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Best Selling Genuine Honda Control Arm Bushings

  • We Stock the following top leading brands, including Genuine, AST, TRW, Dorman, Nishino, JCC
  • Constantly Updated Inventory of Honda Replacement Control Arm Bushing Parts

We stock Control Arm Bushing parts for most Honda models, including Accord, CRV, CRX, Civic, Civic del Sol, Element, Odyssey, Passport, Pilot, Prelude, Ridgeline.


Genuine
2004 Honda Element Suspension Control Arm Bushing Genuine

P311-5BF43B3    W0133-1909681  New

Qty:
29.05
Genuine Suspension Control Arm Bushing
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
Brand: Genuine
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2004 - Honda Element
Genuine
2007 Honda Civic Suspension Control Arm Bushing Genuine

P311-0E1FABB    W0133-1781475  New

Qty:
54.82
Genuine Suspension Control Arm Bushing
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Compliance bushing.
Brand: Genuine
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2007 - Honda Civic
AST
2001 Honda Civic Suspension Control Arm Bushing AST - Heavy Duty

P311-4F96EDE    W0133-1631670  New

Qty:
22.61
AST Suspension Control Arm Bushing
  • Polyurethane
  • ; Front suspension, lower arm, front inner bushing.
  • Heavy Duty
  • Front Suspension
Brand: AST
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2001 - Honda Civic
AST
2003 Honda Civic Suspension Control Arm Bushing AST - Heavy Duty

P311-4F96EDE    W0133-1631670  New

Qty:
22.61
AST Suspension Control Arm Bushing
  • Polyurethane
  • ; Front suspension, lower arm, front inner bushing.
  • Heavy Duty
Brand: AST
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel Body
2003 - Honda Civic Si Hatchback
TRW
2004 Honda Civic Suspension Control Arm Bushing TRW

P311-0EF74A8    W0133-1713357  New

Qty:
18.14
TRW Suspension Control Arm Bushing
  • 3/36 Warranty
  • ; Front suspension, lower arm, front inner bushing.
Brand: TRW
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel
2004 - Honda Civic LX
Genuine
2004 Honda Civic Suspension Control Arm Bushing Genuine

P311-2712AD1    W0133-1713357  New

Qty:
29.05
Genuine Suspension Control Arm Bushing
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • ; Front suspension, lower arm, front inner bushing.
Brand: Genuine
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel
2004 - Honda Civic EX
Dorman
2005 Honda CR-V Suspension Control Arm Bushing Dorman

P311-1957F3B    W0133-1776343  New

Qty:
17.72
Dorman Suspension Control Arm Bushing
  • OE Solutions
Brand: Dorman
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2005 - Honda CR-V
Dorman
2006 Honda CR-V Suspension Control Arm Bushing Dorman

P311-1957F3B    W0133-1776343  New

Qty:
17.72
Dorman Suspension Control Arm Bushing
  • OE Solutions
  • ; Front Suspension - Lower Arm - 1 per Arm
Brand: Dorman
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2006 - Honda CR-V
Nishino
2004 Honda CR-V Suspension Control Arm Bushing Nishino

P311-54E4F87    W0133-1633736  New

Qty:
38.55
Nishino Suspension Control Arm Bushing
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • ; Front suspension, lower arm, rear inner bushing.
Brand: Nishino
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2004 - Honda CR-V
Nishino
2005 Honda CR-V Suspension Control Arm Bushing Nishino

P311-54E4F87    W0133-1633736  New

Qty:
38.55
Nishino Suspension Control Arm Bushing
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
Brand: Nishino
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2005 - Honda CR-V
Nishino
2008 Honda Accord Suspension Control Arm Bushing Nishino

P311-06860E0    W0133-1711958  New

Qty:
16.47
Nishino Suspension Control Arm Bushing
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
Brand: Nishino
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel
2008 - Honda Accord EX
Dorman
2012 Honda Ridgeline Suspension Control Arm Bushing Dorman

P311-0F52E60    W0133-1779739  New

Qty:
29.78
  • OE Solutions
Brand: Dorman
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2012 - Honda Ridgeline
AST
1999 Honda Odyssey Suspension Control Arm Bushing AST - Heavy Duty

P311-51E9C4B    W0133-1635053  New

Qty:
27.59
AST Suspension Control Arm Bushing
  • Polyurethane
  • Heavy Duty
  • Front Suspension
Brand: AST
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1999 - Honda Odyssey
AST
2002 Honda Odyssey Suspension Control Arm Bushing AST - Heavy Duty

P311-51E9C4B    W0133-1635053  New

Qty:
27.59
AST Suspension Control Arm Bushing
  • Polyurethane
  • Heavy Duty
Brand: AST
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2002 - Honda Odyssey
JCC
2006 Honda Accord Suspension Control Arm Bushing 4 Cyl 2.4L JCC

P311-198A2B1    W0133-1711956  New

Qty:
24.28
JCC Suspension Control Arm Bushing
  • ; Front Suspension - Lower Arm - 1 per Arm
Brand: JCC
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel Block Engine CID CC
2006 - Honda Accord LX L 4 Cyl 2.4L 144 2354
AST
2008 Honda Pilot Suspension Control Arm Bushing AST - Heavy Duty

P311-184FCEC    W0133-1637364  New

Qty:
29.85
AST Suspension Control Arm Bushing
  • Polyurethane
  • Heavy Duty
Brand: AST
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2008 - Honda Pilot
AST
2004 Honda CR-V Suspension Control Arm Bushing AST - Heavy Duty

P311-025FECC    W0133-1633736  New

Qty:
20.54
AST Suspension Control Arm Bushing
  • Polyurethane
  • ; Front suspension, lower arm, rear inner bushing.
  • Heavy Duty
Brand: AST
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2004 - Honda CR-V
TRW
2007 Honda Accord Suspension Control Arm Bushing 6 Cyl 3.0L TRW

P311-5EC546A    W0133-1781271  New

Qty:
19.69
TRW Suspension Control Arm Bushing
  • 3/36 Warranty
Brand: TRW
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel Block Engine CID CC
2007 - Honda Accord EX V 6 Cyl 3.0L - 2997
Genuine
2007 Honda Accord Suspension Control Arm Bushing 6 Cyl 3.0L Genuine

P311-185E4B2    W0133-1781271  New

Qty:
50.97
Genuine Suspension Control Arm Bushing
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
Brand: Genuine
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel Block Engine CID CC
2007 - Honda Accord LX V 6 Cyl 3.0L - 2997
Dorman
2002 Honda Civic Suspension Control Arm Bushing - Front Lower Forward Dorman

P311-2A8B0B0    905-752  New

51391SCVA03 , BC59150PR , 51391S7A801 , K200149 , 1409001 , 51391S6M005 , 51391S7A005 , 51391S6MJ51 , 51391S6M801 , 51391S5A024 , 51391S5A801 , TD887W , K200799

Qty:
8.63
Dorman Suspension Control Arm Bushing  Front Lower Forward
  • Product Attributes:
    • Bracket Included: No
    • Bushing 1 Inner Diameter: 12.2 Mm
    • Bushing 1 Outer Diameter: 39.3 Mm
    • Bushing 1 Width: 60 Mm
    • Bushing 2 Inner Diameter: 12.2 Mm
    • Bushing 2 Outer Diameter: 39.3 Mm
    • Bushing 2 Width: 66 Mm
    • Bushing Quantity: 2
    • Color: Black
    • Grade Type: Regular
    • Inside Diameter: 12.2
    • Length: 60
    • Material: Rubber
    • Mounting Hardware Included: No
    • Mounting Type: Bushing
    • Outside Diameter: 60
    • Width: 60
  • Suggested Purchase Quantity: 2
    • Most jobs typically require 2 of this item.
Brand: Dorman
Position: Front Lower Forward
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Position
2002 - Honda Civic Front Lower Forward

Latest Car Advice

CarJunky AutoAdvice

Bushings

Showing 2 out of 2 Posts
Question From Guest on Bushings

Hi there,
My car (2002 Honda civic with 70K miles on it) has been making a rattling noise when I go over bumps. I took it to the local honda dealer who said that the control arm bushing was torn and that I needed a new control arm bushing. He said that replacing just the bushing would cost $700 and replacing the entire control arm would be $800. This sounds pretty expensive for a small rattling noise and was hoping to find out if this problem and price were accurate. Thanks so much for your help. Ari
aripolish@yahoo.com

Response From Jeff Norfolk Top Rated Answer

$700 to $800 is a bit high. I would say around $300 to $400 is more like it. The lower control arm has to be removed, then the bushing has to be pressed out and new one in. So this is not a quick easy job for a small noise. That said the dealer is always going to be higher than a local repair shop. In some cases the quality of work is no different from local to dealer. Infact the local shop I work for dose all the diagnostic and electrical work for the dealership in our town. Shop around, ask your friends where they take their cars. Good Luck

2000 Honda Accord LX - Steering Drift

Showing 2 out of 3 Posts | Show 1 Hidden Posts
Question From Aim4WhirledPeas on 2000 Honda Accord LX - Steering Drift

Howdy-
I have a 2000 Honda Accord LX with a 2.3L engine and about 90,000 miles. Recently, in wet or icy conditions, the car seems to "jump" to a slightly different direction when I'm driving. Obviously, this is pretty alarming . It especially happens when I am turning to the left - my car tries to keep going straight or to the right (only in inclement weather). I drew a crude picture, because it's hard to explain. It only seems to pull to the right. I took it in to the shop, where the mechanics checked the alignment and adjusted it slightly. They also replaced the tires and rotated them. The mechanics didn't seem to understand the problem, and seemed to think I was imagining things. Unfortunately, it's very real, and I drifted into a snowbank last year while rounding a turn (luckily it didn't do any damage). The problem is still happening, and when I drove in the rain this past week, I still felt it pulling to the right on turns. Any advice as to what could be wrong? I'm extremely nervous to drive, especially with the impending snow.

Thanks!


Response From Sidom Top Rated Answer

Have you driven in the conditions you mentioned since the new tires & was there any difference? If you have a printout of the alignment angles it would help if you could post it.

This problem is hard to diagnose online, you really need to be able to drive the car and inspect the frt end. Hondas do have a problem with the lower control arm bushing breaking, of course you would also have a clunk from the frt on brking if they were broken.

Also has the car ever been in a wreck?

Response From Aim4WhirledPeas

I have driven in bad weather since the new tires, and although I don't slip as much, my car still "tries" to drive off the road (as per the diagram). Unfortunately, I don't have the information from the alignment - sorry!

I understand it's hard to tell without really seeing the car. It's never been in a wreck.

2003 Honda crv with codes p1259, p0341 & p1456 - need advice

Showing 5 out of 5 Posts
Question From catapult on 2003 Honda crv with codes p1259, p0341 & p1456 - need advice

2003 Honda CRV AWD - 4 cyl, 111,400 miles. Purchased this vehicle in early Jan 2013 (Super Storm Sandy replacement vehicle) Yellow check engine light came on this past Sunday.
Got codes from Autozone P1456, P1259 & P0341. Immediately brought car to my mechanic Monday morning told him to go through it entirely and to let me know what it needed. Three hours later my mechanic advised that the engine barely had one quart of oil in it (engine oil light was not, nor has ever been on since I had car for 3 months). Timing chain had slack in it and needed to be replaced, Valve cover gasket was leaking and oil sending unit was leaking (I was not seeing any oil in driveway). In addition the VTEC, Water pump and the right and left lower control arm bushings needed to be replaced as well as the gas cap (seal cracked on original). Is $1450 too much for all this work? I am at a loss as the vehicle seemed to be running fine ... I was anticipating having to put some money into it because I did get it for a good price (7300) and I figured the 100,000 maintenance was not done. Just want to make sure my mechanics pricing in on point. I live in Staten Island, NY - mechanics average about 80 an hour. Any advice/comments appreciated ..thanks

Response From Discretesignals

P1456 is an EVAP leak code. Could have been set by a gas cap that was loose.

P1259 VTEC system malfunction and the P0341 VTC phase gap. Both them codes could have appeared because of the oil level being low. It is also important the correct oil viscosity is used.

Did the mechanic change the oil and clear the codes to see if they came back?

That would be a lot of money out of your pocket if the whole problem with the VTC and VTEC system was being caused by the low oil level. Both system's hydraulics are fed by the engine oiling system.

You could always get a second opinion.

Response From catapult Top Rated Answer

Thank-you ... Mechanic said the timing chain was loose, skipping a gear tooth periodically and probably damaged from driving the car with low engine oil. He did change the oil and codes came back. One other thing he mentioned that is concerning me is that the low oil situation may have started to damage the cam in port 1 & 3...said this was most likely caught in the nick of time. He completed the work and I have to keep an eye on the oil to make sure it is not burning oil. He told me to come by in a week to get the scan done again and check to make sure there are no outstanding codes just to be sure. The car is idling very smoothly and has good power. I was planning on keeping this car as I know the CRV's are very reliable and can last in excess of 250k miles if properly maintained. Any advice on type of oil to use in the future? Things to keep an eye out for? One thing I don't understand is how come my dashboard oil light did not come on? The yellow light usually does not mean your engine is about to seize... it is a heads up that the vehicle requires maintenance. Thank.

Response From Discretesignals

Well, if the cam journals are damaged because of lack of lubrication that could mean there is damage to other bearings inside the engine.

That makes you wonder if you should spend all the money on chains and getting the VTC and VTEC system back to normal if the engine is going to have some major mechanical problems later on, but I am sure your mechanic told you that. Maybe that is why he wants you to roll back in the shop for a follow up to see how everything is going. Maybe you got lucky with that part.

5W-20 of any type of major brand oil as long as it meets or exceeds the GF-4 standard will work. If you wanna go to a synthetic oil, that is fine too. As long as you change the oil at the recommended intervals and the PCV system is operating, you shouldn't have to worry about sludge.

Response From catapult

Thanks Appreciate the help!

2006 Honda Accord EX front suspension torx specs

Showing 2 out of 4 Posts | Show 2 Hidden Posts
Question From cmb7684 on 2006 Honda Accord EX front suspension torx specs

I have a 2006 Honda Accord EX 4 door Sedan 4cyl motor automatic trans 155,000 miles. I replaced the front suspension parts: struts, upper and lower control arms, lower ball joint, cv joint axles both sides, stabilizer bar end links, outside tie rod ends and new bearings.


I just want to make sure I have everything tightened right to avoid any issues. Can anyone give me the torx specs for the front end or more specifically the specs for the bolts at the top of the strut tower and the lower fork assembly the strut goes into. The upper control arm bolts, The lower control arm bolts, the stabilizer end links, the outside tie rod ends and the axle bolts?

Response From Tom Greenleaf

What on earth have you done to this poor car to need all that and why do you think you do? Seems like it was dropped off a cliff.


It's spelled "torque" -- Torx is a brand name of a type of fastener just FYI. Most of what you mentioned if you don't have a feel for the right or appropriate torque you probably shouldn't be messing with it sorry to say.


I don't have easy listing for exact suggested specs for each item you mentioned one by one. I also can't just say "tight enough" as that doesn't give you a # to follow.


Perhaps you should buy the AllData.com DIY manual for this car if you are doing this much stuff but still wonder why you need all that at once!


Some items you only tighten when weight is on wheels or pointing steering direct ahead, other's with cotter pins this way and simple stabilizer pins you watch the rubber compress. You should just know that or IMO not be doing this stuff or have proper help with you. I couldn't explain what takes years of experience after training/schools.


When torque is critical most times the part comes with that information,
T

Response From cmb7684 Top Rated Answer

Ummmmm after 4 front end collisions and 155,000 hard miles yes the front end you could say resembled something dropped off a cliff. The lower control arms bushings were shot and the ball joints were very loose and hand some clicking in them. The other rubber boots were dry rotted and starting to go and very loose as you can expert with 155,000 miles but thank your for the spell check and correction on torque versus torx ....completely an oversight on my part however an answer to the question would have been greatly appreciated.


Now the reason I want the specs was because most bolts have TORQUE specs as I am sure you are aware and after I ran into some trouble a while back with going through bearings on a NISSAN bc the axle bolts were not TORQUED right it was new to me as that was something I have never come across in the years I have of messing with cars but by far an expert such as yourself. So after changing everything just as a precaution before I take it in to have it aligned I figured I would torque it all down as it should be so a car genius like yourself could double recheck some of it when they play with the alignment. It my limited experience it seems that the suspensions on the newer cars require a little more precision then the old it feels right to me that was good enough for older cars.
So I guess I will ask at a Honda forum where the torque specs of the front end are often posted by the younger kids who upgrade the suspensions of Honda's as rice burners and don't mind providing information and participating in discussion opposed to the apparent cocky retired has beens know it all types that run this forum and ridicule those who dare ask a question from others who should know a little more about a topic.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Relax. It's still a lot of stuff all at once to be noticing now with apparently no checking along the way of these items ALL of which are total safety items. Neglect of these or checking has resulted in mandatory vehicle inspections to include all safety items are in good shape for you, your passengers and for anyone else you share roads with such that an accident doesn't occur over something that could or should have been known long before. Stuff still happens.


Torque on fasteners anywhere is known and put to #s and tools to show you have reached that #. Many items of marginal importance are not going to specify without looking them up one by one. I could find a page of torque specs for front end steering and suspension parts all at once to post for you. I'm sure one exists somewhere for this car but probably a subscription for a year for just this car. One common one I mentioned and link to its home page is..... http://www.alldatadiy.com/


Once there you can select a sample what you can expect. Here's one for just what marked bolts can take not specific to each item but rather a rating for just bolts...............

http://www.alldatadiy.com/alldatadiy/DIY~G~C45827~R0~OB0~P4R0H~N/0/138181779/138629620/138629625/138629629/34853741/34869961/34869963/165252571/156082788/153621061
That is one of their sample pages of mega 100s. I can't purchase the one (I think $27.50US) for just your car and do things here for free for you and others.
First - does anything on that chart even make any sense to you? That's the easy version or DIY (do it yourself) data.
Do you have the tools that tell you when you reach a specification if one is important enough to be exact? Many things you just know by feel for assorted things.
*************************************
You would select one item at a time and it would list it out especially drivetrain anything and anything that hold or suspends a vehicle.
*************************
It's a valid question there's no one stop way for me anyway to answer all at once. Would be easier to just go to you or you come to me and do it than find all that all at once. 90% of which with a little experience you don't need to look up at all.
**********************
Silly example of life things would be how tight measured in a # would you say you tighten the cap on a screw top container of milk for example? See if you can find that. Too tight you would wreck a cap and too lose it could leak and that's just MILK!
***********************
A lot of learning comes from breaking something once then you pay attention the next time or get hands on help as becoming experienced by yourself and alone would be near impossible or at least impractical. You go to tech schools when you want to do tons more on a vehicle THEN go do it for yourself or for a job if you wanted to do that.
***************************That process never changed for learning things in general. Ex: See something done, get help doing that done, then when you can show another person how to get it done you have learned how to do it.
*************************************
The initial problem as I already mentioned is how did all those things get bad without noticing them along the way. That was neglect by you or for those who fixed accidents were not checking that the vehicle was ready to be back on the road but something failed out of the gate.
I did find one important torque specification for you and could be incorrect too. How tight do you make the lug nuts when you put a wheel back on? If anything is important that is too and bet that info isn't posted on the nuts to the wheel.
BTW it showed "final torque of 80 ft/lbs. That already isn't clear as it suggests you know when it's final and didn't say what that meant.
I see tire places just go all crazy to be fast and never look up or set wheel's fastener's to spec yet they make tools for that too.
Fortunately most even using air tools without a spec just get them right or right enough. It's hard to know or explain each part of everything on everything.
Such is life. You get help and taught many things,
T