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MK Kashiyama
1970 Nissan 521 Pickup Drum Brake Shoe MK Kashiyama

P311-156A24B    New

Qty:
$57.14
MK Kashiyama Drum Brake Shoe
  • Production: 07/1969-
Brand: MK Kashiyama
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Vehicle
1970 - Nissan 521 Pickup
MK Kashiyama
1971 Nissan 521 Pickup Drum Brake Shoe MK Kashiyama

P311-156A24B    New

Qty:
$57.14
MK Kashiyama Drum Brake Shoe
Brand: MK Kashiyama
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Vehicle
1971 - Nissan 521 Pickup
MK Kashiyama
1972 Nissan 521 Pickup Drum Brake Shoe MK Kashiyama

P311-156A24B    New

Qty:
$57.14
MK Kashiyama Drum Brake Shoe
  • Production: -07/1972
Brand: MK Kashiyama
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Vehicle
1972 - Nissan 521 Pickup
MK Kashiyama
1972 Nissan 620 Pickup Drum Brake Shoe MK Kashiyama

P311-156A24B    New

Qty:
$57.14
MK Kashiyama Drum Brake Shoe
  • Production: 03/1972-
Brand: MK Kashiyama
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1972 - Nissan 620 Pickup
MK Kashiyama
1977 Nissan 620 Drum Brake Shoe MK Kashiyama

P311-156A24B    New

Qty:
$57.14
MK Kashiyama Drum Brake Shoe
  • Production: -07/1977
Brand: MK Kashiyama
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Vehicle
1977 - Nissan 620
Genuine
2007 Nissan Versa Drum Brake Shoe Genuine

P311-114227B    New

Qty:
$69.31
Genuine Drum Brake Shoe
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
Brand: Genuine
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Vehicle
2007 - Nissan Versa
Genuine
2007 Nissan Sentra Drum Brake Shoe Genuine

P311-114227B    New

Qty:
$69.31
Genuine Drum Brake Shoe
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Production: 09/01/2006-
Brand: Genuine
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2007 - Nissan Sentra
Genuine
2012 Nissan Sentra Drum Brake Shoe Genuine

P311-114227B    New

Qty:
$69.31
Genuine Drum Brake Shoe
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Production: -08/31/2012
Brand: Genuine
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2012 - Nissan Sentra
Brembo
1999 Nissan Altima Drum Brake Shoe Brembo

P311-5EEDCF5    New

Qty:
$43.26
Brembo Drum Brake Shoe
  • Production: 06/1998-
  • Rear
Brand: Brembo
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1999 - Nissan Altima
Brembo
2000 Nissan Altima Drum Brake Shoe Brembo

P311-5EEDCF5    New

Qty:
$43.26
Brembo Drum Brake Shoe
  • Rear
Brand: Brembo
This Product is Eligible for Free Ground Shipping
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2000 - Nissan Altima
Brembo
2001 Nissan Altima Drum Brake Shoe Brembo

P311-5EEDCF5    New

Qty:
$43.26
Brembo Drum Brake Shoe
  • Production: -07/2001
  • Rear
Brand: Brembo
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2001 - Nissan Altima
Brembo
1993 Nissan Altima Drum Brake Shoe Brembo

P311-2F51796    New

Qty:
$34.92
Brembo Drum Brake Shoe
  • Production: 06/1992-
  • Rear
Brand: Brembo
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Vehicle
1993 - Nissan Altima
Genuine
1993 Nissan Altima Drum Brake Shoe Genuine

P311-14B9CD3    New

Qty:
$60.41
Genuine Drum Brake Shoe
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Production: 06/1992-
  • Rear
Brand: Genuine
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Vehicle
1993 - Nissan Altima
Brembo
1993 Nissan Altima Drum Brake Shoe Brembo

P311-2F51796    New

Qty:
$34.92
Brembo Drum Brake Shoe
  • Production: 06/1992-
Brand: Brembo
This Product is Eligible for Free Ground Shipping
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Vehicle
1993 - Nissan Altima
Brembo
1994 Nissan Altima Drum Brake Shoe Brembo

P311-2F51796    New

Qty:
$34.92
Brembo Drum Brake Shoe
Brand: Brembo
This Product is Eligible for Free Ground Shipping
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Vehicle
1994 - Nissan Altima
Genuine
1994 Nissan Altima Drum Brake Shoe Genuine

P311-14B9CD3    New

Qty:
$60.41
Genuine Drum Brake Shoe
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Rear
Brand: Genuine
Free Ground Shipping on this item
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1994 - Nissan Altima
Brembo
1997 Nissan Altima Drum Brake Shoe Brembo

P311-2F51796    New

Qty:
$34.92
Brembo Drum Brake Shoe
  • Production: -06/1997
Brand: Brembo
This Product is Eligible for Free Ground Shipping
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Vehicle
1997 - Nissan Altima
Genuine
1997 Nissan Altima Drum Brake Shoe Genuine

P311-14B9CD3    New

Qty:
$60.41
Genuine Drum Brake Shoe
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Production: -06/1997
  • Rear
Brand: Genuine
Free Ground Shipping on this item
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1997 - Nissan Altima
Brembo
1998 Nissan Altima Drum Brake Shoe Brembo

P311-2F51796    New

Qty:
$34.92
Brembo Drum Brake Shoe
  • Production: 06/1997-05/1998
Brand: Brembo
This Product is Eligible for Free Ground Shipping
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1998 - Nissan Altima
Genuine
1998 Nissan Altima Drum Brake Shoe Genuine

P311-14B9CD3    New

Qty:
$60.41
Genuine Drum Brake Shoe
  • This Original Equipment Manufacturer part is the same part that was made & installed by the car manufacturer at the factory where the car was produced.
  • Production: 06/1997-05/1998
  • Rear
Brand: Genuine
Free Ground Shipping on this item
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1998 - Nissan Altima

Latest Nissan Repair and Brake Shoe Installation Advice

CarJunky AutoAdvice

Emergency Brake 85 P/U

Showing 2 out of 3 Posts | Show 1 Hidden Posts
Question From Hogue72022 on Emergency Brake 85 P/U

Any help out there on how to tighten a emergency brake for a 85 4WD Nissan P/U? The inside handle will pull to tight, but break doesn't hold and vehicle will roll on a slight incline.

Response From DanD Top Rated Answer

First off you should have the brakes inspected, serviced and adjusted at the wheels. After this has been performed then if need be adjust the emergency cables.
The emergency brakes work mechanically through the rear brake shoes via the cables. If the rear brake shoes are out of adjustment or in need of servicing and you just tighten the cables the rear shoes will wear unevenly and possibly fail.
Now if none of this makes any sense to you I would suggest taking the truck in and have someone perform this servicing of the brakes for you.
Brakes are brakes and shouldn’t be fooled with trial and error.
Dan.

Response From Guest

Thank you!

Parking brake light comes on and stays on for a while

Showing 2 out of 8 Posts | Show 6 Hidden Posts
Question From Larry T on Parking brake light comes on and stays on for a while

I have a 2004 Nissan Xterra with 233000 miles on it. The parking brake warning light has been coming on while I am driving and usually goes off after several miles. It seems to happen when it is cool outside, or raining. Does anyone have an idea what causes this, and what to do about it? I hardly ever use the parking brake.

Response From Hammer Time

Check the brake fluid level.

Response From Larry T Top Rated Answer

Strange as it might seem, I have never had to replace the rear brake shoes. Could that have any effect?

Response From Hammer Time

No,did you check the brake fluid?

Response From Larry T

Not yet, but I plan to do that after dinner. I have to cook around here too and the Baked potatos are in the oven!

Response From Tom Greenleaf

OK - have a good dinner but don't drive this car until you've checked the brake fluid level! If VERY low there probably is a problem to be found and fixed at once,

T

Response From Larry T

I checked the brake fluid level. It was low. I put some in and that fixed the problem with the light coming on, but I have not yet identified the cause of the low level. I plan to watch it carefully all the way to the dealership where I will trade the vehicle on another one.

233,000 miles is plenty to ask of any vehicle in my book. Besides, Mrs. T has her eye on a GMC Terrain. Any argument I make against that is a sure loser! I'll just take over her Pathfinder and run it to death. She only drives about 6,000 or 7,000 miles a year now, so she should be happy for a while.

I expect I'll be back asking for advice in the future on the Pathfinder. I drive about 40,000 a year and like to be safe.

I said this once before, but again Boy! (Imean wow) this is a great website! Thanks again for indulging me.

Response From Hammer Time

You're welcome

locked brakes

Showing 2 out of 8 Posts | Show 6 Hidden Posts
Question From PsstComeHere on locked brakes

I have a 99 Nissan Altima I replaced the driver side brake caliper 5 days ago. Today when driving to work it appears the front brakes have locked up. The brake petal is rock hard there is no travel whatsoever. I have no idea what is causing this. Yes it is both front brakes. I replaced the passenger side a month or 2 ago with no problem. Any help would be appreciated.

Scott

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Have had a master cylinder do that - was defective and did it right away though. Problem was pressure was not allowed to return. The flex hoses can do this unseen by looking but I've never heard of both at once!!

Try just cracking open a bleeder to fronts doing nothing else - just a bit and don't let air back in. If both front wheels free up then the lock is upstream from the caliper(s) themselves or if just that one frees up perhaps both hoses are doing this. If you can get them stuck again try the same trick at the master cylinder. Usually the line closest to the firewall is for the front brakes. If that frees up the brakes then I blame the master cylinder.

See what happens with that and then if no luck we have to consider something anti-lock (if equipped) or a proportioning valve.

Is there a flex hose (one) used somewhere other than the front wheels at each caliper for just the front brakes?

Response From Guest

I was able to free them up by doing just that. I opened the bleeder for each of the front calipers pumped the brake pedal a couple of times then closed them and could get halfway home(appox 4 miles) before they locked up again. Repeated bleeding them again and got it home but it just progresses to the point of locking up again. The master cylinder was replaced 4 mnts ago the brake booster was replaced 1 mnt ago. So you think it is the master cylinder?

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Don't think the master cyl or booster - YET. I'll explain below what happened with just one in a lifetime on me.

You need to get these sticky/locked you called it and see what releases them from letting pressure out - one at a time or this will just be a parts toss/ hit or miss repair. Need to know if both release or not with just one being bled out some. If you want to toss parts go ahead and toss the flex hoses - they're old enough anyway if never done. Get some PB on the flare nut to hose area now as they can be a nightmare if any rust with line to nut.

This is what's happening to you: Pressure gets in the front system either from hitting the brake or from the expansion of heat in using the brakes or even engine heat on lines. Your brake pedal has a freeplay area up top that allows fluid to return to master cylinder and allow you to even push back a piston in a caliper and fluid would return to the master. If as a test you just had someone touch the brake pedal the pistons would not retract that way. Brake fluid is locked somewhere yet unknown to apply front brakes and the warmer they get the harder they lock as the fluid expands.

The flex hoses used can tear inside and become a one-way valve. It would be a first for two to do this at once but possible. That problem is not that uncommon one at a time.

With the recent master and booster replacement I'd like to know how they felt right away and is there a wild temperature difference now and then? That may factor in later as a possible clue.

Also - what was the complaint(s) that led you to replace those?

______________________________

Same issue was a defective part on me: 92 Cadillac CDV needed a new master cylinder with the usual complaint of a fading pedal. Easy job on a mint car overall. I test drove it before giving back to customer/friend who lived about 10 miles from my shop. Got a call as she went right home that the brakes were smoking (front) and she had to floor it to get up her driveway against the resistance! Whoa! I went right over after telling her not to drive the car. Sucker behaved fine right in front of me but you could smell that they had been hot. WTF! Drove it myself back to my shop using just the parking brake as to not heat up the hydraulic parts of brakes at all and it did it to me too. That new master cylinder was a day short of being recalled as the centering hole in the back of it was not drilled deep enough so that the brakes couldn't return fluid and just engine heat was enough to apply the brakes and as they got warmer the thing about locked the wheels which when cooled spun free again. That took a while to figure out and when I test drove again when I felt it doing this again I did loosen the master to booster nuts and it freed right up.

Note: That happened right away with just that part replaced so I wasn't looking for everything in the car to be wrong. That problem could not have lasted without showing up for as long as your problem did before you had trouble which is why I am not ready to blame the other new parts right now.

Sorry for the long book on this but you really need to nail down what this is. If you have a defective part like I did then you must try another brand part or the same defect could be there and really mess up the diagnosis.

________________________

You'll pin it down. Drive carefully if you need to test it out and take a look at the front brakes as they may have been damaged if the heat was excessive and anything else that may have cooked if it got super hot.

Let me/us know what you find,

T

Response From Guest Top Rated Answer

From the begining: The brakes started to go about 8 months ago. I bleed them which worked for about 2 weeks. Replace brake shoes and pads all around. That fixed it for about a month. Then they started to go again at which time I replaced the master cylinder with a remanufactered one. A month or two later the started to go again. I replaced the passenger side caliper due to a leak. Had to bleed the brakes very 2 weeks to keep the brakes good. For 2 months then replaced the power booster with one from a junkyard due to the lack of avaliblity of a remanufactured one in our area. 1 month later they started acting up again, The other caliper started to leak. Replaced the driver side caliper this past Saturday and all was fine brakes were great. Today they began to lock up and I had to keep bleeding them just to get it home.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

TOTAL CONFUSION! What was wrong with the booster? When they lock up do you or did you bleed them both (fronts) before you checked again?

Are you using brake fluid? This bit with leaking calipers and all this could be engine oil in the brake fluid! Gotta know more friend. Please don't just say the brakes were going as that means nothing to me. Noise, shake, pull, scrape, loss of pedal feel etc.,

T

Response From Guest

Sorry, when I said brakes were going I meant that the pedal would go to the floor before we got any real stopping power. The pads, master cylinder, booster, were replaced in an effort to solve this problem. The calipers were replaced as they developed leaks, seals wore out. Not at the same time. The fliud was store bought fresh. As far as freeing them up, my main concern was getting the car home first. so I just opened both bleeders, pumped brakes a couple times. Closed the bleeders. Then they would stay free for a bit, everytime I used the brakes they would slowly lock up again. I repeated this one more time before I got it home. I have not had the oppertunity to do much else. Will do more detailed work this weekend.
Your help is emmensely appreciated.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Ok:Let me/us know what you find,

T

Front Disc Brakes and Rear Drum Brakes

Showing 2 out of 11 Posts | Show 9 Hidden Posts
Question From computerinfoseeker23 on Front Disc Brakes and Rear Drum Brakes

On my 2003 Toyota Echo, I have rotors on the front, and drums on the back for braking. I learned how to change the front disc pads on my car a long time ago, and I can do that quite easily and safely myself. Here is my question. I have 113,000 miles on the Toyota Echo. I have read that your back brakes only contribute to 25% of the car's stopping power. The other 75% is done by the front brakes due to the front end being heavier with things like the engine and transmission/transaxle located there.

My question is with the mileage I have on the echo, should I replace the drum shoes on the rear? I have never done drum shoes before. Is this something I could possibly learn to do myself, or should I take the car to a professional? I have always heard that the brake shoes with drums are a lot harder to do than the brake pads with rotors. Any comments or suggestions sincerely appreciated. Thanks!

Response From Tom Greenleaf

True - in a hard stop the fronts are doing the lion's share of the work. Drum style can last a loooong time but if they are ready to do I strongly suggest you get all the right info and make all the right adjustments that you don't need to do for front disc brakes.

They are very important as they can and will change the feel for the brakes in general. Trouble is new shoes can no longer be arced for the diameter of a worn or cut drum so I strongly suggest getting all new and the hardware that if a part breaks ruins the job.

If you take this on please know or have help available. When in any doubt do one side at a time so you can reference the other side while intact but remember they are asymmetrically opposite like your hands are left and right kind of thing.

All doable with some tools and know how and if in doubt, send it out,

T

Response From computerinfoseeker23

Ok Tom, thanks a lot. Another question? How would I know if the brake shoes are worn down enough to warrant doing this? You said the rear can last a long time. If I remove a back tire, will I be able to tell by looking and/or feeling or must you also pull the drum off to inspect? There is a mobile repair shop guy where I live. It is pretty neat because this guy comes to you rather than you driving to him. He replaced a serpentine belt for me last year. I could have him do the job and ask him to let me watch as he does one so I can see things being done firsthand. That was how I learned how to do my front disc brakes. What do you think?

The car has 113,000 miles on it and the rear brakes have never been done.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

I don't have exact specs on how thick but know that it will be the thinnest spot that counts. Done so many I never measure but just see by eye that they are ready.

Drum must be removed to inspect fully. This may have a hold-down screw that may give you a good fight to remove drum. An impact driver for screws may be needed - can't say but don't strip those things out trying with inferior tools.

There may be a ridge where shoes have worn the drum leaving a ridge making them hard to remove even when free from the hub itself. Turn drum by hand while trying to remove it can help or back off adjuster to make clearance.

Hard to describe but you can knock off that ridge if there or take a good drum to a shop and get just that removed.

In general drum brakes are pretty basic. Brake dust inside can mess them up but do NOT blow that out with air! Clean what you can with disposable towels or rags (clean) and never breath the dust if you have to walk away do so.

Again, if unsure get help. They were pretty much the only style brake front and rear for ages so nothing new there. Hey - everything seems easy if you do enough of it and first times can take forever but don't rush any job as that's a sure waste if not dangerous. That's why earlier I suggested you have some experienced help if you get the least bit confused or worried about your work,

Tom

Response From nickwarner

ask and you shall receive
Print
When servicing drum brakes, only dissemble and assemble one side at a time, leaving the remaining side intact for reference.
Inspection

  1. Clean the drum.
  2. Inspect the drum for scoring, cracks, grooves and out-of-roundness. Replace the drum or have it "turned" at a machine or brake specialist shop, as required. Light scoring may be removed by dressing the drum with fine emery cloth.
  3. Measure the inside diameter of the drum. A tool called an "H-gauge caliper" is used. See the Brake Specifications chart for your vehicle.



/autozone/images/repair_guide/enlarge_icon.gif/autozone/images/repair_guide/enlarge_tooltip.gif
Fig. Using an H-gauge caliper, measure the inside diameter of the brake drum

/autozone/images/repair_guide/enlarge_icon.gif/autozone/images/repair_guide/enlarge_tooltip.gif
Fig. The drum specification is usually stamped inside the drum
Removal & Installation

  1. Loosen the rear wheel lug nuts slightly. Release the parking brake.
  2. Block the front wheels, raise the rear of the car, and safely support it with jackstands.



/autozone/images/repair_guide/enlarge_icon.gif/autozone/images/repair_guide/enlarge_tooltip.gif
Fig. The brake drum is around the outside of the brake shoes
  1. Remove the lug nuts and the wheel.
  2. One way to remove the drum is to tap the drum lightly with a mallet to free the drum if resistance is felt. Sometimes brake drums are stubborn. If the drum is difficult to remove, perform the following:
    1. Insert the end of a bent wire (a coat hanger will do nicely) through the hole in the brake drum and hold the automatic adjusting lever away from the adjuster.
    2. Reduce the brake shoe adjustment by turning the adjuster bolt with a brake adjuster tool. The drum should now be loose enough to remove without much effort.

      /autozone/images/repair_guide/enlarge_icon.gif/autozone/images/repair_guide/enlarge_tooltip.gif
      Fig. Access the shoe adjustment through this hole in the backing plate

      /autozone/images/repair_guide/enlarge_icon.gif/autozone/images/repair_guide/enlarge_tooltip.gif
      Fig. Insert a bent wire or brake tool through the hole in the drum and hold the adjuster lever away from the lever

  3. Another way to remove the brake drum is to insert a bolt in each of the two holes in the drum.
    1. Tighten the bolts down, a popping sound should be heard, this is the drum separating from the backing plate.
    2. Pull the drum from the backing plate.

      /autozone/images/repair_guide/enlarge_icon.gif/autozone/images/repair_guide/enlarge_tooltip.gif
      Fig. Insert two bolts and tighten them down till a popping noise is heard

      /autozone/images/repair_guide/enlarge_icon.gif/autozone/images/repair_guide/enlarge_tooltip.gif
      Fig. Lift the drum off using two hands, they can be heavy



To install:
  1. Clean the drum and inspect it as detailed in this Section.
  2. Hold the brake drum so that the hole on the drum is aligned with the large hole on the axle carrier and install the drum.
  3. If the adjuster was loosened to remove the drum, turn the adjuster bolt to adjust the length to the shortest possible amount.
  4. Install the rear wheels, tighten the lug nuts and lower the vehicle.
  5. Retighten the lug nuts and pump the brake pedal before moving the vehicle.

  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions in the beginning of this section.
  2. Remove the wheels.
  3. Remove the brake drum from the axle hub.


To install:
  1. Install the brake drum.
  2. Install the rear wheels, tighten the wheel lug nuts.

  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the Precautions section.
  2. Remove the wheels.
  3. Remove the brake drum from the axle hub.


To install:
  1. Install the brake drum.
  2. Install the rear wheels, tighten the wheel lug nuts.

    /autozone/images/repair_guide/enlarge_icon.gif/autozone/images/repair_guide/enlarge_tooltip.gif
    Fig. Rear drum brakes-Corolla

    /autozone/images/repair_guide/enlarge_icon.gif/autozone/images/repair_guide/enlarge_tooltip.gif
    Fig. Rear drum brakes-Celica

    /autozone/images/repair_guide/enlarge_icon.gif/autozone/images/repair_guide/enlarge_tooltip.gif
    Fig. Rear drum brakes-Echo

/autozone/images/common/icn_arrow.gifBack to Top

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Nick - If that doesn't do it nothing will! Crazy how easy this seems when you do them all the time

Tom

Response From nickwarner

Its easy for us. Had to search to find the right pics to describe it to someone else. If he was in my area I'd say just bring it by and I'll show you(provided you bring me a case of beer) but alas, this must suffice. This was the procedure I copied from autozone.com for free, so it may help to set up a username there to view tech guides.

Response From computerinfoseeker23 Top Rated Answer

Hey, thanks Tom and Nick. Much helpful, useful information. I really appreciate this forum. Thanks for the autozone tip also Nick. I will go there tomorrow and set up a user name. I have another question for you guys. My mother's Nissan Altima has 4 disc brakes. Why don't all manufacturers do this? Why the rotors on the front and drums on the rear in some cars? Is there a reason for this?

Response From Hammer Time

Why the rotors on the front and drums on the rear in some cars? Is there a reason for this?

Cost................... Only done where it's needed and paid for.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Rotors and Drums?: My take is parking brakes are better or easier to do with drums in the rear. Rear brakes do in fact not do most of the work in hard stops but dammit they worked just fine for ages and lasted! They do have the propensity to lock up and skid more than disc brakes but I'm an old phart that would and have said that if you can't drive than don't!

Whatever vehicle you still need items to operate as intended and things will need attention from time to time. Pay attention as you are as driving a car on public roads is not a RIGHT but rather a privilege. Not much choice where I live if I want even groceries - true,

Tom

Happy to be retired and will delete auto sign off - "still waiting for Godot" thing that nobody understands? BTW that was the #1 Broadway show in the 1970's and we all forgot!

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Just a comment from first post on this thread:

Can I do this myself? Of course you can as all of regular techs here did with cars stuff. I own a home thank God and did almost all work here alone but learned that some professionals even at the increased cost for odd repair are totally worth it!

I don't need to be a pro at some or many one time things so pay the pro for exact right work. I/we here do the same thing frequently and expect these guys to advise such.

Think. I don't want to burn my home down for being stupid to save a buck nor advise on car things that could cause an accident or worse, people hurt or killed so walking on egg shells with suggestions always with this. Older training but collegiate level in physics of this crap the principles still apply.

Said over and over that when in doubt get some help and expensive is part of life but don't let a few bucks get in the way of things being done properly. It is far from cheap to have stuff and knowledge to do this trade!

Said enough I think for this............

Tom Greenleaf

brakes

Showing 2 out of 2 Posts
Question From lmw115 on brakes

I purchased a 2003 Nissan Altima in 2003, with 19,000 miles on it. It was previously a rental car.
At inspection time in 2005, at approx. 42,000 miles, I was told I needed new brakes, shoes, pads, drums, rotors calipers, and anything else having to do with new brakes. Figuring that the first 20,000 miles were rough on the brakes, I invested about $700 or so on the whole brake system plus labor.
Last year, at inspection time, I took my car to a different garage who told me I needed new brakes. I was totally unexpecting that, but they said that the left rear was worn down (I cannot remember the numbers now) so far that my car would not pass inspection without replacement.
I took my car back to the garage who guaranteed the brakes they put on the previous year and they were a little red in the face, stating that the brakes didn't wear evenly due to their error so the brakes and the labor for that fix were free.
I just had my car inspected again in November and I told the mechanic the brakes had started squealing upon stopping a couple weeks before and was told that I needed new rotors??? . I cannot remember exactly what he said I needed because I was in shock and told him I was not interested in spending $700 every two years on brakes. He said they would sand them down but it was a temporary fix.
I told him this is the first car I ever had where I needed to replace the braking system every couple years. In fact I had several different cars for numerous years and never needed to replace more than the brakes on occassion. The mechanic told me that it is usual to have this work done approximately every 25,000 miles, but I now only have 62,000 miles on my car and I am not extremely hard on the brakes when I drive. Is this mechanic taking me for a ride?

Response From Guest Top Rated Answer

The brakes master cylinder should have been under factory warranty. A do-it-yourselfer is going to pay an average of $20-40 per wheel for pads or shoes.
Rotors should last 40000 miles min. I've had my "factory" calipers for over 100,000 miles.

I've bought 3 cars from rental car places, not the big guys, like thrifty or avis, but the Rent-a-wreck places. There usually pretty good at maintaining their vehicles. Those 19,000 miles probably weren't "hard" miles. But who knows ?

$700 bucks plus labor is a chunk. I wouldn't of paid it.