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Best Selling Genuine Pontiac Coolant Temperature Sensors

  • We Stock the following top leading brands, including Delphi, Standard Ignition, Vemo, ACDelco, NTC - TAMA
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We stock Coolant Temperature Sensor parts for most Pontiac models, including Bonneville, Firebird, G6, Grand Am, Grand Prix, Montana, Sunfire, Vibe.

Delphi
1985 Pontiac 6000 Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor 6 Cyl 2.8L Delphi

P311-591F9C6    TS10075  New

140-206 , 213310 , 213928 , TX3T , 211-1012 , 21372 , 8-25036-979-0 , TX3 , 12500 , 8250369790 , 8-12146-312-0 , 25036979 , WT3000P , TS4015 , 8121463120 , 158-0536 , 13111 , CS3 , 12146312 , WT3000 , TU223 , 81532-638-60 , TSU81 , 8153263860 , TS4052SB , 15326386 , TS4052 , 140206 , 36403 , 12001 , 5S1018 , SU109

Qty:
$20.20
Delphi Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor
  • Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor
  • Product Attributes:
    • California Proposition 65: Warning: This Product Can Expose You To Chemicals Including Lead, Which Is Known To The State Of California To Cause Cancer And Birth Defects Or Reproductive Harm. For More Information Go To Www.p65warnings.ca.gov.
  • Delphi temperature sensors are built with the latest OE technology; Delphi temperature sensors use durable, one-piece design; Delphi temperature sensors are impervious to electrical noise and interference.
Brand: Delphi
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel Engine VIN Fuel Delivery Type Block Engine CID CC
1985 - Pontiac 6000 Base W FI V 6 Cyl 2.8L 173 -
Standard Ignition
1990 Pontiac Grand Am Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor Standard Ignition

P311-2EC47E7    TX3  New

TS10075-11B1 , 9-42402 , 18-7600 , 1H8 , 8100458470 , 2CTS0001 , 74040 , 8-12146-312-1 , SU109VC , 5S1474 , 158-0536 , TS10181 , 8-12146-312-0 , 805218T , 213-928 , 31195 , 2-8296 , 19187357 , 211-1012 , 8133450 , 213-4396 , 3850397-5 , J3241950 , 12001 , SU102 , 19189478 , 213-52 , 15326386 , 8132906 , 25036708 , 12500 , 15-51107 , 25037182 , 5S1018 , WT3000 , 158-0468 , 12146312 , CTS003 , 3850397 , TS10075 , 71-2507 , 8983502327 , 25036078 , TS10011 , 211-91012 , 4040 , 201-1593 , 25036979 , TS10140 , 10045847 , 8-25036-092-0 , 213-310 , 8-25036-979-0 , 213-72 , SU109 , 4141 , 36403 , 8-15326-386-0 , 71-2501 , TS10171

Qty:
$21.33
Standard Ignition Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor
  • Coolant Temperature Sensor
  • Product Attributes:
    • Attachment Method: Bolt On
    • Connector Gender: Female
    • Connector Quantity: 1
    • Connector Shape: Round
    • Terminal Gender: Male
    • Terminal Quantity: 2
    • Terminal Type: Pin
    • Thread Size: 3/8-18 "
  • Our temperature sensors are manufactured using proprietary brass casings for superior durability and a longer lasting part life. Each of these parts is 100% functional and environmental tested to ensure that the part you receive will outperform any other sensor available in the aftermarket. Every one of our temperature sensor connectors has been carefully crafted to ensure proper fitment, as engine management systems require reliable connections in order to reach optimum performance. Each part that we manufacture endures rigorous end of line testing to ensure that every part meets the linearity specifications expected by the engine management system in your vehicle.
Brand: Standard Ignition
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1990 - Pontiac Grand Am
Vemo
2005 Pontiac G6 Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor Vemo

P311-2BB766B    W0133-1924495  New

Qty:
$20.09
Vemo Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor
Brand: Vemo
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2005 - Pontiac G6
Vemo
2004 Pontiac Grand Am Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor 4 Cyl 2.2L Vemo

P311-2BB766B    W0133-1924495  New

Qty:
$20.09
Vemo Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor
  • ; Engine - L61
Brand: Vemo
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
2004 - Pontiac Grand Am L 4 Cyl 2.2L 134 2198
Vemo
2008 Pontiac G8 Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor 6 Cyl 3.6L Vemo

P311-4D11164    W0133-2043122  New

Qty:
$14.27
Vemo Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor
Brand: Vemo
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
2008 - Pontiac G8 V 6 Cyl 3.6L 217 3564
ACDelco
2008 Pontiac G8 Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor 6 Cyl 3.6L ACDelco

P311-4FE8EDF    W0133-2043122  New

Qty:
$27.96
ACDelco Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Genuine GM
Brand: ACDelco
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
2008 - Pontiac G8 V 6 Cyl 3.6L 217 3564
ACDelco
1994 Pontiac Bonneville Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor ACDelco

P311-1C38B82    W0133-1681994  New

Qty:
$29.54
ACDelco Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Genuine GM
Brand: ACDelco
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1994 - Pontiac Bonneville
ACDelco
1989 Pontiac Firebird Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor 8 Cyl 5.0L ACDelco

P311-1C38B82    W0133-1681994  New

Qty:
$29.54
ACDelco Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor
  • Gold (Professional)
Brand: ACDelco
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel Block Engine CID CC
1989 - Pontiac Firebird Formula V 8 Cyl 5.0L 305 -
ACDelco
2003 Pontiac Aztek Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor ACDelco

P311-1C38B82    W0133-1681994  New

Qty:
$29.54
ACDelco Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor
  • Gold (Professional)
Brand: ACDelco
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2003 - Pontiac Aztek
ACDelco
1987 Pontiac Firebird Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor 8 Cyl 5.7L ACDelco

P311-1C38B82    W0133-1681994  New

Qty:
$29.54
ACDelco Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Genuine GM
  • ; OEM# 25036979
Brand: ACDelco
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
1987 - Pontiac Firebird V 8 Cyl 5.7L 350 -
ACDelco
1991 Pontiac Grand Prix Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor 4 Cyl 2.3L ACDelco

P311-1C38B82    W0133-1681994  New

Qty:
$29.54
ACDelco Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor
  • Gold (Professional)
  • ; OEM# 25036979
Brand: ACDelco
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
1991 - Pontiac Grand Prix L 4 Cyl 2.3L 138 -
ACDelco
1989 Pontiac Firebird Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor 8 Cyl 5.0L ACDelco

P311-1C38B82    W0133-1681994  New

Qty:
$29.54
ACDelco Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor
  • Gold (Professional)
  • ; OEM# 25036979
Brand: ACDelco
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel Block Engine CID CC
1989 - Pontiac Firebird Trans Am GTA V 8 Cyl 5.0L 305 -
ACDelco
1997 Pontiac Firebird Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor 8 Cyl 5.7L ACDelco

P311-1C38B82    W0133-1681994  New

Qty:
$29.54
ACDelco Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Genuine GM
  • ; (Located at Intake Manifold)
Brand: ACDelco
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
1997 - Pontiac Firebird V 8 Cyl 5.7L 350 -
ACDelco
1997 Pontiac Firebird Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor 8 Cyl 5.7L ACDelco

P311-1C38B82    W0133-1681994  New

Qty:
$29.54
ACDelco Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor
  • Gold (Professional)
  • ; (Located at Intake Manifold)
Brand: ACDelco
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
1997 - Pontiac Firebird V 8 Cyl 5.7L 350 -
ACDelco
1995 Pontiac Firebird Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor 8 Cyl 5.7L ACDelco

P311-1C38B82    W0133-1681994  New

Qty:
$29.54
ACDelco Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor
  • Gold (Professional)
  • ; (Located at Intake Manifold)
Brand: ACDelco
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
1995 - Pontiac Firebird V 8 Cyl 5.7L 350 -
ACDelco
1992 Pontiac Firebird Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor ACDelco

P311-1C38B82    W0133-1681994  New

Qty:
$29.54
ACDelco Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Genuine GM
  • ; with 2 Wire Connector
Brand: ACDelco
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1992 - Pontiac Firebird
ACDelco
1992 Pontiac Firebird Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor ACDelco

P311-1C38B82    W0133-1681994  New

Qty:
$29.54
ACDelco Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor
  • Gold (Professional)
  • ; with 2 Wire Connector
Brand: ACDelco
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1992 - Pontiac Firebird
ACDelco
1992 Pontiac Firebird Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor ACDelco

P311-1C38B82    W0133-1681994  New

Qty:
$29.54
ACDelco Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor
  • Gold (Professional)
  • ; with 2 Wire Connector
Brand: ACDelco
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1992 - Pontiac Firebird
NTC - TAMA
2006 Pontiac Vibe Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor NTC - TAMA - For EFI

P311-21FC813    W0133-1634278  New

Qty:
$31.52
NTC - TAMA Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • ; Sensor for the E.F.I system - Not to be confused with Thermo Time Switch.
  • For EFI
Brand: NTC - TAMA
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Engine Designation
2006 - Pontiac Vibe 2ZZGE
NTC - TAMA
2003 Pontiac Vibe Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor NTC - TAMA - For EFI

P311-21FC813    W0133-1634278  New

Qty:
$31.52
NTC - TAMA Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • ; Production: 01/2002-, Sensor for the E.F.I system - Not to be confused with Thermo Time Switch.
  • For EFI
Brand: NTC - TAMA
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Prod. Date Range
2003 - Pontiac Vibe Fr:01-00-02

Latest Pontiac Repair and Coolant Temperature Sensor Installation Advice

CarJunky AutoAdvice

2001 Pontiac Montana Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor

Showing 3 out of 3 Posts
Question From Karen love on 2001 Pontiac Montana Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor

2001 Pontiac Montana
6 CYL
215,000 kms

Can you please tell me where the Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor is located, Can't find it thank you

Response From Hammer Time

Assuming your looking for the sensor for the computer and not the gauge, it's on the corner of the intake manifold near the end of the front head.

Response From Sidom Top Rated Answer

Should be on the theromstat housing near the back of the motor

check engine light/temp gauge on 0 degrees

Showing 2 out of 10 Posts | Show 8 Hidden Posts
Question From 2001 montana on check engine light/temp gauge on 0 degrees

hello i have a 2001 pontiac montana with a service engine light on & temperature gauge not registering at all 0 degrees, but i have heat & i check fluid levels & checked ok. i have seen leaking (not much) at rear of vehicle on the driver side, it does have a rear heater & cooling controls. any ideas on where to start thank you.

Response From flgmtech1

I am not sure what part of the country you are in, here in Florida the local aftermarket car part stores offer free DTC code reading, this code will help in diagnosing. Generally speaking the issue could be as simple ass a stuck open thermostat but it should still show a relative temp, and or an issue with the ECT sensor or the wiring to the sensor or the Gauge (Part or the IPC) itself. With out a Tech 2 or a scanner with IPC data or engine data to comapre PCM ECT sensor readings it is really hard to say which of these are the cause.
Start with looking at the ECT sensor for issues with connection and or corrosion and if both look goodm, use a multi meter and read resistance of the sensor across the terminals, this will let you know the resistance is either high low or infinite on the sensor.
A
ORN/BLK
469
MAP Sensor Return
B
YEL
410
ECT Sensor Signal
then you need to voltagfe drop test the two wire connector harness side,this will tell you whether or not the circuit is open or if you have high voltage on the signal circuit will induce a Low temperature displal and set a DTC
P0118
The engine coolant temperature (ECT) sensor is a variable resistor, that measures the temperature of the engine coolant. The ECT sensor has a signal circuit and a low reference circuit. The powertrain control module (PCM) supplies 5 volts to the ECT signal circuit and a ground for the ECT low reference circuit. When the ECT is cold, the sensor resistance is high. When the ECT increases, the sensor resistance decreases. With high sensor resistance, the PCM detects a high voltage on the ECT signal circuit. With lower sensor resistance, the PCM detects a lower voltage on the ECT signal circuit. If the PCM detects an excessively high ECT signal voltage, which is a low temperature indication, DTC P0118 sets.
THis would indicate and issue with either the PCM, the ECT sensor or the circuit itself.

Response From 2001 montana

where do i find more information on these sensors you said to test. i did have the engine light checked & was told the message was check coolant levels & thermostat. but i have heat & pressure on upper hose is good & hot. is one of these sensors on the radiator & called the low coolant sensor.

Response From flgmtech1 Top Rated Answer

you said that you have had the vehicle scanned, what is the code? The sensor I am referring to the ECT or Engine coolant temperature sensor is located on the drivers side at the base of the upper radiator hose thermostat housing in the valley of the intake above the Transmission.

Response From 2001 montana

I am not sure what the specific code was the only thing i was told was that the computer detected it could not read the temperature or the temperature was out of the range of what the thermostat was rated at & the fluid level should be checked. I will go back today & see if there was a code when the auto parts place plugged into the on board diagnostics test. I changed the coolant sensor you were talking about next to the thermostat housing & temp gauge moves a little bit & just stops. I noticed the 2 main cooling fans seem to be running a lot more than usual, i have been driving it around a little bit.

Response From flgmtech1

if you have replaced the ECT sensor did you happen to use a mulitmeter to test the connector or wiring at the sensor to ensure the problem was not with the wiring? As I said in my earlier post I have a feeling your DTC is related to the ECM seeing high resistance or an issue with the circuit and may only be resolved by repairing the circuit or wire that is affected or if it is internal to the PCM the PCm itself, but first measuring voltage on both circuits and testing for opens, high resistance shorts to voltage or shorts to grounds are absolutely your next step to determine what is causing your concern. For starters you could unplug your map sensor I have included pictures of your engine and the call out for the MAP sensor is number 2.
By unplugging the map sensor then seeing what your temperature gauge is then reading you are taking the low reference side away form the ECT sensor or the ground side, this eliminates any issues with the MAP sensor or wiring to the map sensor on the eniter low reference circuit for both the MAP and the ECT, if you still have no response unlpug the ECT and test the yellow wire for 5 volts this is the signal side and the side that is possibly open or grounded. Use a Digital multi meter and let me know what the measured DC voltage is at the yellow wire terminal of the ECT.

Response From 2001 montana

Ok i disconnected the map sensor & measured 5 volts on the grey wire the lite green was no voltage i disconnected the map sensor & ran the car for 20 minutes & saw the gauge move about a 1/4" & stop at the same place everytime. I measured yellow wire & got 5volts at the ect harness. when map sensor was disconnected the car seemed to idle very high about 25,000 rpms

any suggestions Thank you 2001 montana

Response From flgmtech1

the vehicle will idle higher as it defaults to a median reading as it does not know if it is above sea level or not. The MAP sensor helps the PCM know what the atmospheric pressure is as read via manifold pressure this determines if atmospheric pressure is say higher elevations in the mountains or flat at or below sea level like some areas here in Florida. I only had you take the MAP sensor connector off to make sure the MAP was not skewing the ECT sensor low reference circuit or the wiring in the circuit, this means if you have been able to read 5 volts at the yellow wire at the ECT sensor and obviously ground at the orange and black wire at the ECT it means the circuit is operating as per designed.
HOWEVER, with out the benefit of a TECH 2 scan tool to see data while the vehicle is running it is hard to determine if the issue is not a IPC issue or an internal PCM issue.
At this stage you really need to obtain a scan tool and see what the live reading is of the ECT to compare with the gauge reading.

Response From 2001 montana

Ok i found the problem out, it was the thermo-stat all along, apparently when the temperature was fluctuating for the last month the service engine light kicked in & shut down the thermostat gauge, also it kicked in the cooling fans, after the sevice engine light was reset the fans immediately shut off & the temp gauge went up to 162 degrees immediately. Also the 25,00 rpms was because i accidently unplugged the throttle sensor & when i plugged it back in the rpms went to normal. So i will start with replacing the thermo-stat & go from there.

Thank you for your input 2001 montana

Response From flgmtech1

by the way, look for signs of a mouse or a rodent eating at any of your under hood insulation or wiring harness conduit, this may be the cause where by a rodent could have eaten into one of these wires casuing all of these issues.

Poor Engine Performance In Cold Temperature: 1996 Pontiac Bonneville

Showing 6 out of 9 Posts | Show 3 Hidden Posts
Question From Guest on Poor Engine Performance In Cold Temperature: 1996 Pontiac Bonneville

1996 Pontiac Bonneville
6 cyl 3.8 L
180000 miles

This winter, my Bonneville has had difficulty accelerating (0-30 mph) in cold weather (below 30 degrees F). When at a complete stop, the car would crawl with the gas completely floored. The car accelerates slowly and eventually reaches desired speeds. The car's acceleration is normal when driving above 35 mph. After each stop, the poor acceleration acts up again. A warm engine does not appear to help this issue. The problem has gotten progressively worse and now idles poorly in cold temperatures. The check engine light turned on and two diagnostic codes were obtained: 1) EGR valve pintle position circuit 2) Cylinder misfire. It is my understanding the EGR may not be the root cause. Other root causes coud be: PCM, Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor, Throttle Position Sensor, Mass Air Flow sensor, Oxygen Sensor, Intake Air Temperature Sensor, etc. I do not know where to start. Please advise. Thank You.

Response From dmac0923

im a little confused???? you got a trouble code for all of those sensors??????

Response From Guest

Nope, just two codes: The ERG and misfire. The components listed are potential causes (based on conversations with repair shop)

Response From Loren Champlain Sr

The misfire code will be one or more of these:
P0300 (Random cylinder misfire)
P0301 (Cyl. 1 misfire)
P0302 (Cyl. 2 misfire)
P0303 (Cyl. 3 misfire)
P0304 (Cyl. 4 misfire)
P0305 (Cyl. 5 misfire)
P0306 (Cyl. 6 misfire)
Your PCM also has misfire history capability; It will tell you how many times each cylinder has misfired. So, which of those seven codes did it show?

Response From Guest

The misifire code is as follows: Cylinder misfire detected - random cylinders. Explanation = The powertrain control module monitors the crankshaft speed and has detected a misfire condition.

I am almost certain the misfire is related to the cold temperature issue. The problem got progressively worse throughout the winter and eventually began idling poorly. I believe the poor idling caused the misfire code. It felt like the car was not getting enough gas or air.

Response From Loren Champlain Sr

That's your story and you're sticking to it. Good luck.

Response From Guest Top Rated Answer

Unfortunately, I still do not know how to address the cold temperature issue. Any recommendations on narrowing down the scenarios? Thanks.

Response From Loren Champlain Sr

Bonnie; I think the first order of business would be to address the misfire. What trouble code(s) did you come up with? Unless the EGR is sticking open at idle, this shouldn't be causing your problem, but don't ignore the code. Could be just a one time thing. Definitely, wouldn't jump to the PCM at this point. The various sensors that you mentioned can be checked. Live data with a scanner is best. Code pullers do just that...pull codes.

Response From Guest

Thanks SW WA. Unfortunately, I cannot get the vehicle to act up again as warmer temperatures have moved in. Thus, I do not think the live data will show a problem. While I would like to be proactive and address the problem now, I hate to spend money if the care will not act up. If I could narrow the problem down to one or two components, I would try to address them now. Unfortunately, there are too many potential causes. Thanks again!

1993 Pontiac Grand Am - Cold Weather Start Issue

Showing 2 out of 33 Posts | Show 31 Hidden Posts
Question From ShinyGrAm on 1993 Pontiac Grand Am - Cold Weather Start Issue

1993 Pontiac Grand Am (V6 - 3.3) (300K miles) Hard time starting in cold (winter) weather. The colder it is the more it turns over before starting. At 10 degrees or below, takes over a minute of cranking to start. Sounds like it's trying, firing, but can't quite get there. Runs perfectly after it starts.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

#1 - do NOT crank engine or let starter run for more than say 15 seconds then let it cool down for a couple minutes or you'll add a new starter to you troubles!


That's tons of miles but alone for this not the real issue so far. It might mean you or someone is using a heavy viscosity of oil (don't do that - still only suggested viscosity even if it used some) could be the trouble.


Cold = less battery amps available and oil thickens anyway and normally. It still should crank at a reasonable speed to start and if not let's find out why not, oil issue or lower than necessary amps delivered to starter,


T

Response From ShinyGrAm

Brand new battery. Fresh 10W30 oil.

Response From Hammer Time

Hard starting in cold weather usually means insufficient fuel mixture. The first thing to check is the fuel pressure and make sure it is within specs at all times.

The next thing will require the use of a scanner. Obviously, checking for stored codes should be first. If no codes are stored, check to see if both ECT temp and IAT temp reading match each other when checked before the car is run for the first time. A inaccurate temp sensor would give you the wrong fuel mixture.

Response From ShinyGrAm Top Rated Answer

Interesting Hammer Time mentioned the temp sensors. Prior to changing the battery I had 2 codes. One was 15 - "Coolant Temperature Sensor (Low Temp Indicated)" and the other was 26 - "Quad Drive Fault". I don't know how long the codes where stored and they haven't since come back. Both temp sensors where replaced not long ago (both coolant sensors). What should I do?

Response From Hammer Time

You should do as I already advised. Use a scan tool to compare temps between the coolant temp sensor and the Intake air temp sensor. They should match if the car has not been run.

Response From ShinyGrAm

Not sure if I can do that. That make and model tends to give up very little scan info beyond codes. I did do an electrical system overhaul a few years ago. Used clamp type connectors when replacing wires. Tomorrow I plan on replacing all those connectors with soldered connections (including those connecting to the temp sensors). Perhaps that will do the trick. I'll let you know in a few days. Thanks.

Response From Hammer Time

That make and model tends to give up very little scan info beyond codes

That is wrong. They may not give you as much info as OBD2 because th3e computer doesn't even have that degree of monitoring but they have all the basics and temp sensors are basics.

Response From Discretesignals

He probably doesn't have access to an enhanced scan tool that can plug into the ALDL.

Response From ShinyGrAm

You're right. No scanner access. The guys I know that have scanners can't get them to do anything beyond codes on my car. I'll work on the connections, and go from there.

Response From Discretesignals

They have enhanced scan tools that can access data information on those. The dealer had the TECH1/A and Tech 2. Some of the high dollar scanners have access too. You can get code readers that plug into the ALDL, but to be honest they are a waste of money because those ECM's have flash code diagnostics.

Response From ShinyGrAm

Used this situation to replaced all 6 original fuel injectors with new OEM injectors. Have been collecting them from auction site at around $40. a piece. I'll see if this helps once we get more really cold weather (sub 20 degrees).

Response From Discretesignals

The old style multecs, 1st design, were fairly prone to shorting out their coil windings. Usually when they shorted out the ECM would shut down or you would have a misfire. The resistance of them should be around 12 ohms. If they have varying resistances between injectors, it is a good bet your going to have troubles.

The upgrade replacement was to install Bosch DRI injectors.

Response From ShinyGrAm

The original ACDelco injectors lasted 300,000 miles without so much as 1 problem. That's a great track record so I replaced them with the same.

Response From Discretesignals

Really don't think injectors will cause an ECT code to show up though.

Response From ShinyGrAm

As it stands now, the codes were a one time thing. Perhaps an aberration. Malfunctioning and/or dirty injectors could be the cause. Started fine this morning at 33º, which means nothing here. Time will tell, once the cold weather hits again. The forcast is for a couple sub 10º nights over the next 10 days. Will continue to update.

Response From ShinyGrAm

The problem of delayed start in cold weather improved a little with the new injectors, however, it still exists. I continue to believe Hammertime's air/fuel mixture suggestion is correct. I need to know every component that is involved in this process. Hammertime already mentioned temperature sensors. What else is involved in the mixture adjustment process during very cold weather starts? ECM gets data from the air and coolant temp sensors and what else? Then the ECM adjusts the air valve, to add more or less air to the mixture? What else is the ECM doing in reaction to the incoming data? BTW - I don't have an air temp sensor. I have a mass air flow sensor that I replaced about 2 years ago.

Response From Hammer Time

It doesn't appear you have verified the temp sensor data yet as I suggested a long time ago.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Thread getting long - sorry. As Hammer just pointed out as well you have to test things out that are on the possible list and these things are.


Looked up and still could be wrong but this engine calls for 5-30 oil if temps below 64F but really shouldn't matter IMO. Actually with the miles you would think it would want that.


Do what you want but I suggest synthetic name branded oil as most likely to be what it claims (I really wonder with some - printing lies on containers is easy) but most people get sticker shock at the costs. It doesn't cost more - it's less in wear and tear, lasts longer and about refuses to sludge up - win, win, win all around. Claims of better fuel economy are possible and IMO likely but more depends on many other factors.


It's cold and is where I am too and no shock for this time of year! Admittedly it helps for a particular anything to know what to expect highly including cars of course. My house creaks, plastic snaps like egg shells and so on. If not used to some of this learn it and what you can do about it other than move. I want you to fix this and be done with it really!


T

Response From ShinyGrAm

The voltage issue is possible. In an effort to deal with that I replaced the battery. That stopped it from running down before it starts but it may still be low voltage as it still seems to struggle a bit on cold cranking. I tested to see how much current is being drawn when the car is totally off >> got 100mA. Is that too much?

Response From Hammer Time

got 100mA. Is that too much?

You have to wait for the timers to expire before you can read that.

Response From ShinyGrAm

Not many timers expiring on a 1993. Most of the current is being drawn by devices I've added over the years: alarm, remote start, special circuits (light and beeper) to complement the warning lights, circuit to light when gas is low, electric trunk lock and larger trunk bulbs. It's pretty unique.
I'll try watching the courtesy lights while starting. Will do more tests when I get my meter. Thanks.

Response From Hammer Time

It should still have some timers on things like courtesy lights. Some modules don't go to sleep right away.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

I can't be certain on a '93 Grand Am but know for sure a '90 Cutlass Supreme (loaded with toys too) did have lots to time out. If I recall and wonder sometimes on that, if you wanted to drain it out faster turn things on with battery disconnected for a while then take your drain test.


Why are we worrying about a parasitic drain now at all? None of the prior symptoms suggest that to me.........


T

Response From Tom Greenleaf

FYI - Took out a second post as nothing was there. FYI again - look for "view all" up top as we are on page 2 now for posts.


1. 100ma what? Are you checking for a drain on battery? That would be too much but you have to wait even on this vintage till all funky anythings in it go to sleep if you will for that and it does count on this model year!


50ma would be acceptable or less. Keep in mind if using a disconnected battery cable you are resetting memory on this thing and that alone can take time to get any help from any possible codes for OBD1 systems. If that, car might stall a lot at idle for a while now but shouldn't prevent immediate start ups.


Said - I live this. -10F only so far this season, normal for here, Mass, US. I keep a voltmeter in a cig lighter or power port and watch the damn voltage drop everytime I start a vehicle! It's fair warning to me something isn't right if below 9.5V as said.


Plain volts without getting out of the car/vehicle is wild info never mind fool gauges on dash I want real for me. I'm beating up on this because you'll go all over hell and back over a stupid bad battery, connection, cable under par type thing and haven't tested it yet!


I'm not reading back the whole thread so know this about battery crap and cold. CCA rating should be on it. That's the power available @ 32F. At 0F it's tons less again so you get more than what might be average for the car if always expecting cold of the sort. New is the only time a battery is at its best potential like a bouncing ball it loses some smidge with every day and every start you do so the rating drops off in a normal situation, not maybe, always!


Dang lead/acid batteries flake when worked too hard taking away potential day one even if you don't pay attention. If one is left dead in below 15-20F it will freeze and either instantly be junk or lost tons for that. Some crack wide open and spill - remind me not to store the pile of dead batteries outdoors anymore - what a mess!


What brings this whole problem to a common denominator is cold start once if I understand you then it's perfect all the time after that so what do you think you'll find when it's perfect? Not much or anything so you've been asked to test things. Where are the results?


See - the second a car/vehicle starts up the alternator is working it's brains out putting back what it took to crank it - right away and that alone warms up the battery so doesn't even take the full time for FULL charge to have more power if you started it again in even 1 minute. Oil had been circulating so better there too.


Car is older and Winter is upon us and will next season too. What people might do in EXTREMES and you really aren't there yet as people live where it's lots colder is put block heaters on engines, cover hoods with blanket even hang light bulbs (don't bother) under hoods for some heat. Better yet and not everyone can is always park in a garage and if heated that much better.


I think your volts drop just enough too low to throw things off. Everything in it counts on it staying in a range of volts. If low enough AMPS seen as low volts too for this it really should flutter starter solenoids earlier but it just doesn't and some don't.


Test away and post results,


T

Response From ShinyGrAm

Over the years I've had many occasions where I needed to clean contacts to solve a problem. I got in the habit of covering the contact with silicon after cleaning and reconnecting it. This included the battery ground where it connects to the block and the positive leads at the starter junction. Some connection probably needs cleaning again. I lost my meter so I won't have one until the eBay order gets here.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

OK - They make Silicone Grease AKA dialectic that pretty much does the trick forever. Spray good. If a problem to solve PB, dry, sand or brush then grease.


Around those years nice copper wire and lead cables were fading out and no nice words for that trick by car makers.


Screw Ebay - you are wasting both time and money plus potential damage to starter and battery waiting for a flicking voltmeter! $10 Wallyworld, NAPA likely too. Full digital DVOM $6.99 at Harbor Freight stores if one near you. Check Autozone, and parts anything even the big box stores that would sell batteries for one that goes in a cig lighter so you see it without getting out even.


Cheap is usually cheap and not for routine use IMO.


You can about tell by looking at a dome light forced on while cranking how dim it gets.


More results may be required checking not just battery bolt but try other ends of battery cable for comparison will show if cable itself has lost it otherwise what you've done is great. Most never touch anything or able to keep a car now 22 years or so and at wild high miles you've done something right,


T

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Some refresh on this for things already asked too: Does this crank at what you think is a normal speed at the temps when it has this "delayed" start? If not, that's an issue alone and testing stuff that works a minute later after it may have been started would likely be misleading.


I don't expect it to crank exactly as it does on a warmer day or subsequent starts. You've said it can be perfect except for just those cold starts.


To me it points to too much effort on the already weakened battery just because it's cold turning a cold engine as well voltage may drop lower than controls will work perfectly with so again I'd test out plain voltage drop while cranking. Many will crank, just too slow and voltages below about 9.5 is about a cut off # when 12v anything begins to be confused.


As a test and you'd need to know you have a good connection to the exact right places. Jumper with a warm jumper box before you touch this. Hard to know you really have a great connection but worth a try. Now if it cranks right up first try quickly you know it isn't delivering proper power or starter/engine is just plain taking too much out to crank properly. Usually an inadequate battery but could be many other things as well but would be a strong clue what to do or check out next,


T

Response From Discretesignals

I don't know how electrical savy you are, but if you don't have a scan tool laying around that will work on that year, you can measure the voltages of the ECT and IAT sensors to see how they compare. It would be best to make your measurement at the ECM's connector if possible, but you can make them at the sensors also.

Inspect the wiring really good on those sensors. I've seen many times the copper inside the wiring break near the sensors' connectors. If you lightly tug on the wires and the insulation stretches, it is a good bet the wiring is broken.

This is a typical GM ECT voltage/temp chart:

Response From ShinyGrAm

Interesting. I'll try that if fixing the connections doesn't work. Thanks.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

I'm still interested in cranking speed when cold. I'm near sure this calls for 5w-30 which would crank faster than 10w-30 alone.


I question "new" batteries for a while. I'd like to see what voltage drop you can see best with a helper cranking engine and what volts drop to. Even 0-10F you shouldn't see it drop below ~9.5 volts or so as even strong spark would be weaker for a quick start.


Other is let key set in plain "run" position for the time it takes for fuel pump to prime up to pressure and shut off if you can hear it that's what it should do. Then pressure is ready right away hopefully up to spec which could be checked also and again if voltage is low from starter sucking up most of the power the fuel pump isn't getting full volts/amps either.


Engines hate cold as much as I do too and it's not battery friendly as available power drops off quite a bit just from temp.


Do you really mean a whole minute of cranking? I mean use a watch or something. That's a LOOOONG time to crank an engine no matter what the issue.


The fact that it runs fine once started really suggests this is consuming a lot of battery power and voltage a bit too low for proper start.


I know, it's got a ton of miles and actually should turn easier all other things equal. This could just be oil now making it harder? If mine I'd switch (do on everything anyway) to synthetic - current fav is 0-30 rated to equal specs of either 5w-30 or 10w-30. First use noticed engines turned faster cool or when really cold out. Have a 12.5HP pull start motor and notice instantly how much less effort it became to pull as added proof.


Back to volt drop: It's indicative of how much draw the starter (largest draw on battery in car) is sucking up. Volts will drop normally but at some # all other things don't like less just adding insult to the cold anyway and harder to start. It matters and think it would help to make the change.


Hey - at the miles IMO you are playing in the zone of "anything can happen" and was long ago by miles. Some can do that and more some much less and fail?


So, for the immediate issue I'd change the oil as suggested. It will be better but not solve everything about cold. Again, do NOT crank engine too long at a time - not a maybe but in doing so you will kill the starter,


T

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Sorry for a second post in case you already read others. Fuel pressure must be maintained up while cranking. Spec shows 41-47 PSI.


Battery measured in CCA = Cold cranking amps. Spec is at least 600 but for you suggest and only found 700 quickly. That's for 32F so it's less below that available.


Already said cold suks. All this crap matters to run well when cold - trust me, I live it too,


T

Response From Hammer Time

It's not an oil problem. 10W30 is the recommended viscosity for this vehicle. 5W30 is acceptable when 10W30 is not available, per service manual.

car shutting off while driving

Showing 2 out of 4 Posts | Show 2 Hidden Posts
Question From kandahopkins on car shutting off while driving

1998
Pontiac
Grand Prix GT
V6
95,028.3 miles

Here is what has been happening: The engine on our Grand Prix will shut off while I'm driving. It doesn't even have to be after a long drive. Typically, I would pull over, turn the ignition back, wait a few seconds, turn it back on and make my way back home/school/wherever. Today it happened on my way home (30 minute commute through the city) and I didn't have anywhere to pull off, so I put it in neutral and turned the key to turn it back on, all while rolling down the road. Suggestions? Ideas what the problem could be?

thanks,
KandA

PS- A few years ago (not long after we acquired this car) we had the radiator switched from DexCool over to standard coolant. Could this be part of or causing the problem? Coolant temperature sensor?

Response From nickwarner Top Rated Answer

what codes are present?

Response From kandahopkins

We don't have a device to know something like that.

Response From nickwarner

a lot of parts stores will scan it for you for free.