802.589.0911 Live Chat With Us

Finish Selecting Your Vehicle to Shop For Your Axle

Choose a Year for your Jaguar 's Axle

  • 2005
  • 2004
  • 2002

Shop By Brand

The Following brands are available based on your search.

  • Aftermarket
    Aftermarket
  • First Equipment Quality
    First Equipment Quality

Best Selling Genuine Jaguar Axles

  • We Stock the following top leading brands, including First Equipment Quality, Aftermarket
  • Constantly Updated Inventory of Jaguar Replacement Axle Parts

We stock Axle parts for most Jaguar models, including XType.

First Equipment Quality
2008 Jaguar X-Type CV Axle Assembly First Equipment Quality

P311-3ABA587    W0133-1788140  New

Qty:
$110.83
First Equipment Quality CV Axle Assembly
  • New - Lifetime Warranty
  • Axle is complete with shaft since often times the axle and shaft adhere to each end and are difficult to separate.
  • Front - Right
Brand: First Equipment Quality
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2008 - Jaguar X-Type
First Equipment Quality
2008 Jaguar X-Type CV Axle Assembly First Equipment Quality

P311-43BAF66    W0133-1788138  New

Qty:
$90.11
First Equipment Quality CV Axle Assembly
  • New - Lifetime Warranty
  • Axle is complete with shaft since often times the axle and shaft adhere to each end and are difficult to separate.
  • Front - Left
Brand: First Equipment Quality
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2008 - Jaguar X-Type
First Equipment Quality
2002 Jaguar X-Type CV Axle Assembly First Equipment Quality

P311-3E45968    W0133-1920826  New

Qty:
$137.20
First Equipment Quality CV Axle Assembly
  • New - Lifetime Warranty
  • Rear Right
Brand: First Equipment Quality
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2002 - Jaguar X-Type
Aftermarket
2008 Jaguar X-Type CV Axle Assembly Aftermarket - _ ODM Brand

P311-4CCA765    W0133-1920826  New

Qty:
$453.94
Aftermarket CV Axle Assembly
  • _ ODM Brand
  • Rear Right
Brand: Aftermarket
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2008 - Jaguar X-Type
First Equipment Quality
2008 Jaguar X-Type CV Axle Assembly First Equipment Quality

P311-3E45968    W0133-1920826  New

Qty:
$137.20
First Equipment Quality CV Axle Assembly
  • New - Lifetime Warranty
Brand: First Equipment Quality
Additional Fitment Information:
Vehicle
2008 - Jaguar X-Type

Latest Jaguar Repair and Axle Installation Advice

CarJunky AutoAdvice

cv axle and transmission

Showing 2 out of 2 Posts
Question From jaguarx-type1 on cv axle and transmission

I took my jaguar x-type to the shop because it was making a loud popping noise when making left hand turns. They replaced the left cv axle and the noise never went away. On my reciept it said that my car was a 2004 jaguar x-type and its really a 2005 jaguar x-type. The only reason I ask is because not only did the sound not go away but my car was hesitating when acclerating a doing a few other things. When I took the car back in they said they test drove it and the car won't move now and my transmission had failed and needs rebuilt. Is it possible they did something to screw up the transmission when replacing the original part? Is a 2004 part differant from a 2005? Could that of screwed it up if they are differat? As far a cv axle? By the way I paid these guys about 500 bucks the first time they replaced it and didn't fix it.

Response From Discretesignals Top Rated Answer

Please don't create duplicate threads on the same subject. Just creates confusion in the forum and unresolved threads.

http://autoforums.carjunky.com/Automotive_Repair_C1/General_Discussions_F5/cv_axle_and_transmission_P137706/gforum.cgi?post=137532;t=search_engine#137532

brakes sqeaking bad

Showing 2 out of 12 Posts | Show 10 Hidden Posts
Question From aarongates25 on brakes sqeaking bad

I have a 99 Ford Contour 4 cylinder and I had my back brakes replaced. Everytime I stopped it sqeaks very loud and it is very irritating. I have tried disc quiet and a bunch of other sprays nothing works. Does anybody know what I can use to get my brakes to be quiet? Thanks

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Did you replace the brakes? I'm guessing that the squeaking is from the new brakes and if so it could be that the pads just have an attitude or perhaps a slight crack that will sing out but brakes will work well. That's more of a problem with worn brakes or if rotors were not replaced. Machining rotors on most cars now is a waste of time as they are so thin to begin with they really can't take being any thinner. Also if machined they have to be cleaned or metal filings get imbedded - usually not a problem but can be.

They do make brake pads that are made to be silent using porcelain. They must meet the OEM specs or they shouldn't be used. My state outlaws selling brake parts not approved by the vehicle's maker. The cheaper stuff used to be better at some things but not allowed or sold here anymore,

T

Response From aarongates25

The brakes and the rotors on the front is fine. The brake shoes on the back are the ones that are making the noise. Is there something that I can put on them to quiet them down. Thanks for responding Tom

Response From Tom Greenleaf Top Rated Answer

The best chance of noise control without just replacing what's there now is putting stick on or spray on products to the back of the pads which requires taking them apart. I've had some luck taking them off and lightly sanding the friction surface with like 600 grit sand paper including rotors and cleaning them with brakeclean. Most that acted up once will do so again.

The whole brake hs to be in good condition. The caliper and the slides must be cleaned and lubed with rubber friendly brake lube. This is skipped over no doubt by many and causes problems. There are also anti-rattle clips and parts that are frequently reused which can be fine but new ones with the job makes sense and I don't think most shops do that.

You didn't say if you did this job yourself or not yet. If you did - how much did you do or do you know what a shop did?

I see the ads for brakes - any car $79.00 / axle!! How can anyone/place say that when there is such a wide variety of prices car by car for just pads. They certainly must have a disclaimer in fine print. One brake job I did the pads cost me $75 at dealer wholesale and nothing less expensive was available anywhere. It was a Jaguar.

Another area of common neglect is bleeding out old brake fluid for new as it does get old and dirty, also most folks just push back piston(s) to make room for new pads which just puts dirty fluid back thru any anti-lock hydraulic parts and back to the master cylinder and that should be avoided.

The only best way to know what's going on and to fix this is to take them apart and look at the pads which may show flaws, hot spots etc., and go from there,

T

Response From aarongates25

The back brake shoes are the problem!Not the pads on the front.My wife had them changed about 4 to 5 months ago and since then they have been very irritating.Is there anything I can put on them to quiet them down?

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Sorry, I figured you had disc brakes in the rear. Doesn't matter that much you still have to look at them. I don't know how Contour does the parking brake which may have something wrong in the replacement of the shoes. Same deal -- they must be looked at and if you want you can clean the friction surfaces with brakecleen but keep that away from rubber parts. I don't think that's it though as they are too new for a lot of dust to have built up and that can make noise but I would describe it as more of a groan than a squeek but possible.

Look for broken hardware while you take a look,

T

Response From aarongates25

Can I take the cover off the drum part so I can check to see if any damage or cracks on the brake shoes?

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Yes, you can remove the drum for inspection. There are a few ways the drum is held in place and I don't know off the top of my head which way it's done on that car without looking myself.

If you take the wheel off and look at the drum itself it may have phillips bolts, torx, allen or just a threaded hole(s) for removal. Few vehicles just have a pull off by hand drum or rotor anymore. Index the drum to a wheel stud to put it back on the same spot.

You can get in some trouble just doing that and if you are not ready with the tools or the concept I wouldn't do it at all. Why don't you just ask the place that replaced them to look at THEIR work? If I had done the work for you I would take a look while you wait and not charge you with this complaint. If you have a problem with the shop that did the work then that's a problem by itself. These may have to be redone and a good shop will make good on that.

There are cases where parts quality is the problem. The shop should know that and they will get replacement parts for free if there are defects and they can argue with their source about whos responsibility it is. If you go in and mess with them the shop is not going to want to take much responsibility for something you've messed with.

I say take it back to the place that did the work. They should be concerned about it and may change the brand(s) of parts they use if they get enough complaints. Everybody wins,

T

Response From aarongates25

ok I will do that!thanks for the info Tom!

Response From aarongates25

I guess I am going to have to have someone else take them off and lubicant them not taking it back to the people who I took it to. I don't think the mechanics turn the drums at all. I appreciate the advice Tom but I think I am going to have to deal with them until then.

Response From CrashedAgain

See this: http://www.focushacks.com/index.php?modid=48
It worked for me.
The link is for a Focus by my guess is Contour rear brakes are pretty similar

Response From aarongates25

thanks for the idea!I will certainly give it a try!!!

How to Stop Rust From Locking Brakes

Showing 2 out of 15 Posts | Show 13 Hidden Posts
Question From tremaine on How to Stop Rust From Locking Brakes

I have this car whihch I park for many weeks at a time. Unfortunately, I have to park it outside, and in the winter where it is parked, it snows heavily. When I go to try to drive it in the Spring, the rear drum type brakes can be locked up badly. This means the tire will not rotate, but will actually drag along the road until it pops and shreds, or until the brakes become unlocked.

A few years ago, when I had never ever heard of this problem before, I practically had a car accident, because my brakes were severly damaged by rust and I had no idea that they were. Just about $1,000 of work was needed then due to this problem.

I had a very good discussion with someone at an auto parts store today. He informed me that the reason I never heard of this problem during my first 20 years of driving is that car makers, up until roughly 2001, made the brake assemblies air tight (encased) After about 2001, they left them ventilated, to reduce the heat buildup. This was a blunder, because the rust problem is worse than the heat buildup problem in terms of the damage and danger it creates.

The problem is, if any moisture gets in, and then if the car is not driven for some number of weeks, the moisture will cause rust to develop, and then the rust will eventually glue the pads to the rotors. And then unless you get rid of the rust inside the brakes immediately, the rust can also get into the brake lines, and even cause your brake fluid to leak out. Unless you are aware of what is going on, your pads, rotors, and even calipers will be destroyed in a matter of a few dozen miles of driving.

It is insane to remain vulnerable to this happening again and again. So I thought of a possible solution, but I'm not sure if it will work. I am proposing to simply cover all four tires with spare tire covers when parking the car for weeks at a time.

At first I was thinking the problem is solved, but then I started to worry again. While you can completely cover the outside, there would still be exposure to the outside air on the inside of the tire/wheel, because obviously the wheel is attached to the axle, so you could not close the spare tire cover completely. (I think these covers close with bungee cords or draw strings.)There is so much snow and wind where I have to park this car, the snow actually accumulates underneath the car a little, so I am thinking a little moisture would still get in even with the covers on.

Does anyone agree or disagree that putting spare tire covers around all 4 tires of the parked car would prevent moisture from getting into the brake assembly?

But maybe if I wedged towels/cloths into the gap where the spare tire covers meet the wheel cylinder (or the axle?) I could close the gaps and stop all moisture from getting in?

Does anyone know, or have an opinion on this proposed solution to an expensive and dangerous problem?

Response From Rick Dempsey Top Rated Answer

You have been receiving good advice here. As for stopping the corrosion on the the brake system...near impossible. Lets look at the original problem..storage. You store your vehicle outdoors in inclemate weather conditions where temperatures fluctuate dramatically. The changes in temperature cause moisture to form everywhere and on everything. This is a simple fact. Now, in order to reduce the impact of this effect you can store your vehicle indoors. If the storage area in not heated the end result will be the same except the corrosion may be less sever and or take longer to form. Heat and ventilation is the key. Even at that the vehicle should be should be cycled once a week. Started, brought up to temp, engaged, and moved. I store my Jaguar XJS every year indoors unheated. Before I go on the road I perform a brake inspection EVERY YEAR to ensure the quality and effectiveness of the braking system. Failure to do so would constitute negligence on my part.
Your situation is typical of a pay me now or later scenario. Either way you'll pay. How much is up to you.

Response From Kay Sweaver

Apologies for jumping in this thread but I seem to have found myself making the same mistake and have one rear wheel locked/frozen/rusted on my car. I'm wondering if anyone here knows the best way to get the wheel moving again while doing the least amount of damage to the break/tire.

Response From Tom Greenleaf

Kindly - start your own thread for the specific vehicle,

T

Response From tremaine

I'm still looking forward to getting the two true/false questions answered. The guy down the street says both are true. Is he correct?

Sorry if these questions seem silly to you.

Regarding the first one, I guess it is pretty clear that the basic answer is true. But what about the rest of that question: is the brake pad clearance you get when you don't use the emergency brake when parking a set amount of clearance, or is it a random amount of clearance?

Response From tremaine

The amount of time needed for the two brake lock-ups and for the investigation is now about 200 hours. The amount of money lost is at least $1,250. Not to mention that I at one point in 2005 came near to smashing into someone on the expressway.

I am not going to stop investigating until at the least I have the most likely cause(s) and the best solution(s) to prevent this ever happening again identified. There is no doubt that this is a relatively rare problem. Which means that it should not be that difficult to prevent this from happening.

So please someone would you answer the two questions just above? Thank you.

ps: A simpler and probably a better way to ask #2 is:

How often does a parked car whose emergency brake is NOT APPLIED have to be moved to avoid any chance for a brake lock-up?

Response From Loren Champlain Sr

tremaine; First, you mentioned that it had drum brakes in the rear. Now you mention disc brakes. Which does it have? The brake shoes should not be in contact with the brake drum unless 1)you apply the brakes, and 2)if the parking brake is applied. Disc brake pads are always in contact with the rotor. If these are, in fact, drum brakes in the rear, I would be highly suspect of some kind of lining contamination causing your problem, other than rust.

Response From tremaine

I want to see whether I am understanding the results of my investigation or not:

1. TRUE OR FALSE:
If when you park you DON'T apply the emergency (also known as the parking) brake, there will always be clearance between the brake pads and whatever they rub against (the rotor,? the wheel?). In other words, the hydraulic brake system (operated with the brake pedal while driving) will always leave about the same amount of brake pad to wheel or rotor clearance when you park, due to spring action. Or is the amount of clearance random, actually?

2. TRUE OR FALSE:
If you park on a hill and you DO apply the parking brake, but you move the car at least, say, twice a week, you do NOT have to worry that rust will lock the pad to the rotor or wheel. In other words, rust would need more time than this to lock the brakes.

Thanks for all responses, above and below here.

Response From tremaine

That was me, tremaine, in the above post, not just a guest. I thought I was logged in.

As long as I have the opportunity, I'll add one more detail. The one thing that everyone seems amazed about in this latest lockup is how severe the lockup was. I think I have that explained.

The severity of the lockup would probably be due to the sheer amount of snow in January and February, and then the sheer amount of time the car sat motionless in March after the snow died down. Together with the gaps, that was the perfect set-up to maximize moisture and then rust inside the drum brakes. After it was drier, the rust hardened and in effect became an extremely strong glue binding the pads to the rotors.

It was as if I was doing a scientific experiment to see how badly I could lock the brakes up.

So at this time I doubt anything else is involved other than the rust acting as if it was a very strong glue and of course the stupid use of the emergency (parking) brake.

Response From dmac0923

i dont know where you got your information about the brakes being airtight??????? drum brakes have gone un changed for decades. you cant have a rotating assembly be air tight.


what you can do to help avoid the pads rusting to the drum surface is not apply the parking brake while the vehicle is stored. this will keep the pads further away

if the car will be parked for very extended periods of time you can climb under the car and manually back the pads away from the drum with the manual star wheel adjuster

Response From Guest

i dont know where you got your information about the brakes being airtight??????? drum brakes have gone un changed for decades. you cant have a rotating assembly be air tight.

I got that information from Advance Auto Parts. True, I donwhat you can do to help avoid the pads rusting to the drum surface is not apply the parking brake while the vehicle is stored. this will keep the pads further away

You know although I didn't have the parking brake applied during the whole time the car was parked, I think for some stupid reason I did apply it for a week or two or three during the 15 weeks it was parked. I did it without thinking, so it was one of those stupid things you can do if you are not thiniking carefully.

So if you park without ever using the parking brake, does this ensure the brakes will not lock up? Or only make it less likely?

if the car will be parked for very extended periods of time you can climb under the car and manually back the pads away from the drum with the manual star wheel adjuster

I don't know what that tool is, nor how to use it. I'll research it on the internet and see if I can find out about it.

Response From Loren Champlain Sr

tremaine; >>I got that information from Advance Auto Parts. True, I don['t know anything specific about the guy who told me that. But why would he tell me that if it wasn't true? It doesn't seem like the kind of thing someone would make up out of thin air, or be misinformed about. Moreover, what is the explanation if not that? <<
Let me guess. Uh, he sells parts. Uh, he knows very little about what he's talking about? dmac was 100% correct. My first car was a 1940 Ford. I've been working on cars, myself, for 40 years. I've never seen, nor heard of, an air-tight braking system. Period. (ooops, I think submarines use them)
Now, for your problem....As dmac stated, don't set the parking brake when sitting for an extended time. When you apply it, the brake shoes are pressed against the brake drum, and yes, they will rust together; But, to the extreme you stated? Highly unlikely. Have you removed the brake drums and inspected? I'd suspect that there is something else going on here. Maybe, leaking wheel cylinders or axle seals. What year, make, model are we dealing with? My guess is an X body GM product. Probably wrong, but they were known for this problem.

Response From Guest

The Advance Auto Parts Supervisor or Manager would have no motivation to make that information up out of thin ar. Nor does it seem likely that someone would be misinformed to that extent regarding a relatively obscure topic.

And his information is not that drum brake assemblies were ever totally air tight, but that they became substantially less air tight roughly 10 years ago.

Moisture needs only very small gaps to get in, of course. It is plausible that the drum brake assembly air gaps on my car, while still very small, are bigger than the gaps used to be on most or all cars prior to about 2000.

In other words, I don't think he was talking about a big change in design, just a small one. From tiny gaps to less tiny gaps if you will. And that is all it might take to produce rust disasters.

A local mechanic today gave some indirect back-up to the informatjion from Advance. He sais that since it is relatively rare for brakes to badly lock up on parked cars even in a very snowy climate, that it is reasonable to suspect that, at the very least, my particular car (2002 Hyundai Accent) has a drum brake assembly that is more open to the air than that of other cars.


The brakes wwere working fine and normally prior to this lockup incident.

I think that the following combination caused the extremely severe lockup of the rear breaks:

1.Being an idiot and setting the parking brake. I will never ever use the parking brake again. I will be duck taping the lever in the down position so I don't apply it without thinking.

2. The sheer amount of snow that became encased on the rim and tire for 2 months plus, resulting of course in a much larger amount of moisture getting in thatn would be the case in a less snowy area.

3. My continual denial of the reality of this "problem out of nowhere" resulted in me not trying to move the car at all for 2 1/2 months, not even in place movement. Next winter, I will be at least twice a week moving the car forward and back about 10 feet several times, which will unlock the rear brakes before they become severely locked. This will be supplemented with efforts to close moisture access paths.

As for further damage, everything seems alright at this point. The local mechanic says that monitoring the brake fluid, listening for unusual noises, feeling for unusual vibrations in the brake pedal, and of course staying alert for any decline in braking capacity is just as good as having a formal inspection done. If anything seems wrong, then you need to get the inspection.

So as for determining how much damage besides two shredded tires I have at the moment, my strategy will be that, after the new tires are installed, I will be driving around in town (where there is very little traffic) daily for at least 10 days, and making the assessments described. If the slightest thing seems to be wrong, I will be forced to have the whole system inspected.

Response From Loren Champlain Sr

>>Being an idiot and setting the parking brake. I will never ever use the parking brake again. I will be duck taping the lever in the down position so I don't apply it without thinking.<<
You are NOT an idiot. That's what the parking brake is there for, and should be able to use it as such. I still disagree with what the guy told you, but whatever works for you, that's what is important. You'd probably notice if you took a look, but the disc rotors will probably show surface rusting in just a few days of non-use. Not much you can do about it.
Good luck.

Response From tremaine

That was me posting in the above post; I thought I was still logged in but I wasn't.

I'm still looking for opinions regarding whether it is possible to stop moisture from getting in by physically covering up the whole tire/wheel area with spare tire covers and/or with towels, sheets, and cloths.

As I was typing the last line, I just thought of a reason why that might not work. If just before you parked the car it was snowing or raining, it probably wouldn't work, because you would have some moisture in there as you were parking. But no big problem, right? You could simply park it only if the weather was dry and only after you had driven around and used the brakes for half an hour or more, which would eliminate all moisture.

Am I right?

please help!!!!!!

Showing 2 out of 2 Posts
Question From jaguarx-type1 on please help!!!!!!

So last friday I brought my 2005 jaguar x-type 3.0 awd(80000 mi) into the shop because when I made sharp left turns the car would make a loud pop or clunk sound and the car would shake a bit until the whEel was straightend out. The auto repair shop told me it was probaly the left cv axle and also the front rotors and pads needed to be changed to and it made sense to do because the wheels and everything were already off so I said ok and the bill for evrything was 450 dollars. When I picked up the car on saturday evening the car still made the same noise and it also noticed that the car jerked when accelerating and it made a weird reving or studdering sound when coasting /decelerating at higher speeds like the car was going to die. I called the shop and told the owner the noise was still there and he said that was odd. He also said he did hear that noise too when test driving it but thought I already new about it but he did notice the cv or whatever was seperated so It did need to be changed and to bring it back in on monday morning. We told the shop workers originally the noise it was making so obiviously the workers there and not communicating or something. So monday I receive no call about the car all day and I got a call back teusday morning. The shop told me that when they pulled the car around into the shop whatever was making that noise gave way and they can't get the wheels to move but can in neutral. They said they were able to check out the repairs they originally made and everything was good as far as what they did. So they asked permission to tow my car to their "other shop" which I don't believe they own because that shop knows more about transmissions. So I hear nothing from anyone about the car until I call them on wednesday a day later and the owner says it something in the transfer case possibly a broken part and I will know more tomorrow on thursday. So I get no call on thursday and call friday asking for an update the worker at the shop says he hasn't heard anything but will call the other shop and call me back. Of course he never calls back so I called today saturday and the worker who answered tells me the same exact thing the owner told me three days earlier that its something in the transfer case and the other shop will be looking into on monday.??????? Needless to say I get pretty pissed ......I asked him where the other shop was located and he took about ten minutes to get me the address and phone number I called the shop about ten times through out the day and no one answered??? Can you give me your opinions on what's going on with my car and if the auto shop I took the car too is being honest and what they are trying to do? I'm going to be pissed if they come at me with some big bill for some new problem they missed.

Response From Discretesignals Top Rated Answer

They can't make any repairs or charge you for work unless it is approved by you. If they charge you for repairing something without your oral or written consent, they are putting themselves in a really bad position.

I suggest you take a ride to the shop and talk with someone in person and see what exactly is going on.