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1992 - Plymouth Colt
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1991 Plymouth Colt Drum Brake Shoe PBR

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1991 - Plymouth Colt
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1996 Plymouth Grand Voyager Drum Brake Shoe - Rear Monroe

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1996 - Plymouth Grand Voyager Rear
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1995 Plymouth Neon Drum Brake Shoe - Rear Monroe

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1995 - Plymouth Neon Rear
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Latest Plymouth Repair and Brake Shoe Installation Advice

CarJunky AutoAdvice

Could a 1971 plymouth duster340 be daily driver?

Showing 2 out of 7 Posts | Show 5 Hidden Posts
Question From frogpajamas on Could a 1971 plymouth duster340 be daily driver?

I'm looking into buying a 1971 plymouth duster that has a rebuilt 360CI V8 4 BBL carb engine with automatic tranny. But i don't know much about cars. I'd be using it a few times a week, maybe 100mi a week, and wondering if it would be functional with that kind of use. It's just an old car so not sure how long it will last. Pics and description at this link: link deleted......... not allowed

Response From Hammer Time

You do realize that car has the wrong engine in it?


That's a 340 duster. They never came with 360s and that will reduce it's value.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

True for collectible value - wrong engine but as I recall would look the same and fit but the wrong engine would bother me personally. It's old enough to be about the muscle car status but if all messed with I'd pass.
If this car is real expensive and wanted to be a race car do what you want. There were some pretty impressive plain 318s back then.

By MY (model year) 1973 the bumper law came into effect along with detuning many engines going lame and were lame by 1975 when cat converters became the norm for almost all. That was after the oil embargo of 1973 and fast mandates at the same time to make engines cleaner which killed their fuel economy till technology could catch up some. USA speed limit was max 50 MPH later changed to 55 for ages it seemed.

Not into the road burners but looking back would pick 1969 or older but some awesome stuff went thru 1972 at least by then the "Big Three" and even AMC got into it,

T

Response From re-tired Top Rated Answer

Nothing wrong with a 71 daily driver . Most parts suchas waterpump ,alt ,brake shoes , tune up stuff are still available. Things such as trim , dash parts will require a little research.. The car was designed to handle on biased ply tires ,but will handle raidials ok.If you could find a 340 you would have the makings of a classic. If you have or want A/C it will have to be 134 converted and wont give OEM cooling. One good thing , when you pull up to a light there wont be another one next to you.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

I just knew our buddy RT would by by

Parts are no doubt available as RT said for cars of interest anyway. Laugh, was a while ago a guy just wanted a tune-up on a '59 Studebaker and a new grille put on (four screws) and I just said he can do the hunt and damn if he didn't show up with boxed stuff marked "Studebaker!"

Web alone may not find the dinky body stuff for some but it's out there. If determined with old stuff join a club for just that make or model in some cars,

T

Response From nickwarner

The net has made the things to fix this available without breaking the bank. Got points? Mallory makes a simple install electronic unit that goes in your points distributor. Most of your brake and chassis parts can be found from O-Reillys and NAPA still. With a close inspection and due diligence on maintenance you can drive this regularly. Maybe a good thing it isn't numbers matching. Then you don't have to care about it being modified and don't care about mileage. Just enjoy it for what it is.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

#1 - get it inspected by a pro that things are done right. Yes cars this old can be dependable to use if things are all in order and old rubber parts like the hoses and belts for cooling system are near new.

This vintage of Mopars had lousy radiator when new which it near can't be now. They also can eat a ballast resistor mounted on firewall like lunch. At the time back when I carried a spare. The common failure for those is car would start but stall the second you let go of the key to just run position.

Rebuilt engines scare me until proven and the best of them can be troubles but at the age so could an original engine.

May or may not have points now as with all Mopars I know of in 1971. All switched to electronic ignition in 1973. If that was altered to electronic from point ignition how well was that done?

I really suggest finding an old Mopar tech to check it out overall. Is this in good shape and rust free as possible? That is important. The sister cars the Dart and Valiant had some nasty rust problem as many cars did and would snap the unit body of underside right off if too rusty. I would reject fixed up rust in most cases unless wildly well done if it ever had a rust problem which is why I suggest you get this totally checked out by a pro who remembers them if you can find one prior to buying it,

T

Brake Trouble in '97 Plymouth Acclaim

Showing 2 out of 6 Posts | Show 4 Hidden Posts
Question From kingjim9 on Brake Trouble in '97 Plymouth Acclaim

Hey in my '97 acclaim the brakes have been acting a little strange. The pedal is a little hard to push down when driving, but the brakes still apply and slow down. The pedal only drops about (1/2" -3/4") from where it is when its not being applied. Like i said the car still stops fine, so does anybody have any ideas on what to check?

Response From Guest

Normally a "Hard pedal" indicates a problem with the power brake booster. However, it can also be caused by a restricted brake line or hose. You might want to check these for damage. If these seem to have lost thier rigidity, a hose might have collapsed on the inside causing a resrtiction. Also, as already stated, restrictions can also be caused by frozen caliper or wheel cylinder pistons.

Response From kingjim9 Top Rated Answer

Ok well i checked the wheels. they all spin free, with the brakes not applied. I recently replaced one of the parking brake cables. I'm thinking that when i re-adjusted the parking brake cable that its pulling the brake shoes closer to the drum so when the pedal is applied the shoes hit the drum relativily quickly causing it to feel hard pretty quickly. Does this sound like a resonable problem?

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Brakes hitting higher up on the pedal and harder to push to get the same braking are two different things. Brakes all adjusted up and in good shape feel nice and apply higher. If way too soon the adjustment could be too much and with the parking cable you can drive into a driveway where the car torques some and the brakes will drag. You said they spin free no so that's good. See how many clicks it takes for the parking brake to firm up. It should take (guess) 5 to 7 clicks where it holds the car. If just a couple it's too tight and can get hot (rear) and you don't really notice right away,

T

Response From Tom Greenleaf

There's something up with that. You could be losing power assist which makes the pedal feel softer and of course assists with the pressure needed. This car should have drum brakes in the rear which is also the parking brake. If that gets over adjusted or can't retract the pedal will gain height on where it grabs. You can note that in cars with drum rear brakes just sitting still and hit the brake and do it a couple times with the parking brake on and it will feel real high on the pedal.

Disc fronts can lose their ability to retract and also give you a hard pedal. There are caliper to freeze up and slides and pins on various types that freeze and may not cause a problem right away but will.

I suggest checking each wheel that it can spin freely. If you know your brakes you can check that things do in fact retract properly with a good look and even watching them with a helper just touching the brakes but if you try that don't apply the brakes more than to just see it and let go as the backs need the drum on to stay in place. If in doubt about that don't hit the brakes with drums off.

It's worth checking this out as you've noticed a change and if one or more is frozen best to know it now,

T

Response From way2old

Also check the little valve in the booster that has engine vacuum going to it. It is a one way valve and if it goes bad, youi have no vacuum assist and will cause your concern.

breeze idling rough& pulling at stops

Showing 2 out of 24 Posts | Show 22 Hidden Posts
Question From RoughBreezing on breeze idling rough& pulling at stops

I have a 1997 plymouth breeze 2.0 SOHC with auto 4 speed tranny I got about a month ago it has 142500 on the odometer. I have two major problems with it...

1) When I am coming to a stop I feel the car shift to what should be neutral as I reach 3-4 MPH, then the car starts pulling itself forward in small bounces like I'm in a 5 speed and forgot to hit the clutch. It has stalled the engine a couple times but for the most part it doesn't...

2)the idle is pretty rough at times and vibrates the steering
wheel badly it has a chugging sound to it but still runs at 750 RPM I have seen it raise the rpm just a hair and the chugging stops and the engine is pretty smooth I was going to adjust the idle air screw but there is none and no MAF sensor to clean. If i rev the engine a bit it has a problem catching itself and will often stall even in gear in stop and go traffic when I start the car the RPMs go up and then drop to 500 or less then even out.

Both of these problems seem to come and go or at least get worse /better at times. I cleaned the throttle body the plugs and wires are ok aside from a bit of oil leaking into the plug compartment that I clean out regularly I used a bunch of fuel injector cleaner. The exhaust doesn't smell very rich or lean. I can't find a vac leak and the egr valve seems to be working properly the CAT rattles and I'm thinking about tapping it out. the car seems to run better when completely topped off with oil. all fluid levels are good and I'm sure there would be an engine light but its burnt out

Long post I know thanks in advance for any help

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Code reading would help now. If bulbs don't light as a bulb check with just key to "run" or some just while cranking perhaps that is a problem,

T

Response From Discretesignals

I agree with Tom, you need to have the computer scanned. Write down the code numbers.

Number 1 sound like the symptoms of a torque converter clutch staying engaged when coming to a stop.

aside from a bit of oil leaking into the plug compartment that I clean out regularly I used a bunch of fuel injector cleaner.

If you mean that oil is leaking into the spark plug wells, you need to replace the valve cover gasket and tube seals.


Hollow a cat out? I didn't just read that did I?

Response From RoughBreezing

Ok so I took the car to advanced auto and had it read its throwing codes P0403 and P1390. I believe he said an egr valve flow problem and something about a misfire for the second. I don't have a lot of money to throw at the car, but I guess my first step is to replace the valve cover gaskets, plugs and wires and see if it gets rid of the misfire(which i don't hear or feel at speed, does that make sense?). As far as the egr valve goes should I be able to see it move when revving the engine? And does anyone know where to find a diagram of which hoses are the vac hoses so I can check them better? Also I was convinced it was the torque converter lockup sticking too from how its acting and I still kinda think it is. wouldn't the car have reported it by now though? Thanks for the help!

Oh and I thought maybe the cat was clogged and tapping it out is free (Sorry ozone). its my girls only transport and I could really use a cheap fix as were tight on cash for another month or so and she is afraid to drive it, heaven forbid it stalls :)

Response From Hammer Time

Misfire? I don't see any misfire code.

The P1390 says your timing belt jumped and you have an EGR issue.
Your first step is to immediately stop trying to run it and replace the timing belt.

Response From Discretesignals

One common problem on those engines that sets that P1390 is a sheared cam sprocket dowel pin. Pull the cover off and inspect the pin too.

Response From RoughBreezing

Is it possible I can re align the timing belt if its not bad or will I have to get a new one? I guess they can't cost all that much. The sheared cam sprocket, I'm assuming you mean under the valve cover...will it be easily noticable to a mechanical mind with limited car experience?

Response From Hammer Time

To add to that, no, you definitely don't want to re-use the belt and you should also replace the tensioner and water pump while in there.

Response From RoughBreezing

My moms b/f is a retired mechanic and he already offered to help change the valve cover gasket and tube seals I'm sure he will do the timing belt too but all I can find in way of timing belts is full kits for 250 and up is it possible to just get the belt? I only have about 250 total to throw at it and I need to get gaskets plugs wires and the timing belt. Will 250 cover that if I can get the work done for free? EGR will have to wait a bit I guess.

Response From Hammer Time

Let me make this perfectly clear to you. If you skimp on this job or make even a small mistake in installing it, you will be looking at a couple thousand in repairs. This engine is not forgiving. One turn of the engine with the belt out of time will bend nearly every valve. If this guy has been retired for more than a few years, he will not be familiar enough with doing this job.
I recommend you pay a shop to do this.

Response From nickwarner

Park it until you can pay a pro to do this or let the other guy send it to the scrapyard. I know it sucks to be broke but HT and DS can tell you the same horror stories I can of people who thought they could save a buck with having any so-called mechanic fic this motor. Just being able to fix some brakes or a radiator doesn't make you a true tech. Thats what we give to junior techs and even they screw the pooch from time to time. This isn't something for someone who isn't fully versed in late model engines with the toolset to go with it.

Wonder why its so damn expensive to see a mechanic for this? Thank Chrysler.

Response From RoughBreezing Top Rated Answer

Taking it to a shop probably won't be an option for me unfortunately. I was charged over 700 bucks for brake shoes engine mount windshield wipers and inspection! My options here are going to be junk it, run it into the ground or take it to my moms b/f (he's 60 and retired pretty close to 3 years now but because his spine is deteriorating not because of incompetence). at least ill have a shot at keeping it on the street with option 3 and at the very least this can be a 'what not to do to your car' post. At any rate ill keep updating this thread with any major happenings until its fixed or in the junk yard just so the information is out there.

PS: I'm not purposely ignoring you guys' advice. I just really am that broke. Thanks a million for pointing me in the right direction I would have been trying to solve a misfire problem that was really only the tip of the iceberg.

Response From Hammer Time

Being broke is not going to make this job turn out any better. If he has back problems, this is not the job to try.

Response From nickwarner

Here is one thing you can do for not a lot of money. Do to www.alldataDIY.com and get a year subscription to this car. I think its about $25. Haynes manuals don't cut it and if this guy was a pro at a good shop he has used it before. This is the data provider we all use and it costs a shop several hundred a month to have access to the whole database. Let him read through the procedure carefully and see what special tools are involved. Then he can make an informed decision as to if he can do this or not. If he can't, see if you can place decently in a demo derby because you have very little time til boom to get some cash together for another car and may as well have fun with it for the last hurrah.

If he hasn't used Alldata before, don't let him do the job. This isn't a riding lawnmower or the cars we had 20 years ago. The warnings we have given are for good reason and we have all seen wrecked engines from novices attempting to save a buck or buying just a belt instead of the kit. Your $30 water pump can and will wreck your head when it takes out the timing belt and you won't get any warning.

Response From RoughBreezing

I messaged him earlier and described what was going on and asked if he was comfortable replacing the timing belt if it wasn't a sheared cam sprocket pin. he goes to sleep early so I should have an answer in the morning. I didn't read about the alldataDIY till after I messaged him but ill be sure to ask him about it and ask if he would want me to subscribe.

Also, would a bad cam/crankshaft sensor throw the same code (P1390) or does it generate its own code? Is there any way to check them without a volt/multimeter?

Response From Hammer Time

Also, would a bad cam/crankshaft sensor throw the same code (P1390) or does it generate its own code? Is there any way to check them without a volt/multimeter?

We have told you exactly what that code means. If it could mean something else, we would have told you that.

Response From RoughBreezing

Turns out the timing belt assembly is brand new but the cam shaft is just less than a half tooth to the right when TDC. We didn't have a puller for the large pully so we couldn't adjust it though. I was messing with the EGR valve today and its functioning but not completely closing. When I hold it closed with a screw driver the idle stops chugging and sounds great. Do you think its carbon buildup since I can still press it closed or would a vac leak do the same thing? I'm planning on taking it off tomorrow and taking a look at it. ill post my findings

The car has been being drivin this whole time. Since the assembly is new I'm just going to take my chances with it especially after hearing how nice the idle was with the egr closed

Response From nickwarner

If you can push that EGR valve manually and make all troubles cease, you pretty much confirmed the issue. They can and do get sticky with age. I'd swap it out and good luck with the car. Thanks for coming back to post the fix, helps plenty of people who search older posts for similar info on their cars.

Response From RoughBreezing

The garage that did the timing belt before I owned the car, also charged me for turned rotors and new brake pads which they never actually touched... Never going to them again. Sad thing is they are a pretty established business here in central PA. Anyway, I'm not sure what the valve positioning would be at ignition with it being off that little bit but my moms b/f said it could already have a slightly bent valve but I'm assuming it will run as is untill the new assembly starts going bad right? I can definately live with how the engine sounds with the egr closed. And since it was hopping to the chug of the engine I'm hoping it will cure that too or at least dampen it. I was going to take it off and look at it but the seal to the exit of the egr looks pretty rough so ill have to wait till I get an extra hundred or so for a new unit. Some people online said you can clean them but mine looks original so its probably way past that point.

Response From nickwarner

If you had a bent valve you would have a dead miss on the cylinder and no EGR valve would help, just a new head. By the fact it runs better when you are manually closing the EGR points me toward a bad valve. Don't bother trying to clean it. Once it gets to this point new is the only way to go.

Response From RoughBreezing

Thanks for all the help! I should be able to swing a hundred with my next pay and close this thread for good hopefully.

Response From Discretesignals

I suggest you take it to your local mechanic and have them check it out. If you haven't ever done a timing belt change before, that engine isn't one you want learn on. You get it wrong and you'll end up with major engine damage and one pissed off GF. You won't be able to see a sheared dowel until you remove the cam sprocket.


edit: If it hasn't ever seen a timing belt replacement and you have 140K something on it, it is way overdue.

Response From RoughBreezing

Hmm the guy said something about a misfire for the second definately nothing about a timing belt. Does the head have to come off to get to the timing belt?

Response From Hammer Time

No, it doesn't.

The only way it could be a misfire code is if you transposed the numbers from PO304 to PO403 but the other code is still a timing belt problem and that can cause a misfire.