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    Beck Arnley
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Shop By Related Steering Center Link Parts

Shop below for all Steering Center Link related parts for your Toyota 4Runner


Shop for Top Selling Genuine Toyota 4runner Center Links

  • We Stock the following top leading brands, including Beck Arnley, Genuine
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We also have Center Link parts for other Toyota models, including 4Runner, Land Cruiser, Pickup.


Beck Arnley
1991 Toyota 4Runner Steering Center Link - Front Beck Arnley

P311-3AD6DB0    101-4250  New

Qty:
120.99
Beck Arnley Steering Center Link  Front
  • CENTER ROD
  • APPLICATION SPECIFIC FOR THIS VEHICLE
  • Product Attributes:
    • ORDER MULTIPLE: 1
  • Beck/Arnley parts meet foreign nameplate OE specifications for form, fit and function. Our product specialists work with a network of global sourcing partners so you can install the right part with confidence.
Brand: Beck Arnley
Position: Front
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Position
1991 - Toyota 4Runner Front
Genuine
1988 Toyota 4Runner Steering Center Link Genuine

P311-31DFCB5    W0133-1741342  New

Qty:
331.23
Genuine Steering Center Link
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Also called Steering relay rod assembly.
  • Center
Brand: Genuine
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel
1988 - Toyota 4Runner DLX
Genuine
1985 Toyota 4Runner Steering Center Link Genuine

P311-31DFCB5    W0133-1741342  New

Qty:
331.23
Genuine Steering Center Link
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • ; Production: 08/1985-
  • Also called Steering relay rod assembly.
  • Center
Brand: Genuine
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel Prod. Date Range
1985 - Toyota 4Runner DLX Fr:08-00-85
Genuine
1989 Toyota 4Runner Steering Center Link 4 Cyl 2.4L Genuine

P311-31DFCB5    W0133-1741342  New

Qty:
331.23
Genuine Steering Center Link
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • ; Production: -03/1989
  • Also called Steering relay rod assembly.
  • Center
Brand: Genuine
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel Block Engine CID CC Prod. Date Range
1989 - Toyota 4Runner DLX L 4 Cyl 2.4L - 2366 To:03-00-89
Genuine
1988 Toyota 4Runner Steering Center Link 6 Cyl 3.0L Genuine

P311-31DFCB5    W0133-1741342  New

Qty:
331.23
Genuine Steering Center Link
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • ; Production: 11/1987-
  • Also called Steering relay rod assembly.
  • Center
Brand: Genuine
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Manuf. Body Code Block Engine CID CC Prod. Date Range
1988 - Toyota 4Runner VZN6 V 6 Cyl 3.0L - 2959 Fr:11-00-87
Genuine
1987 Toyota 4Runner Steering Center Link Genuine

P311-31DFCB5    W0133-1741342  New

Qty:
331.23
Genuine Steering Center Link
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • ; Production: -08/1987
  • Also called Steering relay rod assembly.
  • Center
Brand: Genuine
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Engine Designation Prod. Date Range
1987 - Toyota 4Runner 22R-TEC To:08-00-87

Latest Car Advice

CarJunky AutoAdvice

Mercury Grand Marquis Center link

Showing 3 out of 3 Posts
Question From mercuryman on Mercury Grand Marquis Center link

I have a 1996 Mercury Grand Marquis,and the center link is slipping out from the idler arm.
I ordered ,and picked up a new center link,but the worn out part was not included with the new center link. I was told by another auto parts store that the bushing,or sleeve that slips over the center link bolt on the passenger side is a different part that is sold seperately.

The idler arm connects to the center link. What is this part called? It goes between the center link,and idler arm.Is their also a ball joint inside this collar,or sleeve? Thanks

Response From Hammer Time

Those are parts that come with the idler arm. They are just rubber filler washers.

Response From way2old Top Rated Answer

^^^^^^ What he said. Go get an Idler Arm.

2001 Kia Sportage EX - Center link holding tie rods keep breaking

Showing 3 out of 3 Posts
Question From ann541 on 2001 Kia Sportage EX - Center link holding tie rods keep breaking

About 2 months ago as I was driving down the road and made a turn, I heard a crack in my front end. It then started to shake uncontrollably. I had it towed to the garage and it ended up being the center link that holds the tie rods. They replaced it and the tie rods and everthing appeared fine for about 3 weeks when it happened again. This time it was on the other side. Again, they replaced and since then I have had to tow it in 2 more times for the same thing, making it a toal of 4 times so far. I just got it back again and I am sure there has to be something else causing pressure on that piece. The mechanics could not find anything and they even had the Kia Specialist on the phone who could not provide and reason for it. The steering to me does not feel the same as it used to. It feels as though it is looser than before this all happened. I just don't know what it is but I know it will happen again and I am afraid to drive my car anymore. Could it be the axle??? Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Response From ann541 Top Rated Answer

Yes, we do have some rough roads where I live but I haven't had any problems like this for years. Since I have had my car in the shop for this same problem 4 times in the last 2 1/2 months, I tend to think there is some other cause that is making that control arm break. I just have a hard time believing that the same part is faulty each time. Could there be anything with the steering that could cause pressure? It seems that the steering is looser than it was before all this happened, especially when I am turning. I really believe that it will break again soon but they are saying they can't find anything wrong.

Response From Discretesignals

I am sure they asked you this, but do you have rough roads where you drive or does this see a lot of off roading?

Looking at the picture of the center link itself, it looks pretty chintzy. The answer to why the link broke actually lies in the link itself. They should be able to look at the place where the link snapped and tell if it was a casting defect or if it was over stressed.

1994 E150 new tie rod issue

Showing 7 out of 9 Posts | Show 2 Hidden Posts
Question From gooch mango on 1994 E150 new tie rod issue

I replaced the tie rod ends and center link (aka right inner tie rod end) on my 1994 Ford E150... a relatively simple job. It went well except for one kinda important thing -- I cannot get the retainer nut joining the left inner tie rod to the center link to tighten to torque specs (75 ft. lbs.). It tightened to about 20 ft. lbs. (a rough guess), and then the threaded post began turning, and the retaining nut can no longer get any tighter. (It is on there far enough to get the cotter pin in.)

My question: Is it possible to pop off the back of the tie rod end (where the zerk fitting is) and put a wrench on the post, or will that just ruin the brand new tie rod?

Response From Discretesignals

So the joint is spinning when you go to tighten the nut? If that is the case one trick that I use is taking a large set of channel locks and squeezing the joint into the center link. The pressure should cause the joint to grip the hole it slides through, so you can tighten the nut without it spinning.

There might be other tricks and if there are I am interested in reading about them.

Response From gooch mango

Hmmm... I think the post thing is tapered, so that just might work. And it'll be a heck of a lot easier than tearing open the backside of the joint. Thanks! I'll try that in the morning.

Response From Hammer Time

And it'll be a heck of a lot easier than tearing open the backside of the joint.

Huh?

Response From gooch mango



And it'll be a heck of a lot easier than tearing open the backside of the joint.

Huh?
On the tie rod is some sort of cap (where the zerk fitting goes) that looks like it is pressed into place. I was thinking I would have to pry that cap off, and find some way to grip the base of the threaded post, so I could torque the retaining nut on the other end. I had forgotten that the post itself was tapered, and if I just forced it a bit deeper into the hole, it would grab enough to allow me to torque it down. Fortunately, I didn't need to go down that road thanks to the suggestions from Discretesignals and nickwarner.

Response From Hammer Time Top Rated Answer

Be thankful you didn't try that.
There is nothing inside there but the round, ball base that rotates in the encased housing that you were about to destroy.

Response From nickwarner

What I do on these, especially ones with difficulty to grip the bottom, is to pop it apart and take a center punch in your hole and on the taper of the joint. Peening it with the center punch gives it some grip and when you put it in its 99% effective to hold without spinning while you tighten it.

Response From gooch mango


What I do on these, especially ones with difficulty to grip the bottom, is to pop it apart and take a center punch in your hole and on the taper of the joint. Peening it with the center punch gives it some grip and when you put it in its 99% effective to hold without spinning while you tighten it.

So you are suggesting I should score the post and the hole a bit before I put them together? Rough them up so they don't slide so easy? I'll try that next time. Thanks!

Response From gooch mango


So the joint is spinning when you go to tighten the nut? If that is the case one trick that I use is taking a large set of channel locks and squeezing the joint into the center link. The pressure should cause the joint to grip the hole it slides through, so you can tighten the nut without it spinning.

There might be other tricks and if there are I am interested in reading about them.

Worked like a charm... took all of 5 minutes. I had forgotten that the post was tapered, as it was covered by the boot. If only all of my car problems were so easy to fix!

Thanks!