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We stock Coolant Temperature Sensor parts for most Oldsmobile models, including Achieva, Alero, Aurora, Bravada, Custom Cruiser, Cutlass, Cutlass Ciera, Cutlass Cruiser, Cutlass Salon, Cutlass Supreme, Delta 88, Omega, Regency, Silhouette, 98.

Vemo
2004 Oldsmobile Alero Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor 4 Cyl 2.2L Vemo

P311-2BB766B    W0133-1924495  New

Qty:
$18.31
Vemo Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor
  • Engine - L61
Brand: Vemo
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
2004 - Oldsmobile Alero L 4 Cyl 2.2L 134 2198
ACDelco
1985 Oldsmobile Delta 88 Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor 8 Cyl 5.7L ACDelco

P311-1C38B82    W0133-1681994  New

Qty:
$28.01
ACDelco Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor
  • Professional
Brand: ACDelco
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
1985 - Oldsmobile Delta 88 V 8 Cyl 5.7L 350 -
ACDelco
1990 Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor ACDelco

P311-1C38B82    W0133-1681994  New

Qty:
$28.01
ACDelco Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor
  • Professional
  • OEM# 25036979
Brand: ACDelco
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel Engine VIN
1990 - Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme Base A
ACDelco
1985 Oldsmobile Delta 88 Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor 8 Cyl 5.7L ACDelco

P311-1C38B82    W0133-1681994  New

Qty:
$28.01
ACDelco Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • GM Original Equipment
Brand: ACDelco
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
1985 - Oldsmobile Delta 88 V 8 Cyl 5.7L 350 -
ACDelco
1990 Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor ACDelco

P311-1C38B82    W0133-1681994  New

Qty:
$28.01
ACDelco Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • GM Original Equipment
  • OEM# 25036979
Brand: ACDelco
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel Engine VIN
1990 - Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme Base A
Delphi
2004 Oldsmobile Silhouette Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor Delphi

P311-591F9C6    TS10075  New

140-206 , 213310 , 213928 , 211-1012 , 21372 , TX3 , 12500 , 8250369790 , 8-12146-312-0 , 25036979 , TS4015 , 8121463120 , 158-0536 , 13111 , CS3 , 12146312 , WT3000 , TU223 , TSU81 , 8153263860 , TS4052SB , 15326386 , TS4052 , 140206 , 36403 , 12001 , 5S1018 , SU109

Qty:
$19.94
  • Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor
  • Delphi is an OEM supplier
  • Product Attributes:
    • California Proposition 65: Warning: This Product Can Expose You To Chemicals Including Lead, Which Is Known To The State Of California To Cause Cancer And Birth Defects Or Reproductive Harm. For More Information Go To Www.p65warnings.ca.gov.
  • Delphi temperature sensors are built with the latest OE technology; Delphi temperature sensors use durable, one-piece design; Delphi temperature sensors are impervious to electrical noise and interference.
Brand: Delphi
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel
2004 - Oldsmobile Silhouette Premiere
Standard Ignition
1993 Oldsmobile 88 Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor Standard Ignition

P311-2EC47E7    TX3  New

TS10075-11B1 , 9-42402 , 18-7600 , 1H8 , 8100458470 , 2CTS0001 , 8-12146-312-1 , SU109VC , 5S1474 , 158-0536 , TS10181 , 8-12146-312-0 , 805218T , 213-928 , 31195 , 2-8296 , 19187357 , 8133450 , 213-4396 , 3850397-5 , J3241950 , 12001 , SU102 , 19189478 , 213-52 , 15326386 , 8132906 , 25036708 , 12500 , 15-51107 , 25037182 , 5S1018 , WT3000 , 158-0468 , 12146312 , CTS003 , 3850397 , TS10075 , 71-2507 , 8983502327 , 25036078 , TS10011 , 211-91012 , 4040 , 201-1593 , 25036979 , TS10140 , 10045847 , 8-25036-092-0 , 213-310 , 8-25036-979-0 , 213-72 , SU109 , 4141 , 36403 , 8-15326-386-0 , 71-2501 , TS10171

Qty:
$21.07
Standard Ignition Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor
  • Coolant Temperature Sensor
  • Product Attributes:
    • Connector Gender: Female
    • Terminal Type: Pins
  • Our temperature sensors are manufactured using proprietary brass casings for superior durability and a longer lasting part life. Each of these parts is 100% functional and environmental tested to ensure that the part you receive will outperform any other sensor available in the aftermarket. Every one of our temperature sensor connectors has been carefully crafted to ensure proper fitment, as engine management systems require reliable connections in order to reach optimum performance. Each part that we manufacture endures rigorous end of line testing to ensure that every part meets the linearity specifications expected by the engine management system in your vehicle.
Brand: Standard Ignition
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1993 - Oldsmobile 88
Standard Ignition
1980 Oldsmobile 98 Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor 8 Cyl 5.7L Standard Ignition

P311-2EC47E7    TX3  New

TS10075-11B1 , 9-42402 , 18-7600 , 1H8 , 8100458470 , 2CTS0001 , 8-12146-312-1 , SU109VC , 5S1474 , 158-0536 , TS10181 , 8-12146-312-0 , 805218T , 213-928 , 31195 , 2-8296 , 19187357 , 8133450 , 213-4396 , 3850397-5 , J3241950 , 12001 , SU102 , 19189478 , 213-52 , 15326386 , 8132906 , 25036708 , 12500 , 15-51107 , 25037182 , 5S1018 , WT3000 , 158-0468 , 12146312 , CTS003 , 3850397 , TS10075 , 71-2507 , 8983502327 , 25036078 , TS10011 , 211-91012 , 4040 , 201-1593 , 25036979 , TS10140 , 10045847 , 8-25036-092-0 , 213-310 , 8-25036-979-0 , 213-72 , SU109 , 4141 , 36403 , 8-15326-386-0 , 71-2501 , TS10171

Qty:
$21.07
Standard Ignition Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor
  • Coolant Temperature Sensor
  • with Calif. Emissions
  • Product Attributes:
    • Connector Gender: Female
    • Terminal Type: Pins
  • Our temperature sensors are manufactured using proprietary brass casings for superior durability and a longer lasting part life. Each of these parts is 100% functional and environmental tested to ensure that the part you receive will outperform any other sensor available in the aftermarket. Every one of our temperature sensor connectors has been carefully crafted to ensure proper fitment, as engine management systems require reliable connections in order to reach optimum performance. Each part that we manufacture endures rigorous end of line testing to ensure that every part meets the linearity specifications expected by the engine management system in your vehicle.
Brand: Standard Ignition
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Engine VIN Block Engine CID CC
1980 - Oldsmobile 98 R V 8 Cyl 5.7L 350 -
Standard Ignition
1997 Oldsmobile Cutlass Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor 6 Cyl 3.1L Standard Ignition

P311-2EC47E7    TX3  New

TS10075-11B1 , 9-42402 , 18-7600 , 1H8 , 8100458470 , 2CTS0001 , 8-12146-312-1 , SU109VC , 5S1474 , 158-0536 , TS10181 , 8-12146-312-0 , 805218T , 213-928 , 31195 , 2-8296 , 19187357 , 8133450 , 213-4396 , 3850397-5 , J3241950 , 12001 , SU102 , 19189478 , 213-52 , 15326386 , 8132906 , 25036708 , 12500 , 15-51107 , 25037182 , 5S1018 , WT3000 , 158-0468 , 12146312 , CTS003 , 3850397 , TS10075 , 71-2507 , 8983502327 , 25036078 , TS10011 , 211-91012 , 4040 , 201-1593 , 25036979 , TS10140 , 10045847 , 8-25036-092-0 , 213-310 , 8-25036-979-0 , 213-72 , SU109 , 4141 , 36403 , 8-15326-386-0 , 71-2501 , TS10171

Qty:
$21.07
Standard Ignition Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor
  • Coolant Temperature Sensor
  • 2 Blade Term.
  • Product Attributes:
    • Connector Gender: Female
    • Terminal Type: Pins
  • Our temperature sensors are manufactured using proprietary brass casings for superior durability and a longer lasting part life. Each of these parts is 100% functional and environmental tested to ensure that the part you receive will outperform any other sensor available in the aftermarket. Every one of our temperature sensor connectors has been carefully crafted to ensure proper fitment, as engine management systems require reliable connections in order to reach optimum performance. Each part that we manufacture endures rigorous end of line testing to ensure that every part meets the linearity specifications expected by the engine management system in your vehicle.
Brand: Standard Ignition
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
1997 - Oldsmobile Cutlass V 6 Cyl 3.1L 189 -
Standard Ignition
1997 Oldsmobile Cutlass Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor 6 Cyl 3.1L Standard Ignition

P311-2EC47E7    TX3  New

TS10075-11B1 , 9-42402 , 18-7600 , 1H8 , 8100458470 , 2CTS0001 , 8-12146-312-1 , SU109VC , 5S1474 , 158-0536 , TS10181 , 8-12146-312-0 , 805218T , 213-928 , 31195 , 2-8296 , 19187357 , 8133450 , 213-4396 , 3850397-5 , J3241950 , 12001 , SU102 , 19189478 , 213-52 , 15326386 , 8132906 , 25036708 , 12500 , 15-51107 , 25037182 , 5S1018 , WT3000 , 158-0468 , 12146312 , CTS003 , 3850397 , TS10075 , 71-2507 , 8983502327 , 25036078 , TS10011 , 211-91012 , 4040 , 201-1593 , 25036979 , TS10140 , 10045847 , 8-25036-092-0 , 213-310 , 8-25036-979-0 , 213-72 , SU109 , 4141 , 36403 , 8-15326-386-0 , 71-2501 , TS10171

Qty:
$21.07
Standard Ignition Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor
  • Coolant Temperature Sensor
  • with Pigtail Connector Alternate Number
  • Product Attributes:
    • Connector Gender: Female
    • Terminal Type: Pins
  • Our temperature sensors are manufactured using proprietary brass casings for superior durability and a longer lasting part life. Each of these parts is 100% functional and environmental tested to ensure that the part you receive will outperform any other sensor available in the aftermarket. Every one of our temperature sensor connectors has been carefully crafted to ensure proper fitment, as engine management systems require reliable connections in order to reach optimum performance. Each part that we manufacture endures rigorous end of line testing to ensure that every part meets the linearity specifications expected by the engine management system in your vehicle.
Brand: Standard Ignition
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
1997 - Oldsmobile Cutlass V 6 Cyl 3.1L 189 -

Latest Oldsmobile Repair and Coolant Temperature Sensor Installation Advice

CarJunky AutoAdvice

1995 Olds Cutlass Ciera - Cruise Control head-scratcher (with bonus issues!)

Showing 2 out of 13 Posts | Show 11 Hidden Posts
Question From spongebue on 1995 Olds Cutlass Ciera - Cruise Control head-scratcher (with bonus issues!)

Hey guys,

First off, here's the standard car info, even if some of it is probably not relevant:

1995 Oldsmobile Cutlass Ciera SL
3.1L V6 Engine
~95,000 miles (not bad, eh? :P )

So, the main thing that's been bugging me is the Cruise Control. Not only because it doesn't work when I want it to, but by gawd, I've tested (and replaced) just about everything. It really should work. Here's my story: (I know some things may seem out of order, but some of it is based on ideas I had at the time or lack thereof)

  • Brian finds out Cruise Control is working
  • Brian checks to see if there is a cruise fuse in the glove compartment fuse box (didn't see one)
  • Brian finds Alldata flowchart on repairing cruise unit:
  • If speedo doesn't work, replace vehicle speed sensor. Otherwise, check for about 5 volts on Pin K of the cruise module (I thought this was main power to the module, and was surprised when I still got power with it switched off inside)
  • Got about 7.2 volts (which goes to about 8 when the engine is started)
  • If not 5 volts, check for open circuit for pin K
  • During a trip to a junkyard, Brian found a "new" cruise module as well as switch, only $9 each
  • Brian replaces his parts with junkyard parts
  • Brian is increasingly upset at this, and thinks he has a wiring issue
  • Brian talks in the third person to relieve this stress
  • Brian gives up for a while, but then lives in a dorm in the summer time in a college town, with little else to do but look at his car again
  • Brian finds a book at the library with testing instructions on just about every pin for this cruise unit
  • All tests work for Brian, aside from the voltage issue on the VSS
  • Brian does a test that seems to be a diagnostic test for the cruise, involving the parking brake, regular brake, set button, and R/A. A bad speed sensor connection will cause it to rev a bit, a bad cruise module will have it do nothing
  • The engine revved, but very slightly. Something you'd expect when releasing the brake and putting slightly less stress on the engine
  • Thinking he may have gotten a bad junkyard cruise control module, Brian tried once more with a second one at a different junkyard
  • Still no dice
  • Brian gets very frustrated, and posts here

  • Ok, maybe I went a little overboard with that, sorry . Other problems I have (I'll be more brief about this) in case anyone has ideas:
    Temperature gauge is not working, not the sending unit at fault (tried shorting that spot with a paper clip, which simulates a hot engine with a low resistence. The needle stayed there. Before, it'd indicate a very hot engine for a couple seconds, usually when I'd be accelerating. Then it died completely (that, or I've had a very cold engine for a long time now

    Finally, the ABS is no good. Light goes on after I drive a few feet, though it takes a little longer when I'm going in reverse. I think it's a wheel speed sensor (dad may have done a scan, I forget for sure). Problem is, it's built into the wheel bearing, I think it was, so it's a pain to replace. If anyone has other ideas of what it could be, I'm all for ideas.

    Thanks a lot, guys! If anyone can successfully say what's wrong and is in the Minneapolis/Western Wisconsin area, I swear I'll buy you a 6-pack or something :P

    -Brian

    Response From spongebue

    Boy, thanks for the tip, above poster robot thing! I'll be sure never to check it out.

    Anyway, update to the story, continued entirely in third-person bullet points as you folks seemed to enjoy.

  • Brian decides that it must be the gauge at fault, based on his test with jumping the temperature sending unit connector with a paper clip not doing anything
  • Brian replaces gauge with a new one (again from the junkyard, $4 + $2 admission)
  • Brian turns key to run position, and the gauge changes position majorly
  • This greatly excites Brian, though in a clean non-sexual way (not that big of a car junky, sorry to say
  • He then corrects the needle's position to point to a more logical position, since the engine was cold
  • When Brian drove around, the gauge didn't move any more, just when the key was turned and it had time to move a bit since the last startup
  • Getting fed up with this, Brian pulls out the instrument panel (for a second time after replacing the gauge) and solders a few wires to the gauge (thank god for alldata and some schematics laying around) to simulate a normal environment
  • 12 volts and ground applied to their respective places; temperature input going to ground via a potentiometer
  • Test was successful, the gauge worked fine (being able to turn that potentiometer and control the gauge is more fun than it should be, and Brian's dad agrees)
  • Brian checks for continuity between the wire on the sending unit connector and where it ends up when connecting to the instrument panel; all is good.
  • Knowing that all connections seem solid up to the temperature sending unit, Brian has no other choice but to replace that
  • His dad said he tried that already, but started to question himself the more he talked. Even for Brian's dad, this is unusual
  • Brian's dad replaces the sensor (it's in too awkward of a place for Brian to do on his own, but his dad is a former mechanic)
  • He has enough trouble doing so that he admits that he would have remembered doing it if it were so difficult.
  • Brian drives 100 miles back to school in Wisconsin, and sees the temperature gauge creep up the more he drives, right up to a point just before the halfway marker.
  • Brian is happy to have 2 problems taken care of (albeit one mysteriously) with one more to go
  • Next up, cruise control once and for all. I realized that I copied the section from the J-body, rather than A-body, which uses a very similar (but not quite the same) system... They're in the same grouping in the book, but when it comes to detailed instructions, A-body comes first. Why they put the J-body schematic right before the A-body, which is on the page after, I have no idea. Anyway, I'm going to look at every connection, make sure it's all clear, and highlight each part I examine until there's nothing left. With a little (ok, a LOT) of luck, this will be done (and working) before I go to Indiana on Thursday. 500 mile trip each way with no cruise control. I've done it before, not fun.

    Response From Loren Champlain Sr

    Brian; You didn't mention stopping for a beer. That's where you went wrong. Enjoyed your story! Sorry, can't add any wisdom to it!

    Response From spongebue

    Well, unfortunately, I only turned 21 a couple weeks ago. Ahem, I'm not going to comment about whether or not that's actually stopped me

    Response From Double J

    Double J has a thought!

    Check the High Level Stop Lamp ..If its inoperative,it will keep the cruise control from working ..at least on some GM models it does,not sure on this one....

    Response From spongebue

    High level stop lamp? You mean, the top brake light? (I'm probably way off, but that's the best I can think of). I actually checked those for an unrelated reason a few months ago, well after I had cruise control issues. Or wait, do you mean the one in the back window? That I have not checked in, well, ever. Hmmm...

    Response From Double J

    Yes,the one in the back window....could be as simple as a blown bulb(s)

    Let us know

    Response From spongebue

    Well, I'll be damned, that light isn't turning on (I'm assuming it's tied in with the regular brake lights, which are on... I just used something to hold down the brake without having the car in motion)

    brb, Wal Mart (hoping they have the bulb, otherwise O'Reilly tomorrow)

    Response From spongebue

    Good news: That set of lights now works just fine, and I'm less likely to be rear-ended by someone.

    Bad news: No luck with the cruise.

    Would it help you guys any if I scanned the set of schematics I have, maybe a transcript of the troubleshooting steps?

    Response From spongebue

    I know I only barely mentioned the issue, but kinda strange thing happened to me today. I was trying to make a left arrow, so I sped up a little bit, took the turn a little fast. As I did that, I could swear I heard the noise from the dash that I always hear when the ABS light comes on. I looked down, and the light was off. Maybe it was off prior to that, I didn't really notice (hard to notice problems that are always there )

    Anyway, I thought it was either a lucky fluke, or a burned out bulb. When I arrived at my destination a few blocks later, I shut off the engine and tried again. It turned on for the bulb test, then off. Ok, that's not uncommon, usually it comes on after a few feet. I drove a few feet more. And a few feet more. That light still didn't come on. I've since driven maybe 10 miles, and it seems like the car just wanted attention this whole time. I haven't really been able to truly test it in summer, but if the light is off there's not much I can do, right?

    Now, if only the same thing would happen with the cruise control and temperature gauge :P

    Response From Double J

    May have been fixed with the CHMSL bulb replacement. (Center High Mount Stop Lamp).



    You mentioned Dad may have scanned for codes?Does he remember the code(s)?

    Response From Double J Top Rated Answer

    On the Temp Gauge...you sure you checked the correct switch?

    There should be a Temperature Switch for the gauge and a Coolant Temperature Sensor for the computer.

    Response From spongebue

    IF my dad did test it (I honestly can't remember if this was an educated guess or he did an actual scan) it was the wheel speed sensor. I honestly have my doubts that it was the stop lamp that did it, since I do remember it being on right after that. I remember reading (I think this was on a '95 Ciera) that if there is no ABS trouble code given 100 times when the car goes at least 10MPH, it will essentially do a reset on that system and the light will go off. My dad worked on the regular brakes about a month ago, maybe he accidentally did something that took care of it? I know it's a little farfetched, but 100 starts since then does sound about right.

    As for the temp gauge, it wasn't me that tested it directly, to be honest. My roommate's friend is a mechanic by trade, and he's pretty familiar with GMs. He's the one that found the spot and shorted it, I turned the key and checked it. I would think that if it were the sensor for the computer that we got, it would flash a temperature warning light, wouldn't it? Even still, I later found out that my dad already tried replacing it. (handy guy, he is )