

    I was not able to drain ANY oil from the old compressor. Since I'm replacing all components (accumulator, condenser, evaporator and lines) with new ones, I believe the system will hold between 8-9 ounces. I put 3 ounces of PAG-150 into the compressor. I'll add the appropriate amounts of oil to the other components per the GM info that I have.

    I've never performed any AC work before, so this is definetly a crash-course that I have the luxury of taking my time with since this is not a primary or even secondary means of transportation.

    Thus far on this car, I have completely (and successfully) replaced the rear drum brakes, replaced the power steering pump & replaced the O2 sensors. Pretty routine work for most, but is work I've never done before. This is the first car I've had where totally botched self maintenance wont result in me being stranded w/o transportation.

    Yes I bought a new AC Delco Compressor.

    Thanks kindly for the reply.