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Best Selling Genuine Replacement Camshaft Seals

  • Constantly Updated Inventory of Replacement Camshaft Seal Parts
  • We stock Discount Camshaft Seal OEM Parts
NOK
1995 Chrysler Cirrus Engine Camshaft Seal 6 Cyl 2.5L NOK

P311-49EEE70    W0133-1637407  New

Qty:
$36.37
NOK Engine Camshaft Seal
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • 35x50x8mm.
Brand: NOK
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC
1995 - Chrysler Cirrus V 6 Cyl 2.5L 152 2497
NOK
1992 Eagle Summit Engine Camshaft Seal 4 Cyl 2.4L NOK

P311-49EEE70    W0133-1637407  New

Qty:
$36.37
NOK Engine Camshaft Seal
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
Brand: NOK
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel Block Engine CID CC
1992 - Eagle Summit DL L 4 Cyl 2.4L - 2351
NOK
1991 Mitsubishi Mighty Max Engine Camshaft Seal 4 Cyl 2.4L NOK

P311-49EEE70    W0133-1637407  New

Qty:
$36.37
NOK Engine Camshaft Seal
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Production: 06/1990-
Brand: NOK
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Submodel Block Engine CID CC Prod. Date Range
1991 - Mitsubishi Mighty Max 1 Ton L 4 Cyl 2.4L - 2351 Fr:06-00-90
NOK
1995 Mitsubishi Diamante Engine Camshaft Seal NOK

P311-49EEE70    W0133-1637407  New

Qty:
$36.37
NOK Engine Camshaft Seal
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Production: -08/31/1994, California
Brand: NOK
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Body Prod. Date Range
1995 - Mitsubishi Diamante Wagon To:08-31-94
NOK
1994 Mitsubishi Diamante Engine Camshaft Seal NOK

P311-49EEE70    W0133-1637407  New

Qty:
$36.37
NOK Engine Camshaft Seal
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Federal
Brand: NOK
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Body
1994 - Mitsubishi Diamante Wagon
NOK
1994 Mitsubishi Eclipse Engine Camshaft Seal 4 Cyl 2.0L NOK

P311-49EEE70    W0133-1637407  New

Qty:
$36.37
NOK Engine Camshaft Seal
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Production: -04/1994
Brand: NOK
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Aspiration Block Engine CID CC Prod. Date Range
1994 - Mitsubishi Eclipse Naturally Aspirated L 4 Cyl 2.0L 122 1997 To:04-00-94
NOK
2000 Mitsubishi Eclipse Engine Camshaft Seal 6 Cyl 3.0L NOK

P311-49EEE70    W0133-1637407  New

Qty:
$36.37
NOK Engine Camshaft Seal
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Production: 05/1999-
Brand: NOK
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC Prod. Date Range
2000 - Mitsubishi Eclipse V 6 Cyl 3.0L 181 2972 Fr:05-00-99
NOK
1994 Mitsubishi Eclipse Engine Camshaft Seal NOK

P311-49EEE70    W0133-1637407  New

Qty:
$36.37
NOK Engine Camshaft Seal
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Production: -01/1994
Brand: NOK
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Aspiration Prod. Date Range
1994 - Mitsubishi Eclipse Turbocharged To:01-00-94
NOK
1992 Mitsubishi Expo LRV Engine Camshaft Seal NOK

P311-49EEE70    W0133-1637407  New

Qty:
$36.37
NOK Engine Camshaft Seal
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Production: 05/1991-
Brand: NOK
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Prod. Date Range
1992 - Mitsubishi Expo LRV Fr:05-00-91
NOK
1993 Mitsubishi Mirage Engine Camshaft Seal NOK

P311-49EEE70    W0133-1637407  New

Qty:
$36.37
NOK Engine Camshaft Seal
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Production: 06/1992-
Brand: NOK
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Prod. Date Range
1993 - Mitsubishi Mirage Fr:06-00-92
NOK
1993 Mitsubishi Galant Engine Camshaft Seal NOK

P311-49EEE70    W0133-1637407  New

Qty:
$36.37
NOK Engine Camshaft Seal
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Production: -02/1993
Brand: NOK
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Prod. Date Range
1993 - Mitsubishi Galant To:02-00-93
NOK
1998 Mitsubishi Galant Engine Camshaft Seal NOK

P311-49EEE70    W0133-1637407  New

Qty:
$36.37
NOK Engine Camshaft Seal
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Production: -01/1998
Brand: NOK
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Prod. Date Range
1998 - Mitsubishi Galant To:01-00-98
NOK
1999 Mitsubishi Galant Engine Camshaft Seal 6 Cyl 3.0L NOK

P311-49EEE70    W0133-1637407  New

Qty:
$36.37
NOK Engine Camshaft Seal
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Production: 02/1998-
Brand: NOK
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC Prod. Date Range
1999 - Mitsubishi Galant V 6 Cyl 3.0L 181 2972 Fr:02-00-98
NOK
1990 Mitsubishi Mirage Engine Camshaft Seal NOK

P311-49EEE70    W0133-1637407  New

Qty:
$36.37
NOK Engine Camshaft Seal
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Production: 11/1989-
Brand: NOK
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Prod. Date Range
1990 - Mitsubishi Mirage Fr:11-00-89
NOK
1992 Mitsubishi Mirage Engine Camshaft Seal 4 Cyl 1.5L NOK

P311-49EEE70    W0133-1637407  New

Qty:
$36.37
NOK Engine Camshaft Seal
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Production: -06/1992
Brand: NOK
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC Prod. Date Range
1992 - Mitsubishi Mirage L 4 Cyl 1.5L 90 1468 To:06-00-92
NOK
1996 Mitsubishi Montero Engine Camshaft Seal 6 Cyl 3.0L NOK

P311-49EEE70    W0133-1637407  New

Qty:
$36.37
NOK Engine Camshaft Seal
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Production: -04/1996
Brand: NOK
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Block Engine CID CC Prod. Date Range
1996 - Mitsubishi Montero V 6 Cyl 3.0L 181 2972 To:04-00-96
NOK
1997 Mitsubishi 3000GT Engine Camshaft Seal NOK

P311-49EEE70    W0133-1637407  New

Qty:
$36.37
NOK Engine Camshaft Seal
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Production: 05/1996-
Brand: NOK
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Cylinder Head Type Prod. Date Range
1997 - Mitsubishi 3000GT SOHC Fr:05-00-96
NOK
1991 Mitsubishi Montero Engine Camshaft Seal NOK

P311-49EEE70    W0133-1637407  New

Qty:
$36.37
NOK Engine Camshaft Seal
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Production: 06/1990-09/1991
Brand: NOK
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Prod. Date Range
1991 - Mitsubishi Montero Fr:06-00-90 To:09-00-91
NOK
1992 Mitsubishi Montero Engine Camshaft Seal NOK

P311-49EEE70    W0133-1637407  New

Qty:
$36.37
NOK Engine Camshaft Seal
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Production: 06/1991-05/1992
Brand: NOK
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Prod. Date Range
1992 - Mitsubishi Montero Fr:06-00-91 To:05-00-92
NOK
1993 Mitsubishi Montero Engine Camshaft Seal NOK

P311-49EEE70    W0133-1637407  New

Qty:
$36.37
NOK Engine Camshaft Seal
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Production: 06/01/1993-
Brand: NOK
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Prod. Date Range
1993 - Mitsubishi Montero Fr:06-01-93

Latest Camshaft Seal Repair and Installation Advice

CarJunky AutoAdvice

VW Engine/Oil Issue

Showing 2 out of 3 Posts | Show 1 Hidden Posts
Question From chefneff on VW Engine/Oil Issue

I have a 96 VW Golf w/ 120K miles. I was leaving my house, and stopped about 200 yards away, got out of the car, but left it running while I ran into the store. When I came out, I could hear liquid being pumped out of the engine. I drove the car back to the house, lifted the hood, and oil was being pumped out of the front of the engine, behind the pullys on the passengers side of the car. The oil light and audible alarm both came on, and I immediatley turned the car off. I drove my other car back to the store and saw that there was a puddle of oil on the ground. I don't want to have the car towed (expense), evaluated (expense), only to find out that the vehicle has either blown a head gasket or cracked the block. Any ideas?
Thanks!

Response From Loren Champlain Sr

Saw a TSB about these blowing off oil filters. Just a thought.

Response From DanD Top Rated Answer

The could be’s number in the many, front crankshaft seal, front camshaft seal, valve cover gasket, cylinder head gasket, corroded through oil galley plug and the list goes on and on.
Regardless of what is causing this or where the oil is coming from; it’s going to mean an expense. Towing the car in and having it properly diagnosed; may very well be the smallest one you’ll have during this repair.

Dan.

Scratched camshaft, leaking seal.

Showing 5 out of 5 Posts
Question From rainasky on Scratched camshaft, leaking seal.

I own a 1993 Subaru Impreza AWD sedan that I'm having some issues with. A few weeks ago I took my car to the shop to have a leaking cam seal replaced. Oil had been leaking around the timing belt assembly for quite some time and had started to burn off causing the car to smoke whenever I came to a stop while the engine was hot. The mechanics informed me that there was a scratch on the cam itself which was allowing oil to leak out from underneath the seal and accumulate around the timing belt and under the engine.

A few questions... How does a scratch like this come about? Is it something that can happen naturally or more likely caused by a tool (I've recently had the timing belt replaced, and two years ago the same shop replaced the cam seals and the timing belt because of a leak - but there was no mention of a scratch made at that time)? Basically I'm wondering if it could have been the mechanic who caused the scratch in the first place?

Also, ever since the last replacement of the seal the leak has gotten worse. I'm thinking maybe the seal wasn't properly installed and has come partially loose. Is a scratch such as this likely to get worse on it's own, or am I right in thinking it's a poorly done repair job (I have had a lot of problems recently with this particular garage - having to return for multiple repairs of the same problem or poorly done repairs needing redone, etc)?

I sent my husband by the garage to ask the mechanics when a good time would be to drop by and have them visually inspect the seal to make sure it's properly installed... well, they told him we ought to start looking for a used engine to replace the one in my car. This is not the first time we've heard this from this garage, and usually when they advise us to do this it's before even looking under the hood of the car. I even caught them in a big lie the last time we had the car there. I was wary of taking it back to them in the first place so I had a friend of my father's (who has worked on all of our family's vehicles for the past 15 years) check it out first. I was under the initial suspicion that the oil was coming from a leaky valve cover (or worst case scenario - the head gasket) so I had him inspect both places for the source of the leak. He assured me that the head gasket and the valve cover were both in great shape, and that the leak was coming from either the crankshaft or camshaft seals. He wasn't able to do the repair because of a back injury, unfortunately... but the garage tried to tell me when I took the car to them that not only was the camshaft seal leaking but so were the valve cover and the head gasket! It was only after informing them that I'd already had a trusted mechanic evaluate both of those areas for leaks that the mechanic on the phone choked up and tried to backpedal, saying that it was difficult to tell exactly where the oil was coming from because there was so much oil that had leaked. When the car was "repaired" and returned to me, the mechanic explained his earlier misdiagnosis of the problem by claiming the car had 3 quarts too much oil in it (which I also know is untrue).

I really dread having to take the car back to them, even to correct a problem with the previous repair but I'd rather not spend the extra money going to another shop to fix this shop's screw up!

Should I go ahead and have them check the repair they made and make sure it's done properly? Should I remain present on site while they perform the check? I don't plan on returning to them for any future repairs, but I want to make sure I protect myself against any more problems from these people and make sure the problem is corrected if it was indeed a poor repair job.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Whew! Ok - I don't know exactly how that seal is installed or designed but I can say this:

Seals that need to hold oil on moving parts are designed to leak the smallest amount to protect the seal. Engines that sit for long times can get some rust and ruin seals.

I think you need another shop to look at this and I don't really like this "scratch" story. Worn out - maybe. This is NOT cheap stuff to fix hence the talk about another engine.

A new seal in these spots will not work if bearings in the shaft are bad is most common or perhaps it really did get scratched up taking out the old one with puches and stuff. Can't see that happening on its own. But over the years I've seen crazy stuff happen.

You said you caught them lieing to you so why do you go back there? T

Response From rainasky Top Rated Answer

I go back mainly because it's the only shop for miles and miles, and since they keep screwing up I intend to have them correct thier mistakes at no cost to me (since I shouldn't have to pay for thier mistakes, you know?). I never wanted to take it to them the last time for this seal replacement but they offered to do the job for a very good price - though I guess you get what you pay for, huh? - and money is very tight, so...

Basically, I don't think this "scratch" could get worse on it's own either, and I intend to let them know that I won't be doing business with them no matter what the diagnosis of the problem is this time. If it turns out it's still leaking through some fault of the mechanic's, I do intend to have them fix it (for free), but I also intend to have another shop follow up on the job and make sure it's done properly. If it turns out there is another underlying problem or a new problem that's just surfaced I suppose I will either be shopping for a new engine or a new car altogether.

After speaking with the shop owner again after my original post, he informed me that they did in fact try to smooth out the scratch (which he now describes as a "gouge", although before he had told me it was a small scratch). Is there any kind of recourse I can take if they have done more damage than good in the process? If the scratch/gouge came about during a previous repair, it had to have happened at this particular shop since I haven't been anywhere else in a number of years (call me stupid, but I actually trusted them at first.. I think it may be a new crew of employees who are perhaps not very experienced that are causing all my current woes). They estimated the cost of putting in a rebuilt engine at around $2,000 dollars - is that what I can reasonably expect to pay at another shop? The car is only worth 2,000 dollars in the first place.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

I may get in trouble here but I don't like rebuilt engines! I would much sooner go for a good used original. The salvage yards can be real good at determing what is good and what is junk.

The couple around me will install what they sell!! That and warranty it!

_________________________________________________________

I still don't really understand the scratch/gouge thing that I can't think of a way that could happen short of from a tool! It could have been there when the car was new so there's no way to prove fault. You had it replaced because it leaked to begin with so there was something wrong.

You are the only one I've heard of with this problem. I'm at a loss except for right now keep the engine full of oil and spare oil in the car.

Hey let us and the world what you find out but I still think you need a second opinion from hands on checking this out and as much as I love this site I don't think we can diagnose this further with a keyboard, T

Response From rainasky

Thanks a lot Tom! Prior to researching this problem on the 'net, I'd never imagined that this was a probable cause of the oil leak in my car either. I was only able to find one account of another person having the exact same issue, and it was indeed a toolmark. It's possible that it was a factory defect, I guess, only that you'd figure the car would have been leaking oil all 13 years that I've owned it instead of starting two years ago. Oh well! I've set up an appointment to at least have them take a look and make sure the seal is nice and tight and hasn't come loose (this Friday) - so I'll let you know what happens!

Multiple Codes (hyundai) / misfire, crank shaft, catalytic

Showing 2 out of 17 Posts | Show 15 Hidden Posts
Question From wildonion on Multiple Codes (hyundai) / misfire, crank shaft, catalytic

I brought my 2003 Hyundai Sonata (140,000 miles), 2.4 cylinder, into the shop because my car lost power while driving. The check engine light came on a couple weeks prior.

The car started back up the next morning but lost power again after 5 miles. The mechanic says that I have misfires on all cylinders, a crankshaft position sensor error, and a catalytic converter error.

Can the bad spark plugs, causing the cylinder misfires, also cause the other two codes or vice versa? The car is barely worth $2200 and I'm not sure I want to fix it.

Response From Discretesignals

Bad spark plugs won't cause a crankshaft position sensor error code. A failing or faulty crankshaft position sensor can cause stalling, rough running engine, no starts, and misfire codes. If you go after the crank sensor, you might as well do the timing belt and water pump.

Wouldn't worry too much about the cat code till you get the other problems fixed first.

Response From wildonion

So spark plugs were replaced and the misfire and crankshaft position sensor came back.

The quote for the timing belt, water pump, sensor replacement includes 6 hours of labor at $95/hour. I was told by a friend mechanic from another state that the labor should not be applied per part because the water pump and belt have to come off anyway to do the sensor. They told me the job should take around 3.5 hours so I should not be double charged on the labor. Does this make sense?

Response From Hammer Time

You do not have to remove the water pump to replace a crank sensor but the timing belt and sensor overlap so there should be a blend of times a little higher than either one alone.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Understand your VALID point. Not sure how to suggest approaching this for you. I'm in a rust belt and the dumbest things can take ages more than any listed time which about coincides with when cars come off warranty.


Sooooo, I never used time books. If it took too long I had good faith with people that it was a challenge and equally if something goes so fast. BUT mind you I worked alone so that's that and long done with it.


IDK - ask for a printout of the estimate or get quotes on the work you need as one lump price for all things needed or however you'd like to see it,


T

Response From Hammer Time

Do you have the code numbers? If not, have it scanned and post the numbers here.

Response From wildonion

P0421 $12 - Warm Up Catalyst Efficiency Below Threshold Bank l
P0335 $ 12 - Crankshaft Position sensor A Circuit
P0300 $12 - Random/Multiple Cylinder Misfire Detected
P0304 $12 - Cylinder 4 Misfire Detected
P0303 $12 - Cylinder 3 Misfire Detected
P0302 $12 - Cylinder 2 Misfire Detected
P0301 $12 - Cylinder 1 Misfire Detected

Fuel system 1 status - CL
Fuel System 2 status - 83.1 %
Calculated Load Value - 199 oF
Engine Coolant Temperature - 8.6 %
Short Term Fuel Trim -Bank 1 -0.8 %
Long Term Fuel Trim - Bank 1
Engine RPM - 1250 rpm
Vehicle Speed Sensor - 4 mph

Response From Tom Greenleaf

wildonion: Not sure how you are pricing your own car as it sits with the repairs needed?


What would you buy and what kind of $$ are you willing or able to spend on another? Do the math that suits you as if you didn't have a car at all. Would you buy this car knowing what it needs + some surprises? When older I personally dismiss listed book valuations but rather check them out hard to at least rule out a hidden nightmare car.


Not many folks get away free for transportation. IMO the cost of the repairs if this car is excellent in general you are unlikely to find something used on the lower price end that doesn't need as much also.


True, it does help to know when to give up as you usually will not capture the expense at some point. Cars/transportation is costly, budget it in,


T

Response From wildonion

Thanks Tom - I don't minding paying for the privilege to own a car but I guess I don't quite know when it is too much.

Someone else mentioned 1K - 2K per year on a car unless you have a car payment and then you're paying anyway.

I've put in a new battery and alternator, as well as repaired the CV joints and replaced the tires. I was hoping to have a little break before spending any more money but I guess that's not the case for now. :) Thanks again.

Response From Hammer Time

As long as your engine and transmission are sound, the car isn't rusted out and you don't hate the car, it's worth doing some maintenance to.

Response From Hammer Time

Maintenance costs money............

The value of the car is really not part of the equation. No matter what you drive you are going to spend probably $1000 -$2000 a year to drive it, whether that be in payments or in repairs. What you need to actually look at is the condition of the rest of the car and will it hold together without large repairs for the foreseeable future. What you are looking at right now is mainly expected maintenance.

Response From wildonion

Thanks Hammertime - you see the codes now so I am guess that your response means I need to do all right now of it if I want to keep driving the car. Is that accurate?

Response From Hammer Time

No, what I am saying is don't base your decision solely on the value of the car. Base it on the decision of what future repairs might be and that is done by analyzing the condition of the rest of the car..

Response From wildonion

I don't think I want to spend the $1400 to do all this work on a car barely worth 2K. Is it even worth it for me to replace the spark plugs and see if this is the problem OR is it pretty likely that it's the crank shaft position sensor?

I know it's hard to say but trying to decide if it is worth any work at all right now. I'm willing to spend $250 but not 1500 and it seems it might be all or nothing.

Response From wildonion Top Rated Answer

Thanks - I have a $1500 quote for what you describe. Not sure but the car is barely worth 2200 - 2500. Do you think it is worth it?

Also, is there anything in the list that I don't need or is unfairly priced?


Renew SPARK PLUGS (4) Distributorless / coil over plug full access system 112.00
Spark Plug PGR5A-11 NGK 116.24

TIMING BELT SERVICE (60K Interval) Renew timing belt: Includes front engine seals, drive
belts, and water pump. Inspect and renew tensioner where needed flush cooling system and
fill with 50/50 coolant mixture pressure test cooling system; verify radiator fan operation.
The customer is always RESPONSIBLE for checking and maintaining oil level and tire
pressures at regular intervals (biweekly is recommended.)
672.00

Timing Belt 91.95
Water Pump Incldes O-Ring&Gasket 157.82
Camshaft Seal 23.06
Crankshaft Seal 20.38
Drive Belt 30.00
Multi Rib Belt 29.47
Multi Rib Belt 42.10
Balance Shaft Belt 27.84
T-Belt Tension Adjuster 89.56
Quart - Havoline Long Life Coolant (Yellow) 16.88
Remove and renew Crank Angle Sensor (CKP). Confirm operation. 0.00
Crank Position Sensor 97.23

Estimate for MTN2 1,526.00

Response From Discretesignals

What you could do is shop around for some estimates from other shops in your area. That will give you a general idea. That quote probably sounds pretty close to what something like that would normally cost to have repaired.

Hard to say if the car is worth fixing. Do you like it? Does it met your needs? As long as the rest of the vehicle such as the brakes, body, steering, tires, etc. are in good shape you might be able to get more years and miles out of it. Dropping less than a couple of grand into it would be cheaper than a car payment. If your thinking of the vehicle as an investment, forget that. You'd be lucky to buy a good used car in decent shape for less than 5K.

Response From nickwarner

Plus that 5k car would have enough miles on it that it would probably need a timing belt too.

My daily wheels

Showing 2 out of 3 Posts | Show 1 Hidden Posts
Question From Hallico on My daily wheels

I have a 1994 Dodge Caravan! 3.0L Mistubishi V-6. Its my daily ride and unlike Donald Trump, can't afford a Jag! I have worked on cars for nearly 40 years now! Everything from my beast above to custom fully blown 396 Camaros. Old Vette in the garage. But I just was told something I have never read about or heard: A blocked oil filter! I am so religious about changing it that it never happened to me before. Oil level is full but idiot light comes on. Engine temp is stable. I am losing oil from a small hole in the pan (new one in bag waiting for the weekend). But last night driving home from 3rd shift, I heard a pop and then oil sprayed everywhere coating the back of the van and sending smoke signals clear to Maine!

The oil level went to zero! Being older, the oil pumps of old made real noise and you would overheat. Your oil level would not change and the valves would chatter something awful! D = None of the above happened! Pop, chatter, back to normal, smoke.

When I climb under, timing chain side of pan is wet all the way back to the passenger side wheel. No other areas of oil. I was hoping to survive until tomorrow (Saturday) and change what the guys at work swear is a blocked oil filter. But that's not happening now. Any help and all help would be appreciated. Area around the front seal looks dry, but I have been fooled like that before.

Thanks guys (& gals if applicable)!

Doc (not an MD, name always had a "Doc" in front of it since the 1800s)

Response From DanD Top Rated Answer

I can’t see a plugged oil filter causing this; most of today’s vehicles engines or the oil filters themselves have by-pass valves built into them. If the filter becomes plugged, the valve opens and allows oil to circulate unfiltered. A stuck oil pressure relief valve in the pump could blow a filter off an engine; I’ve seen that before.

With all that oil around the timing cover I’m thinking that possibly one of the camshaft seals blew out or just failed; allowing oil to pour out? The cams in these things are fed a ton of oil.

Dan.

Response From Hallico

Thanks Dan! I appreciate it! Along those same lines, before this happened, I was getting an oil warning light, with no oil loss? No noise from the engine of signs of heating up? Those to me are old fashioned signs my oil pump is going. That's why the question on the oil filter.

Now however, I have to fix the cam seals. I checked it out and there is moisture right there at the front cam on the drive belt side! Thanks a million! I change oil every other month as I only have to drive 6 miles to work. First time in more then 25 years I have had less then an hour commute! That's why the oil filter seemed crazy to me, but wanted to ask!

Regards,

Hallico

89 Acura Integra radiator hose question

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Question From dlmcmurr on 89 Acura Integra radiator hose question

Can anyone tell me which radiator hose goes to the thermostat on this model? I've had the head off and replaced all the hoses at that time. The new hoses look like they fit better in the reversed position relative to the old hoses, but the engine got hot on the first run. That was with the top hose to the thermostat. I did bleed the thermostat housing during refilling. I thought upper hoses always went to the thermostat and someone before me had reversed them?

Thanks,
Dave

Response From Tom Greenleaf

. 1: Thermostat replacement-Integra
***************
Make sure spring end of thermostat is towards engine. There's a lot going on right there and may take a cycle or two to settle down and purge all air out. All the hoses must be right where they belong. This looks like other hoses are part of telling this t-stat when to open and if not all correct there will be problems. When at all possible - match up old hoses to new ones and many need to be cut at one or both ends to match. Everything I could find suggests the upper hose does go from thermostat to radiator directly, T

Response From Tom Greenleaf

http://www.autozone.com/...eId=0900c15280049680

True: Most thermostats won't go in backwards but some have an "up" side to assist air purging.

Try that site for the diagram.

Heater really should be run when first testing out a cooling system after it's been drained for any reason. Most will blow strong heat when full enough and if not there's still more to go (purging) ..

In a career I haven't seen many new thermostats be totally wrong and the problem. In troublesome cases I will test them in water watching the action work on a stove.

Air is lousy at transfering heat so t-stats can be slow to react to hot air but will in time - usually late. As said some are designed with notches or tiny check valves to allow air past them (must be installed with that "UP")for better self purging but even that is slow.

Keep at it. Air still in system is most likely the trouble so far,

T

Response From dlmcmurr

Tom,

Your link didn't work, but it pointed me in the right direction. In the radiator section at the same site, figure 1 shows the hose routing with the lower going to the stat and the upper going to the head. I'll reverse my hoses this evening and try to bleed the system better and see where it goes from here. Hope I haven't cut the one too short!

Thanks,
Dave

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Ok: That's "AutoZone's" parts site. Some, not all when you look for a part will show how it's replaced, located or more about it. Look below when you get a picture of a thermostat for example the look for "repair guides" below that and if there's any further stuff it's hidden there - just a trick to be able to look at stuff.

If you can take pics that's even better so I/we can see just what you are dealing with.

Bleeding: If a plug up high on or near thermostat is there it's for letting air out. If not sometimes you can just remove the highest hose and fill from there and re-attach. Run engine till heater works and upper hose past thermostat is warm to hot and shut if off for a good while. It should be pushing air out to recovery reservoir and when it contracts as it cools can only draw back liquid. Can take many cycles of that to be stabil.

If heater worked before it will work now and when no heat is noted it's frequently because the actual liquid in the cooling system's engine side is still too low unseen at a glance. Understand that the thermostat when closed is not letting air thru it so it must be warm enough to open but don't let it overheat. As said - some t-stat's come with a slot or mini hole to let the air past it when cold but that's still painfully slow and with even minor junk going thru system won't work as it would plug.

Getting air out is not as quick and simple as it looks sometimes. Keep at it and look for the signs of temp stability as the idicator that it's mostly done and would finish the last tidbits of air over use so re-check your coolant level daily for a few days of use is suggested by me anyway.

Good luck - keep trying,

T

Response From dlmcmurr Top Rated Answer

Tom,

It always bugs me wondering how some suggestions worked out, so I thought I'd tell you how this project ended up now that it's running again and I've semi-caught up some of the other things that got behind.

This started out as project to replace a damaged exhaust valve. The last car head I had removed was in a Vega over 30 years ago, so the DOHC experience was not where I really wanted to start. It all went relatively well. As I said, I had used (obviously faulty) logic to decide the radiator hoses had originally been reversed. I put them back correctly, but things still weren't normal. Got frustrated and went to bed. On a whim, turned on the key the next morning and waited on the gauges to stabilize. Lo and behold, the temp gauge was showing normal after resting all night! Must have damaged it when I was banging the head around. Went out and bought another sending unit and that solved that problem. Once I put the proper Permatex on the head to radiator hose adapter (looks kinda like a smaller thermostat housing) and resisted the urge to tighten it all the way down, that solved another problem. Other little incidentals like the intake cam being one tooth off, a nicked O-ring on an injector (those are hard to find replacements for), etc. kept the job interesting. I enjoy reading and using web resouces to learn how things work, plus I really couldn't afford to replace my 280k+ mileage car right now. I had hoped that new valve stem seals, camshaft seals, and a valve cover gasket would make a significant difference in my oil consumption since they were all leaking, but that has not proven to be the case. Guess that means instead of $350, I should have spent 4 to 5 times that to rebuild the engine, but I was worried that even my $350 would be wasted as I would overlook (or cause) some other major problem. At least this gets it to where I can sell it in good conscience later if I want to. Plus I can buy a lot of oil for $1000.

I appreciate people like you that enjoy helping those of us that have the reasoning power and desire, but lack the practical experience to solve our problems. I try to do the same in other areas where I have knowledge.

Thanks again,
Dave

Response From dlmcmurr

Thanks, Tom. Fortunately, the thermostat only fits in one way, with the spring into the pipe running across the back of the block to the water pump. One thing I forgot to do was open the heater valve to purge that system, too. I'll run it through one more cycle this evening. Guess there's always a chance the new thermostat is bad, but probably I just didn't get enough air out. Is that drawing available somewhere that I can read the labels?

Dave