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CarJunky AutoAdvice

Rear Brake question

Showing 2 out of 7 Posts | Show 5 Hidden Posts
Question From Noble on Rear Brake question

On My 2008 Toyota Highlander Sport, my rear driver side brake pads were wore down to the steel plate while all other brake pads have 1/2 to 3/4 of ceramic left on them. I replaced both the rear rotors and pads on the Highlander. I also greased the caliper pins as those didn't seem to have much on them and were a little hard to move. The passenger side caliper had a small hole or rip in the caliper boot (Should i be concerned?). I was able to compress both calipers with little effort.
After I was done replacing the parts, I tested both rear wheels by placing the Highlander in neutral. As i spun both wheels by hand, i had my wife apply the brakes. Both wheels stopped and released properly telling me the calipers were not dragging the brakes and are releasing properly.
I'm very new at working on a brake system. Does it sound like the calipers need to be replace or does it sound like i resolved the issue and shouldn't experiencing anymore issues with the driver side brake pads?


Thank you

Response From Tom Greenleaf

"
I'm very new at working on a brake system."


It's a terrible place to learn without hands on help - no mistakes. By the sounds of things this needs the whole job for rears, calipersm, flex hoses, rotors, pads and if this uses a parking brake inside rotor possibly that too and any cable not perfect for those as well. Seems like this might have been dunked in water over the brakes at some point or just dumb luck with one side wearing out like that vs the other and that happens. Always best to do both sides equally with brakes,


T

Response From Noble

Yes that's true. Hands on help would be best from someone that knows what their doing. Unfortunately I don't have that person :) . So I've had to relay on You tube videos for my model car and AllDataDIY step by step instructions. The Pads and rotors are not hard, its the troubleshooting part of it that i struggle with. I've watched a video this morning on how to replace the calipers and doesn't look hard. Just need to make sure i get all the air out of the line and bleed them properly when I'm done. Thank you for in input and I'll very much consider replacing the calipers and brake hoses.




Thank you

Response From Hammer Time

If you pushed the pistons back easily and lubed the slides and the brakes are releasing, I wouldn't worry about it. Sounds like the calipers are fine.

Response From Tom Greenleaf Top Rated Answer

Plenty of not sure quite yet.
You said you knew they were ceramic pads? Tell me, does this vehicle specify them or you asked for them or what? I was psyched when they first became popular by "Centric" I think - claims of no dust, forever life (not) and did lose a pad off backing plate and they looked like great quality pads vs some I've seen. Then another did that on another person's vehicle.


Not working on other's vehicles at all but aware of what gets done around me with folks. Rusty here is the common early cause of problems but can buy better stuff. Know that none of the stuff likes being dunked under water if that ever happened. Didn't you mention a sticky pin and ripped boot to a piston? NG - why is the question for that.


Water issues: Any reason, flooded, drove thru a surprise puddle or found common with vehicles the launch boats and put 1/2 the vehicle under water to get the boat off! Any reason what clearly happens is warm brake, bearings, calipers, wheel cylinder if used suck in water when they cool off suddenly - you are screwed to need lots - got the t-shirt on that crap.


Brake stuff short of a military Hummer is just water resistant not water proof for being submerged. If my own and knew it would instantly take things apart and re-lube everything possible and get water out,


T

Response From Noble

You make a good point about the pad falling off the back plate. I've heard of that happening with ceramics and now that i think about it, that's probably what happened. I believe Champion auto put those pads on the car 50,000 miles ago. I think they used the "perfect stop" brand....never heard of them but the anti-vibration plate had that name on them. Maybe they were a poor quality. The OEM part number for the pads are 0446648120. I "think" they are ceramic and that's what I replaced them with last night. Nothing I could find was rusted as far as the caliper and bracket. The back plate had some rust on it but seem to have been ok. The parking brakes looked find and I adjusted those and seem to work well.
I haven't towed a boat with this, so they shouldn't have been fully submerged in water. But I'm sure it's been through puddles that may have submerged it.




Thank you

Response From Tom Greenleaf

OK - By rights any pad should be sealed pad to backing plate and NOT rust such that it throws off the lining. IDK for sure about the "ceramics" if they are more prone to the issue but will NOT buy them again by any brand because of that alone.


They were quiet, no dust then missing in action - doesn't cut it with me.


I don't think it's going to totally matter as long as they will be at least misted with water from normal rain if that is going to happen screw that. Of course all of a sudden the metal backing plate to rotor will trash rotor or worse if piston(s) come out too far they can cock and jam too. Those even if you can persuade them to go back in straight and not leak I don't trust that for crap.


Not driving much to wear out my own anymore but have had excellent luck with NAPA's "True Stop" - who knows who makes them? Mid priced for them. Higher price can be for other reasons not wanted by all and IMO more apt to be noisy for those vehicles that noise is an issue - some never are and some you can jump thru all hoops and they still make noise?


Not a fan of now totally common rear disc brakes as they catch the rain and water from the front wheels - drums don't but most you need to clean or dump brake dust out if nothing else over the life of them. Can't win at all types,


T

brake system

Showing 2 out of 4 Posts | Show 2 Hidden Posts
Question From edson on brake system

2005 chevy silverado 1500 4.3liter engine 147,000 miles brake pedal vibrates and pedal goes lower right before astop and there is also a noise under the hood when this happens

Response From Discretesignals Top Rated Answer

How slow? Like parking lot maneuvers or below 5 mph?

ECHNICAL

Bulletin No.: 03-05-25-007D

Date: May 01, 2009

Subject: Antilock Brake (ABS) Activation At Low Speeds (Clean Wheel Speed Sensor Mounting Surface)

Models:
2002-2006 Cadillac Escalade, Escalade EXT
2003-2006 Cadillac Escalade ESV
1999-2006 Chevrolet Silverado
2001-2006 Chevrolet Suburban, Tahoe
2002-2006 Chevrolet Avalanche
2003-2006 Chevrolet Express
2007 Chevrolet Silverado Classic
1999-2006 GMC Sierra
2001-2006 GMC Yukon, Yukon Denali, Yukon XL, Yukon Denali XL
2003-2006 GMC Savana
2007 GMC Sierra Classic
2003-2006 HUMMER H2
................................................................................
Supercede:
This bulletin is being revised to add the 2007 Silverado/Sierra Classic models. Please discard Corporate Bulletin Number 03-05-25-007C (Section 05 - Brakes).
................................................................................
Condition

Some customers may comment on ABS activation at low speeds, usually below 8 km/h (5 mph). Upon investigation, the technician will find no DTCs set.

Cause

The cause of this condition may be an increased air gap between the wheel speed sensor and the hub reluctor ring due to rust and debris built up on the sensor mounting surface.

Correction

Measure AC voltage and clean the wheel speed sensor mounting surfaces.

1. Raise and support the vehicle. Refer to Lifting and Jacking the Vehicle in the General Information sub-section of the Service Manual.
2. Disconnect both the front wheel speed sensor connectors at the frame and harness.
3. Place a Digital Volt Meter (DVM) across the terminals of each wheel speed sensor connector.
4. Rotate the wheel clockwise approximately one revolution per second. The minimum reading should be at least 350 ACmV's. If the reading is less than 350 ACmV's, remove the wheel speed sensor. Refer to the applicable Wheel Speed Sensor Replacement procedure in the ABS sub-section of the Service Manual.
5. Plug the wheel speed sensor bore in order to prevent debris from falling into the hub during service.
6. Clean the wheel speed sensor mounting surface using a wire brush, sand paper, emery cloth, scotch brite, or other suitable material. Be sure to thoroughly clean the wheel speed sensor surface. There should be no rust or corrosion.
7. Check the sensor head to determine if it has been warped/distorted due to the corrosion build up or other causes. Check the mounting surface on the sensor head for flatness by placing it on the edge of a metal machinists scale or other suitable straight edge to measure the flatness. Check the sensor for flatness in multiple (minimum 3) positions/directions. If the sensor head is distorted, replace the sensor.
8. Apply (spray) two thin coats of the specified rust penetrating lubricant (corrosion inhibitor) to the complete sensor mounting surface on the bearing hub. Allow to dry for 3-5 minutes between coats. Use ONLY Rust Penetrating Lubricant, P/N 89022217 (in Canada, P/N 89022218).
9. When the corrosion inhibitor is dry to the touch (about 10 minutes), apply a thin layer of bearing grease to the hub surface and sensor O-ring prior to sensor installation. Use ONLY Wheel Bearing Lubricant, P/N 01051344 (in Canada, P/N 993037).
10. Install either the original sensor or a new one in the hub. Ensure that the sensor is seated flush against the hub. Refer to the applicable Wheel Speed Sensor Replacement procedure in the ABS sub-section of the Service Manual.
11. Place the DVM across the sensor terminals and recheck the voltage while rotating the wheel. The voltage should now read at least 350 ACmV's.

Response From edson

thank you for your advice i will get back to you if this helps

Response From edson

below 5 mph