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2000 Honda S2000 Cabin Air Filter NPN

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1998 Honda CR-V Cabin Air Filter NPN

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1999 Honda Prelude Cabin Air Filter NPN

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2010 Honda Insight Cabin Air Filter Febi

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Febi Cabin Air Filter
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2007 Honda Civic Cabin Air Filter NPN

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Corteco
2006 Honda Odyssey Cabin Air Filter Corteco

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Corteco Cabin Air Filter
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NPN
1998 Honda Accord Cabin Air Filter NPN

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Latest Honda Repair and Cabin Air Filter Installation Advice

CarJunky AutoAdvice

95 Honda Civic

Showing 2 out of 2 Posts
Question From Guest on 95 Honda Civic

As you will quickly find out, I am not a mechanic by any stretch.

I am curious if anyone knows if there is a filter for the blower motor for the a/c - heater...and can it be cleaned or replaced?
Blower motor is running, but not much air is coming out.
Any help is greatly appreciated.

Response From Tom Greenleaf Top Rated Answer

Cars that use cabin air filters need periodic replacement filter. If air flow is low on recirc then it's probably a different issue. Check owner's manual to see if this modes uses a filter at all,

T

help with blower motor fan

Showing 2 out of 2 Posts
Question From bltmstratheepan on help with blower motor fan

My fan speed doesn't work on the 1 & 2 options but works fine on 3 & 4
I tried changing the blower motor resistor and even the blower fan control with scrap yard parts but I'm having the exact same problem.
Please help
I don't know if it's relevant but I believe the problem started after I changed my cabin air filter.
2002 Honda accord ex 2.3
128000 km

Response From Discretesignals Top Rated Answer

You sure the salvage yard blower resistor is any good? How did the electrical connector that plugs into the blower resistor look?

AC Has Water In It

Showing 3 out of 3 Posts
Question From Schmidt1989 on AC Has Water In It

Hey everyone,

I have a 2007 Honda Civic coup and my AC freezes up after a while on full-blast. After much research into why it was doing this, I've determined that the AC condenser (compressor?) must have some water in it. If I set the AC to max and set the fan to full, I get excellent air for about 5-8 minutes, then the air stops coming out, but the fan still runs at full speed. If I turn the AC off and s it to heat, air still doesn't blow out for a good 30 seconds, and then comes out at full blast. Although I have a limited understanding of how cars function, I am an engineer and came up with the probability that a part is just freezing up. I have a K&N cabin air filter in there that is virtually free of debris. There's a good chance water did get into the system as I live in Austin, Texas, and we got some pretty major flooding down here last May.

Anyway, so I know the 'why' of my car's issue, but I'm unsure how to remove the moisture in the system. If there is a way to drain the system entirely, couldn't I just use one of those compressed air things to put new refrigerant into the AC system?

Thank you for your time.

Response From Discretesignals Top Rated Answer

Unlikely to have water in the compressor. I suggest you take it to a shop that specializes in air conditioning or the dealer. If the evaporator is freezing up into a block of ice, the evaporator temperature sensor or its circuit has an issue. The sensor measures the surface temperature of the evaporator core and is designed to prevent the evaporator from freezing by disengaging the compressor clutch. Don't be messing with refrigerant if you don't have the equipment or knowledge.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Arggh! Not sure what flooding would harm the most for A/C but NOT the refrigerant charge! Don't tough that yet.
This sounds just like it's icing up the evaporator to the point of low air flow. If so would drip a lot when shut off (parked) and work again or do so while driving along just OFF for a while and back on.
Think you'll have to check a lot of things possible with water like that. Can it drip out at all? Is floor inside wet still on passenger's floor from this or never A/C normal water made or seen?


Not sure how but expansion valve is possibly now off or not able to do its job properly.


? Why? Some can do that from just being low on refrigerant but with this history all has to be checked out. Take pressures while working at what temp and RPM and post your results.


Expect something strange to be causing this,


T
(edit in) If this will work with NO cabin air filter try that. Some filter material when wet can become a total air restriction swelling up and doesn't just dry out)

03 honda element no heat

Showing 2 out of 41 Posts | Show 39 Hidden Posts
Question From toolman0007 on 03 honda element no heat

have this 2003 honda element again. with this cold snap it's putting out very little heat. after a good bit of running
top hose was good and warm, bottom hose was cold. thought it might be thermostat. replaced it not much of a change.
because it has A/C it's my understanding it would have a heater control valve, or bypass valve when you go from heat to A/C. if so where is it located ? or is there something else I may not be aware of. just replaced the leaking water pump about 12 days ago.

Response From Hammer Time

With the engine at full operating temp, locate the 2 heater hoses where they go into the firewall and feel them to see if they are both hot to the touch. If not too hot to hold, then you have to look at the actual engine temp and if that is up, if it is, then your looking at a restricted heater core or poor circulation for another reason.
If you find that they are both too hot to hold, then the heat in that vehicle is controlled by a blend door that regulates heated air flow. it is operated by an electric motor/actuator. The problem can be that the actuator is stripped or inoperative or the door itself could be damaged. This is what needs to be determined by examining the actuator and see if it is responding to heat change commands or not.

Response From toolman0007

kinda put off anymore checking till the am. thanks for the info, and putting me in the right direction.
I was informed that a stop leak product was used when they noticed the coolant leak.(water pump) whats your input on that. my view is it is unhealthy for the cooling system and could cause blockage.

Response From Hammer Time

Very bad.............. That could be your whole problem. The heater core could be all plugged up with the sealer but do the testing to find out.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

From first post " after a good bit of running
top hose was good and warm, bottom hose was cold."


Yep - now knowing stop leak was used that would easily be the whole problem. So little coolant can get thru it that what does would cool to airflow temp fast and produce little to no heat.


Flush it out forward and backward. In fact do whole cooling system and get that sealer stuff out.


Sealers are useful for one last run to junk a car driving it there vs paying for a tow and that's about it on that,


T

Response From Hammer Time

I think the radiator hose temps are irrelevant here. The issue is lack of heat in the heater, not overheating in the radiator. That would have no bearing on the heater temp. Concentrate on the heater hoses and their temp. It's normal for the lower radiator hose to be cooler if the radiator has done it's job as long as the truck is not overheating.

Response From toolman0007

the element is back. ok after a good bit of running, checking heater hoses one facing fire wall, on the right very warm. one on the left very cold. conclusion no flow through heater core. some one advised flushing it.? have a new one on hand. looks like a real bear to get to. thinking dash has to be dropped . going to try flushing just the core and see if I can get flow. just on the chance anyone ever replace one on these things before, what kind of nightmare am I looking at ? LOL

Response From GC

Havent had the joy of doing one, but I went with the Ex since I wasnt sure what you had. It shows about 8rs labor. Have to recover and recharge a/c system on top of that, if you have a/c. Definitely try flushing it.

Response From toolman0007

well took the reversible pump I have a good bucket of hot water and I have good flow in both directions. I even pulled the inline flow valve. it moved before but wanted to check how easy by hand. there was mention of a flow door actuator in above responses. will be checking that as well. so far still have not found why this had no heat ??

Response From Hammer Time

Don't worry about the blend door until you have 2 hot hoses.

Response From toolman0007

ok heater core has flow. put it all back together. and using just water, let it run for about 15 min both hoses at the core are warm. took it for a good 5 mile ride. both hoses at the core much warmer but bottom hose on the radiator was still cold. peeking in to the radiator I can see quite a bit of build up of what i would presume to be the stop leak that was put in. it does not appear to have flow through the radiator. it tends to back up when throttle is applied heat getting to the inside better but it's not zero out today

Response From Hammer Time

I told you to stop worrying about the radiator hoses. They won't prevent the car from having heat. The lower hose is supposed to be cooler. That's what a radiator does.

Response From toolman0007

hammer I get how it works. but with the length of time running I would think the thermostat would be open or had been open enough to warm the bottom hose. apparently not. so how long do you feel this thing should run before it should be putting out heat. temp today is 30

Response From Hammer Time

The temp of the radiator has no bearing on the heater temp. Engine coolant starts circulating through the heater core long before the thermostat lets it into the radiator. The temp of the upper hose is an accurate comparison of engine temp once the T-stat opens. Don't even worry about the lower hose. Heater temp should gradually increase starting almost immediately after start up.

Response From toolman0007

ok have had this thing running for a good 45 min enough where cooling fans kick in (should both come on) ? hoses at heater core the one with the flow valve is hot, the other is just good and warm. hot being I can't hold it for long . I know im getting circulation through the core, but still feel what heat I am getting is still low in temp. while I'm at this thing I want to do a complete flush to attempt to get all the stop leak out, just a good long flush with hot water should do. whats your take

Response From Hammer Time

I would remove both heater hoses and use a garden hose under pressure and blast it in both directions. I wouldn't be trying to do this in freezing temps. that will be a losing battle. If that doesn't work, then you just have to replace the core.

Make sure you are getting hot on both sides of that heater control valve too.

Response From toolman0007

ok I'm in doors in a garage. to old for the out doors LOl. as I stated earlier I set it up with a pump 6gpm and had good flow both ways. you feel I could use more pressure ? house psi 65-70

Response From Hammer Time

70lbs of water pressure in your house? Are you sure about that? I would expect the average house to be 10 to 20 PSI. That's about all city water pressure is. There isn't a garden hose in the world that will survive 70 PSI. You don't want to exceed 20 in that core. If it's not working, just replace the core.

Response From toolman0007

this can be considered closed as it has been well over a week and the heat is working fine now thanks for every ones help and advice

Response From toolman0007

yes on the pressure can't use a standard garden hose. heavy commercial rubber hose standing psi 65 and running is about 59 psi. been that way for a long time. are there any products out there that are designed to brake up or neutralize stop leak ?.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

#1 - Don't use that much pressure as you can blow your new water pump and too much for radiator ends and about everything not made for that pressure.


IDK what help or harm the isle of assorted junk can do or what harm. Among them is flush for cooling systems. There has to be 20 different brands of sealer and think most is just concoctions of saw dust and perhaps fine ground rubber bits. Containers will claim anything to sell products and could care less if the work or cause harm.


Haven't needed the radiator shops for ages and most gone that I knew of. They would dunk whole radiators in some acid bath and don't know what type of acid but when parts were brass and copper would come out stripped of paint then ready to solder leaks or put a new core on reusable end tanks but not practical any more.


Never done it have heard of using automatic dishwasher soaps and flush all that out too. So many bogus claims but the junk in a bottle stuff I'll just say AYOR if you try one as a flush product,


T

Response From toolman0007

I am cautious and aware on the hole pressure thing. did a good 20 min flush both through the heater core and rad and block, separately. I'm getting heat but it sure does take a bit of time to get there. at least 20 min of run time or more. it was suggested that I just replace the heater core. kinda hard to justify with the amount of flow there is through it. I personally am not a fan of any stop leak products. internals were never meant for that crap. better to fix the problem than to apply a band aid to it. in the long run one is better off

Response From GC

I have had some success with filling the heater core with CLR and letting it sit for 20 min or so, then flushing core again. Only as last resort, since its not recommended by manufacturer. Ive never had it cause a problem with a core, but I suppose it could, so I dont do it unless the only other option is replacing the core.

Response From toolman0007

another thought i had considered, even more so now given the orientation of the core. my goal was to fix the problem but was only going to consider replacement as a last resort. time will tell as she drives the car. still holding the part for a few days.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Tell me toolman the orientation of the blower motor to the heater core if you would as I can't look that up? Some you get a good view of it and can touch it or IR thermo it to see if it's got a cold spot. Flow on this stuff as DS brought up may not be straight line for cleaning out so easy or at all.


All but so very few are a LOT of time and careful attention to just remove and replace plus little crap and things can break easily, how well sealed and with what messed up. Hate them as you can see. There's no doubt to me that everything is tight for work space in this and about everything


Never mind what a new one costs but what a waste of time if not conclusive to change it out and be done with this problem,


T

Response From Hammer Time

It's been very clear throughout this question that he has a temperature problem, not an air flow problem and a plugged up heater core is the only possibility out there. He has already determined that by the temp of the heater hoses.

His only options at this point id to either get it flushed which has been futile for the reasons DS pointed out or replace the core.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Was on PMs about this with him that's it's open. He can take it out (very used to dash work as an auto body guy) and will try to clear it or replace. Waiting to get some funky temp measuring stuff that I'm about sure will prove it has cold spots or whole area.


It's the challenge now not the bucks. Might be good archives for what sealer can really wreck. Of all things in the junk fix isles there should be one that reverses effects of stuff of the sort that really works IMO! Tom


PS: @ HT. Do you recall the brand name Zerex antifreeze? 1960s or so. TV ads they poked holes in the gallon jug of it and it sealed them! Haven't seen the brand name on anything. It wouldn't or couldn't be useful on H.E. cooling systems and was supposed to be proactive not after the fact. Never used it then either.........

Response From Hammer Time

PS: @ HT. Do you recall the brand name Zerex antifreeze? 1960s or so. TV ads they poked holes in the gallon jug of it and it sealed them!

No, that's a new one on me.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

I swear it's not a brain phart. Still long ago and might have been a metal qt. can........



Best I could find. ?? Tom

Response From Hammer Time

Back when radiators were copper and the passages were like tunnels. That stuff was pretty harmless back then. Not any more.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Unlocked as not quite done yet and he has a plan......... Tom

Response From Discretesignals

It's not so much the orientation, but the flow design. It doesn't take much to clog up those small transfer tubes. You may not be able to use water flow through the inlet and outlet pipes to flush out the clogged tubes, because the water flow will go through the good tubes. Water is going to flow through the path of least resistance. That is why radiator shops have to remove the tanks on radiators to rod tubes out.


edit:

Good to see you got it figured out. Closed per request by OP. Can be reopened upon request.

Response From toolman0007

just a thank you for your time. calling this one a wrap,

Response From toolman0007

just a thought, why would the manufacture suggest a fix when they would much rather sell the labor and parts LOL,
tricks of the trade, what we learn when we just don't follow what we are told. or apply a bit of critical thinking.
thank you

Response From Discretesignals

Another thing to consider is the heater core is a parallel flow design. That means that half the core could be clogged and you would still have flow through it, but only half the heating ability. Sometimes you can't effectively flush out something like that because there is more than one passage for the water to flow through.

&imagekey=3607500-0&width=450

Response From toolman0007

a point I did not consider, core orientation. another engineer design flaw LOL. inverted the other way would seem better,
just not sure if air would be an issue. thanks for your point

Response From Tom Greenleaf Top Rated Answer

? Didn't see it mentioned but does this car have good air flow thru vents? Does it use a cabin air filter? Rodent issues chewing up or nesting with junk even a maybe?


The flushes scare me more with so much assorted alloys used and would think an acid. Never did use it on anything so difficult to comment much.


You did say takes a while to warm up in this somewhere. That's a bit unusual to me for this generation of vehicle as warming up quickly helps reduce emissions and sooner to get the best MPGs.


General: Heat should be direct engine coolant temp available. Must be free of air. Thermostat should stay pretty much shut off to radiator till it reaches the rating of it. If the hose from thermostat to radiator gets warm much at all before up to operating temp there's a problem with that IMO. Check that as so far this isn't fixed so something still isn't right so check what you can,


T

Response From toolman0007

yes there is plenty of air flow, but the filter is a very good point, not sure if it has ever been serviced. I will note that thanks. I timed it this morning a 10 min run and it was putting out heat. temp climbed a good bit when rpms were brought up to about 2000. all seems well

Response From Discretesignals

30 degrees with pure water in the system? Is that a good idea?

Response From toolman0007

water is just for the testing, had to drain to check heater core will be putting coolant back in. planning a complete flush to get rid of stop leak

Response From toolman0007

DUH you have a point there. thanks

Interior car smells horrendous after repair. What are my options?

Showing 2 out of 7 Posts | Show 5 Hidden Posts
Question From bsideindy on Interior car smells horrendous after repair. What are my options?

Summary: After a U joint repair to my 2007 Honda CRV/75,000m by a local auto repair shop, a residual chemical oil/sweat like smell is embedded in the upholstery and carpets. The smell is disgusting and my passengers are complaining. The repair man said that they needed to burn rubber for some reason during the repair and that the car interior was "smoked out". It has been a couple months and the smell has not dissipated, instead has gotten worse after a recent carpet shampooing. I'm not sure what to do! The repair shop has admitted that the smell is because of the smoking out during the repair. They offered to give me a carpet shampooing "at cost" $55. I really don't think this is going to do anything since I've already shampooed once.
What are my options here? I think the next step is to get full upholstery replacement. How do I file a claim against the repair shop's insurance? I think they should pay for this. I called my own auto insurance and they said that there is really no damage, just a smell, so nothing they can do. Is this something I can take to small claims court? If the shampooing then upholstery replacement does not work, I will need to sell the car but who would buy a car that smells this bad. I feel that their substandard work has killed the value of my car.
Here are the details:
A couple months ago I had my car repaired at the local shop. They did something to fix a vibration, had to replace a U joint or something. It was very frustrating process and took many trips and attempts for them to diagnose and finally get the vibration fixed. After the repair, I got in the car and there was a chemically oil/locker room sweat smell. It seemed to be worse when turning on the AC. I assumed this would just clear up over time.
A couple weeks went by and the smell from the AC seemed to clear up okay. There was still some residual chemical smell, but it was summer and I would just open the windows. I got the car detailed and the carpets were not dried completely and the rubber mats were replaced. The smell got progressively worse over the next few days, until I realized what was going on and remove the mats and dried the car out by leaving the windows open. After drying, the smell is still there and it's worse than ever before. It is really intense, passengers are complaining of chemical induced headaches. I left a backpack on the floor and brought into my house and the smell is now on the backpack. I had to put the backpack out on the back deck and it still smells. It is a contagious smell just like the Seinfeld episode.
I discussed the issue with the repair shop. They said that during the repair they had to "burn rubber" and that the car was smoked out during the process. They are willing to give me a carpet cleaning "at cost" for my troubles. I really don't think that any sort of carpet shampooing is going to fix this. I don't even know if replacing the upholstery will fix this.

Response From Hammer Time

Go buy an air freshener if it bothers you that much.

Response From bsideindy

what a worthless response.

You're saying I should use some cheap fragrance to cover up a smell of a chemical saturation of my car's interior?

Response From Hammer Time

You could also replace the carpet if you really think it's that bad. If you left your carpet wet, now you have mildew soaked into them. You can replace them or stop complaining.

Response From re-tired Top Rated Answer

This is a catch 22. You have become sensitive to the odor. No matter how much you clean the car you will smell it even if others cant. I'm not saying its you that is the problem ,its just a fact. In my opinion court is going to be a waste of your time and money. You cant prove how it smelled before . And how could you put a value on the odor. If the car is worth it your best bet is to replace the carpet AND the padding. Shampoo the seats and panels....give the interior a heavy spraying of FEBREEZE. Spray down the a/c ducts . If you have a cabin air filter ,replace it. Btw, you might find a carpet and padding in good condition at a salvage yard . GOOD LUCK

Response From bsideindy

thanks for the replies guys.

Response From bsideindy


Go buy an air freshener if it bothers you that much.