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1999 Oldsmobile Silhouette CV Axle Assembly First Equipment Quality

P311-5D681EE    W0133-1682900  New

Qty:
$83.19
First Equipment Quality CV Axle Assembly
  • New - Lifetime Warranty
  • Right
Brand: First Equipment Quality
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1999 - Oldsmobile Silhouette
First Equipment Quality
1999 Oldsmobile Silhouette CV Axle Assembly First Equipment Quality

P311-25A43A3    W0133-1683928  New

Qty:
$84.30
First Equipment Quality CV Axle Assembly
  • New - Lifetime Warranty
  • Left
Brand: First Equipment Quality
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1999 - Oldsmobile Silhouette
First Equipment Quality
1999 Oldsmobile Cutlass CV Axle Assembly First Equipment Quality

P311-1F3F991    W0133-1692019  New

Qty:
$85.92
First Equipment Quality CV Axle Assembly
  • New - Lifetime Warranty
Brand: First Equipment Quality
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
1999 - Oldsmobile Cutlass
First Equipment Quality
2003 Oldsmobile Alero CV Axle Assembly First Equipment Quality

P311-1F3F991    W0133-1692019  New

Qty:
$85.92
First Equipment Quality CV Axle Assembly
  • New - Lifetime Warranty
  • (4T40-E = RPO MN4)
Brand: First Equipment Quality
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Transmission Manuf. Code
2003 - Oldsmobile Alero 4T40-E
First Equipment Quality
1997 Oldsmobile LSS CV Axle Assembly First Equipment Quality

P311-30D187F    W0133-1697016  New

Qty:
$74.30
First Equipment Quality CV Axle Assembly
  • New - Lifetime Warranty
Brand: First Equipment Quality
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Aspiration
1997 - Oldsmobile LSS Supercharged
First Equipment Quality
2004 Oldsmobile Bravada CV Axle Assembly First Equipment Quality

P311-5E8C844    W0133-1693763  New

Qty:
$85.05
First Equipment Quality CV Axle Assembly
  • New - Lifetime Warranty
  • Front
Brand: First Equipment Quality
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Drive Type
2004 - Oldsmobile Bravada AWD
First Equipment Quality
2004 Oldsmobile Silhouette CV Axle Assembly First Equipment Quality

P311-28DF174    W0133-1852765  New

Qty:
$90.98
First Equipment Quality CV Axle Assembly
  • New - Lifetime Warranty
Brand: First Equipment Quality
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle Drive Type
2004 - Oldsmobile Silhouette AWD

Latest Oldsmobile Repair and Axle Installation Advice

CarJunky AutoAdvice

1999 Oldsmobile Silhoette V6 rear end help

Showing 4 out of 4 Posts
Question From rhemmysmommy on 1999 Oldsmobile Silhoette V6 rear end help

I have a 1999 Oldsmobile Silhouette V6 156k miles. We heard a loud pop and the rear end started swaying back and forth. We made it home going 25mph and looked underneath the back and the metal bar that runs from axle to axle is snapped in half. The bar is the width of the axle. What is this called and how difficult is it to repair? Thank you.

Response From Discretesignals

Can you take a picture and post it?


There are two bars. One is a track bar (8) that runs from driver's side trailing arm to the frame. The bar that runs from wheel knuckle to wheel knuckle is actually the axle beam. If you broke the axle beam, you have some serious problems. Is there a lot of rust going on under there?


Response From rhemmysmommy

It is #8 on the diagram. What is that called? I have a pic but it wont let me upload it. THANKS!

Response From Discretesignals Top Rated Answer

Its called a track bar. You probably can only get it from the dealer or a salvage yard.

1997 Oldsmobile Aurora- "play" in steering/ power steering leak

Showing 2 out of 12 Posts | Show 10 Hidden Posts
Question From JAK25 on 1997 Oldsmobile Aurora- "play" in steering/ power steering leak

1997 Olds Aurora 4.0 Northstar V-8
1. I developed a pinhole leak in the high pressure power steering line. It's right in the bend where it connects to the rack and pinion on the passenger side. It looks like the line runs lengthwise along the R&P assembly towards the driver side. The problem is that it runs through a sleeve and I can see 3 similar looking tubes on the other end (driver side) that could possibly be it. I can't find an online schematic, and it is in such a difficult spot (of course) that I don't have the tools, visibility, or know-how to remove it. Any suggestions on the best way to tackle this? Or do I have to replace the entire R&P assembly?

2. Before developing the leak, I had alot of play in the steering. I had the front end aligned but that did not solve it. Driving in a straight line, you can turn the wheel 20-30 degrees before the vehicle will respond. Any ideas what this might be?
Thanks in advance!

Response From Hammer Time

These are things that can only be found by inspection. If you have a rubber hose leaking, then it's likely the pressure hose. all you can do is remove the end you know about and see where it takes you. as far as the play, have someone move the wheel just the amount of play while you watch for the part that is moving without getting a reaction from it's counterpart.

Response From JAK25

Thanks Hammer. That's what I was afraid of. The line that has the leak is aluminum tubing and it's one piece, but I can't tell how it runs or to remove it. I could only feel where the hole was, I could not see it. For the record, JB Weld won't work...lol.

I also tried watching for the play as you suggested but couldn't see anything. Of course I really don't know what to look for specifically. The shade-tree mechanic who helped me watch suggested that it might be a bearing inside the steering column??

It's dead in the water as is and I was hoping to avoid a tow bill.

Response From Hammer Time

If you actually have a metal line leaking, then something dented or chaffed through it because that doesn't happen by itself. It's usually the rubber part that leaks. You just need to take a closer look.

Response From GlennAB1


If you actually have a metal line leaking, then something dented or chaffed through it because that doesn't happen by itself. It's usually the rubber part that leaks. You just need to take a closer look.


Sure it does Hammer. It's aluminum tubing, it can corrode from the inside out. I see it once in a while in hydraulic systems I inspect.




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Response From Hammer Time

It's not aluminum tubing, it's steel tubing and it rarely corrodes (rusts). The fuel and brake lines will always go first.

Response From GlennAB1


It's not aluminum tubing, it's steel tubing and it rarely corrodes (rusts). The fuel and brake lines will always go first.


The guy with the leak (JAK25) said it's aluminum tubing.



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Response From Hammer Time

If it's aluminum, then it's not part of the rack. They don't use aluminum on racks and very rarely on pressure lines.

Response From GlennAB1


If it's aluminum, then it's not part of the rack. They don't use aluminum on racks and very rarely on pressure lines.


I don't know about Olds Auroras...... how much pressure are we talking about? Aircraft use aluminum tubing in 3000 psi systems.



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Response From JAK25 Top Rated Answer

Sorry for the confusion, I just assumed it was aluminum but now that I think of it it is more likely steel tubing. I can only see about 6 inches of what is probably 3 feet of line. I was backing out of a parking place and heard a pretty loud pop and then instantly lost steering. I just assumed it was a weak spot in the tubing (right in the bend) that finally gave up. There is nothing in that area to rub a hole in it, and it's location is such that it is unlikely something hit it from the road. (It runs on top of the R&P assembly, above the frame and is also protected by the axle assembly, etc.

Thanks for the advice. I feel better about having to get the entire R&P assembly now, as just fixing the leak would not have solved the source of the problem or the "play". I've really enjoyed the car and the rest of it is in great shape.

Response From Hammer Time

Buying a rack may not fix your leak though and don't be so convinced it's your play either. You need to confirm which line is leaking and exactly where the play is before buying anything. Metal lines don't "pop". Rubber ones do. The oil can travel a lot before hitting the ground.

Response From GlennAB1


I also tried watching for the play as you suggested but couldn't see anything. Of course I really don't know what to look for specifically. The shade-tree mechanic who helped me watch suggested that it might be a bearing inside the steering column??
If you didn't see anythig, It's probably worn R & P





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