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Genuine
2003 Toyota Matrix Drum Brake Shoe Genuine

P311-3F5F8AF    W0133-1619246  New

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Genuine Drum Brake Shoe
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Rear
Brand: Genuine
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2003 - Toyota Matrix
Brembo
2003 Toyota Corolla Drum Brake Shoe Brembo

P311-2C082ED    W0133-1619397  New

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$37.23
Brembo Drum Brake Shoe
  • Production: 01/01/2002-, North American Made Models
  • Rear
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2003 - Toyota Corolla
Brembo
2007 Toyota Corolla Drum Brake Shoe Brembo

P311-2C082ED    W0133-1619397  New

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$37.23
Brembo Drum Brake Shoe
  • North American made model.
  • Rear
Brand: Brembo
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2007 - Toyota Corolla
Brembo
2003 Toyota Corolla Drum Brake Shoe Brembo

P311-2C082ED    W0133-1619397  New

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$37.23
Brembo Drum Brake Shoe
  • Production: 04/01/2002-03/31/2003, Japan Made Models
  • Rear
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2003 - Toyota Corolla
Genuine
1998 Toyota Corolla Drum Brake Shoe Genuine

P311-23584FF    W0133-1618481  New

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$52.41
Genuine Drum Brake Shoe
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Production: 08/01/1997-
  • Rear
Brand: Genuine
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1998 - Toyota Corolla
Genuine
1999 Toyota Corolla Drum Brake Shoe Genuine

P311-23584FF    W0133-1618481  New

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$52.41
Genuine Drum Brake Shoe
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  • Rear
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1999 - Toyota Corolla
Genuine
2004 Toyota Camry Drum Brake Shoe Genuine

P311-091C5B4    W0133-1803539  New

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$69.05
Genuine Drum Brake Shoe
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  • Production: 06/01/2004-, JAPAN MADE MODELS ONLY
  • Rear
Brand: Genuine
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2004 - Toyota Camry
SBS
2003 Toyota RAV4 Drum Brake Shoe SBS

P311-5153DAD    W0133-1753198  New

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SBS Drum Brake Shoe
  • Rear
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2003 - Toyota RAV4
Genuine
2007 Toyota Yaris Drum Brake Shoe Genuine

P311-5D61F8B    W0133-1967011  New

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Genuine Drum Brake Shoe
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Brand: Genuine
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2007 - Toyota Yaris
Genuine
2007 Toyota Yaris Drum Brake Shoe Genuine

P311-5D61F8B    W0133-1967011  New

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Genuine Drum Brake Shoe
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  • Rear
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2007 - Toyota Yaris
Genuine
2008 Toyota Prius Drum Brake Shoe Genuine

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Genuine Drum Brake Shoe
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  • Production: 01/01/2008-
Brand: Genuine
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2008 - Toyota Prius
Genuine
2008 Toyota Prius Drum Brake Shoe Genuine

P311-5D61F8B    W0133-1967011  New

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$55.94
Genuine Drum Brake Shoe
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Production: 01/01/2008-
  • Rear
Brand: Genuine
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2008 - Toyota Prius
Brembo
2004 Toyota Corolla Drum Brake Shoe Brembo

P311-2C082ED    W0133-1619397  New

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Brembo Drum Brake Shoe
  • North American Made Models
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2004 - Toyota Corolla
Brembo
2008 Toyota Corolla Drum Brake Shoe Brembo

P311-2C082ED    W0133-1619397  New

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Brembo Drum Brake Shoe
  • Production: -12/31/2007, North American Made Models
  • Rear
Brand: Brembo
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2008 - Toyota Corolla
Brembo
2005 Toyota Corolla Drum Brake Shoe Brembo

P311-2C082ED    W0133-1619397  New

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Brembo Drum Brake Shoe
  • Production: 05/01/2004-, North American Made Models
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2005 - Toyota Corolla
Genuine
2002 Toyota Corolla Drum Brake Shoe Genuine

P311-23584FF    W0133-1618481  New

Qty:
$52.41
Genuine Drum Brake Shoe
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Production: -12/31/2001
  • Rear
Brand: Genuine
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2002 - Toyota Corolla
Genuine
2006 Toyota Camry Drum Brake Shoe Genuine

P311-091C5B4    W0133-1803539  New

Qty:
$69.05
Genuine Drum Brake Shoe
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • JAPAN MADE MODELS ONLY
Brand: Genuine
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2006 - Toyota Camry
Brembo
2003 Toyota Tundra Drum Brake Shoe Brembo

P311-51D85FB    W0133-1742338  New

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$62.46
Brembo Drum Brake Shoe
  • Rear
Brand: Brembo
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2003 - Toyota Tundra
Brembo
2006 Toyota Tundra Drum Brake Shoe Brembo

P311-51D85FB    W0133-1742338  New

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$62.46
Brembo Drum Brake Shoe
  • Production: -10/31/2006
  • Rear
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2006 - Toyota Tundra
Brembo
2002 Toyota Tacoma Drum Brake Shoe Brembo

P311-51D85FB    W0133-1742338  New

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$62.46
Brembo Drum Brake Shoe
  • Production: 09/01/2002-
  • Rear
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2002 - Toyota Tacoma

Latest Toyota Repair and Brake Shoe Installation Advice

CarJunky AutoAdvice

Front Disc Brakes and Rear Drum Brakes

Showing 6 out of 11 Posts | Show 5 Hidden Posts
Question From computerinfoseeker23 on Front Disc Brakes and Rear Drum Brakes

On my 2003 Toyota Echo, I have rotors on the front, and drums on the back for braking. I learned how to change the front disc pads on my car a long time ago, and I can do that quite easily and safely myself. Here is my question. I have 113,000 miles on the Toyota Echo. I have read that your back brakes only contribute to 25% of the car's stopping power. The other 75% is done by the front brakes due to the front end being heavier with things like the engine and transmission/transaxle located there.

My question is with the mileage I have on the echo, should I replace the drum shoes on the rear? I have never done drum shoes before. Is this something I could possibly learn to do myself, or should I take the car to a professional? I have always heard that the brake shoes with drums are a lot harder to do than the brake pads with rotors. Any comments or suggestions sincerely appreciated. Thanks!

Response From Tom Greenleaf Top Rated Answer

True - in a hard stop the fronts are doing the lion's share of the work. Drum style can last a loooong time but if they are ready to do I strongly suggest you get all the right info and make all the right adjustments that you don't need to do for front disc brakes.

They are very important as they can and will change the feel for the brakes in general. Trouble is new shoes can no longer be arced for the diameter of a worn or cut drum so I strongly suggest getting all new and the hardware that if a part breaks ruins the job.

If you take this on please know or have help available. When in any doubt do one side at a time so you can reference the other side while intact but remember they are asymmetrically opposite like your hands are left and right kind of thing.

All doable with some tools and know how and if in doubt, send it out,

T

Response From computerinfoseeker23

Ok Tom, thanks a lot. Another question? How would I know if the brake shoes are worn down enough to warrant doing this? You said the rear can last a long time. If I remove a back tire, will I be able to tell by looking and/or feeling or must you also pull the drum off to inspect? There is a mobile repair shop guy where I live. It is pretty neat because this guy comes to you rather than you driving to him. He replaced a serpentine belt for me last year. I could have him do the job and ask him to let me watch as he does one so I can see things being done firsthand. That was how I learned how to do my front disc brakes. What do you think?

The car has 113,000 miles on it and the rear brakes have never been done.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

I don't have exact specs on how thick but know that it will be the thinnest spot that counts. Done so many I never measure but just see by eye that they are ready.

Drum must be removed to inspect fully. This may have a hold-down screw that may give you a good fight to remove drum. An impact driver for screws may be needed - can't say but don't strip those things out trying with inferior tools.

There may be a ridge where shoes have worn the drum leaving a ridge making them hard to remove even when free from the hub itself. Turn drum by hand while trying to remove it can help or back off adjuster to make clearance.

Hard to describe but you can knock off that ridge if there or take a good drum to a shop and get just that removed.

In general drum brakes are pretty basic. Brake dust inside can mess them up but do NOT blow that out with air! Clean what you can with disposable towels or rags (clean) and never breath the dust if you have to walk away do so.

Again, if unsure get help. They were pretty much the only style brake front and rear for ages so nothing new there. Hey - everything seems easy if you do enough of it and first times can take forever but don't rush any job as that's a sure waste if not dangerous. That's why earlier I suggested you have some experienced help if you get the least bit confused or worried about your work,

Tom

Response From nickwarner

ask and you shall receive
Print
When servicing drum brakes, only dissemble and assemble one side at a time, leaving the remaining side intact for reference.
Inspection

  1. Clean the drum.
  2. Inspect the drum for scoring, cracks, grooves and out-of-roundness. Replace the drum or have it "turned" at a machine or brake specialist shop, as required. Light scoring may be removed by dressing the drum with fine emery cloth.
  3. Measure the inside diameter of the drum. A tool called an "H-gauge caliper" is used. See the Brake Specifications chart for your vehicle.



/autozone/images/repair_guide/enlarge_icon.gif/autozone/images/repair_guide/enlarge_tooltip.gif
Fig. Using an H-gauge caliper, measure the inside diameter of the brake drum

/autozone/images/repair_guide/enlarge_icon.gif/autozone/images/repair_guide/enlarge_tooltip.gif
Fig. The drum specification is usually stamped inside the drum
Removal & Installation

  1. Loosen the rear wheel lug nuts slightly. Release the parking brake.
  2. Block the front wheels, raise the rear of the car, and safely support it with jackstands.



/autozone/images/repair_guide/enlarge_icon.gif/autozone/images/repair_guide/enlarge_tooltip.gif
Fig. The brake drum is around the outside of the brake shoes
  1. Remove the lug nuts and the wheel.
  2. One way to remove the drum is to tap the drum lightly with a mallet to free the drum if resistance is felt. Sometimes brake drums are stubborn. If the drum is difficult to remove, perform the following:
    1. Insert the end of a bent wire (a coat hanger will do nicely) through the hole in the brake drum and hold the automatic adjusting lever away from the adjuster.
    2. Reduce the brake shoe adjustment by turning the adjuster bolt with a brake adjuster tool. The drum should now be loose enough to remove without much effort.

      /autozone/images/repair_guide/enlarge_icon.gif/autozone/images/repair_guide/enlarge_tooltip.gif
      Fig. Access the shoe adjustment through this hole in the backing plate

      /autozone/images/repair_guide/enlarge_icon.gif/autozone/images/repair_guide/enlarge_tooltip.gif
      Fig. Insert a bent wire or brake tool through the hole in the drum and hold the adjuster lever away from the lever

  3. Another way to remove the brake drum is to insert a bolt in each of the two holes in the drum.
    1. Tighten the bolts down, a popping sound should be heard, this is the drum separating from the backing plate.
    2. Pull the drum from the backing plate.

      /autozone/images/repair_guide/enlarge_icon.gif/autozone/images/repair_guide/enlarge_tooltip.gif
      Fig. Insert two bolts and tighten them down till a popping noise is heard

      /autozone/images/repair_guide/enlarge_icon.gif/autozone/images/repair_guide/enlarge_tooltip.gif
      Fig. Lift the drum off using two hands, they can be heavy



To install:
  1. Clean the drum and inspect it as detailed in this Section.
  2. Hold the brake drum so that the hole on the drum is aligned with the large hole on the axle carrier and install the drum.
  3. If the adjuster was loosened to remove the drum, turn the adjuster bolt to adjust the length to the shortest possible amount.
  4. Install the rear wheels, tighten the lug nuts and lower the vehicle.
  5. Retighten the lug nuts and pump the brake pedal before moving the vehicle.

  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions in the beginning of this section.
  2. Remove the wheels.
  3. Remove the brake drum from the axle hub.


To install:
  1. Install the brake drum.
  2. Install the rear wheels, tighten the wheel lug nuts.

  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the Precautions section.
  2. Remove the wheels.
  3. Remove the brake drum from the axle hub.


To install:
  1. Install the brake drum.
  2. Install the rear wheels, tighten the wheel lug nuts.

    /autozone/images/repair_guide/enlarge_icon.gif/autozone/images/repair_guide/enlarge_tooltip.gif
    Fig. Rear drum brakes-Corolla

    /autozone/images/repair_guide/enlarge_icon.gif/autozone/images/repair_guide/enlarge_tooltip.gif
    Fig. Rear drum brakes-Celica

    /autozone/images/repair_guide/enlarge_icon.gif/autozone/images/repair_guide/enlarge_tooltip.gif
    Fig. Rear drum brakes-Echo

/autozone/images/common/icn_arrow.gifBack to Top

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Nick - If that doesn't do it nothing will! Crazy how easy this seems when you do them all the time

Tom

Response From nickwarner

Its easy for us. Had to search to find the right pics to describe it to someone else. If he was in my area I'd say just bring it by and I'll show you(provided you bring me a case of beer) but alas, this must suffice. This was the procedure I copied from autozone.com for free, so it may help to set up a username there to view tech guides.

Response From computerinfoseeker23

Hey, thanks Tom and Nick. Much helpful, useful information. I really appreciate this forum. Thanks for the autozone tip also Nick. I will go there tomorrow and set up a user name. I have another question for you guys. My mother's Nissan Altima has 4 disc brakes. Why don't all manufacturers do this? Why the rotors on the front and drums on the rear in some cars? Is there a reason for this?

Response From Hammer Time

Why the rotors on the front and drums on the rear in some cars? Is there a reason for this?

Cost................... Only done where it's needed and paid for.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Rotors and Drums?: My take is parking brakes are better or easier to do with drums in the rear. Rear brakes do in fact not do most of the work in hard stops but dammit they worked just fine for ages and lasted! They do have the propensity to lock up and skid more than disc brakes but I'm an old phart that would and have said that if you can't drive than don't!

Whatever vehicle you still need items to operate as intended and things will need attention from time to time. Pay attention as you are as driving a car on public roads is not a RIGHT but rather a privilege. Not much choice where I live if I want even groceries - true,

Tom

Happy to be retired and will delete auto sign off - "still waiting for Godot" thing that nobody understands? BTW that was the #1 Broadway show in the 1970's and we all forgot!

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Just a comment from first post on this thread:

Can I do this myself? Of course you can as all of regular techs here did with cars stuff. I own a home thank God and did almost all work here alone but learned that some professionals even at the increased cost for odd repair are totally worth it!

I don't need to be a pro at some or many one time things so pay the pro for exact right work. I/we here do the same thing frequently and expect these guys to advise such.

Think. I don't want to burn my home down for being stupid to save a buck nor advise on car things that could cause an accident or worse, people hurt or killed so walking on egg shells with suggestions always with this. Older training but collegiate level in physics of this crap the principles still apply.

Said over and over that when in doubt get some help and expensive is part of life but don't let a few bucks get in the way of things being done properly. It is far from cheap to have stuff and knowledge to do this trade!

Said enough I think for this............

Tom Greenleaf

2003 Toyota Echo

Showing 5 out of 5 Posts
Question From computerinfoseeker23 on 2003 Toyota Echo

I have 123K miles on my echo and I have never had my rear brakes serviced. I want to do this for preventive maintenance purposes. I do my front disk brakes myself but have never done rear drum brakes nor do I want to or want to learn how. Here is my question. If I put my car in a local repair shop, how much can I expect to pay versus buying the parts (brake shoes) and brake cleaning fluid and allowing a mobile service tech come to my home and do the repair?

What should I expect to pay, parts and labor, for a repair shop to do this job. I just want some ballpark estimates please.

I have used mobile auto mechanics before and have been very pleased with the work. Thanks in advance for any replies.

Response From Hammer Time

Preventative maintenance on brakes?

If you don't have a problem, leave them alone until they need to be replaced..

Response From computerinfoseeker23 Top Rated Answer

Preventative maintenance on brakes?

If you don't have a problem, leave them alone until they need to be replaced..Thanks Hammer. I have never serviced the rear drum shoes. How would I know or not if these shoes need to be serviced? I know how to inspect my front pads. Don't you think it is time for a rear drum brake job with 123K miles? I have done the front disk brakes about 3 or 4 times I think.

Response From Hammer Time

You can simply pull a bake drum off and see how much brake is left.

If that's not something you know how to do, most shops will give free brake checks.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

If you know these haven't been even looked at since new I would. Unless somehow remarkably corrosion free just getting drums off to check could break things and you should be ready for a whole brake job.


Shows two screws (probably Phillips headed) hold drum on and near certainly need and impact driver to remove those then fight with center hole stuck to hub and clearing an unworn ring over existing shoes.


Drum brake shoes can last a lot of miles and time but do build up dust and that should (IMO) be periodic to dump that out as it can't get out on it's own most I know of.


Highly likely to have troubles with the screws first, hub to drum and the unworn ring trapping shoes if they can't be retracted and might not so things will break. Don't re-use springs and hardware at the age and miles nor a drum that took a beating to get removed.


If you count on this car I'd just plain expect a whole rear brake job including all parts and hardware. You might be pleasantly surprised that these parts are not all the costly as things go to just do them or have done.


Again, IMO you need to know if you know nothing has been looked at in that time and miles,


T


(edit to show pic and a problem spot)
Drum should be like this......
/
The two tiny holes are for those screws. They are highly unlikely to just turn out with regular screwdriver or break as said. Drum is meant to be very snug to hub is next. You can't know without trying. If trouble with any and you don't have lots of common tools for dealing with them (easy hardware brake as things go) you are better off having this done vs buy all needed to get out of it once...........

03 Toyota Corolla-Clicking Noise When I Brake Coming From The Back Of The Car

Showing 2 out of 16 Posts | Show 14 Hidden Posts
Question From thien1992 on 03 Toyota Corolla-Clicking Noise When I Brake Coming From The Back Of The Car

Hey i purchased a used 03 Toyota Corolla from a dealership yesterday and once i started driving home i noticed a clicking noise coming from the back of the car whenever i brake. The clicking clicks alot faster when i push farther down on the brakes. I don't know if this is a normal thing but I am pretty sure it isn't. They put new brakes on for me as well as new tires and a free oil change. Can someone tell me why its clicking and what can i do to resolve this problem?

Response From tiggrdj Top Rated Answer

While after four years I assume that the original poster has resolve his problem, I will try to help someone like me who has just run across this thread.
I have seen numerous references on various forums to a problem that seems to occur after the rear brakes are replaced on an 8th gen. Corolla. After replacing anything from shoes to the complete rear brake system there are complaints of a clicking noise coming from the rear brakes when the brakes are applied. I recently had the same issue and I think I got to the bottom of it. The Corolla brake shoes like most drum brakes have a leading and trailing set of shoes. The braking surface on the rear shoe should be much closer to the top of the shoe than on the front shoe. On aftermarket brake shoes (at least the Duralast from AutoZone) it is all but impossible to determine which is leading and which is trailing. I ended up going to the dealer and paying through the nose for factory shoes, but they were clearly different than the $15.00 aftermarket variety. Once I installed the factory shoes correctly, the noise went away and all was well. I probably could have used the aftermarket once I compared them to the factory parts but my time must be worth something . If you are having this problem be sure to look carefully at where the pad lands on the steel backing. The one with the pad higher on the backing goes to the rear. This should resolve the clicking problem as it is actually caused by the shoes gripping and releasing from the drum. In my case, I had both leading shoes on one side and both trailing on the other side. Its a simple fix once you know what the problem is but extremely hard to detect without a very close look at the aftermarket shoes. The OEM shoes have a very obvious difference in where the braking surface is bonded to the steel shoe.

Response From Hammer Time

You knew it was 4 years old and you still responded to it.

Please read the FORUM RULES before posting.

Response From thien1992

bump

Response From thien1992

oops it has roughly about 113k miles forgot to post that

Response From Hammer Time

It sounds like something on the wheel is making contact with the brake caliper. They may have used different wheels or put a wheel weight in a place where it's making contact.

Response From thien1992

so what would i have to do to fix it? should i head back to the dealership and have them take a look?

Response From Hammer Time

Your driving home from getting brake and tire work and there is a new noise coming out of the brakes......... Of course you take it back to them. let them find the noise. Don't worry, if they can prove it's not their fault, they will. Otherwise they will resolve the problem.

Response From thien1992

thanks a ton man i will be posting here more often cuz unlike google u guys are more reliable =]

Response From Hammer Time

Thanks, let us know what happens

Response From thien1992

ye so i went tot he dealership today and they didnt take a look at the car! they sent me to another guy which than gave me another guys number and i have to contact him about the car so he can take a look at it......this is bull shit

Response From Hammer Time

I don't understand the runaround your getting. It shouldn't be hard to just get someone to look at it. If the dealership is not giving you satisfaction, ask to speak to the service manager. It's his job to satisfy you.

Response From thien1992

i went there and they said i had to talk to the person that sold the vehicle to me. he wasnt there and so they gave me a number i called it and he said to come back tuesday

Response From Sidom

Wow this really sounds like a run around. If you just bought the car plus they did work to it, it shouldn't be this hard to get this fixed...

The only 2 scenarios I can see here is either this dealership has the worst customer service ever or it's a case of a customer being so frustrated with their problem they are taking it out on everyone they talk to so the buck is being passed.

While the 2nd scenario isn't right, it is human nature. If someone has no sympathy for someone else they will only do the bare minimum that their job requires of them for that person. Where if they actually felt sorry for the person & their problem they might have gone a few extra steps outside their job requirement to help the person out in getting their problem fixed.......

Response From thien1992

will do

Response From thien1992

if the wheel weight were to come off or something it would make my wheel unbalanced as well right? im hoping they fix it for free it was there fault after all......